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Title: A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter]

Abstract

Chloride, Cl , is the most abundant solute in seawater, amounting to 55% of ions by weight. Cl is more difficult to oxidize than bromide, and marine halogenating enzymes tend to be bromoperoxidases that are incapable of forming organochlorines. Consequently, most halogenated natural products identified in the marine environment are organobromines. Known exceptions include small quantities of volatile chlorocarbons emitted by marine algae and dissolved chlorinated benzoic acids.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Marymount Manhattan College, New York, NY (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  3. Univ. of Maine, Walpole, ME (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1341508
Report Number(s):
BNL-108479-2015-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1752-0894; R&D Project: LS001
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Geoscience
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1752-0894
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Leri, Alessandra C., Northrup, Paul A., Mayer, Lawrence M., Thornton, Kathleen R., Dunigan, Marisa R., Ness, Katherine J., and Gellis, Austin B. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter]. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1038/ngeo2481.
Leri, Alessandra C., Northrup, Paul A., Mayer, Lawrence M., Thornton, Kathleen R., Dunigan, Marisa R., Ness, Katherine J., & Gellis, Austin B. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter]. United States. doi:10.1038/ngeo2481.
Leri, Alessandra C., Northrup, Paul A., Mayer, Lawrence M., Thornton, Kathleen R., Dunigan, Marisa R., Ness, Katherine J., and Gellis, Austin B. Mon . "A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter]". United States. doi:10.1038/ngeo2481. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1341508.
@article{osti_1341508,
title = {A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter]},
author = {Leri, Alessandra C. and Northrup, Paul A. and Mayer, Lawrence M. and Thornton, Kathleen R. and Dunigan, Marisa R. and Ness, Katherine J. and Gellis, Austin B.},
abstractNote = {Chloride, Cl–, is the most abundant solute in seawater, amounting to 55% of ions by weight. Cl– is more difficult to oxidize than bromide, and marine halogenating enzymes tend to be bromoperoxidases that are incapable of forming organochlorines. Consequently, most halogenated natural products identified in the marine environment are organobromines. Known exceptions include small quantities of volatile chlorocarbons emitted by marine algae and dissolved chlorinated benzoic acids.},
doi = {10.1038/ngeo2481},
journal = {Nature Geoscience},
number = 8,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {7}
}

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Cited by: 4 works
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