Document Details


Title:
Union Carbide Nuclear Company, Minutes of Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Nuclear Safety Committee Meeting, June 22, 1962
Subject Terms:
ORGDP, nuclear safety; U-235, UF-6, K-1131; aluminum melting facility; aluminum, criticality, UF-4; uranium, plutonium, meeting
Document Location:
DOE INFORMATION CENTER 1 Science.gov Way, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; Eva Butler; Phone: 865-241-4780; Toll-Free: 800-382-6938, Option 6; FAX: 865-574-3521; Email: doeic@oro.doe.gov
Document Categories:
Health, Safety and Environment\Worker Health and Safety; Science and Technology\Instruments and Equipment
Document Type:
REPORT
Publication Date:
1962 Jun 29
Declassification Date:
1996 Dec 03
Declassification Status:
Declassified
Document Pages:
4
Accession Number:
ORF19559
Document Number(s):
KD-1745, Part 1
Originating Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant
OpenNet Entry Date:
1998 Sep 01
Description/Abstract:
This document contains the minutes of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) Nuclear Safety Committee Meeting, June 22, 1962. Final approval was given to the 15 departmental letters issued concerning the nuclear aspects of the ORGDP operation, from October 16, 1961 to June 7, 1962. Plant audits showed an increase from 3 to 9 in the number of deviations from approved nuclear safety procedures over the previous report period. However, only one incident involving unsuspected deposits in the K-31 and K-33 P and E stations, was considered significant, and a formal report was issued on this. The start-up of the new K-1420 aluminum melting facility for the processsing of scrap aluminum materials which were cleaned in K-1420 was described. A review of the start-up of the new UF-4 fluid bed reactor in K-1131 was made, which included a description of some of the nuclear safety features incorporated in its design and operation. It was noted that cracks had developed in the new K-1420 aluminum melting facility during start-up, and that two of the three furnace units would be redesigned. The interaction studies on large arrays of individually subcritical units had proven very useful in the evaluation of storage and shipping problems. Also, a brief resume was given of the criticality incident which occurred in a plutonium recovery facility at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation on April 7. A figure is included.


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