Drawing Back the Curtain of Secrecy

II. MATERIALS

A. DEUTERIUM INCLUDING HEAVY WATER

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

3. Nuclear Physics. (46-1)

4. Production Processes
a. The catalytic chemical exchange, water distillation, hydrogen distillation, and electrolytic processes for the large scale production of heavy water. (53-3)

b. The composition of the catalyst and the design and actual production rates for the entire Trail plant. (53-3)

c. The design production rates of the catalytic chemical exchange, water distillation, (except for Savannah and Dana), and hydrogen distillation process plants and the electrolytic process plants associated with them. (53-3)

5. Sale price of D2 0. (55-1)

6. A reasonable sale price ($28.00 per pound) for heavy water. (55-4)

7. All information on the production technology of heavy water. (56-6)

8. The fact of boosting, the fact that deuterium and tritium are used as boosting fuels in High Explosive Assembly weapons and that they are contained in components known as reservoirs or cartridges which are shipped between the Savannah River Plant and the AEC weapon facilities, the military and the United Kingdom. (72-11) (See also II.B.9. and V.C.2.o.)
a. Fact that gaseous deuterium (D) and tritium (T) are used as boosting fuel. (83-2) (See also II.B.9.a. and V.C.2.o.(3))

9. The fact that the thermonuclear fuel used in the Mike test (10/31/52) of the Ivy series was liquid deuterium. (74-5) (See also V.B.3.ww.)

*10. The fact that the tritium - deuterium mixture of the George test (5/8/51), the first thermonuclear test explosion, burned well. (74-8) (See also II.B.11 and V.B.3.lll.(1))

B.TRITIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

3. Production of Critical Materials; Tritium (H3): Quantities up to and including 40 liters total. (53-4)

4. Research scale methods for the production of tritium and helium-3. (53-6)

5. The fact that the U.S. has a large-scale tritium production program. (59-8)

6. The fact that the Savannah River plant is the center of U.S. tritium production activities. (59-8)

7. The fact that tritium in unspecified form is shipped in containers or reservoirs from Savannah River Operations. (67-1)

8. Distribution of Tritium on the surface in the vicinity of the [Greenland] crash (excluding that picked up on aircraft debris) (69-2) (See also V.D.14.b.)
Enclosed Area1
(square meters)
Tritium Deposition2
(Curies) : (% of total)
1.97 x 103
1.10 x 104
2.49 x 104
3.90 x 104
365
657
986
1337
27.2
49.1
73.7
100
1 Consecutively larger areas corresponding to the fall-out pattern.
2 Total out to the specified boundary.

9. The fact of boosting, the fact that deuterium and tritium are used as boosting fuels in HEA weapons and that they are contained in components known as reservoirs or cartridges which are shipped between the Savannah River Plant and the AEC weapon facilities, the military and the United Kingdom. (72-11) (See also II.A.8. and V.C.2.o.)
a. Fact that gaseous deuterium (D) and tritium (T) are used as boosting fuel. (83-2) (See also II.A.8.a. and V.C.2.o.(3))

10. The fact that compounds of Li6 containing tritium are used in the design of weapons as TN fuel. (72-11) (See also II.Q.13. and V.D.3.i.)

*11. The fact that the tritium - deuterium mixture of the George test (5/8/51), the first thermonuclear test explosion, burned well. (74-8) (See also II.A.10., and V.B.3.lll.(1))

12. The fact that the Contingency Tritium Production Program (CTPP) contemplated the possible use of commercial Light Water Reactors in the production of tritium. (89-2)

13. Fact that tritium is associated with some unspecified pits. (92-4) (See also V.C.2.dd.)

14. The fact that some unspecified pits include or contain tritium, no further elaboration. (94-14) (See also V.C.2.ee.)

**15. As part of the 1958 United States - United Kingdom Mutual Defense Agreement, there have been three barter agreements. The United States received plutonium totaling 5,366 kilograms from the United Kingdom under the Barter A, B, and C Agreements during the period 1960 - 1979. The United States gave the United Kingdom 6.7 kilograms of tritium and 7,500 kilograms of highly enriched uranium for the plutonium. (94-15) (See also II.G.36. and II.M.44)

