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Title: Morphology and mixing of black carbon particles collected in central California during the CARES field study

Aerosol absorption is strongly dependent on the internal heterogeneity (mixing state) and morphology of individual particles containing black carbon (BC) and other non-absorbing species. Here, we examine an extensive microscopic data set collected in the California Central Valley during the CARES 2010 field campaign. During a period of high photochemical activity and pollution buildup, the particle mixing state and morphology were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge. Observations of compacted BC core morphologies and thick organic coatings at both urban and rural sites provide evidence of the aged nature of particles, highlighting the importance of highly aged particles at urban sites during periods of high photochemical activity. Based on the observation of thick coatings and more convex BC inclusion morphology, either the aging was rapid or the contribution of fresh BC emissions at the urban site was relatively small compared to background concentrations. Most particles were observed to have the BC inclusion close to the center of the host. However, host particles containing inorganic rich inclusions had the BC inclusion closer to the edge of the particle. Furthermore, these measurements of BC morphology and mixing state provide important constraints for the morphological effects on BCmore » optical properties expected in aged urban plumes.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [3] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7]
  1. Univ. of the Pacific, Stockton, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of the Pacific, Stockton, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  3. Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  7. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-119121
Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324; 48867; KP1704020
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830; SC0008613; AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 22; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
1339848
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1349438; OSTI ID: 1379590