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Sample records for visible emissions rhode

  1. Washington County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Rhode Island Bradford, Rhode Island Charlestown, Rhode Island Exeter, Rhode Island Hope Valley, Rhode Island Hopkinton, Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island Narragansett Pier,...

  2. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr.; Shannon, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  3. Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TRANSPORT THEORY Incandescent emission of light, polarized emission, pyrometry, hot metals, warm dense matter. Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size N...

  4. The design and synthesis of heterostructured quantum dots with dual emission in the visible and infrared

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Lin, Qianglu; Makarov, Nikolay S.; Koh, Weon-kyu; Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Cirloganu, Claudiu M.; Luo, Hongmei; Klimov, Victor I.; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.

    2014-11-26

    The unique optical properties exhibited by visible emitting core/shell quantum dots with especially thick shells are the focus of widespread study, but have yet to be realized in infrared (IR) -active nanostructures. We apply an effective-mass model to identify PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots as a promising system for achieving this goal. We then synthesize colloidal PbSe/CdSe quantum dots with shell thicknesses of up to 4 nm that exhibit unusually slow hole intra-band relaxation from shell to core states, as evidenced by the emergence of dual emission, i.e., IR photoluminescence from the PbSe core observed simultaneously with visible emission from themore » CdSe shell. In addition to the large shell thickness, the development of slowed intraband relaxation is facilitated by the existence of a sharp core-shell interface without discernible alloying. Growth of thick shells without interfacial alloying or incidental formation of homogenous CdSe nanocrystals was accomplished using insights attained via a systematic study of the dynamics of the cation-exchange synthesis of both PbSe/CdSe as well as the related system PbS/CdS. Finally, we show that the efficiency of the visible photoluminescence can be greatly enhanced by inorganic passivation.« less

  5. The design and synthesis of heterostructured quantum dots with dual emission in the visible and infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Qianglu; Makarov, Nikolay S.; Koh, Weon-kyu; Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Cirloganu, Claudiu M.; Luo, Hongmei; Klimov, Victor I.; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.

    2014-11-26

    The unique optical properties exhibited by visible emitting core/shell quantum dots with especially thick shells are the focus of widespread study, but have yet to be realized in infrared (IR) -active nanostructures. We apply an effective-mass model to identify PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots as a promising system for achieving this goal. We then synthesize colloidal PbSe/CdSe quantum dots with shell thicknesses of up to 4 nm that exhibit unusually slow hole intra-band relaxation from shell to core states, as evidenced by the emergence of dual emission, i.e., IR photoluminescence from the PbSe core observed simultaneously with visible emission from the CdSe shell. In addition to the large shell thickness, the development of slowed intraband relaxation is facilitated by the existence of a sharp core-shell interface without discernible alloying. Growth of thick shells without interfacial alloying or incidental formation of homogenous CdSe nanocrystals was accomplished using insights attained via a systematic study of the dynamics of the cation-exchange synthesis of both PbSe/CdSe as well as the related system PbS/CdS. Finally, we show that the efficiency of the visible photoluminescence can be greatly enhanced by inorganic passivation.

  6. University of Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Testing Facilities Name University of Rhode Island Address Department of Ocean Engineering, Sheets Building, Bay Campus Place Narragansett, Rhode Island Zip 02882 Sector...

  7. Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm Facility Rhode Island Offshore Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore...

  8. Newport County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Newport County, Rhode Island Forbes Energy LLC Places in Newport County, Rhode Island Jamestown, Rhode Island Little...

  9. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  10. Visible light stimulating dual-wavelength emission and O vacancy involved energy transfer behavior in luminescence for coaxial nanocable arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Lei, E-mail: nanoyang@qq.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hunan Province Key Laboratory for Spray Deposition Technology and Application, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Dong, Jiazhang; Jiang, Zhongcheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Pan, Anlian; Zhuang, Xiujuan [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-06-14

    We report a strategy to investigate O vacancy (V{sub O}) involved energy transfer and dual-wavelength yellow emission in coaxial nanocable. By electric field deposition and subsequent sol-gel template approach, ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu coaxial nanocable arrays are synthesized. After visible light excitation, system is promoted to O vacancy charge transfer state of V{sub O}(0/+). In the following cross relaxation, energy transfer from V{sub O} to the excitation energy level of Tb{sup 3+} in ZnO:Tb core area. While in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu shell area, energy transfer to the excitation energy level of Eu{sup 3+}. Subsequently, dual-wavelength emission is observed. By constructing nanocable with dual-wavelength emission, yellow luminescence is obtained. Adjust doping concentration of Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} in the range of 0.010.05, chromaticity coordinates of ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanocable stably stays at yellow region in color space except ZnO:Tb{sub 0.01}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sub 0.01}. As Vo states act as media in energy transfer process in nanocablers, visible light can stimulate dual-wavelength emissions. Yellow luminescent nanocable arrays will have great applications in light-emitting diode luminescence.

  11. South Jersey Energy Company (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Rhode Island Website: www1.nationalgridus.comRhodeI Twitter: @nationalgridus Facebook: https:www.facebook.comnationalgrid Outage Hotline: 1-800-465-1212 Outage Map:...

  12. Freedom Energy (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Freedom Energy Place: Rhode Island Website: www.freedomenergytechnologies. Facebook: https:www.facebook.comFreedomEnergyTechnologies References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File...

