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Title: Chemical Vapor-Deposited Hexagonal Boron Nitride as a Scalable Template for High-Performance Organic Field-Effect Transistors

Organic field-effect transistors have attracted much attention because of their potential use in low-cost, large-area, flexible electronics. High-performance organic transistors require a low density of grain boundaries in their organic films and a decrease in the charge trap density at the semiconductor–dielectric interface for efficient charge transport. In this respect, the role of the dielectric material is crucial because it primarily determines the growth of the film and the interfacial trap density. Here, we demonstrate the use of chemical vapor-deposited hexagonal boron nitride (CVD h-BN) as a scalable growth template/dielectric for high-performance organic field-effect transistors. The field-effect transistors based on C60 films grown on single-layer CVD h-BN exhibit an average mobility of 1.7 cm 2 V –1 s –1 and a maximal mobility of 2.9 cm 2 V –1 s –1 with on/off ratios of 10 7. The structural and morphology analysis shows that the epitaxial, two-dimensional growth of C 60 on CVD h-BN is mainly responsible for the superior charge transport behavior. In conclusion, we believe that CVD h-BN can serve as a growth template for various organic semiconductors, allowing the development of large-area, high-performance flexible electronics.
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ; ORCiD logo [6] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [6] ;  [8] ; ORCiD logo [4] ; ORCiD logo [9] ;  [10] ;  [6]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kwangwoon Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Electrical Engineering
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology (Korea). Dept. of Physics
  3. Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology (Korea). Dept. of Energy Engineering
  4. Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology (Korea). School of Materials Science and Engineering
  5. Queen's Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics and Physics
  6. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  7. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL)
  8. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Queen's Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics and Physics; Queen's Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
  9. Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology (Korea). Dept. of Energy Engineering; Ulsan National Inst. of Science and Technology (Korea). Dept. of Chemistry
  10. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
1.170005.01; 2009-0082580; 2015R1A2A2A01006992; AC02-76SF00515; FOA-0000654-1588; SC0016523; M8407MPH
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemistry of Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0897-4756
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Research Org:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation (NSF); National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Hexagonal boron nitride; epitaxy of organic molecules; van der Waals heterostructure; organic field-effect transistors
OSTI Identifier:
1352885