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Title: Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms

A cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways sustains dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16–174 nmol cm –3 per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (greater than or equal to0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. The most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly,more » two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [4] ;  [4] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Univ. of Konstanz (Germany)
  2. Univ. of Munster (Germany)
  3. Univ. of Vienna (Austria)
  4. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; PCIG14- GA-2013-630188
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
German Research Foundation (DFG); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1347110
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1377513

Hausmann, Bela, Knorr, Klaus-Holger, Schreck, Katharina, Tringe, Susannah G., Glavina del Rio, Tijana, Loy, Alexander, and Pester, Michael. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.42.
Hausmann, Bela, Knorr, Klaus-Holger, Schreck, Katharina, Tringe, Susannah G., Glavina del Rio, Tijana, Loy, Alexander, & Pester, Michael. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms. United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.42.
Hausmann, Bela, Knorr, Klaus-Holger, Schreck, Katharina, Tringe, Susannah G., Glavina del Rio, Tijana, Loy, Alexander, and Pester, Michael. 2016. "Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms". United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.42. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1347110.
@article{osti_1347110,
title = {Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms},
author = {Hausmann, Bela and Knorr, Klaus-Holger and Schreck, Katharina and Tringe, Susannah G. and Glavina del Rio, Tijana and Loy, Alexander and Pester, Michael},
abstractNote = {A cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways sustains dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16–174 nmol cm–3 per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (greater than or equal to0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. The most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems.},
doi = {10.1038/ismej.2016.42},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
number = 10,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}