  13. GEXA Corp. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    GEXA Corp. Place: Rhode Island Website: www.gexaenergy.com Twitter: @nationalgridus Facebook: https:www.facebook.comnationalgrid Outage Hotline: 1-800-465-1212 Outage Map:...

  14. EMISSION OF VISIBLE LIGHT BY HOT DENSE METALS By R M. More, M...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... It is typically about 10 % of the black-body emission. The droplet calculations are only ... For a uniform metal plate (having constant composition, density and temperature) the ...

  15. Method And Apparatus For Examining A Tissue Using The Spectral Wing Emission Therefrom Induced By Visible To Infrared Photoexcitation.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alfano, Robert R.; Demos, Stavros G.; Zhang, Gang

    2003-12-16

    Method and an apparatus for examining a tissue using the spectral wing emission therefrom induced by visible to infrared photoexcitation. In one aspect, the method is used to characterize the condition of a tissue sample and comprises the steps of (a) photoexciting the tissue sample with substantially monochromatic light having a wavelength of at least 600 nm; and (b) using the resultant far red and near infrared spectral wing emission (SW) emitted from the tissue sample to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In one embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a continuous beam of light, and the resultant steady-state far red and near infrared SW emission from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a light pulse, and the resultant time-resolved far red and near infrared SW emission emitted from the tissue sample is used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample. In still another embodiment, the substantially monochromatic photoexciting light is a polarized light pulse, and the parallel and perpendicular components of the resultant polarized time-resolved SW emission emitted from the tissue sample are used to characterize the condition of the tissue sample.

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island EV Initiative Adds Chargers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Across the State Rhode Island EV Initiative Adds Chargers Across the State to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island EV Initiative Adds Chargers Across the State on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island EV Initiative Adds Chargers Across the State on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island EV Initiative Adds Chargers Across the State on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island EV Initiative Adds

  17. EERE Success Story-Rhode Island Schools Teach Energy Essentials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Rhode Island Schools Teach Energy Essentials EERE Success Story-Rhode Island Schools Teach Energy Essentials December 10, 2015 - 11:24am Addthis Students participating in the NEED Project at Scituate High and Calcutt Middle Schools planted 14 trees in Central Falls, Rhode Island. Photo Courtesy | Rhode Island Public Schools Students participating in the NEED Project at Scituate High and Calcutt Middle Schools planted 14 trees in Central Falls, Rhode Island. Photo

  18. Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island Recovery Act State Memo Rhode Island has substantial natural resources, including wind and biomass. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Rhode Island are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects, from weatherization to smart grid workforce training. Through these investments, Rhode Island's businesses,

  19. Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Rhode Island's PBF is supported by a surcharge on electric and gas customers' bills. Initially, the surcharge was was set at $0.0023 per kilowatt-hour (2.3 mills per kWh) and applied only to...

  20. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Rhode Island | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The New England Solar cost-Reduction Challenge Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08152013 Location(s): Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut ...

  1. TBU-0058- In the Matter of Donald R. Rhodes

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Donald R. Rhodes (Rhodes or the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his August 25, 2006 complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee...

  2. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  3. Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC (Rhode Island) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC Place: Rhode Island Phone Number: 1 877-273-6772 Website: noblesolutions.com Outage Hotline: 1...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data for

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Rhode Island Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Google Bookmark

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The University of Rhode Island |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy The University of Rhode Island Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The University of Rhode Island Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The University of Rhode Island Joined the Challenge: July 2015 Headquarters: Kingston, RI Charging Location: Kingston, RI Domestic Employees: 1,815 The University of Rhode Island (URI) is committed to maintaining its reputation as an institution that values practices and principles of sustainability. URI drafted a detailed Strategic

  6. Rhode Island Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",1743,1754,1754,1754,1754 " ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  7. Foster-Glocester Regional School District (Rhode Island) - Financing Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-12-01

    This document is an EnergySmart Schools Financing Profile of Foster-Glocester Regional School District in Rhode Island

  8. Microsoft Word - Rhode Island EA - FINAL EA.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RHODE ISLAND LFG GENCO, LLC COMBINED CYCLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION PLANT FUELED BY LANDFILL GAS JOHNSTON, RHODE ISLAND U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1742 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CFR Code of

  9. Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island Updated August 2015 Rhode Island's utilities budgeted over $100 million for energy efficiency and load management programs in 2014. What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? A system benefits charge of at least 2 mills/kWh for energy efficiency programs and 0.3 mills/kWh for renewable energy programs is collected from customers. National Grid provides a variety of energy efficiency rebates and services to

  10. Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    for your school's state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the High School Coach page. Rhode Island Region High School Regional Rhode Island Northeast...

  11. Rhode Island Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the Middle School Coach page. Rhode Island Region Middle School Regional Rhode Island Massachusetts Regional...

  12. Rhode Island Energy Group LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rhode Island Energy Group LLC Address: PO Box 340 Place: Portsmouth Zip: 2871 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  13. Liberty Power Corp. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Rhode Island Website: www.libertypowercorp.combusin Twitter: @libertypower Facebook: https:www.facebook.comLibertyPowerCorp Outage Hotline: 1-800-465-1212 Outage Map:...

