skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion

Recently, predominantly closed-cell low density shape memory polymer (SMP) foam was reported to be an effective aneurysm filling device in a porcine model (Rodriguez et al., Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A 2013: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34782)). Because healing involves blood clotting and cell migration throughout the foam volume, a more open-cell structure may further enhance the healing response. This research sought to develop a non-destructive reticulation process for this SMP foam to disrupt the membranes between pore cells. Non-destructive mechanical reticulation was achieved using a gravity-driven floating nitinol pin array coupled with vibratory agitation of the foam and supplemental chemical etching. Lastly, reticulation resulted in a reduced elastic modulus and increased permeability, but did not impede the shape memory behavior. Reticulated foams were capable of achieving rapid vascular occlusion in an in vivo porcine model.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [4] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
  2. Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Texas Inst. for Preclinical Studies
  3. Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; R01EB000462
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-6161
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1282115

Rodriguez, Jennifer N., Miller, Matthew W., Boyle, Anthony, Horn, John, Yang, Cheng-Kang, Wilson, Thomas S., Ortega, Jason M., Small, Ward, Nash, Landon, Skoog, Hunter, and Maitland, Duncan J.. Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2014.07.037.
Rodriguez, Jennifer N., Miller, Matthew W., Boyle, Anthony, Horn, John, Yang, Cheng-Kang, Wilson, Thomas S., Ortega, Jason M., Small, Ward, Nash, Landon, Skoog, Hunter, & Maitland, Duncan J.. Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2014.07.037.
Rodriguez, Jennifer N., Miller, Matthew W., Boyle, Anthony, Horn, John, Yang, Cheng-Kang, Wilson, Thomas S., Ortega, Jason M., Small, Ward, Nash, Landon, Skoog, Hunter, and Maitland, Duncan J.. 2014. "Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2014.07.037. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1282115.
@article{osti_1282115,
title = {Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion},
author = {Rodriguez, Jennifer N. and Miller, Matthew W. and Boyle, Anthony and Horn, John and Yang, Cheng-Kang and Wilson, Thomas S. and Ortega, Jason M. and Small, Ward and Nash, Landon and Skoog, Hunter and Maitland, Duncan J.},
abstractNote = {Recently, predominantly closed-cell low density shape memory polymer (SMP) foam was reported to be an effective aneurysm filling device in a porcine model (Rodriguez et al., Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A 2013: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34782)). Because healing involves blood clotting and cell migration throughout the foam volume, a more open-cell structure may further enhance the healing response. This research sought to develop a non-destructive reticulation process for this SMP foam to disrupt the membranes between pore cells. Non-destructive mechanical reticulation was achieved using a gravity-driven floating nitinol pin array coupled with vibratory agitation of the foam and supplemental chemical etching. Lastly, reticulation resulted in a reduced elastic modulus and increased permeability, but did not impede the shape memory behavior. Reticulated foams were capable of achieving rapid vascular occlusion in an in vivo porcine model.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jmbbm.2014.07.037},
journal = {Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials},
number = C,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {8}
}