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Title: Testing the Münch hypothesis of long distance phloem transport in plants

Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem, but this hypothesis has long faced major challenges. The key issue is whether the conductance of sieve tubes, including sieve plate pores, is sufficient to allow pressure flow. We show that with increasing distance between source and sink, sieve tube conductivity and turgor increases dramatically in Ipomoea nil. Our results provide strong support for the Münch hypothesis, while providing new tools for the investigation of one of the least understood plant tissues.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, United States
  2. School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, United States, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States
  3. Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States, Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Boston, United States
  4. Department of Biosciences, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York
  5. Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark
  6. Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-98CH10886
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
eLife
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: eLife Journal Volume: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-084X
Publisher:
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd.
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
OSTI Identifier:
1261693
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1261694