  14. Direct Energy Services (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Rhode Island Website: www.business.directenergy.com Twitter: @nationalgridus Facebook: https:www.facebook.comnationalgrid Outage Hotline: 1-800-465-1212 Outage Map:...

  15. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Rhode Island Website: www.constellation.compagesde Twitter: @constellationeg Facebook: https:www.facebook.comConstellationEnergy References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data...

  16. Glacial Energy Holdings (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Holdings Place: Rhode Island Website: www.glacialenergy.com Twitter: @nationalgridus Facebook: https:www.facebook.comnationalgrid Outage Hotline: 1-800-465-1212 Outage Map:...

  17. Rhode Island High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Detailed license and usage information for this dataset Preview Download 50m GIS NREL Rhode Island energy high resoltuion renewable shapefile wind wind data wind...

  18. Tiverton, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Rhode Island.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  19. Barrington, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Rhode Island.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  20. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",4,4,3,3,3 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-",2 "Wood...

  1. Cumberland Hill, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Hill, Rhode Island: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9745431, -71.4670043 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  2. MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  3. Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources ...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Registered Energy Companies in Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district Cookson Electronics Jefferson Renewable Energy Tomorrow BioFuels LLC Retrieved from "http:...

  4. Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Providence, Rhode Island Cookson Electronics References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division...

  5. Providence County, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Companies in Providence County, Rhode Island American Battery Charging Inc Cookson Electronics Evans Capacitor Company Tomorrow BioFuels LLC Energy Generation Facilities in...

  6. Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

  7. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island ...

  8. Rhode Island/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    >> Rhode Island Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical...

  9. East Providence, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in East Providence, Rhode Island Evans Capacitor Company References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  10. "New Hampshire"," X"," X" "Rhode Island"," X"," X"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (PADD 1A)" "Connecticut"," X"," X" "Maine"," X"," X" "Massachusetts"," X"," X" "New Hampshire"," X"," X" "Rhode Island"," X"," X" "Vermont"," X"," X" "Central Atlantic (PADD ...

  11. Recovery Act State Memos Rhode Island

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Rhode Island For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION

  12. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 24 1.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  13. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1782,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",28,1.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  14. Rhode Island Schools Teach Energy Essentials | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    December 10, 2015 - 11:24am Addthis Students participating in the NEED Project at Scituate ... Photo Courtesy | Rhode Island Public Schools Students participating in the NEED Project at ...

  15. O. E. Rhodes, Jr. | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Olin E. Rhodes, Jr. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-8191 office (803) 725-3309 fax...

  16. Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm.

  17. Rhode Island Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",5813,6891,7224,7547,7595 " Coal","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",33,34,26,17,12 " Natural Gas",5780,6857,7198,7530,...

  18. Energy Department Helps Rhode Island Schools Teach Energy Essentials...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Calcutt Middle School students in Rhode Island played Energy Jeopardy as part of their NEED Energy Carnival. The students used the NEED Project website to write questions for the ...

  19. Summer 2012 Intern Project- Tyler Rhodes | Center for Energy Efficient

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Tyler Rhodes MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY GROWTH OF HIGH QUALITY LuPtSb THIN FILMS Tyler Rhodes Mechanical Engineering UC Santa Barbara Mentor: Sahil Patel Faculty Advisor: Chris Palmstorm Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering Half-Heusler compounds, such as LuPtSb, are of growing interest in materials science for potential applications in energy efficiency and spintronics. To further investigate half-Heusler crystal structures and their interesting electrical and thermal

  20. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 91 654 678 1990's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage - All Operators Rhode

  1. One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-11-01

    Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

  2. 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - TA-21_LASO_Rhodes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Land Use Case Study for Technical Area Land Use Case Study for Technical Area- -21 at 21 at Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Residential or Industrial Cleanup Standards Residential or Industrial Cleanup Standards Los Alamos Site Office 1 David S. Rhodes, Supervisory Federal Project Director Environmental Restoration Projects and Decontamination and Decommissioning Team Los Alamos Site Office Regulations Regulations Public Law 105-119, Title VI, Section 632 -

  5. Rhode Island Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region East Region South Central Region Midwest Region Mountain Region Pacific Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  6. Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 61 265 243 47 97 147 20 65 174 164 1990's 142 749 796 462 1,156 857 850 1,056 102 162 2000's 174 72 254 1,290 971 850 390 1,093 656 698 2010's 468 430 517 624 0 889 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016

  7. Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 316 192 260 55 66 120 36 295 143 202 1990's 188 355 1,216 800 996 908 1,603 1,533 851 139 2000's 986 413 301 1,205 1,058 786 411 1,089 730 954 2010's 698 436 457 645 879 864 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  8. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,158 1,152 1,122 1990's 1,135 1,107 1,096 1,066 1,064 359 363 336 325 302 2000's 317 283 54 236 223 223 245 256 243 260 2010's 249 245 248 271 266 260 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  9. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 97 243 137 1990's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Injections of

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Injections of Natural Gas into Underground

  11. Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's -6 411 541 1990's 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Net Withdrawals of Natural

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Rhode Island.

