skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Lateral gene transfer in a heavy metal-contaminated-groundwater microbial community

Here, unraveling the drivers controlling the response and adaptation of biological communities to environmental change, especially anthropogenic activities, is a central but poorly understood issue in ecology and evolution. Comparative genomics studies suggest that lateral gene transfer (LGT) is a major force driving microbial genome evolution, but its role in the evolution of microbial communities remains elusive.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [5] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [6] ;  [6] ;  [7] ; ORCiD logo [8] ;  [5] ;  [3] ;  [9]
  1. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
  3. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  4. National Centre for Cell Science, Maharashtra (India)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)
  7. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); PanAmerican Bioinformatics Institute, Magdalena (Columbia)
  8. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  9. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
mBio (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: mBio (Online); Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-7511
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1327748
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1379276

Hemme, Christopher L., Green, Stefan J., Rishishwar, Lavanya, Prakash, Om, Pettenato, Angelica, Chakraborty, Romy, Deutschbauer, Adam M., Van Nostrand, Joy D., Wu, Liyou, He, Zhili, Jordan, I. King, Hazen, Terry C., Arkin, Adam P., Kostka, Joel E., and Zhou, Jizhong. Lateral gene transfer in a heavy metal-contaminated-groundwater microbial community. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1128/mBio.02234-15.
Hemme, Christopher L., Green, Stefan J., Rishishwar, Lavanya, Prakash, Om, Pettenato, Angelica, Chakraborty, Romy, Deutschbauer, Adam M., Van Nostrand, Joy D., Wu, Liyou, He, Zhili, Jordan, I. King, Hazen, Terry C., Arkin, Adam P., Kostka, Joel E., & Zhou, Jizhong. Lateral gene transfer in a heavy metal-contaminated-groundwater microbial community. United States. doi:10.1128/mBio.02234-15.
Hemme, Christopher L., Green, Stefan J., Rishishwar, Lavanya, Prakash, Om, Pettenato, Angelica, Chakraborty, Romy, Deutschbauer, Adam M., Van Nostrand, Joy D., Wu, Liyou, He, Zhili, Jordan, I. King, Hazen, Terry C., Arkin, Adam P., Kostka, Joel E., and Zhou, Jizhong. 2016. "Lateral gene transfer in a heavy metal-contaminated-groundwater microbial community". United States. doi:10.1128/mBio.02234-15. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1327748.
@article{osti_1327748,
title = {Lateral gene transfer in a heavy metal-contaminated-groundwater microbial community},
author = {Hemme, Christopher L. and Green, Stefan J. and Rishishwar, Lavanya and Prakash, Om and Pettenato, Angelica and Chakraborty, Romy and Deutschbauer, Adam M. and Van Nostrand, Joy D. and Wu, Liyou and He, Zhili and Jordan, I. King and Hazen, Terry C. and Arkin, Adam P. and Kostka, Joel E. and Zhou, Jizhong},
abstractNote = {Here, unraveling the drivers controlling the response and adaptation of biological communities to environmental change, especially anthropogenic activities, is a central but poorly understood issue in ecology and evolution. Comparative genomics studies suggest that lateral gene transfer (LGT) is a major force driving microbial genome evolution, but its role in the evolution of microbial communities remains elusive.},
doi = {10.1128/mBio.02234-15},
journal = {mBio (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {4}
}