skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

Abstract

Small heat shock protein (sHsp) responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes ( Ceanothus cuneatus ), and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes ( Prunus ilicifolia ). Small Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur. Small Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus , had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42 C . The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus , had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus , but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression) coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Department of Biological Sciences, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1198469
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Botany
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Botany Journal Volume: 2010; Journal ID: ISSN 2090-0120
Publisher:
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Knight, Charles A. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1155/2010/171435.
Knight, Charles A. Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1155/2010/171435.
Knight, Charles A. Mon . "Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1155/2010/171435.
@article{osti_1198469,
title = {Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates},
author = {Knight, Charles A.},
abstractNote = {Small heat shock protein (sHsp) responses were studied for two evergreen perennial shrubs in the northern California chaparral; one common on warm, south-facing slopes ( Ceanothus cuneatus ), and the other on cooler, north-facing slopes ( Prunus ilicifolia ). Small Hsp expression was induced experimentally for field collected leaves. Leaf collections were made where the species co-occur. Small Hsp expression was quantified using two antibodies, one specific to a chloroplast 22 kD sHsp and another that detects a broad range of sHsps. Differences between chloroplast sHsp accumulation, which protects thermally labile proteins in PSII, and the general sHsp response were examined. The species from the cooler microclimate, Prunus , had a lower induction temperature and accumulated greater levels of sHsps at low temperatures. Both Prunus and Ceanothus reached peak sHsp expression at 42 ∘ C . The species from the warmer microclimate, Ceanothus , had greater sHsp expression at higher temperatures. Chloroplast sHsp expression generally tracked sHsp expression in Ceanothus , but in Prunus general Hsps were elevated before chloroplast sHsps. Variation between species for sHsp expression (induction temperatures, accumulation levels, and the duration of expression) coupled with the costs of Hsp synthesis, may contribute to differences in the abundance and distribution of plants across environmental gradients.},
doi = {10.1155/2010/171435},
journal = {Journal of Botany},
number = ,
volume = 2010,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {2010},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1155/2010/171435

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Expression of a unique plastid-localized heat-shock protein is genetically linked to acquired thermotolerance in wheat
journal, October 1997

  • Joshi, C. P.; Klueva, N. Y.; Morrow, K. J.
  • Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Vol. 95, Issue 5-6
  • DOI: 10.1007/s001220050633

The methionine-rich low-molecular-weight chloroplast heat-shock protein: evolutionary conservation and accumulation in relation to thermotolerance
journal, February 1998

  • Downs, Craig A.; Heckathorn, Scott A.; Bryan, John K.
  • American Journal of Botany, Vol. 85, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.2307/2446306

The Roles of Heat Shock Proteins in Plants
journal, June 1991


Use of a scanning densitometer or an ELISA plate reader for measurement of nanogram amounts of protein in crude extracts from biological tissues
journal, March 1988


Expression of a Conserved Family of Cytoplasmic Low Molecular Weight Heat Shock Proteins during Heat Stress and Recovery
journal, August 1991

  • DeRocher, Amy E.; Helm, Kenneth W.; Lauzon, Lisa M.
  • Plant Physiology, Vol. 96, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1104/pp.96.4.1038

Quantitative expression of maize HSPs: genetic dissection and association with thermotolerance
journal, April 1993

  • Frova, C.; Gorla, M. S.
  • Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Vol. 86-86, Issue 2-3
  • DOI: 10.1007/BF00222081

Nitrogen Availability and Vegetative Development Influence the Response of Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase, and Heat-Shock Protein Content to Heat Stress in Zea mays L.
journal, September 1996

  • Heckathorn, Scott A.; Poeller, Gretchen J.; Coleman, James S.
  • International Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 157, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1086/297374

Thermophilic Adaptation of Proteins
journal, January 2001

  • Sterner, Rein hard; Liebl, Wolfgang
  • Critical Reviews in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 36, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1080/20014091074174

Heat shock protein expression in thermotolerant and thermosensitive lines of cotton
journal, May 1989

  • Fender, Susan E.; O'Connell, Mary A.
  • Plant Cell Reports, Vol. 8, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1007/BF00735774

Heat-Shock Response in Heat-Tolerant and Nontolerant Variants of Agrostis palustris Huds
journal, June 1996

  • Park, S. Y.; Shivaji, R.; Krans, J. V.
  • Plant Physiology, Vol. 111, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1104/pp.111.2.515

Expression of Low Molecular Weight Heat-Shock Proteins under Field Conditions
journal, April 1993


Photosynthetic Response and Adaptation to Temperature in Higher Plants
journal, June 1980


Small Heat Shock Protein Responses of a Closely Related Pair of Desert and Coastal Encelia
journal, January 2003

  • Knight, Charles A.; Ackerly, David D.
  • International Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 164, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1086/344554

Quantitative densitometry of proteins stained with Coomassie Blue using a Hewlett Packard scanjet scanner and Scanplot software
journal, January 1997

  • Vincent, Sandra G.; Cunningham, Peter R.; Stephens, Newman L.
  • Electrophoresis, Vol. 18, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1002/elps.1150180114

Heat- and acid-tolerance of a grass commonly found in geothermal areas within Yellowstone National Park
journal, December 1997


Small Heat Shock Proteins Protect Electron Transport in Chloroplasts and Mitochondria During Stress
journal, December 1999

  • Heckathorn, Scott A.; Downs, Craig A.; Coleman, James S.
  • American Zoologist, Vol. 39, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1093/icb/39.6.865

From tropics to tundra: Global convergence in plant functioning
journal, December 1997

  • Reich, P. B.; Walters, M. B.; Ellsworth, D. S.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 94, Issue 25
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.94.25.13730

Gene expression under temperature stress*
journal, September 1993


Heat-shock proteins and thermotolerance: linking molecular and ecological perspectives
journal, August 1995

  • Coleman, James S.; Heckathorn, Scott A.; Hallberg, Richard L.
  • Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Vol. 10, Issue 8
  • DOI: 10.1016/S0169-5347(00)89112-0

A Class of Soybean Low Molecular Weight Heat Shock Proteins: Immunological Study and Quantitation
journal, August 1992

  • Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Chen, Ju-Tzen; Jinn, Tsung-Luo
  • Plant Physiology, Vol. 99, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1104/pp.99.4.1279

Accumulation of Heat Shock Proteins in Field-Grown Cotton
journal, June 1985

  • Burke, John J.; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Klein, Robert R.
  • Plant Physiology, Vol. 78, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1104/pp.78.2.394

Heat shock in plants
journal, September 1985


HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS, MOLECULAR CHAPERONES, AND THE STRESS RESPONSE: Evolutionary and Ecological Physiology
journal, March 1999


Heat-shock protein expression in a perennial grass commonly associated with active geothermal areas in western North America
journal, December 2002


Heat Shock Protein Synthesis and Thermal Tolerance in Wheat
journal, May 1989

  • Krishnan, M.; Nguyen, Henry T.; Burke, John J.
  • Plant Physiology, Vol. 90, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1104/pp.90.1.140

Correlated evolution of chloroplast heat shock protein expression in closely related plant species
journal, March 2001

  • Knight, Charles A.; Ackerly, David D.
  • American Journal of Botany, Vol. 88, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.2307/2657105

Evidence of association between specific heat-shock protein(s) and the drought and heat tolerance phenotype in maize
journal, January 1998