  13. Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

  14. Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 257 951 718 594 102 130 182 109 391 219 1990's 51 92 155 126 0 27 42 18 1 1 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  15. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,128 16,096 16,924 1990's 17,765 18,430 18,607 21,178 21,208 21,472 21,664 21,862 22,136 22,254 2000's 22,592 22,815 23,364 23,270 22,994 23,082 23,150 23,007 23,010 22,988 2010's 23,049 23,177 23,359 23,742 23,934 24,088 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 180,656 185,861 190,796 1990's 195,100 196,438 197,926 198,563 200,959 202,947 204,259 212,777 208,208 211,097 2000's 214,474 216,781 219,769 221,141 223,669 224,320 225,027 223,589 224,103 224,846 2010's 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 236,323 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  17. Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 117,707 130,751 118,001 2000's 88,419 95,607 87,805 78,456 72,609 80,764 77,204 87,972 89,256 92,743 2010's 94,110 100,455 95,476 85,537 88,886 93,997 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release

  18. Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Rhode Island Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.40 0.36 0.36 0.36 0.36 0.36 0.35 2000's 0.37 0.38 0.36 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.39 0.37 0.36 0.37 2010's 0.35 0.36 0.38 0.37 0.39 0.44 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  19. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control

  20. Visibility of a spacetime singularity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-02-15

    We investigate here the causal structure of spacetime in the vicinity of a spacetime singularity. The particle and energy emission from such ultradense regions forming in gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud is governed by the nature of nonspacelike paths near the same. These trajectories are examined to show that if a null geodesic comes out from the singularity, then there exist families of future-directed nonspacelike curves which also necessarily escape from the same. The existence of such families is crucial to the physical visibility of the singularity. We do not assume any underlying symmetries for the spacetime, and earlier considerations on the nature of causal trajectories emerging from a naked singularity are generalized and clarified.

  1. ARM - Measurement - Visibility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsVisibility ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Visibility The greatest horizontal distance in a given direction at which it is just possible to see and identify with the unaided eye (a) in the daytime, a prominent dark object against the sky at the horizon, and (b) at night, a moderately intense light source. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is

  2. Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

  3. Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's -255 73 -17 -8 31 27 -16 -230 31 -38 1990's -46 393 -420 -337 160 -51 -753 -476 -749 24 2000's -812 -341 -47 -84 87 -64 21 4 -74 -256 2010's -230 -7 60 -21 -879 25 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  4. Rhode Island Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural

  5. Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 837 336 243 2000's 295 281 332 383 308 695 804 822 865 900 2010's 1,468 1,003 1,023 1,087 3,020 3,106 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Pipeline

  6. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",6,4,5,5,4 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-",3 "Wood/Wood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSW Biogenic/Landfill

  7. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012, 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average.

  8. DOE Host: David Rhodes LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and Steve Veenis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    David Rhodes LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and Steve Veenis LANL Environmental Outreach: envoutreach@lanl.gov, Lorrie Bonds Lopez @ 667-0216 LA-UR-16-27801 Agenda Individual Permit for Storm Water Project Update Public Meeting Tuesday, October 18, 2016 UNM-Los Alamos, Building 2, Room ### 5:30 - 7:30 5:30 - 6 p.m. Poster Session * Storm Water Individual Permit Process * Watersheds/Sites * Remote Telemetry Unit Overview * ISCO Sampler demonstration * LID Approaches 6 - 6:15 Welcome and

  9. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  10. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1330_sri_2a.xls"

  11. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1350_sri_2a.xls"

  12. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1340_sri_2a.xls"

  13. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1992 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  14. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1490_sri_2a.xls"

  15. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  16. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5060ri2a.xls"

  17. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  19. Copper smelters and atmospheric visibility in the southwest, seasonal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nochumson, D.H.; Williams, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    Seasonal results from a study which evaluated the effects of sulfur oxides (SO/sub x/) emitted from 11 copper smelters on atmospheric visibility in 14 national parks and wilderness areas are presented. In addition two alternative strategies for controlling SO/sub x/ are compared. They are supplementary control systems (SCS) and continuous emission controls (CEC). The objective of each strategy is not to improve visibility but is to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). SCS is a strategy that has been used by almost all of the 11 copper smelters. It reduces SO/sub x/ emissions during adverse meteorological conditions through production curtailment. SCS has not been successful at eliminating NAAQS violations. The emissions used for the SCS control alternative are based upon actual copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions and operating conditions during 1979. The year 1979 was selected because it is fairly representative of production levels, though highly variable, from 1965 to 1978 and copper smelter SO/sub x/ emissions during the latter half of the 1970s. In more recent years, the copper industry has been economically depressed and copper smelter production and SO/sub x/ emissions have been lower. The southwestern states are implementing the CEC strategy to control SO/sub x/ emissions from copper smelters as part of their state implementation plans. For production levels typical of 1979, the CEC regulations would require about a two-thirds reduction in SO/sub x/ emissions from that allowed under SCS. The study estimates the effect of this reduction upon the improvement of visibility in southwestern national parks and wilderness areas.

  20. The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center conversion from HEU to LEU fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tehan, Terry

    2000-09-27

    The 2-MW Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) open pool reactor was converted from 93% UAL-High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to 20% enrichment U3Si2-AL Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The conversion included redesign of the core to a more compact size and the addition of beryllium reflectors and a beryllium flux trap. A significant increase in thermal flux level was achieved due to greater neutron leakage in the new compact core configuration. Following the conversion, a second cooling loop and an emergency core cooling system were installed to permit operation at 5 MW. After re-licensing at 2 MW, a power upgrade request will be submitted to the NRC.

