skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

Abstract

Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. In this paper, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Finally, overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmentalmore » sample analyses.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States). Graduate School of Genome Science and Technology
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1286738
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Mosier, Annika C., Li, Zhou, Thomas, Brian C., Hettich, Robert L., Pan, Chongle, and Banfield, Jillian F. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.113.
Mosier, Annika C., Li, Zhou, Thomas, Brian C., Hettich, Robert L., Pan, Chongle, & Banfield, Jillian F. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community. United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.113.
Mosier, Annika C., Li, Zhou, Thomas, Brian C., Hettich, Robert L., Pan, Chongle, and Banfield, Jillian F. Tue . "Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community". United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.113. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1286738.
@article{osti_1286738,
title = {Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community},
author = {Mosier, Annika C. and Li, Zhou and Thomas, Brian C. and Hettich, Robert L. and Pan, Chongle and Banfield, Jillian F.},
abstractNote = {Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. In this paper, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Finally, overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses.},
doi = {10.1038/ismej.2014.113},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {7}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 13 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

KAAS: an automatic genome annotation and pathway reconstruction server
journal, May 2007

  • Moriya, Y.; Itoh, M.; Okuda, S.
  • Nucleic Acids Research, Vol. 35, Issue S2, p. W182-W185
  • DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkm321

Small CRISPR RNAs Guide Antiviral Defense in Prokaryotes
journal, August 2008

  • Brouns, S. J. J.; Jore, M. M.; Lundgren, M.
  • Science, Vol. 321, Issue 5891, p. 960-964
  • DOI: 10.1126/science.1159689

Gene set enrichment analysis: A knowledge-based approach for interpreting genome-wide expression profiles
journal, September 2005

  • Subramanian, A.; Tamayo, P.; Mootha, V. K.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 102, Issue 43, p. 15545-15550
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0506580102