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Title: Laboratory demonstration and field verification of a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) for determining cooking duration and fuel consumption

With improved cookstoves (ICs) increasingly distributed to households for a range of air pollution interventions and carbon-credit programs, it has become necessary to accurately monitor the duration of cooking and the amount of fuel consumed. In this study, laboratory trials were used to create temperature-based algorithms for quantifying cooking duration and estimating fuel consumption from stove temperatures. Field validation of the algorithms employed a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) that offers remote, low-cost temperature sensing and the wireless transmission of temperature data to a centralized database using local cellular networks. Field trials included 68 unscripted household cooking events. In the laboratory, temperature responses of the IC body and that of a removable temperature probe (J-bar) followed well-known physical models during cooking, indicating that location of the temperature sensor is not critical. In the laboratory, the classification correctly identified active cooking 97.2% of the time. In the field, the cooking duration was not statistically different from that recorded by trained volunteers; the average difference between calculated and observed cooking times was 0.03 ± 0.31 h (mean ± SD). In the laboratory, energy flux from the IC was calculated using temperatures measured by the J-bar and on the IC body and foundmore » to be proportional to the total energy in the consumed fuel, with an r 2 correlation value of 0.95. Here in the field, the average fuel consumption was calculated to be 0.97 ± 0.32 kg compared to that recorded by volunteers of 1.19 ± 0.37 kg with an average difference between calculated and observed fuel mass of 0.21 ± 0.37 kg per event. Finally, despite wide variation in observed cooking duration and fuel consumption per event, a relatively constant rate of fuel consumption of 0.48 kg h -1 was calculated for users of the same type of IC.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1]
  1. Nexleaf Analytics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  2. Energy and Resources Inst., New Delhi (India)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0008205; PR-13-38202
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Energy for Sustainable Development
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 23; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0973-0826
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Cirrus Sense LLC, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 42 ENGINEERING; Improved cookstove; Temperature sensor; Carbon emissions; Wireless sensor; Stove usage
OSTI Identifier:
1228272
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1441147

Graham, Eric A., Patange, Omkar, Lukac, Martin, Singh, Lokendra, Kar, Abhishek, Rehman, Ibrahim H., and Ramanathan, Nithya. Laboratory demonstration and field verification of a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) for determining cooking duration and fuel consumption. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.esd.2014.08.001.
Graham, Eric A., Patange, Omkar, Lukac, Martin, Singh, Lokendra, Kar, Abhishek, Rehman, Ibrahim H., & Ramanathan, Nithya. Laboratory demonstration and field verification of a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) for determining cooking duration and fuel consumption. United States. doi:10.1016/j.esd.2014.08.001.
Graham, Eric A., Patange, Omkar, Lukac, Martin, Singh, Lokendra, Kar, Abhishek, Rehman, Ibrahim H., and Ramanathan, Nithya. 2014. "Laboratory demonstration and field verification of a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) for determining cooking duration and fuel consumption". United States. doi:10.1016/j.esd.2014.08.001.
@article{osti_1228272,
title = {Laboratory demonstration and field verification of a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) for determining cooking duration and fuel consumption},
author = {Graham, Eric A. and Patange, Omkar and Lukac, Martin and Singh, Lokendra and Kar, Abhishek and Rehman, Ibrahim H. and Ramanathan, Nithya},
abstractNote = {With improved cookstoves (ICs) increasingly distributed to households for a range of air pollution interventions and carbon-credit programs, it has become necessary to accurately monitor the duration of cooking and the amount of fuel consumed. In this study, laboratory trials were used to create temperature-based algorithms for quantifying cooking duration and estimating fuel consumption from stove temperatures. Field validation of the algorithms employed a Wireless Cookstove Sensing System (WiCS) that offers remote, low-cost temperature sensing and the wireless transmission of temperature data to a centralized database using local cellular networks. Field trials included 68 unscripted household cooking events. In the laboratory, temperature responses of the IC body and that of a removable temperature probe (J-bar) followed well-known physical models during cooking, indicating that location of the temperature sensor is not critical. In the laboratory, the classification correctly identified active cooking 97.2% of the time. In the field, the cooking duration was not statistically different from that recorded by trained volunteers; the average difference between calculated and observed cooking times was 0.03 ± 0.31 h (mean ± SD). In the laboratory, energy flux from the IC was calculated using temperatures measured by the J-bar and on the IC body and found to be proportional to the total energy in the consumed fuel, with an r2 correlation value of 0.95. Here in the field, the average fuel consumption was calculated to be 0.97 ± 0.32 kg compared to that recorded by volunteers of 1.19 ± 0.37 kg with an average difference between calculated and observed fuel mass of 0.21 ± 0.37 kg per event. Finally, despite wide variation in observed cooking duration and fuel consumption per event, a relatively constant rate of fuel consumption of 0.48 kg h-1 was calculated for users of the same type of IC.},
doi = {10.1016/j.esd.2014.08.001},
journal = {Energy for Sustainable Development},
number = C,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {8}
}