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Title: Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments

Abstract

One challenge to all remedial approaches for contaminated sediments is the continued influx of contaminants from uncontrolled sources following remediation. We investigated the effects of ongoing contamination in mesocosms employing sediments remediated by different types of active and passive caps and in-situ treatment. Our hypothesis was that the sequestering agents used in active caps and in situ treatment will bind elements (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc) from ongoing sources thereby reducing their bioavailability and protecting underlying remediated sediments from recontamination. Most element concentrations in surface water remained significantly lower in mesocosms with apatite and mixed amendment caps than in mesocosms with passive caps (sand), uncapped sediment, and spike solution throughout the 2520 hour experiment. Element concentrations were significantly higher in Lumbriculus variegatus from untreated sediment than in Lumbriculus from most active caps. Moreover, Pearson correlations between element concentrations in Lumbriculus and metal concentrations in the top 2.5 cm of sediment or cap measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) sediment probes were generally strong (as high as 0.98) and significant (p<0.05) for almost all tested elements. Metal concentrations in both Lumbriculus and sediment/cap were lowest in apatite, mixed amendment, and activated carbon treatments. Finally,more » these findings show that some active caps can protect remediated sediments by reducing the bioavailable pool of metals/metalloids in ongoing sources of contamination.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
  2. LimnoTech, Ann Arbor, MN (United States)
  3. Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1254436
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1776292
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2016-00237
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697; PII: S0048969716307331
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC09-08SR22470; ER 2427; AC09-798861048
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 563-564; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Metals; passive caps; active caps; remediated sediment; bioavailability; re-contamination

Citation Formats

Knox, Anna Sophia, Paller, Michael H., Milliken, Charles E., Redder, Todd M., Wolfe, John R., and Seaman, John. Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.050.
Knox, Anna Sophia, Paller, Michael H., Milliken, Charles E., Redder, Todd M., Wolfe, John R., & Seaman, John. Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.050
Knox, Anna Sophia, Paller, Michael H., Milliken, Charles E., Redder, Todd M., Wolfe, John R., and Seaman, John. Fri . "Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.050. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1254436.
@article{osti_1254436,
title = {Environmental impact of ongoing sources of metal contamination on remediated sediments},
author = {Knox, Anna Sophia and Paller, Michael H. and Milliken, Charles E. and Redder, Todd M. and Wolfe, John R. and Seaman, John},
abstractNote = {One challenge to all remedial approaches for contaminated sediments is the continued influx of contaminants from uncontrolled sources following remediation. We investigated the effects of ongoing contamination in mesocosms employing sediments remediated by different types of active and passive caps and in-situ treatment. Our hypothesis was that the sequestering agents used in active caps and in situ treatment will bind elements (arsenic, chromium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc) from ongoing sources thereby reducing their bioavailability and protecting underlying remediated sediments from recontamination. Most element concentrations in surface water remained significantly lower in mesocosms with apatite and mixed amendment caps than in mesocosms with passive caps (sand), uncapped sediment, and spike solution throughout the 2520 hour experiment. Element concentrations were significantly higher in Lumbriculus variegatus from untreated sediment than in Lumbriculus from most active caps. Moreover, Pearson correlations between element concentrations in Lumbriculus and metal concentrations in the top 2.5 cm of sediment or cap measured by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) sediment probes were generally strong (as high as 0.98) and significant (p<0.05) for almost all tested elements. Metal concentrations in both Lumbriculus and sediment/cap were lowest in apatite, mixed amendment, and activated carbon treatments. Finally, these findings show that some active caps can protect remediated sediments by reducing the bioavailable pool of metals/metalloids in ongoing sources of contamination.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.050},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = C,
volume = 563-564,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {4}
}

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Cited by: 4 works
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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Passive Sampling Methods for Assessing the Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Sediments
    journal, May 2019