**16. The amount of tritium in a reservoir is typically less than 20 gm. (95-5)

C.BERYLLIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

3. Metallurgy. (46-1)

4. Nuclear Physics. Classification will be retained, for the present, on all data pertaining to applications for beryllium in a production pile. (46-1)
a. Nuclear Physics. (48-1)

5. Quantity of Be used outside the nuclear assembly systems. (67-1) (See also V.C.2.h.)

6. The total quantity of Be used in the nuclear weapons program. (67-1) (See also V.C.2.i.)

7. The mere fact that Be is used in the nuclear assembly system of designated weapons. (72-11) (See also V.C.2.q.)

D. POLONIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

3. Nuclear Physics. (46-1)

4. The fact that a polonium-beryllium initiator is used in the 280 mm and 8" gun-type nuclear weapons. (64-5) (See also V.C.3.c.(1).)

5. Fact that Po-210 is used in weapon initiators. (67-1) (See also V.C.3.c.(2))

E. THORIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Metallurgy. (46-1)

3. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

4. Nuclear Physics (See Appendix A, for declassified nuclear properties of thorium and its isotopes) (48-1)

5. The sale price for thorium in billets -- $25.00 per Kg, and any proposed changes in the sale price of thorium. (55-4)

6. The general process technology for reducing either uranium or thorium compounds to metal and for preparing uranium or thorium alloys. (56-6)

F. PROTACTINIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

3. Nuclear Physics. (See Appendix A, for declassified nuclear properties of protactinium and its isotopes) (46-1) (48-1)

G. URANIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)
a. General methods of chemical analysis developed for uranium metal and graphite. (46-2) (See also I.C.2.a.)

2. Metallurgy. (46-1)

3. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

4. Nuclear Physics. (See Appendix A, for declassified nuclear properties of uranium and its isotopes) (48-1)

5. The value of the thermal fission cross section of natural uranium and U-235 released without any restriction as to accuracy of measurements. (50-1)

6. All nuclear and extra nuclear properties of all isotopes except as prohibited by the following topics. (50-3) (50-4) (See also I.D.1.d. and II.M.5)
(1) The nuclear properties of U233 , U235 , U236 , U238 , Pu239 and Pu240 except as permitted by topics II.G.7 through II.G.10 and II.M.6. through II.M.8 below and Appendix B.

(2) The neutron absorption cross section of Xe135 for all energies.

(3) The absorption cross section, for thermal neutrons, of carbon isotopes, of their natural mixture, and of high purity graphite specifically manufactured for use as a moderator, except as permitted by topic I.D1.f.

7. The following properties concerning U233 , U235 , U236 , U238 , Pu239 , and Pu240 . (50-4) (See also II.M.6.)
a. Existence, exact mass, spin, and moment.

b. Method of formation of isotope insofar as this does not disclose classified nuclear constants otherwise prohibited.

c. Charged particle and gamma ray reactions involving these isotopes at all energies.

d. Details of neutron reactions (including fission and scattering) involving these isotopes above 25 Mev.

e. Details of neutron induced trans-mutations involving these isotopes for all energies (including isotopic changes but not fission or capture).

f. Spontaneous disintegration properties other than spontaneous fission.

g. Spontaneous fission properties, except in the case of U236 and Pu240 for which only the existence of spontaneous fission may be admitted.
(1) The spontaneous fission properties of Pu240 and U236 with the exception of data on neutron emission in the spontaneous fission of U236 and Pu240 . (53-5)

h. Fission Process. See topic II.G.10. below.

8. The existence but not the magnitude of the (n,γ) cross section in U233 , U236 , Pu239 , and Pu240 . (50-4) (See also II.M.7)

9. That information for natural uranium and the isotopes U235 and U238 specified in Appendix B as well as the following information. (50-4)
a. The neutron fission cross section of natural uranium over the range 0.7 to 5 Mev.

b. The energy spectrum of fission neutrons from thermal fission of U235 .

10. The following information may be declassified concerning the fission process of U233 , U235 , U236 , and U238 , Pu239 , and Pu240 , however initiated: (50-4) (See also II.M.8.)
a. Energies and momenta of related fission fragments (including ternary and quaternary fission).

b. Energies, angular distributions and numbers per fission of protons, alpha particles and prompt gamma rays; and relative yields and energies of delayed neutrons.

c. Frequency of occurrence of ternary and quaternary fission and angular distribution of fragments.

