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Title: Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in advanced alloys

We report that historically, alloy development with better radiation performance has been focused on traditional alloys with one or two principal element(s) and minor alloying elements, where enhanced radiation resistance depends on microstructural or nanoscale features to mitigate displacement damage. In sharp contrast to traditional alloys, recent advances of single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys (SP-CSAs) have opened up new frontiers in materials research. In these alloys, a random arrangement of multiple elemental species on a crystalline lattice results in disordered local chemical environments and unique site-to-site lattice distortions. Based on closely integrated computational and experimental studies using a novel set of SP-CSAs in a face-centered cubic structure, we have explicitly demonstrated that increasing chemical disorder can lead to a substantial reduction in electron mean free paths, as well as electrical and thermal conductivity, which results in slower heat dissipation in SP-CSAs. The chemical disorder also has a significant impact on defect evolution under ion irradiation. Considerable improvement in radiation resistance is observed with increasing chemical disorder at electronic and atomic levels. Finally, the insights into defect dynamics may provide a basis for understanding elemental effects on evolution of radiation damage in irradiated materials and may inspire new design principles ofmore » radiation-tolerant structural alloys for advanced energy systems.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences
  4. Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  5. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  6. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physics Division
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN 0884-2914
Publisher:
Materials Research Society
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY radiation effects; ion-solid interactions; alloy
OSTI Identifier:
1319193
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1319193