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Title: Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

Abstract

Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05-0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (<0.5°C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1198202
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Spectroscopy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Spectroscopy Journal Volume: 17 Journal Issue: 2-3; Journal ID: ISSN 0712-4813
Publisher:
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Holman, Hoi-Ying N., Martin, Michael C., and McKinney, Wayne R. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.1155/2003/486940.
Holman, Hoi-Ying N., Martin, Michael C., & McKinney, Wayne R. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1155/2003/486940.
Holman, Hoi-Ying N., Martin, Michael C., and McKinney, Wayne R. Wed . "Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1155/2003/486940.
@article{osti_1198202,
title = {Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy},
author = {Holman, Hoi-Ying N. and Martin, Michael C. and McKinney, Wayne R.},
abstractNote = {Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05-0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (<0.5°C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.},
doi = {10.1155/2003/486940},
journal = {Spectroscopy},
number = 2-3,
volume = 17,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {2003},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1155/2003/486940

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 22 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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