National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wet bulk density

  1. Development of a Wet Logistics System for Bulk Corn Stover

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a Wet Logistics System for Bulk Corn Stover March 25, 2015 Lynn M. Wendt, William A. Smith, Austin Murphy, and Ian J. Bonner Idaho National Laboratory This presentation does not ...

  2. Method of altering the effective bulk density of solid material and the resulting product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kool, Lawrence B.; Nolen, Robert L.; Solomon, David E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of adjustably tailoring the effective bulk density of a solid material in which a mixture comprising the solid material, a film-forming polymer and a volatile solvent are sprayed into a drying chamber such that the solvent evaporates and the polymer dries into hollow shells having the solid material captured within the shell walls. Shell density may be varied as a function of solid/polymer concentration, droplet size and drying temperature.

  3. Separation of solids by varying the bulk density of a fluid separating medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Palmer L.; Duffy, James B.; Tokarz, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus for separating objects having a density greater than a selected density value from objects having a density less than said selected density value. The method typically comprises: (a) providing a separation vessel having an upper and lower portion, said vessel containing a liquid having a density exceeding said selected density value; (b) reducing the apparent density of the liquid to said selected density value by introducing solid, bubble-like bodies having a density less than that of the liquid into the lower portion of the vessel and permitting them to rise therethrough; (c) introducing the objects to be separated into the separation vessel and permitting the objects having a density greater than the apparent density of the liquid to sink to the lower portion of the vessel, while the objects having a density less than said selected density value float in the upper portion of the vessel; and (d) separately removing the higher density objects in the lower portion and the lower density objects in the upper portion from the separation vessel. The apparatus typically comprises: (a) a vessel containing a liquid having a density such that at least part of said objects having a density exceeding said selected density value will float therein; (b) means to place said objects into said vessel; (c) means to reduce the effective density of at least a portion of said liquid to said selected density value, whereby said objects having a density exceeding said selected density value sink into said liquid and said objects having a density less than said selected density value remain afloat, said means to adjust the effective density comprising solid, bubble-like bodies having a density less than said selected density value and means for introducing said bodies into said liquid; and (d) means for separately removing said objects having a density exceeding said selected density value and said objects having a density less than said selected density value

  4. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killat, N. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M. E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Paskova, T.; Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 ; Evans, K. R.; Leach, J.; Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 ; Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D.

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  5. Modeling target bulk heating resulting from ultra-intense short pulse laser irradiation of solid density targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antici, P.; INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40-00044 Frascati; LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau ; Gremillet, L.; Grismayer, T.; Audebert, P.; Mančic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Borghesi, M.; Cecchetti, C. A.

    2013-12-15

    Isochoric heating of solid-density matter up to a few tens of eV is of interest for investigating astrophysical or inertial fusion scenarios. Such ultra-fast heating can be achieved via the energy deposition of short-pulse laser generated electrons. Here, we report on experimental measurements of this process by means of time- and space-resolved optical interferometry. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with a simple numerical model of fast electron-induced heating.

  6. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  7. Investigation of Interfacial and Bulk Dissociation of HBr, HCl, and HNO3 Using Density Functional Theory-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Marcel; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-12-18

    In this study we investigate the free energy barrier associated with the dissociation of strong acids, XH (HBr, HCl and HNO3) deprotonation, and subsequent formation of ionpairs, X___H3O+ in the vicinity of the air-water interface. We will show that the free energy for acid dissociation for HCl and HNO3 show significant differences at the air-water than under bulk solvation conditions producing a picture where at the interface associated molecular species can be stable. For the strongest acid we consider, HBr the more traditional picture of acids is preserved in the vicinity of the air-water interface. Our results have implications for our understanding of acids, and their surface tensions at the air-water interface.

  8. Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1998-11-20

    Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

  9. Rotary bulk solids divider

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  10. ROTARY BULK SOLIDS DIVIDER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maronde, Carl P.; Killmeyer JR., Richard P.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

  11. Investigation of Interfacial and Bulk Dissociation of HBr, HCl...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Investigation of Interfacial and Bulk Dissociation of HBr, HCl, and HNO3 Using Density Functional Theory-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search...

  12. Fiber Bulk Gaseous Carriers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Compressed natural gas Compressed hydrogen gas * Vehicle fuel cylinders Passenger cars Buses and Heavy-duty vehicles * Transport and storage cylinders Bulk hauling ...

  13. Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    System (DBVS) Review Report | Department of Energy Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report (509.84 KB) Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste

  14. Large area bulk superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  15. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  16. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  17. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  18. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony; Saldana, Christopher J.; Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John; Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  19. Explosive bulk charge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  20. Bulk material handling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kleysteuber, William K.; Mayercheck, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a bulk material handling system particularly adapted for underground mining and includes a monorail supported overhead and carrying a plurality of conveyors each having input and output end portions with the output end portion of a first of the conveyors positioned above an input end portion of a second of the conveyors, a device for imparting motion to the conveyors to move the material from the input end portions toward the output end portions thereof, a device for supporting at least one of the input and output end portions of the first and second conveyors from the monorail, and the supporting device including a plurality of trolleys rollingly supported by the monorail whereby the conveyors can be readily moved therealong.

  1. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device Title: Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic ...

  2. Bulk Data Mover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-03

    Bulk Data Mover (BDM) is a high-level data transfer management tool. BDM handles the issue of large variance in file sizes and a big portion of small files by managing the file transfers with optimized transfer queue and concurrency management algorithms. For example, climate simulation data sets are characterized by large volume of files with extreme variance in file sizes. The BDN achieves high performance using a variety of techniques, including multi-thraded concurrent transfer connections, data channel caching, load balancing over multiple transfer servers, and storage i/o pre-fetching. Logging information from the BDM is collected and analyzed to study the effectiveness of the transfer management algorithms. The BDM can accept a request composed of multiple files or an entire directory. The request also contains the target site and directory where the replicated files will reside. If a directory is provided at the source, then the BDM will replicate the structure of the source directory at the target site. The BDM is capable of transferring multiple files concurrently as well as using parallel TCP streams. The optimal level of concurrency or parallel streams depends on the bandwidth capacity of the storage systems at both ends of the transfer as well as achievable bandwidth of the wide-area network. Hardware req.-PC, MAC, Multi-platform & Workstation; Software req.: Compile/version-Java 1.50_x or ablove; Type of files: source code, executable modules, installation instructions other, user guide; URL: http://sdm.lbl.gov/bdm/

  3. Light-trapping optimization in wet-etched silicon photonic crystal solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyderman, Sergey; John, Sajeev; Hafez, M.; Al-Ameer, S. S.; Al-Harby, T. S.; Al-Hadeethi, Y.; Bouwes, D. M.

    2015-07-14

    We demonstrate, by numerical solution of Maxwell's equations, near-perfect solar light-trapping and absorption over the 300–1100 nm wavelength band in silicon photonic crystal (PhC) architectures, amenable to fabrication by wet-etching and requiring less than 10 μm (equivalent bulk thickness) of crystalline silicon. These PhC's consist of square lattices of inverted pyramids with sides comprised of various (111) silicon facets and pyramid center-to-center spacing in the range of 1.3–2.5 μm. For a wet-etched slab with overall height H = 10 μm and lattice constant a = 2.5 μm, we find a maximum achievable photo-current density (MAPD) of 42.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, falling not far from 43.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to 100% solar absorption in the range of 300–1100 nm. We also demonstrate a MAPD of 37.8 mA/cm{sup 2} for a thinner silicon PhC slab of overall height H = 5 μm and lattice constant a = 1.9 μm. When H is further reduced to 3 μm, the optimal lattice constant for inverted pyramids reduces to a = 1.3 μm and provides the MAPD of 35.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. These wet-etched structures require more than double the volume of silicon, in comparison to the overall mathematically optimum PhC structure (consisting of slanted conical pores), to achieve the same degree of solar absorption. It is suggested these 3–10 μm thick structures are valuable alternatives to currently utilized 300 μm-thick textured solar cells and are suitable for large-scale fabrication by wet-etching.

  4. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a

  5. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  6. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  7. Bulk Data Mover

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-01-03

    Bulk Data Mover (BDM) is a high-level data transfer management tool. BDM handles the issue of large variance in file sizes and a big portion of small files by managing the file transfers with optimized transfer queue and concurrency management algorithms. For example, climate simulation data sets are characterized by large volume of files with extreme variance in file sizes. The BDN achieves high performance using a variety of techniques, including multi-thraded concurrent transfer connections,more » data channel caching, load balancing over multiple transfer servers, and storage i/o pre-fetching. Logging information from the BDM is collected and analyzed to study the effectiveness of the transfer management algorithms. The BDM can accept a request composed of multiple files or an entire directory. The request also contains the target site and directory where the replicated files will reside. If a directory is provided at the source, then the BDM will replicate the structure of the source directory at the target site. The BDM is capable of transferring multiple files concurrently as well as using parallel TCP streams. The optimal level of concurrency or parallel streams depends on the bandwidth capacity of the storage systems at both ends of the transfer as well as achievable bandwidth of the wide-area network. Hardware req.-PC, MAC, Multi-platform & Workstation; Software req.: Compile/version-Java 1.50_x or ablove; Type of files: source code, executable modules, installation instructions other, user guide; URL: http://sdm.lbl.gov/bdm/« less

  8. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  9. Wet chemical thinning of molybdenum disulfide down to its monolayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amara, Kiran Kumar; Chu, Leiqiang; Kumar, Rajeev; Toh, Minglin; Eda, Goki

    2014-09-01

    We report on the preparation of mono- and bi-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) from a bulk crystal by facile wet chemical etching. We show that concentrated nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) effectively etches thin MoS{sub 2} crystals from their edges via formation of MoO{sub 3}. Interestingly, etching of thin crystals on a substrate leaves behind unreacted mono- and bilayer sheets. The flakes obtained by chemical etching exhibit electronic quality comparable to that of mechanically exfoliated counterparts. Our findings indicate that the self-limiting chemical etching is a promising top-down route to preparing atomically thin crystals from bulk layer compounds.

  10. Competitive Wetting in Active Brazes

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Chandross, Michael Evan

    2014-05-01

    We found that the wetting and spreading of molten filler materials (pure Al, pure Ag, and AgAl alloys) on a Kovar ™ (001) substrate was studied with molecular dynamics simulations. A suite of different simulations was used to understand the effects on spreading rates due to alloying as well as reactions with the substrate. Moreover, the important conclusion is that the presence of Al in the alloy enhances the spreading of Ag, while the Ag inhibits the spreading of Al.

  11. Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, A.S.K.

    2008-09-15

    This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

  12. RAPID/BulkTransmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    regulatory processes and requirements by searching our regulatory flowchart library. Learn more about bulk transmission. BulkTransCoverage.png Regulations and permitting...

  13. Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Prev Next Title: Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Authors: Nayak, J. ; Maniraj, M. ; Rai, Abhishek ; Singh, Sanjay ; ...

  14. Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bulk Electronic Structure of Quasicrystals Authors: Nayak, J. ; Maniraj, M. ; Rai, Abhishek ; ...

  15. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  16. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  17. Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BULK HAULING EQUIPMENT FOR CHG Don Baldwin Director of Product Development - Hexagon Lincoln HEXAGON LINCOLN TITAN(tm) Module System Compressed Hydrogen Gas * Capacity 250 bar - 616 kg 350 bar - 809 kg 540 bar - 1155 kg * Gross Vehicle Weight (with prime mover) 250 bar - 28 450 kg 350 bar - 30 820 kg 540 bar - 39 440 kg * Purchase Cost 250 bar - $510,000 350 bar - $633,750 540 bar - $1,100,000 Compressed Natural Gas * Capacity (250 bar at 15 C) - 7412 kg * GVW (With prime mover) - 35 250 kg *

  18. Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of preproduction high performance thermoelectric materials available for device ... More Documents & Publications Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power ...

  19. Bulk Tritium Shipping Package | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Package Bulk Tritium Shipping Package Presentation from the 32nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Germantown, Maryland on April 23-25, 2013. Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (2.77 MB) More Documents & Publications Bulk Tritium Shipping Package Overview and Status FAQS Reference Guide - NNSA Package Certification Engineer Managing Legacy Materials at WETF

  20. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Peterson, R. R.; Shah, R.; Braun, T.; Biener, J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Here, we are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR~15), but willmore » become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation.« less

  1. Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas, ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Natural Gas ...

  2. ,"Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... 7:28:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  3. ,"West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ...

  4. ,"Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  5. Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore ...

  6. ,"Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  7. ,"Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  8. ,"Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  9. ,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ...

  10. MHK Technologies/WET NZ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    to the MHK database homepage WET NZ.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy Technology New Zealand WET NZ Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology...

  11. ARM: AOS Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages (Dataset) | Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: ARM: AOS Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages AOS Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages Authors: Scott Smith ; Cynthia Salwen ; Janek Uin ; Gunnar Senum ; Stephen Springston ; ...

  12. New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves ... Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas ...

  13. New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New ...

  14. New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New Mexico Natural ...

  15. New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New ...

  16. Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved ...

  17. ,"North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet ... 9:32:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet ...

  18. Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas ...

  19. ,"Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  20. North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    North Dakota Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves ... Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North ...

  1. ,"Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  2. North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota ...

  3. ,"Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ...

  4. North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves ... Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas ...

  5. Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 North Louisiana ...

  6. New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade ...

  7. New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  8. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved ...

  9. New Mexico - East Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, ...

  10. New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade ...

  11. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  12. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  13. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R.; Rohsenow, Warren R.

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  14. Excitonic exchange splitting in bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, H.; Wang, L.; Zunger, A.

    1999-02-01

    We present an approach to calculate the excitonic fine-structure splittings due to electron-hole short-range exchange interactions using the local-density approximation pseudopotential method, and apply it to bulk semiconductors CdSe, InP, GaAs, and InAs. Comparing with previous theoretical results, the current calculated splittings agree well with experiments. Furthermore, we provide an approximate relationship between the short-range exchange splitting and the exciton Bohr radius, which can be used to estimate the exchange splitting for other materials. The current calculation indicates that a commonly used formula for exchange splitting in quantum dot is not valid. Finally, we find a very large pressure dependence of the exchange splitting: a factor of 4.5 increase as the lattice constant changes by 3.5{percent}. This increase is mainly due to the decrease of the Bohr radius via the change of electron effective mass. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Synthesis of bulk superhard semiconducting B-C material (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthesis of bulk superhard semiconducting B-C material Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis of bulk superhard semiconducting B-C material A bulk composite ...

