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Title: Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens

Abstract

Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. In conclusion, these results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1255544
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1379041
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02- 05CH11231; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Couradeau, Estelle, Karaoz, Ulas, Lim, Hsiao Chien, Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses, Northen, Trent, Brodie, Eoin, and Garcia-Pichel, Ferran. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms10373.
Couradeau, Estelle, Karaoz, Ulas, Lim, Hsiao Chien, Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses, Northen, Trent, Brodie, Eoin, & Garcia-Pichel, Ferran. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms10373.
Couradeau, Estelle, Karaoz, Ulas, Lim, Hsiao Chien, Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses, Northen, Trent, Brodie, Eoin, and Garcia-Pichel, Ferran. Wed . "Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms10373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1255544.
@article{osti_1255544,
title = {Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens},
author = {Couradeau, Estelle and Karaoz, Ulas and Lim, Hsiao Chien and Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses and Northen, Trent and Brodie, Eoin and Garcia-Pichel, Ferran},
abstractNote = {Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. In conclusion, these results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms10373},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {1}
}

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Cited by: 21 works
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    Works referencing / citing this record:

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