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Title: Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG) technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both “solid” and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm) indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [3] ;  [3] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [5] ;  [6] ; ORCiD logo [7] ;  [3] ;  [2]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Department of Chemistry; CINVESTAV-Unidad Merida, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km 6, Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico). Applied Physics Department
  2. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Department of Chemistry
  3. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Department of Mechanical Engineering
  4. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Department of Chemistry ; Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  5. CINVESTAV-Unidad Merida, Carretera Antigua a Progreso Km 6, Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico). Applied Physics Department
  6. Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona (Spain)
  7. Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0001299; FG02-09ER46577; FIS2015-70862-P; 251882; SEV-2013-0295
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
AIP Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 12; Related Information: S3TEC partners with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (lead); Boston College; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Journal ID: ISSN 2158-3226
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; solar (photovoltaic); solar (thermal); solid state lighting; phonons; thermal conductivity; thermoelectric; defects; mechanical behavior; charge transport; spin dynamics; materials and chemistry by design; optics; synthesis (novel materials); synthesis (self-assembly); synthesis (scalable processing)
OSTI Identifier:
1334354
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1388425; OSTI ID: 1421042