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Title: Quantification of water content by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy on Mars

Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), as performed by the ChemCam instrument, provides a new technique to measure hydrogen at the surface of Mars. Using a laboratory replica of the LIBS instrument onboard the Curiosity rover, different types of hydrated samples (basalts, calcium and magnesium sulfates, opals and apatites) covering a range of targets observed on Mars have been characterized and analyzed in this paper. A number of factors related to laser parameters, atmospheric conditions and differences in targets properties can affect the standoff LIBS signal, and in particular the hydrogen emission peak. Dedicated laboratory tests were run to identify a normalization of the hydrogen signal which could best compensate for these effects and enable the application of the laboratory calibration to Mars data. We check that the hydrogen signal increases linearly with water content; and normalization of the hydrogen emission peak using to oxygen and carbon emission peaks (related to the breakdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide) constitutes a robust approach. Finally, moreover, the calibration curve obtained is relatively independent of the samples types.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [5] ;  [2] ;  [6] ;  [1] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [9] ;  [4] ;  [4] ;  [10]
  1. Univ. of Toulouse (France). UPS-OMP; Research Inst. in Astrophysics and Planetology (IRAP), Toulouse (France). CNRS
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Blaise Pascal Univ., Clermont-Ferrand (France). CNRS. IRD. OPGC. Lab. Magma and Volcanoes
  4. Lab. of Planetology and Geodynamics, Nantes (France). CNRS
  5. Grenoble Alpes Univ., Grenoble (France)
  6. Pierre and Marie Curie Univ. (Sorbonne), Paris (France). Inst. of Mineralogy. CNRS
  7. Research Inst. in Astrophysics and Planetology (IRAP), Toulouse (France). CNRS
  8. National Inst. of Chemical and Technological Arts (ENSIACET), Toulouse (France). CIRIMAT Carnot Inst.
  9. Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States). Optical Science Center for Applied Research
  10. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-22202
Journal ID: ISSN 0584-8547
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Spectrochimica Acta. Part B, Atomic Spectroscopy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 130; Journal ID: ISSN 0584-8547
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; Paul Sabatier Univ. (France); National Centre for Space Studies (CNES) (France)
Contributing Orgs:
Blaise Pascal Univ., Clermont-Ferrand (France); Lab. of Planetology and Geodynamics, Nantes (France); Grenoble Alpes Univ., Grenoble (France); Pierre and Marie Curie Univ. (Sorbonne), Paris (France); National Inst. of Chemical and Technological Arts (ENSIACET), Toulouse (France); Delaware State Univ., Dover, DE (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Planetary Sciences
OSTI Identifier:
1356155