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Title: Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research

Abstract

Contact rates vary widely among individuals in socially structured wildlife populations. Understanding the interplay of factors responsible for this variation is essential for planning effective disease management. Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are a socially structured species which pose an increasing threat to livestock and human health, and little is known about contact structure. We analyzed 11 GPS data sets from across the United States to understand the interplay of ecological and demographic factors on variation in co-location rates, a proxy for contact rates. Between-sounder contact rates strongly depended on the distance among home ranges (less contact among sounders separated by >2 km; negligible between sounders separated by >6 km), but other factors causing high clustering between groups of sounders also seemed apparent. Our results provide spatial parameters for targeted management actions, identify data gaps that could lead to improved management and provide insight on experimental design for quantitating contact rates and structure.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [1];
  1. National Wildlife Research Center United States Department of Agriculture 4101 Laporte Avenue Fort Collins Colorado 80526 USA
  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources University of Georgia PO Drawer E Aiken South Carolina 29802 USA
  3. Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Range Cattle Research and Education Center University of Florida 3401 Experiment Station Ona Florida 33865 USA
  4. East Foundation 200 Concord Plaza Drive, Suite 410 San Antonio Texas 78216 USA
  5. Texas A&,M AgriLife Research 1619 Garner Field Road Uvalde Texas 78801 USA
  6. USDA/APHIS/Wildlife Services 602 Duncan Drive Auburn Alabama 36849 USA
  7. United States Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center 700 Cajundome Boulevard Lafayette Louisiana 70506 USA
  8. Southern Research Station USDA Forest Service P.O. Box 700 New Ellenton South Carolina 29809 USA
  9. Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation University of Florida Gainesville Florida 32611 USA
  10. Santa Lucia Conservancy 26700 Rancho San Carlos Road Carmel California 93923 USA, Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute Texas A&,M University‐Kingsville 955 University Boulevard, Kingsville Texas 78363 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service, New Ellenton, SC (United States). Savannah River Operations
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1248410
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1248411; OSTI ID: 1360971
Grant/Contract Number:  
DE‐FC09‐07SR22506; FC09-07SR22506; AI09-00SR22188
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Ecosphere Journal Volume: 7 Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-8925
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; contact; disease transmission; feral swine; GPS; meta-analysis; network; social structure; Sus scrofa.

Citation Formats

Pepin, Kim M., Davis, Amy J., Beasley, James, Boughton, Raoul, Campbell, Tyler, Cooper, Susan M., Gaston, Wes, Hartley, Steve, Kilgo, John C., Wisely, Samantha M., Wyckoff, Christy, VerCauteren, Kurt C., and Park, ed., A. W. Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1230.
Pepin, Kim M., Davis, Amy J., Beasley, James, Boughton, Raoul, Campbell, Tyler, Cooper, Susan M., Gaston, Wes, Hartley, Steve, Kilgo, John C., Wisely, Samantha M., Wyckoff, Christy, VerCauteren, Kurt C., & Park, ed., A. W. Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research. United States. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1230
Pepin, Kim M., Davis, Amy J., Beasley, James, Boughton, Raoul, Campbell, Tyler, Cooper, Susan M., Gaston, Wes, Hartley, Steve, Kilgo, John C., Wisely, Samantha M., Wyckoff, Christy, VerCauteren, Kurt C., and Park, ed., A. W. Thu . "Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research". United States. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1230.
@article{osti_1248410,
title = {Contact heterogeneities in feral swine: implications for disease management and future research},
author = {Pepin, Kim M. and Davis, Amy J. and Beasley, James and Boughton, Raoul and Campbell, Tyler and Cooper, Susan M. and Gaston, Wes and Hartley, Steve and Kilgo, John C. and Wisely, Samantha M. and Wyckoff, Christy and VerCauteren, Kurt C. and Park, ed., A. W.},
abstractNote = {Contact rates vary widely among individuals in socially structured wildlife populations. Understanding the interplay of factors responsible for this variation is essential for planning effective disease management. Feral swine (Sus scrofa) are a socially structured species which pose an increasing threat to livestock and human health, and little is known about contact structure. We analyzed 11 GPS data sets from across the United States to understand the interplay of ecological and demographic factors on variation in co-location rates, a proxy for contact rates. Between-sounder contact rates strongly depended on the distance among home ranges (less contact among sounders separated by >2 km; negligible between sounders separated by >6 km), but other factors causing high clustering between groups of sounders also seemed apparent. Our results provide spatial parameters for targeted management actions, identify data gaps that could lead to improved management and provide insight on experimental design for quantitating contact rates and structure.},
doi = {10.1002/ecs2.1230},
journal = {Ecosphere},
number = 3,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.1230

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Cited by: 4 works
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