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Title: Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy

Abstract

Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is demonstrated using single-layer graphene membranes as photoelectron-transparent barriers that sustain pressure differences in excess of 6 orders of magnitude. The graphene serves as a support for catalyst nanoparticles under atmospheric pressure reaction conditions (up to 1.5 bar), where XPS allows the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles and gas phase species to be simultaneously probed. We thereby observe that the Cu2+ oxidation state is stable in O2 (1 bar) but is spontaneously reduced under vacuum. We further demonstrate the detection of various gas-phase species (Ar, CO, CO2, N2, O2) in the pressure range 10-1500 mbar including species with low photoionization cross sections (He, H2). Pressure-dependent changes in the apparent binding energies of gas-phase species are observed, attributable to changes in work function of the metal-coated grids supporting the graphene. We expect atmospheric pressure XPS based on this graphene membrane approach to be a valuable tool for studying nanoparticle catalysis.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1760, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division; USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division; European Union (EU)
OSTI Identifier:
1251440
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1619075
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; 656870
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters Journal Volume: 7 Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
two dimensional materials; membranes; vacuum; x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; gases

Citation Formats

Weatherup, Robert S., Eren, Baran, Hao, Yibo, Bluhm, Hendrik, and Salmeron, Miquel B. Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00640.
Weatherup, Robert S., Eren, Baran, Hao, Yibo, Bluhm, Hendrik, & Salmeron, Miquel B. Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00640.
Weatherup, Robert S., Eren, Baran, Hao, Yibo, Bluhm, Hendrik, and Salmeron, Miquel B. Mon . "Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00640.
@article{osti_1251440,
title = {Graphene Membranes for Atmospheric Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy},
author = {Weatherup, Robert S. and Eren, Baran and Hao, Yibo and Bluhm, Hendrik and Salmeron, Miquel B.},
abstractNote = {Atmospheric pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is demonstrated using single-layer graphene membranes as photoelectron-transparent barriers that sustain pressure differences in excess of 6 orders of magnitude. The graphene serves as a support for catalyst nanoparticles under atmospheric pressure reaction conditions (up to 1.5 bar), where XPS allows the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles and gas phase species to be simultaneously probed. We thereby observe that the Cu2+ oxidation state is stable in O2 (1 bar) but is spontaneously reduced under vacuum. We further demonstrate the detection of various gas-phase species (Ar, CO, CO2, N2, O2) in the pressure range 10-1500 mbar including species with low photoionization cross sections (He, H2). Pressure-dependent changes in the apparent binding energies of gas-phase species are observed, attributable to changes in work function of the metal-coated grids supporting the graphene. We expect atmospheric pressure XPS based on this graphene membrane approach to be a valuable tool for studying nanoparticle catalysis.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00640},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters},
number = 9,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpclett.6b00640

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 13 works
Citation information provided by
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