skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparing costs and returns for sugarcane production on sand and muck soils of southern Florida, 2008-2009

Abstract

Sugarcane production in Florida is concentrated south and west of Lake Okeechobee and is grown on both muck and sand soils. During the 2008-2009 season, more than 12 million metric tons of sugarcane was harvested and supported important sugarcane milling and sugar refining operations located in southern Florida. Farms on muck soils account for 80% of Florida’s annual sugarcane crop, while farms on sand soils account for the remaining 20%. This paper compares revenues, production costs and net annual returns from two equally sized sugarcane farms (2,000 hectare) representing typical growing conditions on sand and muck soils. Sugarcane growers on muck soils enjoy two distinct advantages over their counterparts farming sugarcane on sand soils. First, total farm revenues are higher because of greater yields and a higher percentage of land that can be grown for commercial harvest. Second, unit costs of production are lower due to the inherent organic matter in muck soils, allowing growers to apply substantially less quantities of fertilizers. Annual net returns to land, management and risk from growing sugarcane on muck soils are estimated to be 400 dollars/ha, more than five times higher than estimated net returns from growing sugarcane on sand soils (70 dollars/ha). Furthermore,more » while sugarcane production on sand soils is less profitable relative to muck soils, economic returns from sugarcane on sand soils are higher than from cattle operations, offer less risk than presently associated with citrus production, and occupy land area far beyond the capacity of the vegetable industry to absorb.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Florida, Immokalee, FL (United States)
  2. Univ. of Florida, LaBelle, FL (United States)
  3. Univ. of Florida, Palm Beach, FL (United States)
  4. Univ. of Florida, Belle Glade, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Intelligentsia International, LaBelle, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1337167
Grant/Contract Number:  
EE0000303
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30; Journal ID: ISSN 1075-6302
Publisher:
American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; representative farm; enterprise budget; sugar price; yields

Citation Formats

Roka, Fritz M., Baucum, Leslie E., Rice, Ronald W., and Alvarez, Jose. Comparing costs and returns for sugarcane production on sand and muck soils of southern Florida, 2008-2009. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Roka, Fritz M., Baucum, Leslie E., Rice, Ronald W., & Alvarez, Jose. Comparing costs and returns for sugarcane production on sand and muck soils of southern Florida, 2008-2009. United States.
Roka, Fritz M., Baucum, Leslie E., Rice, Ronald W., and Alvarez, Jose. Fri . "Comparing costs and returns for sugarcane production on sand and muck soils of southern Florida, 2008-2009". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337167.
@article{osti_1337167,
title = {Comparing costs and returns for sugarcane production on sand and muck soils of southern Florida, 2008-2009},
author = {Roka, Fritz M. and Baucum, Leslie E. and Rice, Ronald W. and Alvarez, Jose},
abstractNote = {Sugarcane production in Florida is concentrated south and west of Lake Okeechobee and is grown on both muck and sand soils. During the 2008-2009 season, more than 12 million metric tons of sugarcane was harvested and supported important sugarcane milling and sugar refining operations located in southern Florida. Farms on muck soils account for 80% of Florida’s annual sugarcane crop, while farms on sand soils account for the remaining 20%. This paper compares revenues, production costs and net annual returns from two equally sized sugarcane farms (2,000 hectare) representing typical growing conditions on sand and muck soils. Sugarcane growers on muck soils enjoy two distinct advantages over their counterparts farming sugarcane on sand soils. First, total farm revenues are higher because of greater yields and a higher percentage of land that can be grown for commercial harvest. Second, unit costs of production are lower due to the inherent organic matter in muck soils, allowing growers to apply substantially less quantities of fertilizers. Annual net returns to land, management and risk from growing sugarcane on muck soils are estimated to be 400 dollars/ha, more than five times higher than estimated net returns from growing sugarcane on sand soils (70 dollars/ha). Furthermore, while sugarcane production on sand soils is less profitable relative to muck soils, economic returns from sugarcane on sand soils are higher than from cattle operations, offer less risk than presently associated with citrus production, and occupy land area far beyond the capacity of the vegetable industry to absorb.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of the American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists},
number = ,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
The DOI is not currently available

Save / Share: