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Title: Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology

Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. Here, we chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–A sat, and saturating CO 2–A max). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content). In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PeerJ
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2167-8359
Publisher:
PeerJ Inc.
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; bacterial endophytes; Burkholderia; plant functional traits; Populus trichocarpa; Pseudomonas fluorescens; trait plasticity; plant morphology; 58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1356906
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1394451

Henning, Jeremiah A., Weston, David J., Pelletier, Dale A., Timm, Collin M., Jawdy, Sara S., and Classen, Aimée T.. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.7717/peerj.2606.
Henning, Jeremiah A., Weston, David J., Pelletier, Dale A., Timm, Collin M., Jawdy, Sara S., & Classen, Aimée T.. Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology. United States. doi:10.7717/peerj.2606.
Henning, Jeremiah A., Weston, David J., Pelletier, Dale A., Timm, Collin M., Jawdy, Sara S., and Classen, Aimée T.. 2016. "Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology". United States. doi:10.7717/peerj.2606. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356906.
@article{osti_1356906,
title = {Root bacterial endophytes alter plant phenotype, but not physiology},
author = {Henning, Jeremiah A. and Weston, David J. and Pelletier, Dale A. and Timm, Collin M. and Jawdy, Sara S. and Classen, Aimée T.},
abstractNote = {Plant traits, such as root and leaf area, influence how plants interact with their environment and the diverse microbiota living within plants can influence plant morphology and physiology. Here, we explored how three bacterial strains isolated from the Populus root microbiome, influenced plant phenotype. Here, we chose three bacterial strains that differed in predicted metabolic capabilities, plant hormone production and metabolism, and secondary metabolite synthesis. We inoculated each bacterial strain on a single genotype of Populus trichocarpa and measured the response of plant growth related traits (root:shoot, biomass production, root and leaf growth rates) and physiological traits (chlorophyll content, net photosynthesis, net photosynthesis at saturating light–Asat, and saturating CO2–Amax). Overall, we found that bacterial root endophyte infection increased root growth rate up to 184% and leaf growth rate up to 137% relative to non-inoculated control plants, evidence that plants respond to bacteria by modifying morphology. However, endophyte inoculation had no influence on total plant biomass and photosynthetic traits (net photosynthesis, chlorophyll content). In sum, bacterial inoculation did not significantly increase plant carbon fixation and biomass, but their presence altered where and how carbon was being allocated in the plant host.},
doi = {10.7717/peerj.2606},
journal = {PeerJ},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {11}
}

Works referenced in this record:

A Revised Medium for Rapid Growth and Bio Assays with Tobacco Tissue Cultures
journal, July 1962