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Title: Wintering Golden Eagles on the coastal plain of South Carolina

Abstract

Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) are rare winter residents in eastern North America, with most found along the Appalachian Mountains and few reported on the coastal plain of the Carolinas. We used remote cameras baited with wild pig (Sus scrofa) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) carcasses to detect, age, and individually identify Golden Eagles on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site on the coastal plain of South Carolina. We identified eight individual Golden Eagles during the winters of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, with one detected during both winters. We detected eagles for 19 and 66 calendar days during the winters of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, respectively, with two adult eagles detected for 30 and 31 calendar days in 2014–2015. Eagles typically scavenged on carcasses for a few days, left, and then returned when cameras were baited with another carcass, suggesting they had remained in the area. These observations suggest that large tracts of forests on the coastal plain may be important wintering areas for some Golden Eagles and, further, that other areas in the coastal plain of the southeastern United States may also harbor wintering eagles. Identification of wintering areas of Golden Eagles in the east will be an important stepmore » in the conservation of this protected species, and camera traps baited with carcasses can be an effective tool for such work.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. USDA Forest Service-Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)
  2. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)
  3. USDA Forest Service, New Ellenton, SC (United States). Savannah River
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA Forest Service-Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), Office of Security (AU-50)
OSTI Identifier:
1329915
Report Number(s):
USDA-16-09-P
Journal ID: ISSN 0273-8570; 16-09-P
Grant/Contract Number:  
AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Field Ornithology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0273-8570
Publisher:
Association of Field Ornithologists - Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Aquila chrysaetos; camera trap; carcass; open pine forest; southeast; wild pig

Citation Formats

Vukovich, Mark, Turner, Kelsey L., Grazia, Tracy E., Mims, Thiomas, Beasley, James C., and Kilgo, John C. Wintering Golden Eagles on the coastal plain of South Carolina. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1111/jofo.12127.
Vukovich, Mark, Turner, Kelsey L., Grazia, Tracy E., Mims, Thiomas, Beasley, James C., & Kilgo, John C. Wintering Golden Eagles on the coastal plain of South Carolina. United States. doi:10.1111/jofo.12127.
Vukovich, Mark, Turner, Kelsey L., Grazia, Tracy E., Mims, Thiomas, Beasley, James C., and Kilgo, John C. Thu . "Wintering Golden Eagles on the coastal plain of South Carolina". United States. doi:10.1111/jofo.12127. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329915.
@article{osti_1329915,
title = {Wintering Golden Eagles on the coastal plain of South Carolina},
author = {Vukovich, Mark and Turner, Kelsey L. and Grazia, Tracy E. and Mims, Thiomas and Beasley, James C. and Kilgo, John C.},
abstractNote = {Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) are rare winter residents in eastern North America, with most found along the Appalachian Mountains and few reported on the coastal plain of the Carolinas. We used remote cameras baited with wild pig (Sus scrofa) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) carcasses to detect, age, and individually identify Golden Eagles on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site on the coastal plain of South Carolina. We identified eight individual Golden Eagles during the winters of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, with one detected during both winters. We detected eagles for 19 and 66 calendar days during the winters of 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, respectively, with two adult eagles detected for 30 and 31 calendar days in 2014–2015. Eagles typically scavenged on carcasses for a few days, left, and then returned when cameras were baited with another carcass, suggesting they had remained in the area. These observations suggest that large tracts of forests on the coastal plain may be important wintering areas for some Golden Eagles and, further, that other areas in the coastal plain of the southeastern United States may also harbor wintering eagles. Identification of wintering areas of Golden Eagles in the east will be an important step in the conservation of this protected species, and camera traps baited with carcasses can be an effective tool for such work.},
doi = {10.1111/jofo.12127},
journal = {Journal of Field Ornithology},
number = 4,
volume = 86,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}

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