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Title: Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow

Abstract

Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for multiple days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (~50%) and of shorter duration (1–2 days). The multiday production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products of both aromatics and alkanes, especially those with relatively low carbon numbers (C4–15). In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions and different vapor pressure schemes, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. Here, the results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimatemore » this influence.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
  2. Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), Creteil (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1197838
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1441388
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0006780
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Lee-Taylor, J., Hodzic, A., Madronich, S., Aumont, B., Camredon, M., and Valorso, R. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-15-595-2015.
Lee-Taylor, J., Hodzic, A., Madronich, S., Aumont, B., Camredon, M., & Valorso, R. Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow. United States. doi:10.5194/acp-15-595-2015.
Lee-Taylor, J., Hodzic, A., Madronich, S., Aumont, B., Camredon, M., and Valorso, R. Fri . "Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow". United States. doi:10.5194/acp-15-595-2015.
@article{osti_1197838,
title = {Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow},
author = {Lee-Taylor, J. and Hodzic, A. and Madronich, S. and Aumont, B. and Camredon, M. and Valorso, R.},
abstractNote = {Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in air masses containing either anthropogenic or biogenic (terpene-dominated) emissions is investigated using the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A. Simulations show several-fold increases in SOA mass continuing for multiple days in the urban outflow, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. The SOA mass increase in the forest outflow is more modest (~50%) and of shorter duration (1–2 days). The multiday production in the urban outflow stems from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase, and can be attributed to multigenerational reaction products of both aromatics and alkanes, especially those with relatively low carbon numbers (C4–15). In particular we find large contributions from substituted maleic anhydrides and multi-substituted peroxide-bicyclic alkenes. The results show that the predicted production is a robust feature of our model even under changing atmospheric conditions and different vapor pressure schemes, and contradict the notion that SOA undergoes little mass production beyond a short initial formation period. Here, the results imply that anthropogenic aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over an extremely wide region, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-15-595-2015},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.5194/acp-15-595-2015

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Cited by: 9 works
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