  1. Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.87 3.77 3.88 7.09 7.09 5.85 3.34 5.27 5.15 4.83 2000's 5.30 7.58 6.28 7.32 8.24 8.84 9.98 10.96 12.62 10.72 2010's 11.71 8.61 16.32 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  2. Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,742 1,080 1,411 1990's 330 0 0 0 0 0 1,010 2,405 4,679 5,524 2000's 6,070 5,380 3,912 3,176 3,015 2,834 2,673 3,764 3,663 3,430 2010's 4,062 4,669 4,503 5,288 6,295 5,531 - = No Data Reported;

  3. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Natural Gas",10,11,19,20,18,17,14,15,15,13,12,18,17,19,15,14,18,14,14,10,11,11,11,7,3 "Natural gas",2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0

  4. Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.73 0.33 0.39 1970's 0.33 0.38 0.38 0.42 0.41 0.55 0.75 1.67 2.08 2.06 1980's 2.92 4.74 4.53 4.74 4.05 4.53 3.55 2.87 2.20 4.19 1990's 3.74 3.41 2.94 3.31 2.69 2.21 3.35 3.15 3.00 2.53 2000's 4.67 5.20 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  6. 1,"Entergy Rhode Island State Energy LP","Natural gas","Entergy RISE",538

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Entergy Rhode Island State Energy LP","Natural gas","Entergy RISE",538 2,"Manchester Street","Natural gas","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",447 3,"Tiverton Power Plant","Natural gas","Tiverton Power LLC",250 4,"Ocean State Power","Natural

  7. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2005 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016"

  8. Field Performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in the Northeast, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are finally entering the mainstream residential water heater market. Potential catalysts are increased consumer demand for higher energy efficiency electric water heating and a new Federal water heating standard that effectively mandates use of HPWHs for electric storage water heaters with nominal capacities greater than 55 gallons. When compared to electric resistance water heating, the energy and cost savings potential of HPWHs is tremendous. Converting all electric resistance water heaters to HPWHs could save American consumers 7.8 billion dollars annually ($182 per household) in water heating operating costs and cut annual residential source energy consumption for water heating by 0.70 quads. Steven Winter Associates, Inc. embarked on one of the first in situ studies of these newly released HPWH products through a partnership with two sponsoring electric utility companies, National Grid and NSTAR, and one sponsoring energy efficiency service program administrator, Cape Light Compact. Recent laboratory studies have measured performance of HPWHs under various operating conditions, but publicly available field studies have not been as available. This evaluation attempts to provide publicly available field data on new HPWHs by monitoring the performance of three recently released products (General Electric GeoSpring, A.O. Smith Voltex, and Stiebel Eltron Accelera 300). Fourteen HPWHs were installed in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and monitored for over a year. Of the 14 units, ten were General Electric models (50 gallon units), two were Stiebel Eltron models (80 gallon units), and two were A.O. Smith models (one 60-gallon and one 80-gallon unit).

  9. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  10. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  11. Visible Light Solar Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Solar Technologies Place: Albuquerque, New York Zip: 87113 Product: New Mexico-based LED lighting fixture maker. References: Visible Light Solar Technologies1 This article is...

  12. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  13. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Massachusetts and Rhode Island PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Deep energy retrofit (DER) Type: 37 comprehensive retrofits, 5 partial retrofits Housing Type: 31 single-family, 8 two- family, and 3 three-family dwellings Pilot Program Sponsor: National Grid, www.nationalgridus.com Technical Support Partner: Building Science Corporation, www.buildingscience.com Contractors: Various Projects Completed: 2009-2012 Climate Zone: Cold POST-RETROFIT PERFORMANCE

  14. Design and Synthesis of Heterostructured Quantum Dots with Dual Emission in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Visible and Infrared (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Design and Synthesis of Heterostructured Quantum Dots with Dual Emission in the Visible and Infrared Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design and Synthesis of Heterostructured Quantum Dots with Dual Emission in the Visible and Infrared Authors: Lin, Qianglu ; Makarov, Nikolay S. ; Koh, Weon-kyu ; Velizhanin, Kirill A. ; Cirloganu, Claudiu M. ; Luo, Hongmei ; Klimov, Victor I. ; Pietryga, Jeffrey M. Publication Date:

  15. Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Brinkman, G.; Funk, K.; Gelman, R.; Lantz, E.; Larney, C.; Peterson, D.; Worley, C.; Liebsch, E.

    2012-01-01

    Pursuant to the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced in 2009 its intent to issue rules for controlling emissions from Navajo Generating Station that could affect visibility at the Grand Canyon and at several other national parks and wilderness areas. The final rule will conform to what EPA determines is the best available retrofit technology (BART) for the control of haze-causing air pollutants, especially nitrogen oxides. While EPA is ultimately responsible for setting Navajo Generating Station's BART standards in its final rule, it will be the U.S. Department of the Interior's responsibility to manage compliance and the related impacts. This study aims to assist both Interior and EPA by providing an objective assessment of issues relating to the power sector.

