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Title: Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning

The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. In this paper, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided a cold field emission source is used. Finally, these results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [4] ;  [1] ;  [5]
  1. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Engineering Innovation
  2. National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  4. Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia). School of Physics and Astronomy
  5. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. of Engineering Innovation; Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya (Japan). Nanostructures Research Lab.
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231; DP110102228
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) (Japan); Australian Research Council (Australia)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION
OSTI Identifier:
1338557
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1329329

Ishikawa, Ryo, Pennycook, Stephen J., Lupini, Andrew R., Findlay, Scott D., Shibata, Naoya, and Ikuhara, Yuichi. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.4965709.
Ishikawa, Ryo, Pennycook, Stephen J., Lupini, Andrew R., Findlay, Scott D., Shibata, Naoya, & Ikuhara, Yuichi. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4965709.
Ishikawa, Ryo, Pennycook, Stephen J., Lupini, Andrew R., Findlay, Scott D., Shibata, Naoya, and Ikuhara, Yuichi. 2016. "Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4965709. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338557.
@article{osti_1338557,
title = {Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning},
author = {Ishikawa, Ryo and Pennycook, Stephen J. and Lupini, Andrew R. and Findlay, Scott D. and Shibata, Naoya and Ikuhara, Yuichi},
abstractNote = {The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. In this paper, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided a cold field emission source is used. Finally, these results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4965709},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 16,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}