  16. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Air Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    BulkTransmissionAir Quality < RAPID | BulkTransmission Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission...

  17. Relative entropy equals bulk relative entropy

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Jafferis, Daniel L.; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Maldacena, Juan; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-06-01

    We consider the gravity dual of the modular Hamiltonian associated to a general subregion of a boundary theory. We use it to argue that the relative entropy of nearby states is given by the relative entropy in the bulk, to leading order in the bulk gravitational coupling. We also argue that the boundary modular flow is dual to the bulk modular flow in the entanglement wedge, with implications for entanglement wedge reconstruction.

  18. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Assessment | Department of Energy Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource Assessment Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource Assessment Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste Feedstocks Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource Assessment Corinne Drennan, Energy & Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  19. RAPID/Bulk Transmission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Page Edit History RAPIDBulk Transmission < RAPID(Redirected from RAPIDOverviewBulkTransmission) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT RAPIDBulkTransmission...

  20. Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    dense, consolidated, nanostructured thermoelectric material nemir.pdf (3.11 MB) More ... Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bulk High Performance ...

  1. Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste ...

  2. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reviews work in engineered thin-film nanoscale thermoelectric materials and nano-bulk ... More Documents & Publications Nano-structures Thermoelectric Materals - Part 1 ...

  3. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Analysis of 1w Bulk Laser Damage in KDP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, D A; Carr, C W

    2011-04-11

    The influence of laser parameters on laser-induced damage in the bulk of KDP is difficult to determine because the damage manifests as discrete sites a few microns in diameter distributed throughout a relatively large volume of material. Here, they present a method to directly measure the size and location of many thousands of such sites and correlate them to the laser conditions which produced them. This technique is used to characterize the effects of pulse duration on damage initiated by 1053 nm light in the bulk of KDP crystals. They find that the density of damage sites produced by 1053 nm light is less sensitive to pulse duration than was previously reported for 526 nm and 351 nm light. In addition, the effect of pulse duration on the size of the damage sites produced appears insensitive to wavelength.

  5. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, L.G.

    1979-08-29

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  6. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, Louis G.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  7. Observation of surface to bulk interatomic Auger decay from Ta(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, E. ); Bartynski, R.A. ); Weinert, M. ); Hulbert, S.L.; Johnson, E.D.; Garrett, R.F. )

    1990-06-15

    Core-valence-valence ({ital CVV}) Auger spectra from Ta(100) taken in coincidence with bulk and surface-shifted 4{ital f}{sub 7/2} core-level emission are presented. These data are compared with self-convolutions of calculations of the {ital d}-band densities of states for the surface and subsurface layers of a nine-layer slab. Agreement of the bulk spectrum with the calculation is good; agreement for the surface spectrum is very poor. These data are explained by proposing an interatomic surface to bulk Auger decay mode for the surface core hole that is competitive with the conventional {ital CVV} decay process.

  8. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2014-08-18

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ∼20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  9. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T.; Kuroishi, M.

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  10. bulk power system | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Dc(266) Contributor 31 October, 2014 - 10:58 What do you know about the grid? black out brown out bulk power system electricity grid future grid grid history security Smart Grid...

  11. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Transmission Siting & Interconnection...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    federal review). Bulk Transmission Transmission Siting & Interconnection in New Mexico New Mexico Statutes (N.M.S.) 62-9-1, 62-9-3(B), and 62-9-3.2 No Location Permit may be...

  12. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  13. Overview of Western's Interconnected Bulk Electric System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Western's Interconnected Bulk Electric System Western Area Power Admin. Objectives * Describe Western Area Power Administration Region and Facilities Overview * Explain Fundamentals of Electricity, Power Transformers and Transmission Lines * Discuss Overview of the Bulk Electric System (BES) * Objectives Review Western's Service Area Western marketing areas and offices 3 Wholesale Power Services * Markets 10,479 MW from 56 Federal hydropower projects owned by Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) , Army

  14. Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Centre for Wind Energy Technology C WET Jump to: navigation, search Name: Indian Centre for Wind Energy Technology (C-WET) Place: Chennai, India Zip: 601 302 Sector: Wind energy...

  15. ,"Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... 7:27:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  16. ,"Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... 7:29:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ...

  17. ,"U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Federal Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  18. Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data Sets for...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data ... Wet chemical compositional data and NIR spectra exist for the following types of biomass ...

  19. ,"New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico - West Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  20. New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas, ... Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New York Natural ...

  1. ,"New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... 8:57:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  2. ,"New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... 8:57:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ...

  3. ,"New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  4. ,"New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... 8:59:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ...

  5. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  6. ,"New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 8:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico - East Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  7. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... 9:30:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ...

  8. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet ...

  9. Y-12 to Resume Wet Chemistry Operations | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) to Resume Wet Chemistry Operations March 14, 2003 PDF icon 3-14-03

  10. Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) | Department of Energy Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) Technology for Tank 48H Treatment Project (TTP) This assessment determines the technology maturity level of the candidate Tank 48H treatment technologies that are being considered for implementation at DOE's SRS - specifically Wet Air Oxidation. Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Wet Air Oxidation (WAO)

  11. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes Breakout Session 3A-Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste (Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025?) Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation oyler_biomass_2014.pdf (1.18 MB) More Documents & Publications Excellence in Bioenergy Innovation-A Presentation of 2015 R&D 100 Award Winning Projects Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste

  12. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-4 and -5: Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S.; Martin, R.J. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Experimental results are presented for bulk and mechanical properties measurements on specimens of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-4 and -5, at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Measurements have been performed on three thermal/mechanical units, PTn, TSwl, and TSw2. On each specimen the following bulk properties have been reported: dry bulk density, saturated bulk density, average grain density, and porosity. Unconfined compression to failure, confined compression to failure, and indirect tensile strength tests were performed on selected specimens recovered from the boreholes. In addition, compressional and shear wave velocities were measured on specimens designated for unconfined compression and confined compression experiments. Measurements were conducted at room temperature on nominally water-saturated specimens. The nominal rate for the fracture experiments was 10{sup -5}s{sup -1}.

  13. Controlling wet abrasion in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1997-09-01

    Maintenance departments in many industries are continually battling the daily fires that run costs up and productivity down. Many plants have equipment that must operate under wet sliding conditions which can lead to accelerated wear of the equipment. Electric power generating plants, for example, have ongoing maintenance concerns for piping, chutes, hoppers, heat exchangers, and valves. Pulp and paper plants have heavy maintenance on: plate screens, conical bottoms of blow tanks, chutes, and augers. Coal handling equipment is often subjected to wet sliding conditions. Utility and coal prep plants can have serious flow problems if an improper structural or wear material is selected. Vibrating screens, chutes, surge bin feeders, conical distributors, screw conveyors, and cyclones are some of the components that must resist the ravages of corrosion and wear. This paper will address many of the issues that affect the life of plant components under wet sliding conditions. Environmental effects and material effects will be examined. Since the material of construction is most times the easier to change, the paper will concentrate on this subject. Such factors as: hardness, surface roughness, corrodent, and material of construction will be explored. Both controlled laboratory studies and real world service evaluations will be presented.

  14. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  15. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  16. ,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and ... "Date","U.S. Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...

  17. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDBulkTransmissionLand Use < RAPID | BulkTransmission Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission...

  18. Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    for bulk transmission. Date: Tuesday, 29 July, 2014 - 09:30 - 15:30 Location: NREL Education Center Auditorium Golden, Colorado Groups: Federal Bulk Transmission Regulatory...

  19. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDBulkTransmissionWater Use < RAPID | BulkTransmission Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission...

  20. RAPID/Overview/BulkTransmission/Siting/Colorado | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Colorado < RAPID | Overview | BulkTransmission | Siting(Redirected from RAPIDAtlasBulkTransmissionSitingColorado) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT...

  1. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Exploration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us RAPID Bulk Transmission ...

  2. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for ...

  3. RAPID/BulkTransmission/General Construction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDBulkTransmissionGeneral Construction < RAPID | BulkTransmission Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  4. Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Bulk Organic Electrolytes from First Principles Molecular Dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic ...

  5. Linux Kernel Co-Scheduling For Bulk Synchronous Parallel Applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linux Kernel Co-Scheduling For Bulk Synchronous Parallel Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Linux Kernel Co-Scheduling For Bulk Synchronous Parallel ...

  6. Stability analysis of 5D gravitational solutions with N bulk...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stability analysis of 5D gravitational solutions with N bulk scalar fields Prev Next Title: Stability analysis of 5D gravitational solutions with N bulk scalar fields ...

  7. Material Profile Influences in Bulk-Heterojunctions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Material Profile Influences in Bulk-Heterojunctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Material Profile Influences in Bulk-Heterojunctions he morphology in mixed ...

  8. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDBulkTransmissionPower Plant < RAPID | BulkTransmission Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  9. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  10. Bulk-memory processor for data acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.O.; McMillan, D.E.; Sunier, J.W.; Meier, M.; Poore, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    To meet the diverse needs and data rate requirements at the Van de Graaff and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facilities, a bulk memory system has been implemented which includes a fast and flexible processor. This bulk memory processor (BMP) utilizes bit slice and microcode techniques and features a 24 bit wide internal architecture allowing direct addressing of up to 16 megawords of memory and histogramming up to 16 million counts per channel without overflow. The BMP is interfaced to the MOSTEK MK 8000 bulk memory system and to the standard MODCOMP computer I/O bus. Coding for the BMP both at the microcode level and with macro instructions is supported. The generalized data acquisition system has been extended to support the BMP in a manner transparent to the user.

  11. Orchestrating Bulk Data Movement in Grid Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazhkudai, SS

    2005-01-25

    Data Grids provide a convenient environment for researchers to manage and access massively distributed bulk data by addressing several system and transfer challenges inherent to these environments. This work addresses issues involved in the efficient selection and access of replicated data in Grid environments in the context of the Globus Toolkit{trademark}, building middleware that (1) selects datasets in highly replicated environments, enabling efficient scheduling of data transfer requests; (2) predicts transfer times of bulk wide-area data transfers using extensive statistical analysis; and (3) co-allocates bulk data transfer requests, enabling parallel downloads from mirrored sites. These efforts have demonstrated a decentralized data scheduling architecture, a set of forecasting tools that predict bandwidth availability within 15% error and co-allocation architecture, and heuristics that expedites data downloads by up to 2 times.

  12. The Quantum Energy Density: Improved E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krogel, Jaron; Yu, Min; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    We establish a physically meaningful representation of a quantum energy density for use in Quantum Monte Carlo calculations. The energy density operator, dened in terms of Hamiltonian components and density operators, returns the correct Hamiltonian when integrated over a volume containing a cluster of particles. This property is demonstrated for a helium-neon \\gas," showing that atomic energies obtained from the energy density correspond to eigenvalues of isolated systems. The formation energies of defects or interfaces are typically calculated as total energy dierences. Using a model of delta-doped silicon (where dopant atoms form a thin plane) we show how interfacial energies can be calculated more eciently with the energy density, since the region of interest is small. We also demonstrate how the energy density correctly transitions to the bulk limit away from the interface where the correct energy is obtainable from a separate total energy calculation.

  13. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  14. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  15. A stereoscopic look into the bulk

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-07-26

    Here, we present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphisminvariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the “OPE blocks,” contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1/N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimalmore » surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields. Although the OPE blocks are non-local operators in the CFT, they admit a simple geometric description as fields in kinematic space — the space of pairs of CFT points. We develop the tools for constructing local bulk operators in terms of these non-local objects. The OPE blocks also allow for conceptually clean and technically simple derivations of many results known in the literature, including linearized Einstein’s equations and the relation between conformal blocks and geodesic Witten diagrams.« less

  16. Performance of dehumidifying heat exchangers with and without wetting coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, K.; Webb, R.L.

    1999-11-01

    Limited previous work has shown that use of special hydrophilic coatings will provide lower air pressure drop in finned tube heat exchangers operated under dehumidifying conditions. However, no detailed work has been reported on the effect of different coating types, or different fin surface geometries on the wet pressure drop. In this study, wind tunnel tests were performed on three different fin geometries (wavy, lanced, and louver) under wet and dry conditions. All dehumidification tests were done for fully wet surface conditions. For each geometry, the tests were performed on uncoated and coated heat exchangers. For all three fin geometries, the wet-to-dry pressure drop ratio was 1.2 at 2.5 m/s frontal air velocity. The coatings have no influence on the wet or dry heat transfer coefficient. However, the wet surface heat transfer coefficient was 10 to 30% less than the dry heat transfer coefficient, depending on the particular fin geometry. The effect of the fin press oil on wet pressure drop was also studied. If the oil contains a surfactant, good temporary wetting can be obtained on an uncoated surface; however, this effect is quickly degraded as the oil is washed from the surface during wet operation. This work also provides a critical assessment of data reduction methods for wet surface operation, including calculation of the fin efficiency.

  17. ARM: AOS Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages (Dataset) | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages Title: ARM: AOS Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages AOS Wet Nephelometer 1 Minute Averages Authors: Scott Smith ; Cynthia Salwen ; Janek Uin ; Gunnar Senum ; Stephen Springston ; Anne Jefferson Publication Date: 2013-12-11 OSTI Identifier: 1259232 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (US); Sponsoring

  18. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  19. Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion ... After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved ...

  20. Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved ...

  1. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After ... Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved ...

  2. Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved ...

  3. Observation of Ordered Structures in Counterion Layers near Wet...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Observation of Ordered Structures in Counterion Layers near Wet Charged Surfaces: A Potential Mechanism for Charge Inversion Authors: Miller, Mitchell ; Chu, Miaoqi ; Lin, ...

  4. Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Challenges and Opportunities for Wet-Waste Feedstocks - Resource Assessment Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from ...

  5. W.E.T. Automotive Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    E.T. Automotive Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: W.E.T. Automotive Systems Place: Odelzhausen, Germany Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes...