NOTE: Yield information must be expressed only in terms of numbers of particles per fission and not in terms of partial cross sections in case the particular fission cross section is not declassifiable.

11. U3 08 costs. (55-1)

12. Sale price of uranium containing up to 20% U-235. (55-1)

13. A reasonable sale price ($40.00 per Kg.) for normal uranium metal in billet form. (55-4)

14. A price ($25.00 per gram of contained U-235) for uranium enriched to 20% U-235. (55-4)

15. Information concerning U.S. total ore production and approximate uranium production of the free world. (56-4)

16. The charges for enriched uranium of various degrees of enrichment. (56-5)

17. The fuel value of $16 per gram for U-233 metal. (56-5)

18. The general process technology for reducing either uranium or thorium compounds to metal and for preparing uranium or thorium alloys. (56-6)

19. Information on over-all uranium ore reserves and uranium ore and ore concentrate production statistics. (56-6)

20. Existence of uranium of approximately 0.22 � 0.02 wt. % U-235 and information that may be derived by analysis of this material by any means whatsoever. (58-1)

21. That material of assay above 0.22 � 0.02 wt. % U-235 if specifically requested by a user. (58-1)

22. The schedule of charges and buy-back prices of depleted uranium, or any modifications thereof which do not reveal AEC production costs. (58-1)

23. All information concerning the conversion of ore concentrates to uranium metal at the Destrehan Street, St. Louis and the Weldon Spring, Mo. feed materials facilities. (58-6)

24. Past and current production rates or capacities concerning these same facilities for the production of uranium metal and intermediate compounds. (58-6)

25. Use in weapons of normal, depleted or fully enriched uranium and the identification of the fissionable materials used in a specific fission weapon. (59-7) (See also V.C.5.b.)

26. Fact of use in specified or unspecified weapons of normal uranium or depleted uranium of any assay. (67-1) (See also V.C.2.g.)

27. Uranium-zirconium hydride reactor technology (SNAP). (72-3) (See also IV.J.11.a.)

28. The quantity of depleted uranium on-site and processed at Rocky Flats, as represented by periodic inventory data and processing totals, as long as weapons design, production rate or quantities, or other classified information that is protected by classified inventory data is not revealed. (94-6)

29. The historical (1952 - 1993) annual inventory difference for plutonium and highly enriched uranium at Rocky Flats. (94-7) (See also II.M.39.)

30. The historical (1947 - 1993) annual inventory difference for highly enriched uranium at the Y-12 plant. (94-8)

31. The fact that intermediate enrichments of uranium are used in U.S. nuclear weapons. (94-10)

32. The amount of uranium element that was enriched by the Portsmouth and K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plants to above 20 percent in U235 . (94-10)

33. The current total Y-12 highly enriched uranium inventory in terms of the quantity of uranium element enriched to above 20 percent in U235 . Also declassified is the maximum amount of enriched uranium stored at the Y-12 plant in the past. (94-10)

34. The total current Portsmouth uranium inventory enriched to 20 percent U235 and above, expressed in terms of uranium element. (94-10)

35. The Rocky Flats Plant current total uranium inventory enriched to over 20 percent, provided quantities in weapons components or other classified data is not revealed. (94-10)

Note: Declassified uranium inventory quantities in the specified assay ranges may be broken down into any unclassified forms or quantities (e.g., uranium, metal, fuel, spent fuel, UF6 , etc.)

**36. As part of the 1958 United States - United Kingdom Mutual Defense Agreement, there have been three barter agreements. The United States received plutonium totaling 5,366 kilograms from the United Kingdom under the Barter A, B, and C Agreements during the period 1960 - 1979. The United States gave the United Kingdom 6.7 kilograms of tritium and 7,500 kilograms of highly enriched uranium for the plutonium. (94-15) (See also II.B.15. and II.M.44)

**37. The quantities of uranium, actual or planned, from the U.S. nuclear weapons program, that is enriched to greater than 20 percent in U235 , that will be offered to the International Atomic Energy Agency for inspection or used for other unclassified purposes. (94-16)

**38. The specific assays of intermediate enriched uranium (enriched to between 20 percent and a nominal 90 percent) that were produced for weapons usage. (94-16)

