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Title: Surveillance for Emerging Diseases with Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostics

Here, we present an analysis of the diagnostic technologies that were used to identify historical outbreaks of ebola virus disease and consider systematic surveillance strategies that may greatly reduce the peak size of future epidemics. We observe that clinical signs and symptoms alone are often insufficient to recognize index cases of diseases of global concern against the considerable background infectious disease burden that is present throughout the developing world. We propose a simple sampling strategy to enrich in especially dangerous pathogens with a low background for molecular diagnostics by targeting blood borne pathogens in the healthiest age groups. With existing multiplexed diagnostic technologies, such a system could be combined with existing public health screening and reference laboratory systems for malaria, dengue, and common bacteremia or be used to develop such an infrastructure in less-developed locations. Because the needs for valid samples and accurate recording of patient attributes are aligned with needs for global biosurveillance, local public health needs, and improving patient care, co-development of these capabilities appears to be quite natural, flexible, and extensible as capabilities, technologies, and needs evolve over time. Furthermore, implementation of multiplexed diagnostic technologies to enhance fundamental clinical lab capacity will increase public health monitoring andmore » biosurveillance as a natural extension.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Analytics, Intelligence and Technology Division
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division
  3. Dept. of Homeland Security, Washington, DC (United States). Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency (HSARPA)
  4. US Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-20747
Journal ID: ISSN 2326-5094
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; HSHQPM- 14-X-00069
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Health Security
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2326-5094
Publisher:
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; US Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Biological Science; disease surveillance; multiplex diagnostics
OSTI Identifier:
1340961

Deshpande, Alina, McMahon, Benjamin, Daughton, Ashlynn Rae, Abeyta, Esteban Luis, Anderson, Kevin, Hodge, David, and Pillai, Segaran. Surveillance for Emerging Diseases with Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostics. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1089/hs.2016.0005.
Deshpande, Alina, McMahon, Benjamin, Daughton, Ashlynn Rae, Abeyta, Esteban Luis, Anderson, Kevin, Hodge, David, & Pillai, Segaran. Surveillance for Emerging Diseases with Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostics. United States. doi:10.1089/hs.2016.0005.
Deshpande, Alina, McMahon, Benjamin, Daughton, Ashlynn Rae, Abeyta, Esteban Luis, Anderson, Kevin, Hodge, David, and Pillai, Segaran. 2016. "Surveillance for Emerging Diseases with Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostics". United States. doi:10.1089/hs.2016.0005. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340961.
@article{osti_1340961,
title = {Surveillance for Emerging Diseases with Multiplexed Point-of-Care Diagnostics},
author = {Deshpande, Alina and McMahon, Benjamin and Daughton, Ashlynn Rae and Abeyta, Esteban Luis and Anderson, Kevin and Hodge, David and Pillai, Segaran},
abstractNote = {Here, we present an analysis of the diagnostic technologies that were used to identify historical outbreaks of ebola virus disease and consider systematic surveillance strategies that may greatly reduce the peak size of future epidemics. We observe that clinical signs and symptoms alone are often insufficient to recognize index cases of diseases of global concern against the considerable background infectious disease burden that is present throughout the developing world. We propose a simple sampling strategy to enrich in especially dangerous pathogens with a low background for molecular diagnostics by targeting blood borne pathogens in the healthiest age groups. With existing multiplexed diagnostic technologies, such a system could be combined with existing public health screening and reference laboratory systems for malaria, dengue, and common bacteremia or be used to develop such an infrastructure in less-developed locations. Because the needs for valid samples and accurate recording of patient attributes are aligned with needs for global biosurveillance, local public health needs, and improving patient care, co-development of these capabilities appears to be quite natural, flexible, and extensible as capabilities, technologies, and needs evolve over time. Furthermore, implementation of multiplexed diagnostic technologies to enhance fundamental clinical lab capacity will increase public health monitoring and biosurveillance as a natural extension.},
doi = {10.1089/hs.2016.0005},
journal = {Health Security},
number = 3,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {6}
}