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Title: Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies

Deep-level defects are usually considered undesirable in semiconductors as they typically interfere with the performance of present-day electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the electronic spin states of certain atomic-scale defects have recently been shown to be promising quantum bits for quantum information processing as well as exquisite nanoscale sensors due to their local environmental sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in quantum control protocols of several of these spin defects, the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV -) center in diamond and a variety of forms of the neutral divacancy (VV 0) complex in silicon carbide (SiC). These defects exhibit a spin-triplet ground state that can be controlled through a variety of techniques, several of which allow for room temperature operation. Microwave control has enabled sophisticated decoupling schemes to extend coherence times as well as nanoscale sensing of temperature along with magnetic and electric fields. On the other hand, photonic control of these spin states has provided initial steps toward integration into quantum networks, including entanglement, quantum state teleportation, and all-optical control. Electrical and mechanical control also suggest pathways to develop quantum transducers and quantum hybrid systems. In conclusion, the versatility of the control mechanisms demonstrated should facilitate themore » development of quantum technologies based on these spin defects.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the IEEE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0018-9219
Publisher:
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Research Org:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR); U.S. Army Research Laboratory - U.S. Army Research Office (ARO)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; diamond; divacancy; microwave; nitrogen-vacancy center; photonics; quantum control; silicon carbide; spin defects; wide-band gap semiconductors
OSTI Identifier:
1339658

Heremans, F. Joseph, Yale, Christopher G., and Awschalom, David D.. Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1109/JPROC.2016.2561274.
Heremans, F. Joseph, Yale, Christopher G., & Awschalom, David D.. Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies. United States. doi:10.1109/JPROC.2016.2561274.
Heremans, F. Joseph, Yale, Christopher G., and Awschalom, David D.. 2016. "Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies". United States. doi:10.1109/JPROC.2016.2561274. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1339658.
@article{osti_1339658,
title = {Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies},
author = {Heremans, F. Joseph and Yale, Christopher G. and Awschalom, David D.},
abstractNote = {Deep-level defects are usually considered undesirable in semiconductors as they typically interfere with the performance of present-day electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the electronic spin states of certain atomic-scale defects have recently been shown to be promising quantum bits for quantum information processing as well as exquisite nanoscale sensors due to their local environmental sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in quantum control protocols of several of these spin defects, the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in diamond and a variety of forms of the neutral divacancy (VV0) complex in silicon carbide (SiC). These defects exhibit a spin-triplet ground state that can be controlled through a variety of techniques, several of which allow for room temperature operation. Microwave control has enabled sophisticated decoupling schemes to extend coherence times as well as nanoscale sensing of temperature along with magnetic and electric fields. On the other hand, photonic control of these spin states has provided initial steps toward integration into quantum networks, including entanglement, quantum state teleportation, and all-optical control. Electrical and mechanical control also suggest pathways to develop quantum transducers and quantum hybrid systems. In conclusion, the versatility of the control mechanisms demonstrated should facilitate the development of quantum technologies based on these spin defects.},
doi = {10.1109/JPROC.2016.2561274},
journal = {Proceedings of the IEEE},
number = 10,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {5}
}