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Title: A large increase in U.S. methane emissions over the past decade inferred from satellite data and surface observations

The global burden of atmospheric methane has been increasing over the past decade, but the causes are not well understood. National inventory estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency indicate no significant trend in U.S. anthropogenic methane emissions from 2002 to present. Here we use satellite retrievals and surface observations of atmospheric methane to suggest that U.S. methane emissions have increased by more than 30% over the 2002-2014 period. The trend is largest in the central part of the country, but we cannot readily attribute it to any specific source type. This large increase in U.S. methane emissions could account for 30-60% of the global growth of atmospheric methane seen in the past decade.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  2. Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)
  3. Netherlands Inst. for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1240197
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1240198; OSTI ID: 1471011

Turner, A. J., Jacob, D. J., Benmergui, J., Wofsy, S. C., Maasakkers, J. D., Butz, A., Hasekamp, O., and Biraud, S. C.. A large increase in U.S. methane emissions over the past decade inferred from satellite data and surface observations. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/2016GL067987.
Turner, A. J., Jacob, D. J., Benmergui, J., Wofsy, S. C., Maasakkers, J. D., Butz, A., Hasekamp, O., & Biraud, S. C.. A large increase in U.S. methane emissions over the past decade inferred from satellite data and surface observations. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL067987.
Turner, A. J., Jacob, D. J., Benmergui, J., Wofsy, S. C., Maasakkers, J. D., Butz, A., Hasekamp, O., and Biraud, S. C.. 2016. "A large increase in U.S. methane emissions over the past decade inferred from satellite data and surface observations". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL067987.
@article{osti_1240197,
title = {A large increase in U.S. methane emissions over the past decade inferred from satellite data and surface observations},
author = {Turner, A. J. and Jacob, D. J. and Benmergui, J. and Wofsy, S. C. and Maasakkers, J. D. and Butz, A. and Hasekamp, O. and Biraud, S. C.},
abstractNote = {The global burden of atmospheric methane has been increasing over the past decade, but the causes are not well understood. National inventory estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency indicate no significant trend in U.S. anthropogenic methane emissions from 2002 to present. Here we use satellite retrievals and surface observations of atmospheric methane to suggest that U.S. methane emissions have increased by more than 30% over the 2002-2014 period. The trend is largest in the central part of the country, but we cannot readily attribute it to any specific source type. This large increase in U.S. methane emissions could account for 30-60% of the global growth of atmospheric methane seen in the past decade.},
doi = {10.1002/2016GL067987},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}