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Title: Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion

Abstract

We calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western United States, using a regional time domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02–0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity model perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 s) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), and the goodness of fit of the inversion result cannot bemore » used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50 and 200%. Furthermore, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data have a good SNR.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1332987
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC52-06NA27324
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: B1; Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Ford, Sean R., Dreger, Douglas S., and Walter, William R. Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1029/2008JB005743.
Ford, Sean R., Dreger, Douglas S., & Walter, William R. Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion. United States. doi:10.1029/2008JB005743.
Ford, Sean R., Dreger, Douglas S., and Walter, William R. Sat . "Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion". United States. doi:10.1029/2008JB005743. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1332987.
@article{osti_1332987,
title = {Identifying isotropic events using a regional moment tensor inversion},
author = {Ford, Sean R. and Dreger, Douglas S. and Walter, William R.},
abstractNote = {We calculate the deviatoric and isotropic source components for 17 explosions at the Nevada Test Site, as well as 12 earthquakes and 3 collapses in the surrounding region of the western United States, using a regional time domain full waveform inversion for the complete moment tensor. The events separate into specific populations according to their deviation from a pure double-couple and ratio of isotropic to deviatoric energy. The separation allows for anomalous event identification and discrimination between explosions, earthquakes, and collapses. Confidence regions of the model parameters are estimated from the data misfit by assuming normally distributed parameter values. We investigate the sensitivity of the resolved parameters of an explosion to imperfect Earth models, inaccurate event depths, and data with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assuming a reasonable azimuthal distribution of stations. In the band of interest (0.02–0.10 Hz) the source-type calculated from complete moment tensor inversion is insensitive to velocity model perturbations that cause less than a half-cycle shift (<5 s) in arrival time error if shifting of the waveforms is allowed. The explosion source-type is insensitive to an incorrect depth assumption (for a true depth of 1 km), and the goodness of fit of the inversion result cannot be used to resolve the true depth of the explosion. Noise degrades the explosive character of the result, and a good fit and accurate result are obtained when the signal-to-noise ratio is greater than 5. We assess the depth and frequency dependence upon the resolved explosive moment. As the depth decreases from 1 km to 200 m, the isotropic moment is no longer accurately resolved and is in error between 50 and 200%. Furthermore, even at the most shallow depth the resultant moment tensor is dominated by the explosive component when the data have a good SNR.},
doi = {10.1029/2008JB005743},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research},
number = B1,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {1}
}

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