skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Analysis of cell division patterns in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem

Abstract

The stereotypic pattern of cell shapes in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem (SAM) suggests that strict rules govern the placement of new walls during cell division. When a cell in the SAM divides, a new wall is built that connects existing walls and divides the cytoplasm of the daughter cells. Because features that are determined by the placement of new walls such as cell size, shape, and number of neighbors are highly regular, rules must exist for maintaining such order. Here in this paper we present a quantitative model of these rules that incorporates different observed features of cell division. Each feature is incorporated into a "potential function" that contributes a single term to a total analog of potential energy. New cell walls are predicted to occur at locations where the potential function is minimized. Quantitative terms that represent the well-known historical rules of plant cell division, such as those given by Hofmeister, Errera, and Sachs are developed and evaluated against observed cell divisions in the epidermal layer (L1) of Arabidopsis thaliana SAM. The method is general enough to allow additional terms for nongeometric properties such as internal concentration gradients and mechanical tensile forces.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. California State Univ. (CalState), Northridge, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  2. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1235160
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1349045
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-88ER13873; R01-GM086883; P50GM76516
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Arabidopsis; cell division; computer modeling; live imaging

Citation Formats

Shapiro, Bruce E., Tobin, Cory, Mjolsness, Eric, and Meyerowitz, Elliot M. Analysis of cell division patterns in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1502588112.
Shapiro, Bruce E., Tobin, Cory, Mjolsness, Eric, & Meyerowitz, Elliot M. Analysis of cell division patterns in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1502588112.
Shapiro, Bruce E., Tobin, Cory, Mjolsness, Eric, and Meyerowitz, Elliot M. Mon . "Analysis of cell division patterns in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1502588112.
@article{osti_1235160,
title = {Analysis of cell division patterns in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem},
author = {Shapiro, Bruce E. and Tobin, Cory and Mjolsness, Eric and Meyerowitz, Elliot M.},
abstractNote = {The stereotypic pattern of cell shapes in the Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem (SAM) suggests that strict rules govern the placement of new walls during cell division. When a cell in the SAM divides, a new wall is built that connects existing walls and divides the cytoplasm of the daughter cells. Because features that are determined by the placement of new walls such as cell size, shape, and number of neighbors are highly regular, rules must exist for maintaining such order. Here in this paper we present a quantitative model of these rules that incorporates different observed features of cell division. Each feature is incorporated into a "potential function" that contributes a single term to a total analog of potential energy. New cell walls are predicted to occur at locations where the potential function is minimized. Quantitative terms that represent the well-known historical rules of plant cell division, such as those given by Hofmeister, Errera, and Sachs are developed and evaluated against observed cell divisions in the epidermal layer (L1) of Arabidopsis thaliana SAM. The method is general enough to allow additional terms for nongeometric properties such as internal concentration gradients and mechanical tensile forces.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1502588112},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 15,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1502588112

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 17 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

The shoot apical meristem: the dynamics of a stable structure
journal, June 2002

  • Traas, Jan; Vernoux, Teva
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 357, Issue 1422
  • DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2002.1091

Demonstration of the Three Germ Layers in the Shoot Apex of Datura by Means of Induced Polyploidy in Periclinal Chimeras
journal, December 1940

  • Satina, S.; Blakeslee, A. F.; Avery, Amos G.
  • American Journal of Botany, Vol. 27, Issue 10
  • DOI: 10.2307/2436558

The Relative Position of Cell Walls in Developing Plant Tissues
journal, July 1941

  • Sinnott, Edmund W.; Bloch, Robert
  • American Journal of Botany, Vol. 28, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.2307/2437010

Universal rule for the symmetric division of plant cells
journal, March 2011

  • Besson, S.; Dumais, J.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 108, Issue 15
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1011866108

Mechanical Signals in Plant Development: A New Method for Single Cell Studies
journal, January 1997

  • Lynch, Timothy M.; Lintilhac, Philip M.
  • Developmental Biology, Vol. 181, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1006/dbio.1996.8462

Energy-Minimization Approach to the Atomic Geometry of Semiconductor Surfaces
journal, October 1978


Elastic Domains Regulate Growth and Organogenesis in the Plant Shoot Apical Meristem
journal, March 2012

  • Kierzkowski, D.; Nakayama, N.; Routier-Kierzkowska, A. -L.
  • Science, Vol. 335, Issue 6072
  • DOI: 10.1126/science.1213100

Plant cell division: building walls in the right places
journal, January 2001

  • Smith, Laurie G.
  • Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 2, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1038/35048050

Regulatory Role of Cell Division Rules on Tissue Growth Heterogeneity
journal, August 2012


Structural integration at the shoot apical meristem: models, measurements, and experiments
journal, September 2004


The Initiation and Determination of Leaves.
journal, September 1992


The initial protrusion of a leaf primordium can form without concurrent periclinal cell divisions
journal, September 1971

  • Foard, Donald E.
  • Canadian Journal of Botany, Vol. 49, Issue 9
  • DOI: 10.1139/b71-223

A Modeling Study on How Cell Division Affects Properties of Epithelial Tissues Under Isotropic Growth
journal, July 2010


The Relationship Between the Distribution of Periclinal Cell Divisions in the Shoot Apex and Leaf Initiation
journal, June 1986


Stem-Cell Homeostasis and Growth Dynamics Can Be Uncoupled in the Arabidopsis Shoot Apex
journal, October 2005


Imaging plant growth in 4D: robust tissue reconstruction and lineaging at cell resolution
journal, June 2010

  • Fernandez, Romain; Das, Pradeep; Mirabet, Vincent
  • Nature Methods, Vol. 7, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1472

ImageJ for microscopy
journal, July 2007


    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche
    journal, December 2016

    • Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond
    • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 113, Issue 51
    • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1616768113