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Title: Strong inter-population cooperation leads to partner intermixing in microbial communities

Abstract

Patterns of spatial positioning of individuals within microbial communities are often critical to community function. However, understanding patterning in natural communities is hampered by the multitude of cell–cell and cell–environment interactions as well as environmental variability. Here, through simulations and experiments on communities in defined environments, we examined how ecological interactions between two distinct partners impacted community patterning. We found that in strong cooperation with spatially localized large fitness benefits to both partners, a unique pattern is generated: partners spatially intermixed by appearing successively on top of each other, insensitive to initial conditions and interaction dynamics. Intermixing was experimentally observed in two obligatory cooperative systems: an engineered yeast community cooperating through metabolite-exchanges and a methane-producing community cooperating through redox-coupling. Even in simulated communities consisting of several species, most of the strongly-cooperating pairs appeared intermixed. Thus, when ecological interactions are the major patterning force, strong cooperation leads to partner intermixing.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States
  2. Department of Microbiology and Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, United States
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1197657
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1197658
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
eLife
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: eLife Journal Volume: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-084X
Publisher:
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Momeni, Babak, Brileya, Kristen A., Fields, Matthew W., and Shou, Wenying. Strong inter-population cooperation leads to partner intermixing in microbial communities. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.7554/eLife.00230.
Momeni, Babak, Brileya, Kristen A., Fields, Matthew W., & Shou, Wenying. Strong inter-population cooperation leads to partner intermixing in microbial communities. United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.00230.
Momeni, Babak, Brileya, Kristen A., Fields, Matthew W., and Shou, Wenying. Tue . "Strong inter-population cooperation leads to partner intermixing in microbial communities". United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.00230.
@article{osti_1197657,
title = {Strong inter-population cooperation leads to partner intermixing in microbial communities},
author = {Momeni, Babak and Brileya, Kristen A. and Fields, Matthew W. and Shou, Wenying},
abstractNote = {Patterns of spatial positioning of individuals within microbial communities are often critical to community function. However, understanding patterning in natural communities is hampered by the multitude of cell–cell and cell–environment interactions as well as environmental variability. Here, through simulations and experiments on communities in defined environments, we examined how ecological interactions between two distinct partners impacted community patterning. We found that in strong cooperation with spatially localized large fitness benefits to both partners, a unique pattern is generated: partners spatially intermixed by appearing successively on top of each other, insensitive to initial conditions and interaction dynamics. Intermixing was experimentally observed in two obligatory cooperative systems: an engineered yeast community cooperating through metabolite-exchanges and a methane-producing community cooperating through redox-coupling. Even in simulated communities consisting of several species, most of the strongly-cooperating pairs appeared intermixed. Thus, when ecological interactions are the major patterning force, strong cooperation leads to partner intermixing.},
doi = {10.7554/eLife.00230},
journal = {eLife},
number = ,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.00230

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 59 works
Citation information provided by
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