  16. Visible imaging of edge turbulence in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Zweben; R. Maqueda; K. Hill; D. Johnson; et al

    2000-06-13

    Edge plasma turbulence in tokamaks and stellarators is believed to cause the radical heat and particle flux across the separatrix and into the scrape-off-layers of these devices. This paper describes initial measurements of 2-D space-time structure of the edge density turbulence made using a visible imaging diagnostic in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The structure of the edge turbulence is most clearly visible using a method of gas puff imaging to locally illuminate the edge density turbulence.

  17. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects, and was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  18. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P.; Crawford, Mary H.

    1996-01-01

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  19. Visible imaging and spectroscopy of disruption runaway electrons in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, J. H.; Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; James, A. N.

    2013-04-15

    The first visible light images of synchrotron emission from disruption runaway electrons are presented. The forward-detected continuum radiation from runaways is identified as synchrotron emission by comparing two survey spectrometers and two visible fast cameras viewing in opposite toroidal directions. Analysis of the elongation of 2D synchrotron images of oval-shaped runaway beams indicates that the velocity pitch angle v{sub Up-Tack }/v{sub ||} ranges from 0.1 to 0.2 for the detected electrons, with energies above 25 MeV. Analysis of synchrotron intensity from a camera indicates that the tail of the runaway energy distribution reaches energies up to 60 MeV, which agrees with 0D modeling of electron acceleration in the toroidal electric field generated during the current quench. A visible spectrometer provides an independent estimate of the upper limit of runaway electron energy which is roughly consistent with energy determined from camera data. Synchrotron spectra reveal that approximately 1% of the total post-thermal quench plasma current is carried by the detected high-energy runaway population with energies in the range of 25-60 MeV; the bulk of the plasma current thus appears to be carried by relativistic electrons with energy less than 25 MeV. In addition to stable oval shapes, runaway beams with other shapes and internal structure are sometimes observed.

  20. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Crawford, M.H.

    1996-09-17

    The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1{lambda}) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%. 5 figs.

  2. Electrically Injected UV-Visible Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Changyi; Li, Qiming; Liu, Sheng; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting -Shan; Chow, Weng W.; Leung, Benjamin; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    There is strong interest in minimizing the volume of lasers to enable ultracompact, low-power, coherent light sources. Nanowires represent an ideal candidate for such nanolasers as stand-alone optical cavities and gain media, and optically pumped nanowire lasing has been demonstrated in several semiconductor systems. Electrically injected nanowire lasers are needed to realize actual working devices but have been elusive due to limitations of current methods to address the requirement for nanowire device heterostructures with high material quality, controlled doping and geometry, low optical loss, and efficient carrier injection. In this project we proposed to demonstrate electrically injected single nanowire lasers emitting in the important UV to visible wavelengths. Our approach to simultaneously address these challenges is based on high quality III-nitride nanowire device heterostructures with precisely controlled geometries and strong gain and mode confinement to minimize lasing thresholds, enabled by a unique top-down nanowire fabrication technique.

  3. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olbright, Gregory R.; Jewell, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  4. ARM: Infrared/visible sky imager (Dataset) | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Infrared/visible sky imager Title: ARM: Infrared/visible sky imager Infrared/visible sky imager Authors: Annette Koontz ; Victor Morris Publication Date: 2014-05-20 OSTI Identifier: 1181986 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (US); Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Country of

  5. Enhanced visible and near-infrared capabilities of the JET mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomanowski, B. A. Sharples, R. M.; Meigs, A. G.; Conway, N. J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Heesterman, P.; Kinna, D. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    The mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy diagnostic on JET has been upgraded with a new visible and near-infrared grating and filtered spectroscopy system. New capabilities include extended near-infrared coverage up to 1875 nm, capturing the hydrogen Paschen series, as well as a 2 kHz frame rate filtered imaging camera system for fast measurements of impurity (Be II) and deuterium D?, D?, D? line emission in the outer divertor. The expanded system provides unique capabilities for studying spatially resolved divertor plasma dynamics at near-ELM resolved timescales as well as a test bed for feasibility assessment of near-infrared spectroscopy.

  6. Visible light photocatalytic property of Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.; Narayanan, V.

    2012-06-05

    The Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition method. The prepared samples were characterized by various techniques like Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies, UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The photocatalytic activities of pure and Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanoparticles were examined based on the photodegradation of Rhodamine B (RhB). Experimental results indicated that the Zn doped V{sub 2}O{sub 5} photocatalyst (the molar ratio of V to Zn is 99: 1) exhibited maximum photocatalytic activity.

  7. Detecting Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Using Visible, Infrared...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Drizzle in Marine Warm Clouds Using Visible, Infrared, and Microwave Satellite Data H. Shao and G. Liu Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction Determining the ...

  8. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium ... The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the ...

  9. A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  10. A proposed visible FEL Facility at Boeing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    A 1-kW average power, visible wavelength FEL is described, based on a 120-MeV, 0.1. A macropulse average current linac operating at a duty factor of 0. 6% and having average beam power of 70 kW. The accelerator will employ a demonstrated photoinjector, 18-MeV, 433-MHz linac as an injector, followed by a 1300-MHz longitudinal phase space {open_quotes} linearizer,{close_quotes} a magnetic buncher chicane, and seven 1300-MHz, pulsed traveling wave linac sections. The magnets used to transport the beam from the linac to the FEL centerline, the 5-m THUNDER wiggler, and the optical resonator will be reclaimed from previous FEL demonstration experiments. We expect to attain pulse lengths of 7 ps for 3.5 nC, with minimal distortion of the pulse profile and normalized rms emittance of 7.5 {+-} 2.5 {pi} mm-mr. FELEX projects a laser conversion efficiency of 4.3 %, yielding average output of 3 kW.

