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Title: Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production

To date, the algal biofuel industry has focused on the cultivation of monocultures of highly productive algal strains, but scaling up production remains challenging. However, algal monocultures are difficult to maintain because they are easily contaminated by wild algal strains, grazers, and pathogens. In contrast, theory suggests that polycultures (multispecies assemblages) can promote both ecosystem stability and productivity. A greater understanding of species interactions and how communities change with time will need to be developed before polycultures can be successfully applied to large-scale algal production efforts. Here in this paper we review the agricultural and ecological literature to explore opportunities for increased annual biomass production through the use of algal polycultures. We discuss case studies where algal polycultures have been successfully maintained for industries other than the biofuel industry, as well as the few studies that have compared biomass production of algal polycultures to that of monocultures. Assemblages that include species with complementary traits are of particular promise. These assemblages have the potential not only to increase crop productivity and stability, but they may also be capable of utilizing natural resources (e.g. light, nutrients, water) more efficiently via tighter niche packing. Therefore, algal polycultures show promise for enhancing biomass productivity,more » enabling sustainable production and reducing overall production costs.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  4. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  5. Boise State Univ., ID (United States)
  6. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-16-38337
Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264; BM0108010; CEBM007
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC07-05ID14517; AC04-94AL85000; AC05-76RLO1830; AC05-76RLO 1830
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Algal Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; algae; biofuel; polyculture; Overyielding; Culture resilience; Algal biofuel; Algal polyculture; Algal Biofuel; culture resilience; overyielding
OSTI Identifier:
1343500
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1357752; OSTI ID: 1402512

Newby, Deborah T., Mathews, Teresa J., Pate, Ron C., Huesemann, Michael H., Lane, Todd W., Wahlen, Bradley D., Mandal, Shovon, Engler, Robert K., Feris, Kevin P., and Shurin, Jon B.. Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.09.004.
Newby, Deborah T., Mathews, Teresa J., Pate, Ron C., Huesemann, Michael H., Lane, Todd W., Wahlen, Bradley D., Mandal, Shovon, Engler, Robert K., Feris, Kevin P., & Shurin, Jon B.. Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production. United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.09.004.
Newby, Deborah T., Mathews, Teresa J., Pate, Ron C., Huesemann, Michael H., Lane, Todd W., Wahlen, Bradley D., Mandal, Shovon, Engler, Robert K., Feris, Kevin P., and Shurin, Jon B.. 2016. "Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production". United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.09.004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1343500.
@article{osti_1343500,
title = {Assessing the potential of polyculture to accelerate algal biofuel production},
author = {Newby, Deborah T. and Mathews, Teresa J. and Pate, Ron C. and Huesemann, Michael H. and Lane, Todd W. and Wahlen, Bradley D. and Mandal, Shovon and Engler, Robert K. and Feris, Kevin P. and Shurin, Jon B.},
abstractNote = {To date, the algal biofuel industry has focused on the cultivation of monocultures of highly productive algal strains, but scaling up production remains challenging. However, algal monocultures are difficult to maintain because they are easily contaminated by wild algal strains, grazers, and pathogens. In contrast, theory suggests that polycultures (multispecies assemblages) can promote both ecosystem stability and productivity. A greater understanding of species interactions and how communities change with time will need to be developed before polycultures can be successfully applied to large-scale algal production efforts. Here in this paper we review the agricultural and ecological literature to explore opportunities for increased annual biomass production through the use of algal polycultures. We discuss case studies where algal polycultures have been successfully maintained for industries other than the biofuel industry, as well as the few studies that have compared biomass production of algal polycultures to that of monocultures. Assemblages that include species with complementary traits are of particular promise. These assemblages have the potential not only to increase crop productivity and stability, but they may also be capable of utilizing natural resources (e.g. light, nutrients, water) more efficiently via tighter niche packing. Therefore, algal polycultures show promise for enhancing biomass productivity, enabling sustainable production and reducing overall production costs.},
doi = {10.1016/j.algal.2016.09.004},
journal = {Algal Research},
number = C,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}