  6. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  7. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  8. Structural rejuvenation in bulk metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Tong, Yang; Iwashita, T.; Dmowski, Wojciech; Bei, Hongbin; Yokoyama, Y.; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-01-05

    Using high-energy X-ray diffraction we study structural changes in bulk metallic glasses after uniaxial compressive homogeneous deformation at temperatures slightly below the glass transition. We observe that deformation results in structural disordering corresponding to an increase in the fictive, or effective, temperature. However, the structural disordering saturates after yielding. Lastly, examination of the experimental structure and molecular dynamics simulation suggests that local changes in the atomic connectivity network are the main driving force of the structural rejuvenation.

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM (DBVS) EXTERNAL REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HONEYMAN, J.O.

    2007-02-08

    The Hanford mission to retrieve and immobilize 53 million gallons of radioactive waste from 177 underground storage tanks will be accomplished using a combination of processing by the waste treatment plant currently under construction, and a supplemental treatment that would process low-activity waste. Under consideration for this treatment is bulk vitrification, a versatile joule-heated melter technology which could be deployed in the tank farms. The Department proposes to demonstrate this technology under a Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) permit issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology using both non-radioactive simulant and blends of actual tank waste. From the demonstration program, data would be obtained on cost and technical performance to enable a decision on the potential use of bulk vitrification as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford. An independent review by sixteen subject matter experts was conducted to assure that the technical basis of the demonstration facility design would be adequate to meet the objectives of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) program. This review explored all aspects of the program, including flowsheet chemistry, project risk, vitrification, equipment design and nuclear safety, and was carried out at a time when issues can be identified and corrected. This paper describes the mission need, review approach, technical recommendations and follow-on activities for the DBVS program.

  10. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1991-08-20

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

  11. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  12. Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1991-01-01

    Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

  13. Spatiotemporal dynamics of wetted soils across a polar desert landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langford, Zachary L.; Gooseff, Michael N.; Lampkin, Derrick J.

    2014-10-30

    Liquid water is scarce across the landscape of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica, a 3800 km2 ice-free region, and is chiefly associated with soils that are adjacent to streams and lakes (i.e. wetted margins) during the annual thaw season. However, isolated wetted soils have been observed at locations distal from water bodies. The source of water for the isolated patches of wet soil is potentially generated by a combination of infiltration from melting snowpacks, melting of pore ice at the ice table, and melting of buried segregation ice formed during winter freezing. In this paper, high resolution remote sensing data gathered several times per summer in the MDV region were used to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of wet soils. The spatial consistency with which the wet soils occurred was assessed for the 2009–10 to 2011–12 summers. The remote sensing analyses reveal that cumulative area and number of wet soil patches varies among summers. The 2010–11 summer provided the most wetted soil area (10.21 km2) and 2009–10 covered the least (5.38 km2). Finally, these data suggest that wet soils are a significant component of the MDV cold desert land system and may become more prevalent as regional climate changes.

  14. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  15. Silicon surface and bulk defect passivation by low temperature PECVD oxides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z.; Rohatgi, A.; Ruby, D.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of PECVD passivation of surface and bulk defects in Si, as well as phosphorous diffused emitters, Is investigated and quantified. Significant hydrogen incorporation coupled with high positive charge density in the PECVD SiN layer is found to play an important role in bulk and surface passivation. It is shown that photo-assisted anneal in a forming gas ambient after PECVD depositions significantly improves the passivation of emitter and bulk defects. PECVD passivation of phosphorous doped emitters and boron doped bare Si surfaces is found to be a strong function of doping concentration. Surface recombination velocity of less than 200 cm/s for 0.2 Ohm-cm and less than 1 cm/s for high resistivity substrates ({approximately} Ohm-cm) were achieved. PECVD passivation improved bulk lifetime in the range of 30% to 70% in multicrystalline Si materials. However, the degree of the passivation was found to be highly material specific. Depending upon the passivation scheme, emitter saturation current density (J{sub oe}) can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 9. Finally, the stability of PECVD oxide/nitride passivation under prolonged UV exposure is established.

  16. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Miller, M.C. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of {sup 235}U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. The authors have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, {sup 235}U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling.

  17. Improving the bulk data transfer experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

    2008-05-07

    Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

  18. Towards bulk based preconditioning for quantum dotcomputations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongarra, Jack; Langou, Julien; Tomov, Stanimire; Channing,Andrew; Marques, Osni; Vomel, Christof; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-05-25

    This article describes how to accelerate the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) type eigensolvers for the computation of several states around the band gap of colloidal quantum dots. Our new approach uses the Hamiltonian from the bulk materials constituent for the quantum dot to design an efficient preconditioner for the folded spectrum PCG method. The technique described shows promising results when applied to CdSe quantum dot model problems. We show a decrease in the number of iteration steps by at least a factor of 4 compared to the previously used diagonal preconditioner.

  19. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow The boundary entropy log(g) of a critical ...

  20. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow You are accessing a document from ...

  1. Nanostructured Electrodes For Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The nanotube addition leads to a 22% increase in the optimal blend layer thickness from 90 nm to 110 nm, enhancing the short circuit current density and photovoltaic device ...

  2. Solution-Processed Squaraine Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Guodan; Wang, Siyi; Renshaw, Kyle; Thompson, Mark E.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-04-01

    The donor, 2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine (SQ) is used with the acceptor, [6,6]-phenyl C70 butyric acid methyl ester (PC70 BM) to result in efficient, solution-processed, small-molecule bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. The distribution of the donor nanoparticles in the acceptor matrix as a function of relative concentrations results in a trade-off between exciton dissociation and hole mobility (and hence, cell series resistance). A bulk heterojunction solar cell consisting of an active region with a component ratio of SQ to PC70 BM of 1:6 has a power conversion efficiency of 2.7 ± 0.1% with a 8.85 ± 0.22 mA/cm2 short-circuit current density and an open-circuit voltage of 0.89 ± 0.01 V obtained under simulated 1 sun (100 mW/cm2) air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5 G) solar illumination. This is a decrease from 3.3 ± 0.3% at 0.2 sun intensity, and is less than that of a control planar heterojunction SQ/C60 cell with 4.1 ± 0.2% at 1 sun, suggesting that the nanoparticle morphology introduces internal resistance into the solution-based thin film. The nanomorphology and hole mobility in the films is strongly dependent on the SQ-to-PC{sub 70}BM ratio, increasing by greater than 2 orders of magnitude as the ratio increases from 28% to 100% SQ.

  3. Solution-Processed Squaraine Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Guodan; Wang, Siyi; Renshaw, Kyle; Thompson, Mark E.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2010-04-01

    The donor, 2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine (SQ) is used with the acceptor, [6,6]-phenyl C70 butyric acid methyl ester (PC70 BM) to result in efficient, solution-processed, small-molecule bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. The distribution of the donor nanoparticles in the acceptor matrix as a function of relative concentrations results in a trade-off between exciton dissociation and hole mobility (and hence, cell series resistance). A bulk heterojunction solar cell consisting of an active region with a component ratio of SQ to PC70 BM of 1:6 has a power conversion efficiency of 2.7 ± 0.1% with a 8.85 ± 0.22 mA/cm2 short-circuit current density and an open-circuit voltage of 0.89 ± 0.01 V obtained under simulated 1 sun (100 mW/cm2) air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5 G) solar illumination. This is a decrease from 3.3 ± 0.3% at 0.2 sun intensity, and is less than that of a control planar heterojunction SQ/C60 cell with 4.1 ± 0.2% at 1 sun, suggesting that the nanoparticle morphology introduces internal resistance into the solution-based thin film. The nanomorphology and hole mobility in the films is strongly dependent on the SQ-to-PC70 BM ratio, increasing by greater than 2 orders of magnitude as the ratio increases from 28% to 100% SQ.

  4. Spreading dynamics of a partially wetting water film atop a MHz substrate vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altshuler, Gennady; Manor, Ofer

    2015-10-15

    A MHz vibration, or an acoustic wave, propagating in a solid substrate may support the convective spreading of a liquid film. Previous studies uncovered this ability for fully wetting silicon oil films under the excitation of a MHz Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW), propagating in a lithium niobate substrate. Partially wetting de-ionized water films, however, appeared immune to this spreading mechanism. Here, we use both theory and experiment to reconsider this situation and show partially wetting water films may spread under the influence of a propagating MHz vibration. We demonstrate distinct capillary and convective (vibrational/acoustic) spreading regimes that are governed by a balance between convective and capillary mechanisms, manifested in the non-dimensional number θ{sup 3}/We, where θ is the three phase contact angle of the liquid with the solid substrate and We ≡ ρU{sup 2}H/γ; ρ, γ, H, and U are the liquid density, liquid/vapour surface tension, characteristic film thickness, and the characteristic velocity amplitude of the propagating vibration on the solid surface, respectively. Our main finding is that the vibration will support a continuous spreading motion of the liquid film out of a large reservoir if the convective mechanism prevails (θ{sup 3}/We < 1); otherwise (θ{sup 3}/We > 1), the dynamics of the film is governed by the capillary mechanism.

  5. Negative ion extraction from hydrogen plasma bulk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudini, N.; Taccogna, F.; Minelli, P.

    2013-10-15

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model has been developed and used to study low electronegative magnetized hydrogen plasma. A configuration characterized by four electrodes is used: the left electrode is biased at V{sub l} = −100 V, the right electrode is grounded, while the upper and lower transversal electrodes are biased at an intermediate voltage V{sub ud} between 0 and −100 V. A constant and homogeneous magnetic field is applied parallel to the lateral (left/right) electrodes. It is shown that in the magnetized case, the bulk plasma potential is close to the transversal electrodes bias inducing then a reversed sheath in front of the right electrode. The potential drop within the reversed sheath is controlled by the transversal electrodes bias allowing extraction of negative ions with a significant reduction of co-extracted electron current. Furthermore, introducing plasma electrodes, between the transversal electrodes and the right electrode, biased with a voltage just above the plasma bulk potential, increases the negative ion extracted current and decreases significantly the co-extracted electron current. The physical mechanism on basis of this phenomenon has been discussed.

  6. Substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement via nanolayering

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Wang, Fenggong; Young, Steve M.; Zheng, Fan; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2016-01-21

    Spontaneous polarization and inversion symmetry breaking in ferroelectric materials lead to their use as photovoltaic devices. However, further advancement of their applications are hindered by the paucity of ways of reducing bandgaps and enhancing photocurrent. By unravelling the correlation between ferroelectric materials’ responses to solar irradiation and their local structure and electric polarization landscapes, here we show from first principles that substantial bulk photovoltaic effect enhancement can be achieved by nanolayering PbTiO3 with nickel ions and oxygen vacancies ((PbNiO2)x(PbTiO3)1–x). The enhancement of the total photocurrent for different spacings between the Ni-containing layers can be as high as 43 times duemore » to a smaller bandgap and photocurrent direction alignment for all absorption energies. This is due to the electrostatic effect that arises from nanolayering. Lastly, this opens up the possibility for control of the bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric materials by nanoscale engineering of their structure and composition.« less

  7. Manufacture of SOFC electrodes by wet powder spraying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkenhoener, R.; Mallener, W.; Buchkremer, H.P.

    1996-12-31

    The reproducible and commercial manufacturing of electrodes with enhanced electrochemical performance is of central importance for a successful technical realization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems. The route of electrode fabrication for the SOFC by Wet Powder Spraying (WPS) is presented. Stabilized suspensions of the powder materials for the electrodes were sprayed onto a substrate by employing a spray gun. After drying of the layers, binder removal and sintering are performed in one step. The major advantage of this process is its applicability for a large variety of materials and its flexibility with regard to layer shape and thickness. Above all, flat or curved substrates of any size can be coated, thus opening up the possibility of {open_quotes}up-scaling{close_quotes} SOFC technology. Electrodes with an enhanced electrochemical performance were developed by gradually optimizing the different process steps. For example an optimized SOFC cathode of the composition La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} with 40% 8YSZ showed a mean overpotential of about -50 mV at a current density of -0.8 A/cm{sup 2}, with a standard deviation amounting to 16 mV (950{degrees}C, air). Such optimized electrodes can be manufactured with a high degree of reproducibility, as a result of employing a computer-controlled X-Y system for moving the spray gun. Several hundred sintered composites, comprising the substrate anode and the electrolyte, of 100x 100 mm{sup 2} were coated with the cathode by WPS and used for stack integration. The largest manufactured electrodes were 240x240 mm{sup 2}, and data concerning their thickness homogeneity and electrochemical performance are given.

  8. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more

  9. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  10. Bulk amorphous steels based on Fe alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, ZhaoPing; Liu, Chain T.

    2006-05-30

    A bulk amorphous alloy has the approximate composition: Fe.sub.(100-a-b-c-d-e)Y.sub.aMn.sub.bT.sub.cM.sub.dX.sub.e wherein: T includes at least one of the group consisting of: Ni, Cu, Cr and Co; M includes at least one of the group consisting of W, Mo, Nb, Ta, Al and Ti; X includes at least one of the group consisting of Co, Ni and Cr; a is an atomic percentage, and a<5; b is an atomic percentage, and b.ltoreq.25; c is an atomic percentage, and c.ltoreq.25; d is an atomic percentage, and d.ltoreq.25; and e is an atomic percentage, and 5.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.30.

  11. DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.

    2013-10-10

    A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50

  13. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

    2011-03-01

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  14. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

    2013-04-09

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  15. New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves ... Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas ...

  16. MHK Technologies/WET EnGen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Test of Wave Energy Technologies Moored Floating WET EnGen: Regular and Irregular Waves. TR-2009-13, Fraser Winsor and Emile Baddour, June 2009. Date Submitted 1082010 << Return...

  17. Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Wet Natural Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. proved reserves, and reserves changes, 2013-2014 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Wet Natural Gas billion barrels trillion cubic feet U.S. proved reserves at December 31, 2013...

  18. ,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. proved reserves, and reserves changes, 2013-2014" ,"Crude Oil and Lease Condensate","Wet Natural Gas" ,"billion barrels","trillion cubic feet" "U.S. proved reserves at...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of ...