  11. Graphene oxide modified TiO2 nanotube arrays?enhanced visible light photoelectrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Mingxun; Cui, Xiao-Li; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-03-01

    Novel nanocomposite films based on graphene oxide (GO) and TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were synthesized by assembling GO on the surface of self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays through a simple assembling method. The composite films were characterized with field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Photoelectrochemical properties of the composite nanotube arrays were investigated under visible light illumination. Remarkably enhanced visible light photoelectrochemical response was observed for the GO decorated TiO{sub 2} nanotube composite electrode compared with pristine TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays. Sensitizing effect of GO on the photoelectrochemical response of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays was demonstrated and about 15 times enhanced maximum photoconversion efficiency was obtained with the presence of GO. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays towards degradation of methyl blue was also demonstrated after modification of GO. The results presented here demonstrate GO to be efficient for the improvement of utilization of visible light for TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays.

  12. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, T.H.; Williams, A.H.

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasma generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  13. Apparatus for recording emissions from a rapidly generated plasma from a single plasma producing event

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Tai Ho; Williams, Arthur H.

    1985-01-01

    An optical fiber-coupled detector visible streak camera plasma diagnostic apparatus. Arrays of optical fiber-coupled detectors are placed on the film plane of several types of particle, x-ray and visible spectrometers or directly in the path of the emissions to be measured and the output is imaged by a visible streak camera. Time and spatial dependence of the emission from plasmas generated from a single pulse of electromagnetic radiation or from a single particle beam burst can be recorded.

  14. Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Performance | Department of Energy Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy Performance Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy Performance June 13, 2016 - 1:18pm Addthis bto_uptakepost_062216.png by Andrew Burr, U.S. Department of Energy On May 26, Better Buildings announced an historic partnership with The CoStar Group, one of the largest providers of information to real estate decision-makers in the country, to increase the visibility of

  15. Visible-Wavelength Polarized-Light Emission with Small-Diameter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: solar (photovoltaic), solar (thermal), phonons, thermal conductivity, thermoelectric, electrodes - solar, defects, charge transport, materials and chemistry by design, ...

  16. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3. Methane Emissions 3.1. Total emissions The major sources of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9 percent higher than the 2008 total of 724 MMTCO2e (Table 17). Methane emissions declined steadily from 1990 to 2001, as emissions from coal mining and landfills fell, then rose from 2002 to 2009 as a result of moderate increases in emissions related to energy,

  17. Groundbreaking Partnership with CoStar Adds Visibility to Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of the largest providers of information to real estate decision-makers in the country, to increase the visibility of energy performance data in CoStar's online property database. ...

  18. Visible Reflectivity System for High-Pressure Studies. (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Visible Reflectivity System for ... OSTI Identifier: 1073453 Report Number(s): SAND2013-2893J Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748 DOE ...

  19. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13

  20. Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Health of the Nation's Electric Grid | Department of Energy Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid Energy Department Announces Funding to Provide Better Visibility into the Health of the Nation's Electric Grid September 26, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Editor's note: This post has been edited to correct the deadline for application submissions. WASHINGTON - As part of the Administration's commitment to improve the reliability and

  1. CHARACTERISTIC SIZE OF FLARE KERNELS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED CONTINUA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin; Cao, Wenda

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we present a new approach to estimate the formation height of visible and near-infrared emission of an X10 flare. The sizes of flare emission cores in three wavelengths are accurately measured during the peak of the flare. The source size is the largest in the G band at 4308 A and shrinks toward longer wavelengths, namely the green continuum at 5200 A and NIR at 15600 A, where the emission is believed to originate from the deeper atmosphere. This size-wavelength variation is likely explained by the direct heating model as electrons need to move along converging field lines from the corona to the photosphere. Therefore, one can observe the smallest source, which in our case is 0.''65 {+-} 0.''02 in the bottom layer (represented by NIR), and observe relatively larger kernels in upper layers of 1.''03 {+-} 0.''14 and 1.''96 {+-} 0.''27, using the green continuum and G band, respectively. We then compare the source sizes with a simple magnetic geometry to derive the formation height of the white-light sources and magnetic pressure in different layers inside the flare loop.

  2. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors

  3. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO[sub x] emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO[sub x] fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO[sub x] emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO[sub 2] which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  4. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2} which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  5. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. . Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Visible Hyperspectral Imaging for Standoff Detection of Explosives on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2010-11-01

    There is an ever-increasing need to be able to detect the presence of explosives, preferably from standoff distances. This paper presents an application of visible hyperspectral imaging using anomaly, polarization and spectral identification approaches for the standoff detection (13 meters) of nitroaromatic explosives on realistic painted surfaces based upon the colorimetric differences between tetryl and TNT which are enhanced by solar irradiation.

