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Title: Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

Abstract

A significant fraction (~ 20%) of microbial life is found in the terrestrial deep subsurface, yet the metabolic processes extant in those environments are poorly understood. Here we show that H 2, injected into the Opalinus Clay formation in a borehole located 300 meters below the surface, fuels a community of microorganisms with interconnected metabolisms. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis reveal a complete carbon cycle, driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers. Dead biomass from these organisms is a substrate for a fermenting bacterium that produces acetate as a product. In turn, complete oxidizer heterotrophic sulfate- reducing bacteria utilize acetate and oxidize it to CO 2, closing the cycle. This metabolic reconstruction sheds light onto a hydrogen-driven carbon cycle, and a sunlight-independent ecosystem in the deep subsurface.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [5];  [1]
  1. Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (Switzlerland). Environmental Microbiology Lab.
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division
  3. Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Life Sciences (BILS), Stockholm (Sweden); KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Biotechnology, Division of Gene Technology, Science for Life Lab.
  4. KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). School of Biotechnology, Division of Gene Technology, Science for Life Lab.
  5. National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Swedish Research Council (SRC)
OSTI Identifier:
1352739
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231; CSP 1505; 2011-5689
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Bagnoud, Alexandre, Chourey, Karuna, Hettich, Robert L., de Bruijn, Ino, Andersson, Anders F., Leupin, Olivier X., Schwyn, Bernhard, and Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms12770.
Bagnoud, Alexandre, Chourey, Karuna, Hettich, Robert L., de Bruijn, Ino, Andersson, Anders F., Leupin, Olivier X., Schwyn, Bernhard, & Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12770.
Bagnoud, Alexandre, Chourey, Karuna, Hettich, Robert L., de Bruijn, Ino, Andersson, Anders F., Leupin, Olivier X., Schwyn, Bernhard, and Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan. Fri . "Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12770. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352739.
@article{osti_1352739,
title = {Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock},
author = {Bagnoud, Alexandre and Chourey, Karuna and Hettich, Robert L. and de Bruijn, Ino and Andersson, Anders F. and Leupin, Olivier X. and Schwyn, Bernhard and Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan},
abstractNote = {A significant fraction (~ 20%) of microbial life is found in the terrestrial deep subsurface, yet the metabolic processes extant in those environments are poorly understood. Here we show that H2, injected into the Opalinus Clay formation in a borehole located 300 meters below the surface, fuels a community of microorganisms with interconnected metabolisms. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis reveal a complete carbon cycle, driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers. Dead biomass from these organisms is a substrate for a fermenting bacterium that produces acetate as a product. In turn, complete oxidizer heterotrophic sulfate- reducing bacteria utilize acetate and oxidize it to CO2, closing the cycle. This metabolic reconstruction sheds light onto a hydrogen-driven carbon cycle, and a sunlight-independent ecosystem in the deep subsurface.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms12770},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 10,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

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