**39.Quantities of uranium element enriched to over 20 percent produced in any time period by the K-25 and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants. (94-16)

H. NEPTUNIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Metallurgy. (46-1)

3. Basic Physics. (46-1)
a. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

4. Nuclear Physics. (46-1)
a. Nuclear Physics. (See Appendix A, for declassified nuclear properties of neptunium and its isotopes) (48-1)

I. Np 237

1. Nuclear Physics. (46-1)

J. Np 239

1. Nuclear Physics. (46-1)

K. UF6

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Basic Physics. (46-1)

3. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

4. Information concerning laser isotope separation research at LASL. (76-1)
a. Fact of use of UF6 . (See also III.E.4.a.)

b. Fact of disassociation of UF6 to UF5 as a result of irradiation. (See also III.E.4.d.)

L. BORON 10

1. Nuclear Physics. (46-1)

2. Information that sufficient Boron 10 is available for making counters can be declassified. (46-1)

3. The fact of use of B-10 for hardening in unspecified nuclear weapons. (67-1) (See also V.C.2.j.)

4. The fact that B10 is used for reduction of neutron emission. (72-11)

M. PLUTONIUM

1. Basic Chemistry. (46-1)

2. Machining techniques in handling graphite. (46-2)

3. Extra-nuclear Physics (No physical or mechanical properties of solid or liquid states of plutonium metal may be declassified) (48-1)

4. Nuclear Physics. (See Appendix A, for list of declassified nuclear properties of plutonium and its isotopes). (48-1)

5. All nuclear and extra nuclear properties of all isotopes except as prohibited by the following topics. (50-3) (50-4) (See also I.D.1.c. and II.G.6.)
(1) The nuclear properties of U233 , U235 , U236 , U238 , Pu239 and Pu240 except as permitted by topics II.G.7 through II.G.10 and II.M.6. through II.M.8 below and Appendix B.

(2) The neutron absorption cross section of Xe135 for all energies.

(3) The absorption cross section, for thermal neutrons, of carbon isotopes, of their natural mixture, and of high purity graphite specifically manufactured for use as a moderator, except as permitted by topic I.D.1.f.

6. The following properties concerning U233 , U235 , U236 , U238 , Pu239 , and Pu240 : (50-4) (See also II.G.7.)
a. Existence, exact mass, spin, and moment.

b. Method of formation of isotope insofar as this does not disclose classified nuclear constants otherwise prohibited.

c. Charged particle and gamma ray reactions involving these isotopes at all energies.

d. Details of neutron reactions (including fission and scattering) involving these isotopes above 25 Mev.

e. Details of neutron induced trans-mutations involving these isotopes for all energies (including isotopic changes but not fission or capture).

f. Spontaneous disintegration properties other than spontaneous fission.

g. Spontaneous fission properties, except in the case of U236 and Pu240 for which only the existence of spontaneous fission may be admitted.
(1) The spontaneous fission properties of Pu240 and U236 with the exception of data on neutron emission in the spontaneous fission of U236 and Pu240 . (53-5)

h. Fission Process. See topic II.M.8. below.

7. The existence but not the magnitude of the (n, γ) cross section in U233 , U236 , Pu239 , and Pu240 . (50-4) (See also II.G.8)

8. The following information may be declassified concerning the fission process of U233 , U235 , U236 , U238 , Pu239 , and Pu240 , however initiated: (50-4) (See also II.G.10.)
a. Energies and momenta of related fission fragments (including ternary and quaternary fission).

b. Energies, angular distributions and numbers per fission of protons, alpha particles and prompt gamma rays; and relative yields and energies of delayed neutrons.

c. Frequency of occurrence of ternary and quaternary fission and angular distribution of fragments.

NOTE: Yield information must be expressed only in terms of numbers of particles per fission and not in terms of partial cross sections in case the particular fission cross section is not declassifiable.

