Document Details


Title:
A Guidance Document for Prioritizing Supplemental Monitoring Around Synfuels Facilities
Subject Terms:
ecological, effluent; environmental, ORNL, exposure
Document Location:
DOE INFORMATION CENTER 1 Science.gov Way, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; Eva Butler; Phone: 865-241-4780; Toll-Free: 800-382-6938, Option 6; FAX: 865-574-3521; Email: doeic@oro.doe.gov
Document Categories:
Health, Safety and Environment\Environmental Effects; Health, Safety and Environment\Environmental Effects
Document Type:
REPORT
Publication Date:
1986 Jan 31
Declassification Status:
Never classified
Document Pages:
72
Accession Number:
ORF65907
Document Number(s):
ORNL/FETEP-15
Originating Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
OpenNet Entry Date:
1998 Jun 16
Description/Abstract:
This document contains a guidance for prioritizing supplemental monitoring around synfuels facilities. According to the Environmental Monitoring Plan of the U.S. Synthetic Fuels Corporation, supplemental monitoring is required for new synfuels industries. Recommended screening methods for exposure, health-effects, and ecological-effects assessments are given. Exposure assessment methods are used for both health-effects and ecological-effects assessments. Potential targets for health effects and ecological effects differ greatly so that a common methodology to manage supplemental monitoring activities is not practical. For health effects, a new rapid chemical-scoring method based on relative-potency comparisons is used. Permissible concentrations, and estimates of uncertainty, in air, water, and the workplace are given for 58 example chemicals. The new system is a recommended tool for estimating trigger values and management of priorities for currently unregulated chemicals. For ecological effects, a detailed decision tree leads one from the results of effluent chemical analysis or toxicity tests to decisions on additional monitoring/testing. Techniques for calculating toxicity benchmarks for aquatic and terrestrial systems are presented. Methods for deciding whether to use acute toxicity data or to conduct additional chronic and subchronic tests are described. Tables and figures are included.


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