Document Details


Title:
Shale Fracturing Injections at Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1972 Series
Subject Terms:
ORNL, shale fracturing; injection, radiation; wells, solids, waste
Document Location:
DOE INFORMATION CENTER 1 Science.gov Way, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; Eva Butler; Phone: 865-241-4780; Toll-Free: 800-382-6938, Option 6; FAX: 865-574-3521; Email: doeic@oro.doe.gov
Document Categories:
Science and Technology\General; Health, Safety and Environment\Waste Management
Document Type:
REPORT
Publication Date:
1974 Jun 30
Declassification Status:
Never classified
Document Pages:
53
Accession Number:
ORF48452
Document Number(s):
ORNL-TM-4467
Originating Research Org.:
Union Carbide Corporation
OpenNet Entry Date:
1998 Sep 01
Description/Abstract:
This document concerns the shale fracturing injections at Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1972 Series. A series of four injections of intermediate level waste solution was made during the fall of 1972. A total of 301,520 gal of waste solution containing 100,200 Ci of radionuclides was injected. Prior to this series of injections, a large volume of waste solution had been accumulated. The need to dispose of this accumulation of waste and to regain operating flexibility in the tank farm led to the scheduling of the injections as close together as practical. Several modifications to the shale fracturing facility are scheduled to be installed in 1973. Detailed information on the performance of the existing facility was needed for the design of the proposed modifications, and a particular effort was made to obtain these data from the 1972 injections. Analyses of the waste solutions to be injected were obtained, and synthetic mixes were prepared for testing with the solids blended for the injection. It was found that the properties of grouts made with plant-mixed solids were significantly different from those of grouts made with laboratory-mixed solids. A set of recommended weight ratios was prepared. When mixed at these weight ratios, solids from the various bins would produce grouts with minimum phase separation. In general, this series of injections was made with comparatively few difficulties. Figures and tables are included in this report.


<< Return to Search Results