9. Physical properties of plutonium metal which have little military significance but are of basic scientific interest. (53-6)

10. Information concerning methods for the reduction of plutonium compounds to metal for civil uses and for the preparation of alloys of plutonium (plutonium content 50 atomic percent or less) for civil uses. (56-6)

11. Information on the fabrication technology of plutonium alloys containing up to 50 atomic percent plutonium. (56-6)

12. Information on:
a. The physical metallurgy and the mechanical properties of plutonium alloy containing up to 50 atomic percent plutonium, subject, however, to the restriction that no release of information on plutonium alloys of special interest to the weapons program will be made, and (56-6)

b. The thermal conductivity of plutonium and its alloys containing over 50 atomic percent plutonium. (56-6)

13. The fuel value of $12 per gram for plutonium metal. (56-5)

14. The $12-45 "buy-back" schedule of prices and the $30 single value plutonium "buy-back" price schedule and future single value plutonium in "buy-back" prices, which are not usable to calculate classified production rates. (57-3)

15. Information concerning the metallurgy of plutonium:
a. Fabrication technology of plutonium alloys containing up to and including 90 atomic percent plutonium. (58-5)

b. Fabrication methods for laboratory preparation (up to about 100 gms) of plutonium and its alloys except as prohibited by the following: (58-5)
(1) All information on plutonium or its alloys of special interest to the weapons program.

(2) Fabrication Technology for plutonium and its alloys containing more than 90 atomic percent plutonium except the description of method used in fabrication of materials under II.M.15.a. above beyond statement of basic method used, such as rolling, casting, etc.

c. The physical metallurgy and mechanical properties of plutonium alloys containing up to and including 90 atomic percent plutonium. (58-5)

d. The following physical constants of plutonium and its alloys containing over 90 atomic percent plutonium (the pressure not exceeding 10,000 atmospheres) except for information on plutonium or its alloys of special interest to the weapons program. (58-5)
(1) Melting point

(2) Density

(3) Number of phases, transition temperature, and thermodynamic functions

(4) Expansion coefficients

(5) Electrical properties

(6) Elastic constants and sound velocities

(7) Magnetic properties

(8) Crystal structures

(9) Thermal conductivity

This is intended to permit the release of complete phase diagrams, including metallographic descriptions, which do not reveal additional data.

16. Information concerning the preparation, properties and use of plutonium alloys except the phase stabilized alloys containing more than 90% of plutonium which are of specific significance to weapons. (59-3)

17. The isotopic content of the plutonium fuel used in the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor and in the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor Critical Facility. (61-3) (See also IV.J.6.)

18. Information concerning the composition and properties of phase-stabilized alloys of plutonium containing more than 90 atomic percent plutonium. (63-5)

19. Revealing the general fact of existence of nuclear weapons which contain only Pu-239. (67-1) (See also V.C.2.e.)

20. The mere fact that delta phase Pu has been or is used in weapons. (67-1) (See also V.C.2.k.)

21. The isotopic enrichment of Pu-238, when classified use is not revealed. (67-1)

22. The fact that reactor grade plutonium can be used to make nuclear weapons. (67-9) (See also V.C.5.c.)

23. The mere fact that high irradiation level reactor-grade plutonium can be used to make nuclear weapons. (67-10) (See also V.C.5.d.)

24. The fact that approximately 6 kgs of plutonium were involved in the Greenland accident. (68-4) (See also V.D.14.)
a. Best estimate of the amount of plutonium removed from the site. (68-4) (See also V.D.14.a.)

25. The fact that ERDA has an interest in the separation of plutonium isotopes by laser methods. (75-1) (See also III.E.2.)

26. The fact that a nuclear test was conducted using reactor grade plutonium and that it successfully produced a nuclear yield. (77-4) (See also V.B.3.eee.)

Note: Information on date, event, name, yield, etc. remain classified.

DOE announced on June 27, 1994 that the event occurred in 1962.

27. Historical plutonium production information and associated rare gas releases for the decommissioned production reactors at the Hanford site for the period 1944 through 1960. (89-4) (See also IV.I.17.)

28. Fact of use of alpha phase plutonium in unspecified weapons and test devices. (92-3)

29. That plutonium-239 or weapon-grade plutonium is used:
a. In unspecified implosion assembled weapons or pits of unspecified staged weapons. (93-2) (See also V.C.2.gg.(1))

b. As the sole fissile material in unspecified implosion assembled weapons, or in the pit of unspecified staged weapons. (93-2) (See also V.C.2.gg.(2))

30. Special nuclear materials masses: That about 6 kg plutonium is enough hypothetically to make one nuclear explosive device. (93-2) (See also V.C.2.ii.)
a. Hypothetically, a mass of 4 kilograms of plutonium or uranium-233 is sufficient for one nuclear explosive device. (94-1) (See also V.C.2.jj.)

