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Title: Chemistry and Formation of the Beilby Layer During Polishing of Fused Silica Glass

The chemical characteristics and the proposed formation mechanisms of the modified surface layer (called the Beilby layer) on polished fused silica glasses are described. Fused silica glass samples were polished using different slurries, polyurethane pads, and at different rotation rates. The concentration profiles of several key contaminants, such as Ce, K, and H, were measured in the near surface layer of the polished samples using Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The penetration of K, originating from KOH used for pH control during polishing, decreased with increase in polishing material removal rate. In contrast, penetration of the Ce and H increased with increase in polishing removal rate. In addition, Ce penetration was largely independent of the other polishing parameters (e.g., particle size distribution and the properties of the polishing pad). The resulting K concentration depth profiles are described using a two-step diffusion process: (1) steady-state moving boundary diffusion (due to material removal during polishing) followed by (2) simple diffusion during ambient postpolishing storage. Using known alkali metal diffusion coefficients in fused silica glass, this diffusion model predicts concentration profiles that are consistent with the measured data at various polishing material removal rates. On the other hand, the observed Ce profiles aremore » inconsistent with diffusion based transport. Rather we propose that Ce penetration is governed by the ratio of Ce–O–Si and Si–O–Si hydrolysis rates; where this ratio increases with interface temperature (which increases with polishing material removal rate) resulting in greater Ce penetration into the Beilby layer. Calculated Ce surface concentrations using this mechanism are in good agreement to the observed change in measured Ce surface concentrations with polishing material removal rate. In conclusion, these new insights into the chemistry of the Beilby layer, combined together with details of the single particle removal function during polishing, are used to develop a more detailed and quantitative picture of the polishing process and the formation of the Beilby layer.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-666384
Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7820
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Ceramic Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7820
Publisher:
American Ceramic Society
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 42 ENGINEERING
OSTI Identifier:
1234587

Suratwala, Tayyab, Steele, William, Wong, Lana, Feit, Michael D., Miller, Philip E., Dylla-Spears, Rebecca, Shen, Nan, and Desjardin, Richard. Chemistry and Formation of the Beilby Layer During Polishing of Fused Silica Glass. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1111/jace.13659.
Suratwala, Tayyab, Steele, William, Wong, Lana, Feit, Michael D., Miller, Philip E., Dylla-Spears, Rebecca, Shen, Nan, & Desjardin, Richard. Chemistry and Formation of the Beilby Layer During Polishing of Fused Silica Glass. United States. doi:10.1111/jace.13659.
Suratwala, Tayyab, Steele, William, Wong, Lana, Feit, Michael D., Miller, Philip E., Dylla-Spears, Rebecca, Shen, Nan, and Desjardin, Richard. 2015. "Chemistry and Formation of the Beilby Layer During Polishing of Fused Silica Glass". United States. doi:10.1111/jace.13659. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1234587.
@article{osti_1234587,
title = {Chemistry and Formation of the Beilby Layer During Polishing of Fused Silica Glass},
author = {Suratwala, Tayyab and Steele, William and Wong, Lana and Feit, Michael D. and Miller, Philip E. and Dylla-Spears, Rebecca and Shen, Nan and Desjardin, Richard},
abstractNote = {The chemical characteristics and the proposed formation mechanisms of the modified surface layer (called the Beilby layer) on polished fused silica glasses are described. Fused silica glass samples were polished using different slurries, polyurethane pads, and at different rotation rates. The concentration profiles of several key contaminants, such as Ce, K, and H, were measured in the near surface layer of the polished samples using Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The penetration of K, originating from KOH used for pH control during polishing, decreased with increase in polishing material removal rate. In contrast, penetration of the Ce and H increased with increase in polishing removal rate. In addition, Ce penetration was largely independent of the other polishing parameters (e.g., particle size distribution and the properties of the polishing pad). The resulting K concentration depth profiles are described using a two-step diffusion process: (1) steady-state moving boundary diffusion (due to material removal during polishing) followed by (2) simple diffusion during ambient postpolishing storage. Using known alkali metal diffusion coefficients in fused silica glass, this diffusion model predicts concentration profiles that are consistent with the measured data at various polishing material removal rates. On the other hand, the observed Ce profiles are inconsistent with diffusion based transport. Rather we propose that Ce penetration is governed by the ratio of Ce–O–Si and Si–O–Si hydrolysis rates; where this ratio increases with interface temperature (which increases with polishing material removal rate) resulting in greater Ce penetration into the Beilby layer. Calculated Ce surface concentrations using this mechanism are in good agreement to the observed change in measured Ce surface concentrations with polishing material removal rate. In conclusion, these new insights into the chemistry of the Beilby layer, combined together with details of the single particle removal function during polishing, are used to develop a more detailed and quantitative picture of the polishing process and the formation of the Beilby layer.},
doi = {10.1111/jace.13659},
journal = {Journal of the American Ceramic Society},
number = 8,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {5}
}