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Title: Catalytic reduction of CO 2 by H 2 for synthesis of CO, methanol and hydrocarbons: challenges and opportunities

Ocean acidification and climate change are expected to be two of the most difficult scientific challenges of the 21st century. Converting CO 2 into valuable chemicals and fuels is one of the most practical routes for reducing CO 2 emissions while fossil fuels continue to dominate the energy sector. Reducing CO 2 by H 2 using heterogeneous catalysis has been studied extensively, but there are still significant challenges in developing active, selective and stable catalysts suitable for large-scale commercialization. We study the catalytic reduction of CO 2 by H 2 can lead to the formation of three types of products: CO through the reverse water–gas shift (RWGS) reaction, methanol via selective hydrogenation, and hydrocarbons through combination of CO 2 reduction with Fischer–Tropsch (FT) reactions. In addition, investigations into these routes reveal that the stabilization of key reaction intermediates is critically important for controlling catalytic selectivity. Furthermore, viability of these processes is contingent on the development of a CO 2-free H 2 source on a large enough scale to significantly reduce CO 2 emissions.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Department
  3. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Department
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
BNL-111844-2016-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1754-5692; KC0302010
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704; FG02-13ER16381
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy & Environmental Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1754-5692
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Research Org:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1335402

Porosoff, Marc D., Yan, Binhang, and Chen, Jingguang G.. Catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 for synthesis of CO, methanol and hydrocarbons: challenges and opportunities. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1039/c5ee02657a.
Porosoff, Marc D., Yan, Binhang, & Chen, Jingguang G.. Catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 for synthesis of CO, methanol and hydrocarbons: challenges and opportunities. United States. doi:10.1039/c5ee02657a.
Porosoff, Marc D., Yan, Binhang, and Chen, Jingguang G.. 2015. "Catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 for synthesis of CO, methanol and hydrocarbons: challenges and opportunities". United States. doi:10.1039/c5ee02657a. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1335402.
@article{osti_1335402,
title = {Catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 for synthesis of CO, methanol and hydrocarbons: challenges and opportunities},
author = {Porosoff, Marc D. and Yan, Binhang and Chen, Jingguang G.},
abstractNote = {Ocean acidification and climate change are expected to be two of the most difficult scientific challenges of the 21st century. Converting CO2 into valuable chemicals and fuels is one of the most practical routes for reducing CO2 emissions while fossil fuels continue to dominate the energy sector. Reducing CO2 by H2 using heterogeneous catalysis has been studied extensively, but there are still significant challenges in developing active, selective and stable catalysts suitable for large-scale commercialization. We study the catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 can lead to the formation of three types of products: CO through the reverse water–gas shift (RWGS) reaction, methanol via selective hydrogenation, and hydrocarbons through combination of CO2 reduction with Fischer–Tropsch (FT) reactions. In addition, investigations into these routes reveal that the stabilization of key reaction intermediates is critically important for controlling catalytic selectivity. Furthermore, viability of these processes is contingent on the development of a CO2-free H2 source on a large enough scale to significantly reduce CO2 emissions.},
doi = {10.1039/c5ee02657a},
journal = {Energy & Environmental Science},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}