skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests

The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-115889
Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7820
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Ceramic Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7820
Publisher:
American Ceramic Society
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; nuclear waste; glass; reaction path
OSTI Identifier:
1341439

Xu, Kai, Hrma, Pavel, Rice, Jarrett A., Schweiger, Michael J., Riley, Brian J., Overman, Nicole R., and Kruger, Albert A.. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1111/jace.14310.
Xu, Kai, Hrma, Pavel, Rice, Jarrett A., Schweiger, Michael J., Riley, Brian J., Overman, Nicole R., & Kruger, Albert A.. Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests. United States. doi:10.1111/jace.14310.
Xu, Kai, Hrma, Pavel, Rice, Jarrett A., Schweiger, Michael J., Riley, Brian J., Overman, Nicole R., and Kruger, Albert A.. 2016. "Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests". United States. doi:10.1111/jace.14310. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1341439.
@article{osti_1341439,
title = {Conversion of Nuclear Waste to Molten Glass: Cold-Cap Reactions in Crucible Tests},
author = {Xu, Kai and Hrma, Pavel and Rice, Jarrett A. and Schweiger, Michael J. and Riley, Brian J. and Overman, Nicole R. and Kruger, Albert A.},
abstractNote = {The feed-to-glass conversion, which comprises complex chemical reactions and phase transitions, occurs in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification. Here, to investigate the conversion process, we analyzed heat-treated samples of a simulated high-level waste feed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, leaching tests, and residual anion analysis. Feed dehydration, gas evolution, and borate phase formation occurred at temperatures below 700°C before the emerging glass-forming melt was completely connected. Above 700°C, intermediate aluminosilicate phases and quartz particles gradually dissolved in the continuous borosilicate melt, which expanded with transient foam. Finally, knowledge of the chemistry and physics of feed-to-glass conversion will help us control the conversion path by changing the melter feed makeup to maximize the glass production rate.},
doi = {10.1111/jace.14310},
journal = {Journal of the American Ceramic Society},
number = 9,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {5}
}