skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Staging Life in an Early Warm ‘Seltzer’ Ocean

Abstract

A period as short as 20 million years within the first 100 million years after the formation of the Moon may have set the stage for the origin of life. This atmosphere contained more carbon dioxide than any other period afterwards. The carbon dioxide sustained greenhouse conditions, accelerated the weathering of a primitive crust and may have led to conditions conducive to the formation of the building blocks of life. The conversion of CO2 as well as N2 may have been facilitated by clays, zeolites, sulfides and metal alloys formed as the crust reacted with a warm ‘seltzer’ ocean. We used geochemical modeling to constrain the conditions favorable for the formation of these potential mineral catalysts.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1336151
Report Number(s):
BNL-112655-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1811-5209
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Elements
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1811-5209
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Schoonen, Martin, and Smirnov, Alexander. Staging Life in an Early Warm ‘Seltzer’ Ocean. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2113/gselements.12.6.395.
Schoonen, Martin, & Smirnov, Alexander. Staging Life in an Early Warm ‘Seltzer’ Ocean. United States. doi:10.2113/gselements.12.6.395.
Schoonen, Martin, and Smirnov, Alexander. Thu . "Staging Life in an Early Warm ‘Seltzer’ Ocean". United States. doi:10.2113/gselements.12.6.395. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1336151.
@article{osti_1336151,
title = {Staging Life in an Early Warm ‘Seltzer’ Ocean},
author = {Schoonen, Martin and Smirnov, Alexander},
abstractNote = {A period as short as 20 million years within the first 100 million years after the formation of the Moon may have set the stage for the origin of life. This atmosphere contained more carbon dioxide than any other period afterwards. The carbon dioxide sustained greenhouse conditions, accelerated the weathering of a primitive crust and may have led to conditions conducive to the formation of the building blocks of life. The conversion of CO2 as well as N2 may have been facilitated by clays, zeolites, sulfides and metal alloys formed as the crust reacted with a warm ‘seltzer’ ocean. We used geochemical modeling to constrain the conditions favorable for the formation of these potential mineral catalysts.},
doi = {10.2113/gselements.12.6.395},
journal = {Elements},
number = 6,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: