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Title: Fungi in the future: Interannual variation and effects of atmospheric change on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities

Abstract

Understanding the natural dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and their response to global environmental change is essential for the prediction of future plant growth and ecosystem functions. We investigated the long-term temporal dynamics and effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) and ozone (O 3) concentrations on AM fungal communities. Molecular methods were used to characterize the AM fungal communities of soybean ( Glycine max) grown under elevated and ambient atmospheric concentrations of both CO 2 and O 3 within a free air concentration enrichment experiment in three growing seasons over 5 yr. Elevated CO 2 altered the community composition of AM fungi, increasing the ratio of Glomeraceae to Gigasporaceae. By contrast, no effect of elevated O 3 on AM fungal communities was detected. However, the greatest compositional differences detected were between years, suggesting that, at least in the short term, large-scale interannual temporal dynamics are stronger mediators than atmospheric CO 2 concentrations of AM fungal communities. We conclude that, although atmospheric change may significantly alter AM fungal communities, this effect may be masked by the influences of natural changes and successional patterns through time. We suggest that changes in carbon availability are important determinants of the communitymore » dynamics of AM fungi.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Univ. of York, York (United Kingdom); Univ. of Essex, Colchester (United Kingdom); Univ. of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)
  2. Univ. of York, York (United Kingdom)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  4. Univ. of Essex, Colchester (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1212767
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 205; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 18S rRNA; arbuscular mycorrhizas; atmospheric change; free air concentration enrichment (FACE); Glomeromycota; microbial diversity; soil fungi; temporal dynamics

Citation Formats

Cotton, T. E. Anne, Fitter, Alastair H., Miller, R. Michael, Dumbrell, Alex J., and Helgason, Thorunn. Fungi in the future: Interannual variation and effects of atmospheric change on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.13224.
Cotton, T. E. Anne, Fitter, Alastair H., Miller, R. Michael, Dumbrell, Alex J., & Helgason, Thorunn. Fungi in the future: Interannual variation and effects of atmospheric change on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities. United States. doi:10.1111/nph.13224.
Cotton, T. E. Anne, Fitter, Alastair H., Miller, R. Michael, Dumbrell, Alex J., and Helgason, Thorunn. Mon . "Fungi in the future: Interannual variation and effects of atmospheric change on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities". United States. doi:10.1111/nph.13224. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1212767.
@article{osti_1212767,
title = {Fungi in the future: Interannual variation and effects of atmospheric change on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities},
author = {Cotton, T. E. Anne and Fitter, Alastair H. and Miller, R. Michael and Dumbrell, Alex J. and Helgason, Thorunn},
abstractNote = {Understanding the natural dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and their response to global environmental change is essential for the prediction of future plant growth and ecosystem functions. We investigated the long-term temporal dynamics and effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3) concentrations on AM fungal communities. Molecular methods were used to characterize the AM fungal communities of soybean (Glycine max) grown under elevated and ambient atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and O3 within a free air concentration enrichment experiment in three growing seasons over 5 yr. Elevated CO2 altered the community composition of AM fungi, increasing the ratio of Glomeraceae to Gigasporaceae. By contrast, no effect of elevated O3 on AM fungal communities was detected. However, the greatest compositional differences detected were between years, suggesting that, at least in the short term, large-scale interannual temporal dynamics are stronger mediators than atmospheric CO2 concentrations of AM fungal communities. We conclude that, although atmospheric change may significantly alter AM fungal communities, this effect may be masked by the influences of natural changes and successional patterns through time. We suggest that changes in carbon availability are important determinants of the community dynamics of AM fungi.},
doi = {10.1111/nph.13224},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = 4,
volume = 205,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {1}
}

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Cited by: 18 works
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