NOTE: The average masses of special nuclear materials in the U.S. nuclear weapons or special nuclear materials masses in any specific weapon type remain classified.

31. The total quantities of plutonium produced or processed at Richland. (93-3)

32. The total quantity of weapons grade plutonium including supergrade plutonium produced at the Savannah River Plant. (93-5) (See also IV.J.19.a.)

33. The Savannah River approximate total post-August 1988 plutonium inventory. (93-6)

34. The United States total production of weapon-grade plutonium. (93-7)

35. The total plutonium inventory at the Rocky Flats Plant. (93-8)

36. The total plutonium inventory at the Argonne National Laboratory-West. (93-8)

37. The total plutonium inventory at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. (93-8)

38. The quantity of plutonium involved in the fire in Room 180 in Building 771 on September 11, 1957, and the quantity of plutonium involved in the fire in Buildings 776 and 777 on May 11, 1969, as represented by inventory data, the amount recovered, the amounts allocated to other disposition categories such as normal operating loss, and the amount considered inventory difference as long as weapon design, manufacturing, material composition or properties, or other classified information that is protected by classified inventory data is not revealed. (94-5)

39. The historical (1952 - 1993) annual inventory difference for plutonium and highly enriched uranium at Rocky Flats. (94-7) (See also II.G.29.)

40. The historical quantity of plutonium produced for any time period in the Savannah River reactors and information that only reveals Pu production. (94-9) (See also IV.I.19.b.)

41. The quantity of plutonium separated, or otherwise modified, to other forms (such as oxide or metal) at the Savannah River Plant during any time period. (94-9) (See also IV.I.19.c)

42. Plutonium quantities at the Savannah River Plant for any time period, provided other classified information such as weapons design are not revealed. (94-9)

43. The total quantity of plutonium involved in all nuclear weapons tests performed by the United States. (94-11)

**44. As part of the 1958 United States - United Kingdom Mutual Defense Agreement, there have been three barter agreements. The United States received plutonium totaling 5,366 kilograms from the United Kingdom under the Barter A, B, and C Agreements during the period 1960 - 1979. The United States gave the United Kingdom 6.7 kilograms of tritium and 7,500 kilograms of highly enriched uranium for the plutonium. (94-15) (See also II.B.15. and II.G.36)

**45. The fact that plutonium combined with any stated weight percent gallium exists: (1) stabilized as an alloy in the delta phase in nuclear weapons, providing neither weapon or alloy nickname (other than Headwind) is specified, and (2) as an oxide in the weapons program, providing the source of the plutonium is not specified by weapon or alloy nickname (other than Headwind). (95-1)

**46. The sum of the quantity of plutonium at the Pantex site and in the nuclear weapons stockpile was 66.1 metric tons on September 30, 1993. (95-6)

N. UCl4

1. Basic Chemistry. (48-1)

2. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

O. ELEMENTS 95 AND ABOVE

1. Basic Chemistry. (48-1)

2. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

P. FISSION PRODUCTS

1. Basic Chemistry. (48-1)

2. Metallurgy. (48-1)

3. Extra-nuclear Physics. (48-1)

4. The kinetic energies and all nuclear properties of fission products may be declassified except: (48-1)
a. Slow neutron capture cross sections above 100 barns for radioactive fission products.

b. The absolute fission yield of delayed neutrons.

c. The fission yield of any of the isotopes leading to delayed neutron fission.