  20. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  1. Linear relationship between water wetting behavior and microscopic interactions of super-hydrophilic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian; Guo, Pan; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Wang, Chunlei; Shi, Guosheng Fang, Haiping

    2013-12-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show a fine linear relationship between surface energies and microscopic Lennard-Jones parameters of super-hydrophilic surfaces. The linear slope of the super-hydrophilic surfaces is consistent with the linear slope of the super-hydrophobic, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic surfaces where stable water droplets can stand, indicating that there is a universal linear behavior of the surface energies with the water-surface van der Waals interaction that extends from the super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, we find that the linear relationship exists for various substrate types, and the linear slopes of these different types of substrates are dependent on the surface atom density, i.e., higher surface atom densities correspond to larger linear slopes. These results enrich our understanding of water behavior on solid surfaces, especially the water wetting behaviors on uncharged super-hydrophilic metal surfaces.

  2. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Estimated Production, Wet After Lease Separation Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

  3. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments, Wet After Lease

  4. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments, Wet After Lease Separation

  5. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation Natural Gas

  6. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Nebraska

  7. Low-resistivity bulk silicon prepared by hot-pressing boron- and phosphorus-hyperdoped silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Qingbin; Ni, Zhenyi; Zhu, Tiejun; Yang, Deren; Pi, Xiaodong; Koura, Setsuko

    2014-12-15

    Technologically important low-resistivity bulk Si has been usually produced by the traditional Czochralski growth method. We now explore a novel method to obtain low-resistivity bulk Si by hot-pressing B- and P-hyperdoped Si nanocrystals (NCs). In this work bulk Si with the resistivity as low as ∼ 0.8 (40) mΩ•cm has been produced by hot pressing P (B)-hyperdoped Si NCs. The dopant type is found to make a difference for the sintering of Si NCs during the hot pressing. Bulk Si hot-pressed from P-hyperdoped Si NCs is more compact than that hot-pressed from B-hyperdoped Si NCs when the hot-pressing temperature is the same. This leads to the fact that P is more effectively activated to produce free carriers than B in the hot-pressed bulk Si. Compared with the dopant concentration, the hot-pressing temperature more significantly affects the structural and electrical properties of hot-pressed bulk Si. With the increase of the hot-pressing temperature the density of hot-pressed bulk Si increases. The highest carrier concentration (lowest resistivity) of bulk Si hot-pressed from B- or P-hyperdoped Si NCs is obtained at the highest hot-pressing temperature of 1050 °C. The mobility of carriers in the hot-pressed bulk Si is low (≤  ∼ 30 cm{sup -2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1}) mainly due to the scattering of carriers induced by structural defects such as pores.

  8. Electronegativity calculation of bulk modulus and band gap of ternary ZnO-based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Keyan; Kang, Congying [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, the bulk moduli and band gaps of M{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O (M = Be, Mg, Ca, Cd) alloys in the whole composition range were quantitatively calculated by using the electronegativity-related models for bulk modulus and band gap, respectively. We found that the change trends of bulk modulus and band gap with an increase of M concentration x are same for Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O and Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O, while the change trends are reverse for Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O and Ca{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O. It was revealed that the bulk modulus is related to the valence electron density of atoms whereas the band gap is strongly influenced by the detailed chemical bonding behaviors of constituent atoms. The current work provides us a useful guide to compositionally design advanced alloy materials with both good mechanical and optoelectronic properties.

  9. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved

  10. Effect of mechanical strain on electronic properties of bulk MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sandeep Kumar, Jagdish Sastri, O. S. K. S.

    2015-05-15

    Ab-initio density functional theory based calculations of electronic properties of bulk and monolayer Molybdenum di-Sulfide (MoS{sub 2}) have been performed using all electron Full Potential Linearised Augmentad Plane Wave (FPLAPW) method using Elk code. We have used Generalised Gradient Approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation functionals and performed calculaitons of Lattice parameters, Density Of States (DOS) and Band Structure (BS). Band structure calculations revealed that bulk MoS{sub 2} has indirect band gap of 0.97 eV and mono-layer MoS{sub 2} has direct band gap which has increased to 1.71 eV. These are in better agreement with experimental values as compared with the other calculations using pseudo-potential code. The effect of mechanical strain on the electronic properties of bulk MoS{sub 2} has also been studied. For the different values of compressive strain (varying from 2% to 8% in steps of 2%) along the c-axis, the corresponding DOS and BS are obtained. We observed that the band gap decreases by about 15% for every 2% increase in strain along the c-axis.

  11. Determination of Bulk Dimensional Variation in Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James F. Cuttino Dr. Edward P. Morse

    2005-04-14

    The purpose of this work is to improve the efficiency of green sand foundries so that they may continue to compete as the most cost-effective method of fabrication while meeting tightening constraints on near-net shape manufacturing. In order to achieve this objective, the study is divided into two major components. The first component concentrated on identifying which processes control surface finish on the castings and which provide potential reductions in variations. The second component identified metrological methods that effectively discern between the geometry of bulk material versus surface finish in order to more accurately determine the quality of a part. The research resulted in the determination of an empirical relationship relating pouring parameters to dimensional variation, with an R2 value of greater than 0.79. A significant difference in variations obtained from vertical vs. horizontal molding machines was also noticed. When analyzed separately, however, the resulting empirical relationships for horizontal and vertical machines had reduced R2 values, probably due to the reduced data sets. Significant parameters when considering vertical and horizontal molding machines together included surface roughness, pattern type, iron type, pouring rate, copper content, amount of Western Bentonite, and permeability.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ? 225K). The second, T{sup *} ? 315 5K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient ?{sub P}(T, P) in the PT plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  13. Material Profile Influences in Bulk-Heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehling, John D.; Rochester, Christopher W.; Ro, Hyun W.; Wang, Peng; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Batenburg, Kees J.; Arslan, Ilke; Delongchamp, Dean M.; Moule, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    he morphology in mixed bulk-heterojunction films are compared using three different quantitative measurement techniques. We compare the vertical composition changes using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron tomography and neutron and x-ray reflectometry. The three measurement techniques yield qualita-tively comparable vertical concentration measurements. The presence of a metal cathode during thermal annealing is observed to alter the fullerene concentration throughout the thickness of the film for all measurements. However, the abso-lute vertical concentration of fullerene is quantitatively different for the three measurements. The origin of the quantitative measurement differences is discussed. The authors thank Luna Innovations, Inc. for donating the endohedral fullerenes used in this study and Plextronics for the P3HT. They are gratefully thank the National Science Foundation Energy for Sustainability Program, Award No. 0933435. This work benefited from the use of the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Los Alamos National Laboratory under DOE Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. This research was also supported in part by Laboratory Directed Research & Development program at PNNL. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  14. ARM - Campaign Instrument - ec-convair580-bulk

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsec-convair580-bulk Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters (EC-CONVAIR580-BULK) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Airborne Observations, Cloud Properties Campaigns Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) [ Download Data ] North Slope Alaska, 2008.04.01 - 2008.04.30 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered

  15. Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials |

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Design of Bulk Nanocomposites as High Efficiency Thermoelectric Materials Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement A newly synthesized bulk thermoelectric material that contains nanocrystals

  16. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing

  17. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    information about BulkTransmission in Hawaii. Use the Edit with form button to editupdate. Planning Organizations not provided Hawaii Owners not provided Current Projects not...

  18. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    information about BulkTransmission in Alaska. Use the Edit with form button to editupdate. Planning Organizations not provided Alaska Owners not provided Current Projects not...

  19. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    information about BulkTransmission in Texas. Use the Edit with form button to editupdate. Planning Organizations not provided Texas Owners not provided Current Projects not...

  20. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Policy Act (HEPA) Hawaii Department of Health Office of Environmental Quality Control Bulk Transmission Environment in Idaho Varies by local municipality Varies by...

  1. Economic manufacturing of bulk metallic glass compositions by microalloying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.

    2003-05-13

    A method of making a bulk metallic glass composition includes the steps of:a. providing a starting material suitable for making a bulk metallic glass composition, for example, BAM-11; b. adding at least one impurity-mitigating dopant, for example, Pb, Si, B, Sn, P, to the starting material to form a doped starting material; and c. converting the doped starting material to a bulk metallic glass composition so that the impurity-mitigating dopant reacts with impurities in the starting material to neutralize deleterious effects of the impurities on the formation of the bulk metallic glass composition.

  2. Light-Emitting Diodes on Semipolar Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project is producing high-efficiency semipolar light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on low-defect bulk gallium nitride (GaN) substrates.

  3. Federal Bulk Transmission Regulatory Roadmapping | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Federal Bulk Transmission Regulatory Roadmapping Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll...

  4. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Site Considerations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    and comparison for Bulk Transmission Site Considerations across various states. To learn more detailed information about Site Considerations in a state, click on the...

  5. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Federal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Regulatory Information Overviews Search for other...

  6. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Access | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDBulkTransmissionLand Access < RAPID | BulkTransmission(Redirected from RAPIDBulkTransmissionLeasing) Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting...

  7. RAPID/BulkTransmission/About | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Current Topics in Bulk Transmission West-Wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The West-Wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

  8. Enhancing covalent mechanochemistry in bulk polymers using electrospun...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhancing covalent mechanochemistry in bulk polymers using electrospun ABA triblock copolymers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhancing covalent mechanochemistry in ...

  9. Category:Bulk Transmission Regulatory Roadmap Sections | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Category:Bulk Transmission Regulatory Roadmap Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the RAPIDRoadmap?...

  10. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Colorado | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and promoting Bulk Electric System reliability in the Western Interconnection, including in Colorado. In addition, WECC provides...

  11. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Idaho | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and promoting Bulk Electric System reliability in the Western Interconnection, including in Idaho. In addition, WECC provides an...

  12. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Washington | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and promoting Bulk Electric System reliability in the Western Interconnection, including in Washington. In addition, WECC provides...

  13. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and promoting Bulk Electric System reliability in the Western Interconnection, including in Nevada. WECC also provides an...

  14. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Arizona | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and promoting Bulk Electric System reliability in the Western Interconnection, including Arizona. WECC also provides an...

  15. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Oregon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the Regional Entity responsible for coordinating and promoting Bulk Electric System reliability in the Western Interconnection, including Oregon. WECC also provides an environment...

  16. Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Lithium Ion Solvation and Diffusion in Bulk Organic Electrolytes from First Principles and Classical Reactive Molecular Dynamics Authors: Ong, M T ; Verners, O ; Draeger, E ...

  17. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric metrology. konig.pdf (5.11 MB) More ... Bulk Materials and Device Development Thermoelectric Activities of European Community ...

  18. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design for cooling using a novel V-shaped shunt configuration with bulk TE elements achieving high area packing fractions

  19. Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric Materials at RTI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Reviews work in engineered thin-film nanoscale thermoelectric materials and nano-bulk materials with high ZT undertaken by RTI in collaboration with its research partners

  20. Strategies for High Thermoelectric zT in Bulk Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Zintl principle in chemistry, complex electronic band structures, and incorporation of nanometer sized particles were used to explore, optimize and improve bulk thermoelectric materials

  1. Ensuring a Reliable Bulk Electric System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Ensuring a Reliable Bulk Electric System Cooling Tower Report, October 2008 Transmission Constraints and Congestion in the Western...

  2. Bulk, thermal, and mechanical properties of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimick, F.B.; Schwartz, B.M.

    1987-09-01

    Experimental data on matrix porosity, grain density, thermal expansion, compressive strength, Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and axial strain at failure for samples from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff are compiled. Heat capacity and emissivity also are discussed. Data have been analyzed for spatial variability; slight variability is observed for matrix porosity, grain density, and thermal expansion coefficient. Estimates of in situ values for some properties, such as bulk density and heat capacity, are presented. Vertical in situ stress as a function of horizontal and vertical location has been calculated. 96 refs., 37 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. An experimental comparison of laboratory techniques in determining bulk properties of tuffaceous rocks; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J. III; Price, R.H.

    1994-04-01

    Samples of tuffaceous rock were studied as part of the site characterization for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. These efforts were scoping in nature, and their results, along with those of other investigations, are being used to develop suitable procedures for determining bulk properties of tuffaceous rock in support of thermal and mechanical properties evaluations. Comparisons were made between various sample preparation, handling, and measurement techniques for both zeolitized and nonzeolitized tuff in order to assess their effects on bulk property determinations. Laboratory tests included extensive drying regimes to evaluate dehydration behavior, the acquisition of data derived from both gas and water pycnometers to compare their suitability in determining grain densities, a comparison of particle size effects, and a set of experiments to evaluate whole core saturation methods. The results affirm the added complexity of these types of measurements where there is a zeolite component in the sample mineralogy. Absolute values for the bulk properties of zeolitized tuff are immeasurable due to the complex nature of their dehydration behavior. However, the results of the techniques that were investigated provide a basis for the development of preferred, consistent methods for determining the grain density, dry and saturated bulk densities, and porosity of tuffaceous rock, including zeolitic tuff in support of thermal and mechanical properties evaluations.

  4. High-Performance All Air-Processed Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, C.T.; Nam, C.-Y.; Su, D.

    2009-10-23

    High photovoltaic device performance is demonstrated in ambient-air-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells having an active blend layer of organic poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), with power conversion efficiencies as high as 4.1%, which is comparable to state-of-the-art bulk heterojunction devices fabricated in air-free environments. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is combined with detailed analysis of electronic carrier transport in order to quantitatively understand the effects of oxygen exposure and different thermal treatments on electronic conduction through the highly nanostructured active blend network. Improvement in photovoltaic device performance by suitable post-fabrication thermal processing results from the reduced oxygen charge trap density in the active blend layer and is consistent with a corresponding slight increase in thickness of an {approx}4 nm aluminum oxide hole-blocking layer present at the electron-collecting contact interface.

