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Title: Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures

Abstract

Retro-aldol reactions have been implicated as the limiting steps in catalytic routes to convert biomass-derived hexoses and pentoses into valuable C2, C3, and C4 products such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-butenoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, and alkyl esters thereof. Due to a lack of efficient retro-aldol catalysts, most previous investigations of catalytic pathways involving these reactions were conducted at high temperatures (≥160 °C). Here, we report moderate-temperature (around 100 °C) retro-aldol reactions of various hexoses in aqueous and alcoholic media with catalysts traditionally known for their capacity to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular carbon shift (1,2-CS) reactions of aldoses, i.e., various molybdenum oxide and molybdate species, nickel(II) diamine complexes, alkali-exchanged stannosilicate molecular sieves, and amorphous TiO2–SiO2 coprecipitates. Solid Lewis acid cocatalysts that are known to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular hydride shift (1,2-HS) reactions that enable the formation of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids from tetroses, trioses, and glycolaldehyde, but cannot readily catalyze retro-aldol reactions of hexoses and pentoses at these moderate temperatures, are shown to be compatible with the aforementioned retro-aldol catalysts. The combination of a distinct retro-aldol catalyst with a 1,2-HS catalyst enables lactic acid and alkyl lactate formation from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures (around 100 °C), with yields comparable to best-reported chemocatalytic examples at highmore » temperature conditions (≥160 °C). As a result, the use of moderate temperatures enables numerous desirable features such as lower pressure and significantly less catalyst deactivation.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1235109
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1370715
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0001004
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Journal Volume: 112 Journal Issue: 38; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; catalysis (homogeneous); catalysis (heterogeneous); biofuels (including algae and biomass); bio-inspired; hydrogen and fuel cells; materials and chemistry by design; synthesis (novel materials); synthesis (self-assembly); synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Orazov, Marat, and Davis, Mark E. Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1516466112.
Orazov, Marat, & Davis, Mark E. Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1516466112
Orazov, Marat, and Davis, Mark E. Tue . "Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1516466112.
@article{osti_1235109,
title = {Tandem catalysis for the production of alkyl lactates from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures},
author = {Orazov, Marat and Davis, Mark E.},
abstractNote = {Retro-aldol reactions have been implicated as the limiting steps in catalytic routes to convert biomass-derived hexoses and pentoses into valuable C2, C3, and C4 products such as glycolic acid, lactic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-butenoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybutanoic acid, and alkyl esters thereof. Due to a lack of efficient retro-aldol catalysts, most previous investigations of catalytic pathways involving these reactions were conducted at high temperatures (≥160 °C). Here, we report moderate-temperature (around 100 °C) retro-aldol reactions of various hexoses in aqueous and alcoholic media with catalysts traditionally known for their capacity to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular carbon shift (1,2-CS) reactions of aldoses, i.e., various molybdenum oxide and molybdate species, nickel(II) diamine complexes, alkali-exchanged stannosilicate molecular sieves, and amorphous TiO2–SiO2 coprecipitates. Solid Lewis acid cocatalysts that are known to catalyze 1,2-intramolecular hydride shift (1,2-HS) reactions that enable the formation of α-hydroxy carboxylic acids from tetroses, trioses, and glycolaldehyde, but cannot readily catalyze retro-aldol reactions of hexoses and pentoses at these moderate temperatures, are shown to be compatible with the aforementioned retro-aldol catalysts. The combination of a distinct retro-aldol catalyst with a 1,2-HS catalyst enables lactic acid and alkyl lactate formation from ketohexoses at moderate temperatures (around 100 °C), with yields comparable to best-reported chemocatalytic examples at high temperature conditions (≥160 °C). As a result, the use of moderate temperatures enables numerous desirable features such as lower pressure and significantly less catalyst deactivation.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1516466112},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 38,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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DOI: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1516466112

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Cited by: 28 works
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