5. Technology - Information on the laboratory scale separation of the fission products from one another, but care must be exercised not to reveal information regarding the large scale production of specific radioactive products of fission. (48-1)

6. Data on techniques for preparing and handling high intensity fission product sources so that they may be made available for industrial study as well as for studies in fundamental science and medical applications. (53-6)

7. The data concerning the compatibility of the strontium-90 titanate and cobalt-60 fuels with their containers above 1200�F is already unclassified. Such data on other strontium-90 fuels is . . . expected to be of immediate benefit to the civilian industry. . . . the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company and Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory are currently considering the use of such other strontium-90 fuels above 1200�F for nuclear power sources for remote locations. (67-5)

Q. LITHIUM AND ITS COMPOUNDS

1. Production of Critical Materials; lithium and its compounds: Normal lithium hydride in excess of 100 lbs. when associated with thermonuclear weapons. (53-4)

2. Production of Critical Materials; lithium 6: When not revealing nature or existence of large scale production process up to and including 25 gms total. (53-4)

3. Lithium enriched in the isotope Li6 ; Material up to and including 1 Kilogram contained Li6 total. (54-2)

4. Lithium enriched in the isotope Li7 ; Material up to 15 kilograms total contained Li7 . (54-2)

5. Other normal lithium compounds. (54-2)

6. Partial cross sections of lithium and its isotopes for neutrons of energies between 1 Mev and 25 Mev. (61-1)

7. The fact that lithium, deuterium (Li6 D, LiD) are used in unspecified thermonuclear weapons. (62-7) (See also V.D.3.d.)

8. The association of lithium hydride with the weapons laboratories. (62-7)

9. The mere fact that normal lithium deuteride (Lin D) is used in unspecified TN weapons. (67-1) (See also V.D.3.e.)

10. The assay of top product of Li6 production plant or the fact that this top assay is used in weapons. (67-1) (See also V.D.3.f.)

11. The fact that Li6 H is used in unspecified weapons for hardening. (67-1) (See also V.D.3.g.)

12. The fact that Li7 H or Lin H may be used as mockup materials in the weapons program. (67-1) (See also V.D.3.h.)

13. The fact that compounds of Li6 containing tritium are used in the design of weapons as TN fuel. (72-11) (See also II.B.10. and V.D.3.i.)

14. General description of the processes used or investigated for the separation of lithium isotopes. (73-8) (74-6) (See also III.F.5.)

15. The fact that the device fired in the Bravo test (2/28/54) of the Castle series used lithium deuteride as its thermonuclear fuel. (74-5) (See also V.B.3.yy.)

16. The quantity of depleted lithium hydroxide currently stored at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant or other Department of Energy facilities. (94-3)

17. The production rates and quantities of Li6 and Li7 (amalgam or hydroxide) produced by COLEX, or other processes, and information classified to protect production quantities. Such data would include, for COLEX, but not be limited to lithium tails inventories, plant capacity indicators such as number of columns, trays, pumps, etc. (94-4)

R. MISCELLANEOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION

1. For elements of atomic number 90 or above declassification of those aspects of their behavior under neutron bombardment, of their spontaneous fission, and of the number and energy of neutrons emitted in their fission which do not have any bearing on weapons or production information. (47-1)

2. Information that AEC projects have up to 1 milligram of Am-241. (50-1)

3. New isotopes in microgram quantities or less may be revealed provided that their half lives are shorter than 6 months. (50-1)

4. Production of Critical Materials; Helium 3: Quantities up to and including 15 liters total. (53-4)

5. Certain production methods for uranium, graphite and heavy water. (53-6)

6. All information on the production technology of the separation of zirconium-hafnium mixtures. (56-6)

7. The fact that plastic cases are used in weapons. (62-7)

8. Fact of interest in hydriding of fissile materials. (88-4)

9. Information about mercury inventories procured for use in Li6 enrichment at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant (or their value). (93-1)

10. Size (area) of the amalgamaker system and its operating temperature. Included is the number and size of the amalgamaker trays. (93-1)

11. Mercury/thallium information:
a. The fact of use of mercury and/or thallium (Hg-Tl) in electrical switches in specified or unspecified weapons. (93-2)

b. The fact of use of Hg and/or Tl in weapons, use unspecified, quantity per weapon unspecified. (93-2)

c. The quantity of mercury or thallium in an unclassified component. (93-2)

d. The total quantity of mercury or thallium involved in normal operations at a specified Department of Energy facility (e.g., production or weapon dismantlement) provided other classified information is not revealed, even though it may reveal that there are classified uses of mercury and/or thallium in weapons or production processes. (93-2)

12. The fact that certain specified transplutonic isotopes are potential weapon -useable materials. (94-14)

**13. The sweeping process used to remove impurities from quartz crystal material. (95-4)

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