  5. Bulk Vitrification Castable Refractory Block Protection Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Beck, Andrew E.; Brouns, Thomas M.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Matyas, Josef; Minister, Kevin BC; Schweiger, Michael J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Tinsley, Bronnie P.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-05-01

    Bulk vitrification (BV) was selected for a pilot-scale test and demonstration facility for supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford U.S. DOE Site. During engineering-scale (ES) tests, a small fraction of radioactive Tc (and Re, its nonradioactive surrogate) were transferred out of the LAW glass feed and molten LAW glass, and deposited on the surface and within the pores of the castable refractory block (CRB). Laboratory experiments were undertaken to understand the mechanisms of the transport Tc/Re into the CRB during vitrification and to evaluate various means of CRB protection against the deposition of leachable Tc/Re. The tests used Re as a chemical surrogate for Tc. The tests with the baseline CRB showed that the molten LAW penetrates into CRB pores before it converts to glass, leaving deposits of sulfates and chlorides when the nitrate components decompose. Na2O from the LAW reacts with the CRB to create a durable glass phase that may contain Tc/Re. Limited data from a single CRB sample taken from an ES experiment indicate that, while a fraction of Tc/Re is present in the CRB in a readily leachable form, most of the Tc/Re deposited in the refractory is retained in the form of a durable glass phase. In addition, the molten salts from the LAW, mainly sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates, begin to evaporate from BV feeds at temperatures below 800 C and condense on solid surfaces at temperatures below 530 C. Three approaches aimed at reducing or preventing the deposition of soluble Tc/Re within the CRB were proposed: metal lining, sealing the CRB surface with a glaze, and lining the CRB with ceramic tiles. Metal liners were deemed unsuitable because evaluations showed that they can cause unacceptable distortions of the electric field in the BV system. Sodium silicate and a low-alkali borosilicate glaze were selected for testing. The glazes slowed down molten salt condensate penetration, but did little to reduce the

  6. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  7. Pairing in bulk nuclear matter beyond BCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, D.; Dickhoff, W. H.; Dussan, H.; Witte, S. J.; Rios, A.; Polls, A.

    2014-10-15

    The influence of short-range correlations on the spectral distribution of neutrons is incorporated in the solution of the gap equation for the {sup 3}P{sub 2}−{sup 3}F{sub 2} coupled channel in pure neutron matter. This effect is studied for different realistic interactions including one based on chiral perturbation theory. The gap in this channel vanishes at all relevant densities due to the treatment of these correlations. We also consider the effect of long-range correlations by including polarization terms in addition to the bare interaction which allow the neutrons to exchange density and spin fluctuations governed by the strength of Landau parameters allowed to have reasonable values consistent with the available literature. Preliminary results indicate that reasonable values of these parameters do not generate a gap in the {sup 3}P{sub 2}−{sup 3}F{sub 2} coupled channel either for all three realistic interactions although the pairing interaction becomes slightly more attractive.

  8. WHAT GOVERNS THE BULK VELOCITY OF THE JET COMPONENTS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai Bo; Cao Xinwu; Gu Minfeng E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-11-10

    We use a sample of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with measured black hole masses to explore the jet formation mechanisms in these sources. Based on Koenigl's inhomogeneous jet model, the jet parameters, such as the bulk motion Lorentz factor, magnetic field strength, and electron density in the jet, can be estimated with the very long baseline interferometry and X-ray data.. We find a significant correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample, while no significant correlation is present between the bulk Lorentz factor and the Eddington ratio. The massive black holes will be spun up through accretion, as the black holes acquire mass and angular momentum simultaneously through accretion. Recent investigation indeed suggested that most supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies have on average higher spins than the black holes in spiral galaxies, where random, small accretion episodes (e.g., tidally disrupted stars, accretion of molecular clouds) might have played a more important role. If this is true, then the correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components found in this work implies that the motion velocity of the jet components is probably governed by the black hole spin. No correlation is found between the magnetic field strength at 10R {sub S} (R {sub S} = 2GM/c {sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius) in the jets and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample. This is consistent with the black hole spin scenario, i.e., the faster moving jets are magnetically accelerated by the magnetic fields threading the horizon of more rapidly rotating black holes. The results imply that the Blandford-Znajek mechanism may dominate over the Blandford-Payne mechanism for the jet acceleration, at least in these radio-loud AGNs.

  9. Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG This presentation by Don Baldwin of Hexagon Composites was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013. csd_workshop_8_baldwin.pdf (1.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Deployment and Field Performance Hydrogen Delivery Roadmap US DRIVE Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

  10. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menchhofer, Paul A.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  11. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  12. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-09-22

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1--5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric. 5 figs.

  13. Michigan Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 217 87 74 53 2000's 337 485 527 663 497 421 460 686 618 556 2010's 314 147 95 63 49 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 17 3 3 1 2000's 0 0 15 40 27 28 29 65 54 102 2010's 62 120 92 48 42 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  15. Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 60 70 126 156 2000's 144 120 111 103 83 110 149 206 243 257 2010's 207 220 127 143 204 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  16. Montana Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 96 43 92 110 2000's 90 104 117 206 199 110 176 151 161 127 2010's 146 81 124 80 125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  17. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 94 41 89 89 2000's 76 93 92 175 158 85 152 128 137 104 2010's 91 50 48 30 29 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  18. Final Report: Wetted Cathodes for Low-Temperature Aluminum Smelting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Craig W

    2002-09-30

    A low-temperature aluminum smelting process being developed differs from the Hall-Heroult process in several significant ways. The low-temperature process employs a more acidic electrolyte than cryolite, an alumina slurry, oxygen-generating metal anodes, and vertically suspended electrodes. Wetted and drained vertical cathodes are crucial to the new process. Such cathodes represent a significant portion of the capital costs projected for the new technology. Although studies exist of wetted cathode technology with Hall-Heoult cells, the differences make such a study desirable with the new process.

  19. Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 456 363 479 173 2000's 174 208 191 286 371 163 245 225 177 126 2010's 162 102 40 73 36 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  20. Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska (with Total Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 130 314 567 793 2000's 718 620 599 716 681 556 346 338 258 193 2010's 246 351 1,243 1,093 1,190 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  1. Arkansas Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 156 146 99 195 2000's 221 257 264 253 325 420 623 1,047 2,183 5,872 2010's 7,274 5,919 3,520 4,844 4,011 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  2. California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) California (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 156 233 431 288 2000's 358 518 414 376 624 1,050 770 641 267 460 2010's 441 395 360 248 303 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  3. California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 305 284 277 - = No Data Reported;

  4. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 207 163 104 115 163 188 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 103 108 108 115 112 146 154 174 2000's 204 195 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 98 90 84 - = No Data

  5. California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 234 1980's 166 256 254 243 235 1990's 194 60 63 65 63 59 49 56 44 77 2000's 91 85 91 83 87 90 90 83 57 57 2010's 66 82 66 75 76 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  6. Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 156 1980's 180 193 74 81 77 77 136 66 84 87 1990's 72 76 93 96 67 69 68 44 39 67 2000's 42 83 100 134 110 132 139 241 272 349 2010's 363 393 233 188 185 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  7. North Dakota Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 128 119 87 81 2000's 61 57 63 34 36 54 46 72 117 510 2010's 920 1,324 2,360 3,619 3,559 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 20 6 43 211 2000's 97 105 122 112 103 132 123 128 110 68 2010's 19 54 252 1,072 3,504 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  9. Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 19 6 38 142 2000's 75 102 107 98 92 124 115 125 110 67 2010's 14 50 246 1,015 3,498 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  10. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 57 24 236 216 2000's 227 374 466 333 448 456 639 714 696 2,282 2010's 5,472 13,069 17,236 21,500 24,089 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  11. West Virginia Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 202 379 440 428 2000's 310 202 353 295 510 587 923 1,010 923 818 2010's 926 1,579 2,532 6,549 17,221 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  12. Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--California Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 110 66 65 68 2000's 113 158 166 181 107 98 146 91 32 36 2010's 35 42 46 16 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Florida Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 98 0 0 2010's 0 4 0 14 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  14. Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 4 0 14 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 2 2000's 1 1 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release

  16. Indiana Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 0 2000's 2 6 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  17. Indiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Indiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 0 2000's 2 6 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  18. Kansas Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 185 146 117 99 2000's 94 116 112 145 59 166 146 150 168 132 2010's 236 283 277 486 764 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  19. Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 178 144 108 92 2000's 93 112 109 139 54 161 144 148 159 128 2010's 235 244 218 314 489 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  20. Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Sales, Wet After Lease Separation

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 124 137 183 226 2000's 387 56 117 111 107 113 286 232 271 149 2010's 106 75 6 3 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  2. Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,112 1,073 739 634 564 610 1990's 461 477 350 337 230 313 293 290 350 419 2000's 400 468 436 456 321 265 305 261 220 164 2010's 131 118 94 59 42 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. C60 -induced Devil's Staircase transformation on a Pb/Si(111) wetting layer

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Johnson, Duane D.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2015-12-03

    Density functional theory is used to study structural energetics of Pb vacancy cluster formation on C60/Pb/Si(111) to explain the unusually fast and error-free transformations between the “Devil's Staircase” (DS) phases on the Pb/Si(111) wetting layer at low temperature (~110K). The formation energies of vacancy clusters are calculated in C60/Pb/Si(111) as Pb atoms are progressively ejected from the initial dense Pb wetting layer. Vacancy clusters larger than five Pb atoms are found to be stable with seven being the most stable, while vacancy clusters smaller than five are highly unstable, which agrees well with the observed ejection rate of ~5 Pbmore » atoms per C60. Furthermore, the high energy cost (~0.8 eV) for the small vacancy clusters to form indicates convincingly that the unusually fast transformation observed experimentally between the DS phases, upon C60 adsorption at low temperature, cannot be the result of single-atom random walk diffusion but of correlated multi-atom processes.« less

  4. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  5. The nature of the interlayer interaction in bulk and few-layer phosphorus

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Shulenburger, Luke; Baczewski, A. D.; Zhu, Z.; Guan, J.; Tomanek, David

    2015-11-02

    Sensitive dependence of the electronic structure on the number of layers in few-layer phosphorene raises a question about the true nature of the interlayer interaction in so-called van der Waals (vdW) solids . We performed quantum Monte Carlo calculations and found that the interlayer interaction in bulk black phosphorus and related few-layer phosphorene is associated with a significant charge redistribution that is incompatible with purely dispersive forces and not captured by density functional theory calculations with different vdW corrected functionals. Lastly, these findings confirm the necessity of more sophisticated treatment of nonlocal electron correlation in total energy calculations.

  6. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamicsquantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquidalcoholshas attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  7. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases, Wet After Lease

  8. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Sales, Wet After Lease Separation

  9. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Reserves Sales, Wet After Lease Separation

  10. Subcritical water extraction of lipids from wet algal biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Shuguang; Reddy, Harvind K.; Schaub, Tanner; Holguin, Francisco Omar

    2016-05-03

    Methods of lipid extraction from biomass, in particular wet algae, through conventionally heated subcritical water, and microwave-assisted subcritical water. In one embodiment, fatty acid methyl esters from solids in a polar phase are further extracted to increase biofuel production.

  11. Visualization of electronic density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atoms volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  12. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  13. Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 February 1, 2012 - 12:48pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Iowa Stored Energy Park (ISEP) are conducting a free, 1-hour webinar, Lessons from Iowa: The Economic, Market, and Organizational Issues in Making Bulk Energy Storage Work, on Thursday, February 9, 2012 at 1 p.m. ET. Presenters include Dr. Imre Gyuk of DOE's Office of Electricity

  14. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  15. Change of variables as a method to study general ?-models: Bulk universality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbina, M.

    2014-04-15

    We consider ? matrix models with real analytic potentials. Assuming that the corresponding equilibrium density ? has a one-interval support (without loss of generality ? = [?2, 2]), we study the transformation of the correlation functions after the change of variables ?{sub i} ? ?(?{sub i}) with ?(?) chosen from the equation ?{sup ?}(?)?(?(?)) = ?{sub sc}(?), where ?{sub sc}(?) is the standard semicircle density. This gives us the deformed ?-model which has an additional interaction term. Standard transformation with the Gaussian integral allows us to show that the deformed ?-model may be reduced to the standard Gaussian ?-model with a small perturbation n{sup ?1}h(?). This reduces most of the problems of local and global regimes for ?-models to the corresponding problems for the Gaussian ?-model with a small perturbation. In the present paper, we prove the bulk universality of local eigenvalue statistics for both one-cut and multi-cut cases.

  16. Interplay of topological surface and bulk electronic states in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Interplay of topological surface and bulk electronic states in Bi2Se3 Authors: Romanowich, Megan ; Lee, Mal-Soon ; Chung, Duck-Young ; Mahanti, S. D. ; Kanatzidis, Mercouri ...

  17. Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Vinod

    2011-11-01

    The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Active hopper for promoting flow of bulk granular or powdered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer Search Results Active hopper for promoting flow of bulk granular or powdered ... An apparatus that promotes the flow of materials has a body having an inner shape for ...

  19. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ace082_caylor_2012_o.pdf (866.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High

  20. Compositional ordering and stability in nanostructured, bulk thermoelectric alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Faleev, S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Leonard, F.; Lensch-Falk, J.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Sugar, J. D.

    2009-09-01

    Thermoelectric materials have many applications in the conversion of thermal energy to electrical power and in solid-state cooling. One route to improving thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency in bulk material is to embed nanoscale inclusions. This report summarize key results from a recently completed LDRD project exploring the science underpinning the formation and stability of nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric and the quantitative relationships between such structures and thermoelectric properties.

  1. Tunable Quantum Dot Solids: Impact of Interparticle Interactions on Bulk

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Properties (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Tunable Quantum Dot Solids: Impact of Interparticle Interactions on Bulk Properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tunable Quantum Dot Solids: Impact of Interparticle Interactions on Bulk Properties QD-solids comprising self-assembled semiconductor nanocrystals such as CdSe are currently under investigation for use in a wide array of applications including light emitting diodes, solar cells, field effect transistors, photodetectors,

  2. CMI Unique Facility: Bulk Combinatoric Materials Synthesis Facility |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Bulk Combinatoric Materials Synthesis Facility The Bulk Combinatoric Materials Synthesis Facility is one of more than a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy. Combinatoric studies of materials involve the creation of samples with varying composition, allowing the researcher to find the optimum combination of elements to produce a desired set of properties. The method has

  3. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined

  4. Waste Form Qualification Compliance Strategy for Bulk Vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagaasen, Larry M.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Brouns, Thomas M.

    2005-01-03

    The Bulk Vitrification System is being pursued to assist in immobilizing the low-activity tank waste from the 53 million gallons of radioactive waste in the 177 underground storage tanks on the Hanford Site. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process, a research and development facility known as the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is being built to demonstrate the technology. Specific performance requirements for the final packaged bulk vitrification waste form have been identified. In addition to the specific product-performance requirements, performance targets/goals have been identified that are necessary to qualify the waste form but do not lend themselves to specifications that are easily verified through short-term testing. Collectively, these form the product requirements for the DBVS. This waste-form qualification (WFQ) strategy document outlines the general strategies for achieving and demonstrating compliance with the BVS product requirements. The specific objectives of the WFQ activities are discussed, the bulk vitrification process and product control strategy is outlined, and the test strategy to meet the WFQ objectives is described. The DBVS product performance targets/goals and strategies to address those targets/goals are described. The DBVS product-performance requirements are compared to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant immobilized low-activity waste product specifications. The strategies for demonstrating compliance with the bulk vitrification product requirements are presented.

  5. ,"U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation ...

  6. ,"U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet ...

  7. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher

  8. Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 693 1980's 682 683 1990's 4,184 5,460 5,870 5,212 4,898 4,930 5,100 5,013 4,643 4,365 2000's 4,269 3,958 3,922 4,345 4,159 4,006 3,963 4,036 3,379 2,948 2010's 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670 2,121 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 32,275 1980's 33,395 33,049 35,002 34,291 34,476 34,223 33,355 33,715 9,179 9,019 1990's 9,393 9,653 9,725 9,986 9,813 9,575 9,296 10,673 10,043 9,855 2000's 9,331 8,901 8,533 8,348 8,473 8,237 10,333 12,022 7,766 9,183 2010's 8,917 9,511 9,667

  10. Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,725 1980's 1,796 1,821 1,974 2,081 2,240 2,032 2,011 2,018 2,000 1,782 1990's 1,739 1,672 1,752 1,555 1,610 1,566 1,472 1,479 1,332 1,546 2000's 1,584 1,619 1,654 1,666 1,837 1,967 2,271 3,306 5,628 10,872 2010's 14,181 16,374 11,039 13,524

  11. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,037 1980's 4,434 4,230 4,058 3,964 3,808 3,716 3,404 3,229 3,033 2,899 1990's 2,775 2,703 2,511 2,425 2,130 2,018 1,864 2,012 2,016 2,021 2000's 2,413 2,298 2,190 2,116 2,306

  12. California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 322 1980's 414 1,337 1,466 1,570 1,519 1990's 1,469 1,174 1,136 1,123 1,187 1,289 1,266 556 489 536 2000's 576 540 515 511 459 825 811 805 705 740 2010's 725 711 652 264 243 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  13. California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4,842 1980's 5,137 4,084 3,893 3,666 3,513 1990's 3,311 3,114 2,892 2,799 2,506 2,355 2,193 2,390 2,332 2,505 2000's 2,952 2,763 2,696 2,569 2,773 3,384 2,935 2,879 2,538 2,926 2010's 2,785 3,042 2,119 2,023 2,260 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  14. Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,838 1980's 3,170 3,228 3,551 3,373 3,140 3,095 3,198 3,131 3,749 4,526 1990's 4,759 6,011 6,463 6,979 7,036 7,592 8,064 7,160 8,208 9,372 2000's 10,837 12,949 14,348 15,893 15,249 17,122 17,682 22,480 24,169 24,081 2010's 25,372 26,151 21,674

  15. Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10,824 1980's 10,065 10,443 10,128 10,183 9,981 9,844 11,093 11,089 10,530 10,509 1990's 10,004 9,946 10,302 9,872 9,705 9,093 8,145 7,328 6,862 6,248 2000's 5,682 5,460 5,329 5,143 5,003 4,598 4,197 4,248 3,795 3,500 2010's 3,937 3,747 3,557

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 504 1980's 536 561 592 600 647 806 883 940 957 1,015 1990's 1,047 1,187 1,126 1,036 1,025 1,102 1,046 1,429 1,295 1,530 2000's 1,837 1,950 1,999 1,971 1,982 2,240 2,369 2,588 2,846 2,919 2010's 2,785 2,128 1,515 1,794 1,753 - = No Data Reported;

  17. Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,580 1980's 13,407 13,049 12,153 11,553 10,650 10,120 9,416 9,024 8,969 8,934 1990's 8,492 7,846 7,019 6,219 6,558 6,166 6,105 6,137 5,966 5,858 2000's 5,447 5,341 4,395 3,874 3,557 3,478 3,473 3,463 2,916

  18. Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,676 13,334 12,852 12,620 12,912 1990's 12,151 11,363 10,227 9,541 10,145 9,891 10,077 10,036 9,480 9,646 2000's 9,512 10,040 9,190 9,538 9,792 10,679 10,710 10,292 11,816 20,970 2010's 29,517 30,545 22,135 20,389 23,258 - = No Data Reported;

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,511 1980's 1,776 2,042 1,803 1,603 1,496 1,364 1,304 1,223 1,146 1,108 1990's 1,129 1,061 873 800 653 667 634 583 662 681 2000's 620 663 746 748 692 758 816 958 1,035 922 2010's 858 868 612 600 563 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  20. Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 837 1980's 1,308 1,336 870 921 825 884 823 801 834 889 1990's 920 848 875 684 727 792 806 769 789 851 2000's 892 907 914 1,068 1,002 998 1,069 1,067 1,014 993 2010's 959 792 616 590 686 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,545 1980's 13,908 15,507 17,140 17,261 17,102 17,078 17,779 17,703 17,450 16,733 1990's 16,967 15,518 14,732 14,099 14,323 14,295 13,952 14,311 14,517 13,490 2000's 14,543 14,366 15,753 16,231 17,200 18,146 18,535 20,184 22,113 24,207 2010's

  2. Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,516 1980's 951 1,265 1,430 1,882 1,576 1,618 1,562 1,650 2,074 1,644 1990's 1,722 1,631 1,533 1,722 1,806 1,488 1,702 1,861 1,848 1,780 2000's 1,740 1,782 2,225 2,497 2,371 2,793 3,064 3,377 3,594 7,018 2010's 14,068 26,719 36,543

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3,007 3,803 4,124 3,136 2000's 4,461 5,860 5,216 5,381 5,547 7,911 7,387 11,600 12,655 12,839 2010's 11,628 11,304 7,961 8,938 8,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  4. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,983 3,709 4,089 3,075 2000's 4,363 5,817 5,185 5,361 5,524 7,847 7,359 11,533 12,598 12,812 2010's 11,593 11,256 7,745 8,658 8,298 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  5. Oklahoma Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,228 1,326 1,602 1,741 2000's 1,484 2,929 3,206 3,658 3,880 4,526 4,948 6,080 7,053 8,161 2010's 10,288 10,965 11,828 9,688 13,996 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 7,729 6,466 7,052 8,502 2000's 10,518 12,858 12,678 11,603 13,915 18,202 23,187 26,547 28,514 31,336 2010's 36,190 37,479 35,178

  7. Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 365 441 669 1,278 2000's 1,567 1,578 1,202 983 1,263 1,457 2,118 2,439 2,799 2,110 2010's 3,476 3,646 3,573 3,100 2,837 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  8. Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 258 347 595 1,177 2000's 1,377 1,423 1,002 840 1,136 1,379 1,978 2,272 2,670 1,739 2010's 3,125 3,230 2,955 2,621 2,460 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  9. Colorado Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 897 674 1,631 1,985 2000's 2,958 3,962 3,781 3,945 4,409 4,990 6,685 9,146 10,839 8,188 2010's 7,527 6,794 6,386 8,732 8,523 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  10. Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana (with State Offshore) Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,706 3,308 3,345 3,426 2000's 3,228 4,316 3,661 3,927 3,806 3,821 4,354 4,339 5,487 13,125 2010's 19,326 15,162 9,995 8,913

  11. Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,803 46,620 44,319 42,192 41,404 41,554 1990's 41,411 39,288 38,141 37,847 39,020 39,736 41,592 41,108 40,793 43,350 2000's 45,419 46,462 47,491 48,717 53,275 60,178 65,805 76,357 81,843 85,034 2010's 94,287 104,454 93,475 97,921 105,955 - = No

  12. Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 122 175 216 235 253 248 230 217 1990's 138 225 904 1,322 1,833 1,836 1,930 2,446 1,973 2,017 2000's 1,704 1,752 1,673 1,717 1,742 2,018 2,302 2,529 2,378 3,091 2010's 3,215 2,832 2,579 2,373 2,800 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  13. West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,669 1980's 2,559 1,944 2,252 2,324 2,246 2,177 2,272 2,360 2,440 2,342 1990's 2,329 2,672 2,491 2,598 2,702 2,588 2,793 2,946 2,968 3,040 2000's 3,062 2,825 3,498 3,399 3,509 4,572 4,654 4,881 5,266 6,090 2010's 7,163 10,532

  14. Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7,834 1980's 9,413 9,659 10,155 10,728 11,014 11,229 10,393 10,572 10,903 11,276 1990's 10,433 10,433 11,305 11,387 11,351 12,712 13,084 14,321 14,371 14,809 2000's 17,211 19,399 21,531 22,716 23,640 24,722 24,463 30,896 32,399 36,748 2010's

  15. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J.; Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  16. Deriving Value from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Deriving Value from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams Deriving Value from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams Breakout Session 3A: Deriving Value from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams Deriving Value from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams Luca Zullo, Principal, Verde Nero zullo_bioenergy_2016.pdf (1.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols CX-011101: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  17. Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Revision

  18. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Estimated

  19. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields, Wet After Lease Separation

  20. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases

  1. Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Nebraska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) No Data Available For This Series - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases

  2. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-15

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  3. Catalytic gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Xu, Xiaodong

    1995-12-31

    Wet biomass (water hyacinth, banana trees, cattails, green algae, kelp, etc.) grows rapidly and abundantly around the world. As a biomass crop, aquatic species are particularly attractive because their cultivation does not compete with land-based agricultural activities designed to produce food for consumption or export. However, wet biomass is not regarded as a promising feed for conventional thermochemical conversion processes because the cost associated with drying it is too high. This research seeks to address this problem by employing water as the gasification medium. Prior work has shown that low concentrations of glucose (a model compound for whole biomass) can be completely gasified in supercritical water at 600{degrees}C and 34.5 Wa after a 30 s reaction time. Higher concentrations of glucose (up to 22% by weight in water) resulted in incomplete conversion under these conditions. The gas contained hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ethane, propane, and traces of other hydrocarbons. The carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are easily converted to hydrogen by commercial technology available in most refineries. This prior work utilized capillary tube reactors with no catalyst. A larger reactor system was fabricated and the heterogeneous catalytic gasification of glucose and wet biomass slurry of higher concentration was studied to attain higher conversions.

  4. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Gerald T.

    2001-01-01

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  5. Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porro, I.

    2000-09-30

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  6. Coal combustion by wet oxidation. Wet oxidation of coal for energy production: test plan and partial results. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettinger, J.A.

    1980-07-10

    A test plan has been developed which will provide the data necessary to carry out design and economic studies of a steam generating facility, employing the wet oxidation of coal as a heat source. It is obvious, from the literature search and preliminary testing, that the higher the reaction temperature, the more complete the combustion of coal. However, operation at elevated temperatures and pressures present difficult design problems, and the necessary equipment is costly. Operation under these conditions can only be justified by the higher economic value of high pressure and temperature steam. With a reduction in temperature from 550/sup 0/F (228/sup 0/C) to 450/sup 0/F (232/sup 0/C), the operating pressure is reduced by more than half, thus holding down the overall cost of the system. For this reason, our plan is to study both the enhancement of low temperature wet oxidation of coal, and the higher operating regions. The coal selected for the first portion of this test is an Eastern Appalachian high-volatile-A Bituminous type, from the Upper Clarion seam in Pennsylvania. This coal was selected as being a typical high sulfur, eastern coal. The wet oxidation of coal to produce low pressure steam is a process suited for a high sulfur, low grade, coal. It is not intended that wet oxidation be used in all applications with all types of coals, as it does not appear to be competitive, economically, with conventional combustion, therefore the testing will focus on using high sulfur, low grade coals. In the later portion of testing all the available coals will be tested. In addition, a sample of Minnesota peat will be tested to determine if it also can be used in the process.

  7. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Gui; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 ; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu; Duan, Yuanyuan E-mail: ysun@coe.drexel.edu

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger.

  8. Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

  9. "Plastic" Solar Cells: Self-Assembly of Bulk HeterojunctionNano...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Self-Assembly of Bulk Heterojunction Nano-Materials by Spontaneous Phase Separation ... self-assembly of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) nano-materials by spontaneous phase separation. ...

  10. Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yusheng; He, Duanwei

    2011-05-10

    Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

  11. Palladium diffusion into bulk copper via the (100) surface.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bussmann, Ezra; Pohl, Karsten; Sun, Jiebing; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2009-01-01

    Using low-energy electron microscopy, we measure the diffusion of Pd into bulk Cu at the Cu(100) surface. Interdiffusion is tracked by measuring the dissolution of the Cu(100)-c(2 x 2)-Pd surface alloy during annealing (T > 240 C). The activation barrier for Pd diffusion from the surface alloy into the bulk is determined to be (1.8 {+-} 0.6) eV. During annealing, we observe the growth of a new layer of Cu near step edges. Under this new Cu layer, dilute Pd remaining near the surface develops a layered structure similar to the Cu{sub 3}Pd L 1{sub 2} bulk alloy phase.

  12. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J; Wang, Hsin; Ferber, Mattison K; Liang, Zhenxian

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal

  13. Mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-04-01

    A method of making a mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel, including the steps of dispersing nanotubes in an aqueous media or other media to form a suspension, adding reactants and catalyst to the suspension to create a reaction mixture, curing the reaction mixture to form a wet gel, drying the wet gel to produce a dry gel, and pyrolyzing the dry gel to produce the mechanically robust, electrically conductive ultralow-density carbon nanotube-based aerogel. The aerogel is mechanically robust, electrically conductive, and ultralow-density, and is made of a porous carbon material having 5 to 95% by weight carbon nanotubes and 5 to 95% carbon binder.

  14. Density Equalizing Map Projections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    A geographic map is mathematically transformed so that the subareas of the map are proportional to a given quantity such as population. In other words, population density is equalized over the entire map. The transformed map can be used as a display tool, or it can be statistically analyzed. For example, cases of disease plotted on the transformed map should be uniformly distributed at random, if disease rates are everywhere equal. Geographic clusters of diseasemore » can be readily identified, and their statistical significance determined, on a density equalized map.« less

  15. Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 138 23 228 283 588 70 57 2,091 917 82 2010's 598 4,948 276 964 2,277 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  16. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,884 1980's 1,721 1,553 1,359 1,195 1,219 1,067 1,074 996 1,044 1,029 1990's 989 964 942 942 929 882 925 862 827 894 2000's 887 876 797 728 750 611

  17. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 171 1980's 195 629 122 87 25 11 6 5 24 9 1990's 0 72 78 3 26 24 10 5 36 24 2000's 21 18 49 7 4 6 11 0 36 4 2010's 1 49 4 0 32 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  18. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 270 1980's 389 397 329 259 250 312 141 281 213 150 1990's 188 50 101 80 547 197 411 321 264 309 2000's 308 511 187 165 80 141 151 101 61 56

  19. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 340 484 405 142 230 192 498 278 138 36 2010's 205 356 91 255 239 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  20. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 107 1980's 419 138 -178 151 326 -331 105 -31 361 24 1990's 60 19 -59 319 375 -209 447 22 -91 191 2000's -253 197 53 126 73 21 127 112 -84 98 2010's -42 -32 187 -118 298 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  1. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 459 1980's 668 542 486 498 416 313 582 261 282 296 1990's 546 240 139 112 322 510 279 520 500 130 2000's 221 345 285 302 365 345 321 299 209 231 2010's 266 78 214 119 218 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  2. Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 325 339 360 202 260 90 338 150 138 32 2010's 55 579 36 85 184 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  3. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 301 330 276 220 220 1990's 191 177 205 141 149 155 152 165 170 163 2000's 142 138 97 90 75 75 64 64 107 113 2010's 108 99 107 105 109 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  4. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 80 131 37 61 34 34 49 96 6 18 2010's 69 76 22 62 92 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  5. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17 -70 -57 7 69 1990's -27 -70 -44 -53 100 35 -43 73 -9 41 2000's -45 43 -24 8 -1 56 -3 15 54 59 2010's -282 -39 159 -39 99 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  6. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 53 34 32 18 59 1990's 34 36 27 25 42 31 150 104 35 65 2000's 28 49 37 39 51 19 27 20 30 67 2010's 26 29 114 155 59 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  7. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 291 258 265 413 316 1990's 266 199 198 240 123 118 125 206 387 285 2000's 248 155 195 142 153 79 62 94 137 299 2010's 171 144 196 169 212 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  8. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 326 291 288 238 350 1990's 256 244 187 155 173 211 173 150 382 380 2000's 199 126 123 111 145 116 93 135 302 116 2010's 144 225 159 183 134 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  9. Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 77 88 19 79 42 44 70 36 19 16 2010's 88 90 19 4 41 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  10. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 511 202 295 298 171 1990's 243 54 104 85 604 247 437 415 298 365 2000's 369 563 255 246 119 191 189 131 208 1,550 2010's 268 167 12 8 59 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  11. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 770 7 16 24 17 1990's 3 72 78 3 26 66 12 5 43 46 2000's 36 26 69 12 13 6 29 0 195 259 2010's 49 49 4 18 57 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  12. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 702 782 669 464 572 355 713 1,589 1,300 87 2010's 792 5,509 267 1,382 4,471 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  13. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 266 226 251 507 266 1990's 67 83 -188 604 491 -81 620 -44 -278 556 2000's -193 238 139 270 -12 100 98 201 -150 244 2010's -411 165 469 49 441 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  14. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 539 423 591 559 912 187 449 2,307 1,067 114 2010's 658 5,528 337 1,053 2,461 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  15. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 391 159 176 174 170 1990's 126 111 103 116 119 130 163 136 113 101 2000's 110 140 109 113 88 63 79 81 60 45 2010's 53 42 70 55 42 - = No Data Reported;

  16. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 97 0 10 0 8 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 7 22 2000's 9 8 11 0 4 0 18 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 17 25 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  17. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 92 7 13 55 10 1990's 24 1 0 2 42 50 25 92 34 51 2000's 49 29 44 75 28 39 34 29 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  18. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 83 164 17 81 58 22 25 52 5 0 2010's 23 144 0 0 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  19. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 30 -27 291 8 61 1990's -115 123 -70 162 23 -23 27 28 -58 181 2000's 61 2 -3 31 -66 30 -11 9 -3 -8 2010's 115 53 158 -57 -34 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  20. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 27 37 13 45 37 1990's 15 108 1 42 6 14 26 25 5 25 2000's 59 55 38 25 24 28 75 19 22 15 2010's 2 13 4 0 18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  1. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 252 252 123 291 3,303 1990's 110 168 139 83 120 151 85 103 99 207 2000's 100 77 240 71 114 41 48 84 69 40 2010's 64 12 209 19 41 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  2. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 128 104 90 141 3,397 1990's 82 110 127 91 199 125 82 81 84 97 2000's 76 55 46 66 103 49 56 63 38 45 2010's 46 34 65 59 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 76 61 3 74 64 27 54 66 12 0 2010's 5 1 25 4 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  4. Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 18,226 13,756 10,172 10,638 12,571 10,156 25,122 14,615 7,910 3,477 2010's 10,879 45,818 5,941 8,359 23,671 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 52 1980's 66 62 67 70 67 73 70 73 61 54 1990's 53 49 44 36 41 38 36 35 31 32 2000's 39 26 28 29 18 17 18 17 16 5 2010's 6 5 10 15 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  6. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 12 0 23 148 0 0 3 24 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  7. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's -21 1980's 179 -99 -10 143 -105 -19 -48 36 -27 0 1990's 17 38 -30 -6 51 10 9 -25 6 -28 2000's 33 -12 19 19 3 -9 0 1 5 -28 2010's 4 2 -8 39 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  8. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 16 1980's 23 19 53 19 23 15 4 3 1 7 1990's 1 15 0 5 8 1 1 13 2 1 2000's 3 3 7 0 3 2 0 0 7 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  9. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 64 1980's 42 46 98 79 66 88 58 38 27 54 1990's 31 42 28 23 21 24 17 53 76 50 2000's 27 41 33 43 69 24 5 3 34 105 2010's 13 12 8 4 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  10. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 41 1980's 33 54 76 90 149 61 55 59 27 41 1990's 42 67 17 36 32 18 64 34 46 107 2000's 18 22 79 83 5 8 61 2 7 39 2010's 10 6 35 8 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  11. Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 13 2 12 123 0 0 3 20 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  12. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 96 1980's 111 94 81 69 81 69 68 68 76 85 1990's 76 114 110 111 115 130 179 192 215 208 2000's 300 218 218 195 194 198 183 170 145 151 2010's 151 137 130 120 112 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  13. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 5 0 0 4 154 60 1 76 1990's 24 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 3 0 2 31 0 5 0 1 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  14. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 41 1980's 13 11 11 15 16 27 65 94 95 32 1990's 42 17 7 0 0 9 78 0 6 0 2000's 15 50 8 0 0 11 0 0 4 0 2010's 2 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 664 2 49 244 15 91 24 1,235 10 17 2010's 725 410 0 11 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  16. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's -26 1980's 144 -91 21 87 -54 -1 24 -7 -105 46 1990's -21 193 134 100 101 321 580 199 94 44 2000's 165 687 60 50 -90 1 112 -48 -24 -286 2010's 254 3 -97 -103 -52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  17. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 26 1980's 20 20 6 8 7 6 84 275 50 45 1990's 42 6 31 18 8 34 17 39 10 1 2000's 143 61 286 75 88 54 88 30 14 16 2010's 1 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 55 1980's 37 64 61 31 47 55 28 132 256 251 1990's 150 285 233 190 29 303 139 74 218 441 2000's 152 493 248 197 298 142 290 210 407 307 2010's 372 260 1,073 137 85 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  19. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 90 1980's 38 44 86 38 49 44 59 115 232 205 1990's 50 228 139 135 167 65 403 225 506 532 2000's 410 246 311 225 204 136 406 791 140 334 2010's 255 207 515 387 292 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  20. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 473 23 24 82 14 106 45 1,041 0 0 2010's 539 654 0 11 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  1. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 5 1 3 4 2 4 4 2 3 3 1990's 4 2 2 2 3 10 5 2 1 2 2000's 2 2 1 1 1 11 1 1 0 13 2010's 1 8 1 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  2. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  3. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  4. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  5. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 16 -20 18 6 -17 15 22 -27 16 13 1990's -13 -7 -3 1 5 27 1 11 -22 5 2000's -31 4 1 -5 -1 7 4 -13 -2 42 2010's -70 66 -97 -5 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  6. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1990's 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 0 2010's 2 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  7. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 3 3 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 1990's 2 3 0 2 0 0 3 26 1 7 2000's 4 2 0 0 3 4 0 0 4 13 2010's 0 9 0 0 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  8. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 3 2 1 2 2 2 0 0 2 1 1990's 1 1 2 1 0 4 3 20 10 41 2000's 3 0 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 53 2010's 1 46 1 19 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  9. Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  10. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 13 14 4 4 5 7 2 5 7 4 1990's 3 5 4 8 8 2 1 1 2 1 2000's 4 4 5 9 8 7 8 13 19 17 2010's 15 14 12 11 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 0 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 4 14 0 38 8 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 16 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  12. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 1 2 7 0 7 7 0 13 5 10 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 0 0 2010's 0 0 2 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 4 1 2 0 6 31 21 0 2010's 0 46 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  14. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 23 1980's 6 12 -9 6 5 -11 42 -53 13 -20 1990's 3 13 -12 5 -4 -20 -4 -29 5 23 2000's 8 7 2 5 0 17 -12 14 -12 26 2010's -5 2 -12 5 -3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 21 1980's 9 12 0 3 0 3 2 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 2 37 12 35 17 2 29 48 41 94 2010's 127 16 5 6 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  16. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 5 4 22 3 9 3 0 1 11 0 1990's 3 4 0 5 22 2 0 0 0 31 2000's 0 2 1 0 40 14 18 14 33 107 2010's 121 42 38 58 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  17. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 1980's 6 6 12 1 15 0 1 4 3 6 1990's 5 8 36 12 3 5 8 3 6 0 2000's 4 3 4 6 5 8 9 12 41 12 2010's 110 28 18 8 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  18. Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 18 10 0 2010's 14 100 14 0 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  19. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 1980's 10 9 14 10 13 12 14 12 10 12 1990's 11 14 12 16 10 6 7 8 7 6 2000's 6 4 5 8 3 3 3 5 6 8 2010's 7 8 9 6 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 0 3 0 5 1 8 0 1 0 0 1990's 15 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2010's 0 1 1 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1990's 0 0 7 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 11 2 9 1 5 0 0 9 0 0 2010's 2 0 3 0 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  3. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's -66 1980's 6 -6 6 -2 2 2 0 -1 0 31 1990's 7 10 -4 -13 19 -12 20 0 -6 -6 2000's -1 -3 5 -1 -2 1 0 2 11 22 2010's 11 37 -3 -14 15 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 7 1 3 1 4 3 3 3 13 11 1990's 2 1 0 0 1 0 9 12 0 0 2000's 4 2 3 0 0 1 7 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 4 3 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  5. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5 1980's 5 9 7 5 6 23 60 7 7 18 1990's 36 29 24 10 31 6 15 8 12 14 2000's 7 7 5 4 2 2 1 1 10 20 2010's 12 17 8 8 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 15 1980's 8 13 20 17 46 13 31 10 14 22 1990's 44 14 10 7 10 7 13 8 21 10 2000's 6 4 6 8 3 4 1 6 17 7 2010's 10 13 13 6 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  7. Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3 3 7 2 8 1 5 2 0 10 2010's 6 0 1 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  8. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 146 1980's 161 187 185 150 169 140 151 166 172 144 1990's 130 129 97 95 73 85 81 85 72 74 2000's 73 90 94 85 90 83 81 95 104 93 2010's 81 67 56 56 47 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  9. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 360 42 15 4 16 2 0 0 20 25 1990's 6 12 5 10 3 14 0 0 0 0 2000's 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  10. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 1980's 50 31 24 8 20 11 4 2 9 29 1990's 19 8 2 3 8 1 1 2 0 8 2000's 1 19 27 28 7 3 4 1 2 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 25 28 24 28 3 54 29 70 4 2 2010's 11 10 107 91 80 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  12. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 55 1980's 23 405 19 14 5 4 51 5 1 -13 1990's 71 97 -97 81 -17 45 -7 -18 -12 40 2000's -22 55 76 -26 21 6 -23 33 1 6 2010's -8 75 67 44 -29 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  13. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 65 1980's 96 72 39 30 45 77 68 29 18 46 1990's 19 10 9 2 1 30 34 36 110 11 2000's 49 41 52 81 27 74 112 147 156 133 2010's 33 24 0 2 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 119 1980's 146 152 366 275 188 153 155 89 79 175 1990's 106 122 98 99 104 41 74 48 100 106 2000's 32 36 71 37 53 25 39 49 87 232 2010's 59 140 294 68 16 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  15. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 56 1980's 37 62 207 163 130 76 162 143 116 160 1990's 121 74 111 57 45 66 74 58 157 156 2000's 78 66 83 59 46 53 94 48 92 85 2010's 67 93 79 33 76 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  16. Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 92 31 21 40 10 16 39 22 2 7 2010's 25 11 159 39 116 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  17. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6 1980's 11 14 10 12 10 11 11 11 13 8 1990's 9 7 8 6 7 7 6 5 5 6 2000's 6 7 8 7 9 15 19 21 27 35 2010's 24 19 22 25 25 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6 4 6 4 2 2 17 26 42 3 2010's 30 45 4 4 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  19. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 34 -32 -9 26 -17 9 0 -4 -1 -29 1990's 14 -18 3 -8 6 1 -3 -5 1 4 2000's 1 4 8 -8 -4 0 1 1 7 84 2010's -38 -33 -3 -5 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  20. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7 1980's 21 13 5 6 3 1 2 2 1 1 1990's 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 6 3 2000's 5 15 14 25 16 39 22 18 9 5 2010's 41 14 38 37 79 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 8 1980's 13 20 15 18 19 8 10 8 8 10 1990's 7 4 8 5 6 3 1 4 7 28 2000's 10 9 14 3 12 14 19 32 17 65 2010's 31 34 20 43 49 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  2. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11 1980's 26 12 18 17 10 21 25 19 25 13 1990's 19 8 7 11 8 7 7 4 14 42 2000's 9 12 7 7 26 20 51 60 11 126 2010's 40 32 26 51 15 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  3. Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 5 8 0 1 1 19 28 47 3 2010's 29 45 4 4 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  4. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 42 1980's 51 74 36 39 38 41 31 32 47 36 1990's 40 42 46 44 43 45 47 51 46 35 2000's 62 67 70 79 86 86 100 92 88 80 2010's 70 57 45 39 35 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 1 4 4 5 9 19 8 0 0 4 1990's 10 3 5 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2000's 41 4 0 0 6 14 28 1 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  6. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 7 0 2 1 0 0 4 0 0 1 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 1 0 0 1 0 20 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  7. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6 56 0 325 1 7 0 13 55 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  8. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's -68 1980's 550 56 -430 51 -58 52 -67 -22 77 -73 1990's 14 -12 56 -151 137 -5 20 36 -13 42 2000's 10 48 49 -21 -55 8 12 10 -10 56 2010's 16 -25 46 11 41 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  9. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 40 1980's 24 47 29 25 36 2 5 1 0 128 1990's 39 17 15 0 0 0 1 21 0 12 2000's 53 22 83 122 116 92 123 64 67 28 2010's 47 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  10. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 80 1980's 179 63 83 63 61 33 22 8 25 16 1990's 25 30 13 6 71 11 11 130 37 28 2000's 125 82 96 23 113 109 60 43 40 148 2010's 70 65 175 8 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  11. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 35 1980's 48 91 56 44 47 46 35 40 24 80 1990's 15 12 15 18 18 127 52 96 106 56 2000's 121 70 34 39 47 44 15 34 30 8 2010's 65 12 6 65 76 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  12. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6 52 2 227 1 5 1 13 45 0 2010's 12 0 27 70 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated

  13. Nebraska Natural Gas Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Proved Nonproducing Reserves of Total Gas

  14. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 400 1980's 341 365 355 304 318 293 202 254 236 278 1990's 286 272 298 306 295 239 246 253 275 327 2000's 294 352 354 328 338 367 340 334 340 325 2010's 265 228 208 220 187

  15. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 96 1980's 60 74 69 17 25 4 1 0 0 11 1990's 20 6 3 2 0 5 2 0 1 2 2000's 8 20 5 3 14 5 39 22 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  16. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 41 1980's 4 12 32 8 12 22 4 10 11 24 1990's 3 14 2 29 8 6 4 4 2 6 2000's 5 16 9 16 3 2 0 11 1 3 2010's 1 2 4 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  17. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 338 103 80 184 371 554 112 123 180 186 2010's 150 148 52 286 12 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  18. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 370 1980's -309 141 15 -34 -81 -3 -145 126 3 92 1990's 193 -100 70 31 29 -37 -3 9 -3 104 2000's -108 46 51 37 9 42 110 56 -12 149 2010's -49 -92 31 -97 111 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  19. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 297 1980's 300 359 277 164 151 155 47 61 76 84 1990's 147 93 14 89 128 67 88 175 225 94 2000's 666 435 246 403 294 333 312 356 381 116 2010's 94 218 164 170 80 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  20. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 269 1980's 270 333 417 240 225 299 221 157 182 201 1990's 220 255 205 147 148 162 127 128 290 251 2000's 230 349 1,000 895 322 329 408 308 324 406 2010's 225 301 515 296 322 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  1. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 260 1980's 188 223 333 272 339 298 265 365 457 369 1990's 302 297 289 214 209 217 246 275 340 558 2000's 461 311 1,095 345 407 288 332 307 330 298 2010's 339 237 253 343 463 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  2. New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 200 185 71 192 166 436 121 205 112 100 2010's 91 121 100 510 12 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  3. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 8 47 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 29 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 1 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  4. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 16 41 5 7 8 3 0 0 31 40 1990's 1 0 12 8 0 0 0 0 0 22 2000's 1 14 0 0 0 1 147 0 1 0 2010's 0 7 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 524 189 913 647 938 617 6,278 161 5 66 2010's 0 844 5 326 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  6. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 28 714 -803 -54 -41 49 119 54 92 205 1990's 171 721 401 -265 -559 247 161 -884 60 253 2000's -86 -111 125 -6 -32 6 49 73 -14 263 2010's 120 179 49 42 310 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 334 1980's 384 484 182 132 127 129 73 64 1,147 318 1990's 1,554 493 387 285 476 514 442 485 584 486 2000's 1,266 772 930 976 908 610 446 168 110 130 2010's 150 222 103 7 56 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 273 116 904 458 443 470 6,278 297 202 145 2010's 13 841 0 224 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  9. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6 1980's 5 5 1990's 5 4 8 11 12 12 10 10 8 7 2000's 6 4 4 5 5 5 4 4 3 5 2010's 6 8 17 9 17 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  10. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2010's 0 20 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  11. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 2 1990's 0 0 1 5 6 -10 2 -1 3 0 2000's 1 -4 4 3 3 -4 1 -1 0 5 2010's 13 3 57 -65 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  12. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 2 1 1990's 0 2 0 4 2 4 2 0 0 0 2000's 0 1 2 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  13. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 1 1990's 2 6 3 1 2 3 3 2 8 3 2000's 2 1 1 0 0 1 8 1 0 1 2010's 4 0 6 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  14. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 13 5 1990's 3 4 16 19 14 9 3 5 11 9 2000's 1 3 7 3 1 4 4 12 1 11 2010's 6 2 18 20 76 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  15. Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 1 5 0 0 0 4 5 0 0 2010's 2 9 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  16. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 44 1980's 63 85 1990's 104 147 254 276 385 354 367 372 391 380 2000's 365 345 365 347 325 298 286 273 262 256 2010's 225 218 204 174 167 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  17. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 71 1980's 0 8 1990's 0 0 1 0 0 131 0 14 0 0 2000's 0 0 2 4 0 0 7 17 1 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 1 5 1990's 434 33 94 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 2000's 0 43 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 2010's 1 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  19. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 246 2 0 270 0 439 259 385 20 0 2010's 153 378 22 191 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  20. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 38 32 1990's 202 598 173 -639 22 -39 -42 -47 1 31 2000's -23 -35 63 -45 28 -21 -3 2 -7 42 2010's 47 -48 47 -195 498 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 46 1980's 66 11 1990's 1,019 227 35 376 78 114 175 34 19 1 2000's 184 173 291 321 132 84 150 125 61 21 2010's 29 3 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  2. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 44 1980's 124 93 1990's 942 205 192 164 2,130 290 94 54 308 139 2000's 68 224 156 125 157 60 205 35 747 336 2010's 176 163 256 79 43 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  3. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 135 1980's 61 121 1990's 762 772 546 29 2,091 482 504 346 301 210 2000's 78 77 126 595 163 133 234 153 287 90 2010's 208 470 84 50 70 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  4. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 149 1 1 251 30 427 188 303 11 2 2010's 270 586 11 373 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  5. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 52 1980's 52 55 74 80 135 113 149 172 219 211 1990's 184 171 199 212 253 236 235 270 314 263 2000's 312 253 262 276 275 258 218 227 207 225 2010's 174 176 172 181 204 - = No

  6. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3,573 0 0 0 0 19 0 1 0 0 2010's 0 51 0 1 161 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  7. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 1980's 13 97 11 -3 -5 465 0 -1 101 6 1990's -26 0 77 -29 25 -339 3 106 -149 145 2000's -145 0 0 -1 1 0 -1 1 -1 1 2010's -1 -1 -2 1 -1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  8. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 311 0 0 1 1 72 2 46 10 127 1990's 53 17 51 8 0 3 6 14 1 2 2000's 1,976 20 0 0 33 1 4 6 0 0 2010's 2 3 14 17 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  9. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 123 1980's 13 10 22 606 339 201 71 67 25,117 79 1990's 40 129 19 67 19 36 107 6 48 3,530 2000's 1,869 133 42 19 155 26 111 10 3,954 5 2010's 260 79 198 2,120 553 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  10. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 719 1980's 1,091 77 2,223 282 426 513 19 21 762 83 1990's 926 84 84 71 240 386 87 1,792 65 3,577 2000's 77 171 84 187 589 179 2,850 2,098 37 1,696 2010's 236 843 495 38 179 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  11. Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3,741 0 0 0 0 22 0 3 0 1 2010's 0 2 0 0 167 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  12. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 161 181 188 193 189 200 179 179 184 192 1990's 158 184 219 184 201 195 211 207 204 202 2000's 198 213 200 204 206 213 192 164 149 136 2010's 145 152 129 108 101 - = No Data

  13. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 15 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53 2000's 0 56 0 20 0 22 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  14. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 4 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 1990's 0 40 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 23 2000's 13 4 4 1 26 10 2 0 5 0 2010's 0 3 0 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  15. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 825 0 13 0 0 79 0 5 0 0 2010's 0 171 0 271 34 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  16. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's -50 1980's 22 -310 1 0 1 -451 23 0 54 -14 1990's -291 1 201 81 28 -76 66 -1 -14 -1 2000's 145 -1 1 0 -1 -1 -49 1 -1 1 2010's -2 -1 -1 1 -24 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  17. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 29 1990's 2 0 4 19 5 39 0 0 1 0 2000's 0 40 62 81 108 61 46 22 18 2 2010's 13 1 30 74 138 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  18. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 91 51 0 136 56 354 689 1 13 57 1990's 59 112 2 43 32 18 64 93 77 45 2000's 249 206 77 215 53 129 267 103 153 103 2010's 195 128 142 301 137 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  19. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 77 2 24 481 16 166 701 47 145 1990's 151 713 94 609 34 234 115 42 105 50 2000's 224 65 58 241 49 116 32 70 149 191 2010's 392 95 263 114 89 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  20. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 842 0 13 0 0 74 0 8 0 4 2010's 132 34 2 92 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Nonassociated

  1. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11 1980's 28 28 9 11 11 4 7 6 6 6 1990's 13 21 25 21 19 22 23 17 13 5 2000's 4 3 5 5 4 3 5 4 3 4 2010's 4 6 9 9 10 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 2 1 0 27 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 79 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  3. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 0 0 4 1 1 -26 -2 3 15 -2 1990's -70 91 23 -17 11 25 14 -19 -3 -1 2000's -1 -1 4 2 -1 -3 3 -7 3 12 2010's -3 24 38 -23 -20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 2 1 3 16 3 1 2 1 1 0 1990's 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2010's 4 0 11 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  5. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 1980's 0 2 12 3 7 11 18 11 4 10 1990's 4 5 4 8 5 6 25 7 17 20 2000's 1 1 1 2 0 1 2 7 28 0 2010's 0 13 9 4 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  6. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 54 19 4 17 9 8 18 8 5 6 1990's 8 3 3 6 5 20 18 10 15 29 2000's 4 1 10 3 7 1 2 11 3 5 2010's 12 50 5 88 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  7. Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 5 2 0 0 16 0 0 0 5 2010's 0 38 0 0 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  8. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 91 1980's 90 94 150 196 178 173 119 124 154 161 1990's 152 152 180 167 167 160 178 173 157 159 2000's 150 157 153 161 166 171 183 265 454 694 2010's 948 1,074 1,143 1,132 1,133 - = No Data

  9. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 24 1980's 25 1 24 8 14 16 24 29 27 13 1990's 9 6 6 1 1 0 27 15 36 12 2000's 16 11 8 0 18 31 33 27 41 36 2010's 27 23 11 1 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  10. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 5 18 7 4 2 13 0 0 0 0 1990's 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 2000's 0 0 24 0 3 4 7 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  11. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 343 5 78 81 52 3 5 280 5 36 2010's 807 6,882 6 9 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  12. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 17 1980's -8 36 85 -20 89 -100 65 26 101 -48 1990's 162 15 160 -45 84 39 18 0 3 -47 2000's -2 28 25 17 13 11 -31 -22 -67 -8 2010's -31 705 -778 -53 18 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  13. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 49 1980's 90 75 105 155 161 168 246 222 229 279 1990's 114 191 171 115 91 87 83 94 638 357 2000's 48 87 106 132 91 141 112 139 161 621 2010's 301 311 6,603 280 1,095 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  14. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 46 1980's 64 43 83 165 138 98 163 210 115 197 1990's 93 160 179 92 142 88 79 196 582 734 2000's 204 127 104 146 193 121 99 310 1,247 1,907 2010's 1,060 581 1,749 472 157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 337 3 64 63 24 15 4 298 19 49 2010's 393 6,724 1 4 239 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  16. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 27 1980's 26 30 34 32 28 28 26 24 22 24 1990's 25 22 19 14 12 9 9 11 13 10 2000's 10 13 12 11 10 18 9 12 11 12 2010's 12

  17. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 1 3 1 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  18. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 5 2 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No

  19. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 23 0 5 2 7 1 60 6 6 0 2010's 0 0 0 1 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  20. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 47 1980's -31 10 44 -2 -42 -4 -4 -17 -5 8 1990's 6 18 -11 -59 4 -15 15 10 6 -3 2000's -1 3 2 6 -4 73 -64 2 1 2 2010's 2 15 2 -8 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;