  7. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  8. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2012

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews vehicle emission control highlighting representative studies that illustrate the state-of-the-art

  9. Active Diesel Emission Control Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conferencen Presentation: RYPOS Active Diesel Emission Control Systems

  10. Strong visible electroluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon carbide film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Chul Kim, Tae-Youb; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Bong Kyu

    2015-05-25

    We report the strong visible light emission from silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a Si carbide (SiC) film. Compared to Si NC light-emitting diode (LED) by employing the Si nitride (SiN{sub x}) film as a surrounding matrix, the turn-on voltage of the Si NC LED with the SiC film was significantly decreased by 4 V. This was attributed to a smaller barrier height for injecting the electrons into the Si NCs due to a smaller band gap of SiC film than a SiN{sub x} film. The electroluminescence spectra increases with increasing forward voltage, indicating that the electrons are efficiently injected into the Si NCs in the SiC film. The light output power shows a linear increase with increasing forward voltage. The light emission originated from the Si NCs in a SiC film was quite uniform. The power efficiency of the Si NC LED with the SiC film was 1.56 times larger than that of the Si NC LED with the SiN{sub x} film. The Si NCs in a SiC film show unique advantages and are a promising candidate for application in optical devices.

  11. Visibility of two-dimensional layered materials on various substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Müller, M. R. E-mail: knoch@iht.rwth-aachen.de; Gumprich, A.; Ecik, E.; Kallis, K. T.; Winkler, F.; Kardynal, B.; Petrov, I.; Kunze, U.; Knoch, J. E-mail: knoch@iht.rwth-aachen.de

    2015-10-14

    For the investigation of 2D layered materials such as graphene, transition-metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and their heterostructures, dedicated substrates are required to enable unambiguous identification through optical microscopy. A systematic study is conducted, focusing on various 2D layered materials and substrates. The simulated colors are displayed and compared with microscopy images. Additionally, the issue of defining an appropriate index for measuring the degree of visibility is discussed. For a wide range of substrate stacks, layer thicknesses for optimum visibility are given along with the resulting sRGB colors. Further simulations of customized stacks can be conducted using our simulation tool, which is available for download and contains a database featuring a wide range of materials.

  12. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  13. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  14. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Richard P.; Lott, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  15. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  16. Reducing Emissions from Uranium Dissolving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. The trays are steam coil heated. The process has operated satisfactorily, with few difficulties, for decades. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. Because NO{sub x} is hazardous, fumes should be suppressed whenever the electric blower system is inoperable. Because the tray dissolving process has worked well for decades, as much of the current capital equipment and operating procedures as possible were preserved. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2}, which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  17. Low-Cost, Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating Film to Enable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings | Department of Energy Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings Low-Cost, Highly Transparent, Flexible, Low-Emission Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings ITN Energy Systems is using low-cost, high volume roll-to-roll coating techniques to develop a new low-e film with high visible transmission and high infrared reflectivity.

  18. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  19. Ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra of 50 samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, B.

    1988-08-30

    Under the subject contract, Unidynamics/Phoenix recorded the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra of 50 samples supplied by LANL. A Varian Cary 2300 series spectrophotometer produced the spectral data. The spectrophotometer was interfaced to a Varian D5-15 Data Station, and hard copies of data were made. Baseline corrections throughout the wavelength range were established using Halon as a reference material. Corrected measurements were automatically made by the system on every sample. Two types of sample holders were tried. Before collecting data on the LANL samples, identical samples of PETN were examined using both holders.

  20. An Interoperability Testing Study: Automotive Inventory Visibility and Interoperability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Nenad; Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Frechette, Simon; Jones, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between the NIST and Korean Business-to-Business Interoperability Test Beds to support a global, automotive-industry interoperability project. The purpose of the collaboration is to develop a methodology for validation of interoperable data-content standards implemented across inventory visibility tools within an internationally adopted testing framework. In this paper we describe methods (1) to help the vendors consistently implement prescribed message standards and (2) to assess compliance of those implementations with respect to the prescribed data content standards. We also illustrate these methods in support of an initial proof of concept for an international IV&I scenario.

  1. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  2. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  3. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5,"Monthly","32016","01151989" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",1,"Monthly","121996","01151994" ,"Data 3","Consumption",6,"Monthly","32016","01151989" ,"Release Date:","05...

  4. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"06301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2015,"06301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2015,"0630...

  5. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Industrial 10.09 9.79 9.92 9.48 8.22 8.61 2001-2016 Electric Power 2.42 2.78 3.74 3.50 W W 2002-2016 Underground Storage (Million Cubic Feet) Injections 1994-1996 Consumption ...

  6. Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    10.05 8.22 4.11 4.01 4.03 3.14 1984-2015 Residential Price 16.48 15.33 14.29 14.55 15.14 14.23 1967-2015 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 ...

  7. Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Citygate Price 2.22 2.14 2.09 2.05 2.06 2.03 1989-2016 Residential Price 12.64 13.42 14.49 16.89 19.20 20.37 1989-2016 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2002-2016 Commercial Price 10.32 10.79 11.51 13.58 15.43 15.78 1989-2016 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 52.7 51.2 47.1 46.6 53.9 55.6 1989-2016 Industrial Price 8.40 8.77 8.91 8.76 8.91 9.22

  8. Rhode Island Natural Gas Summary

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Commercial 14.46 13.33 12.31 12.37 12.89 11.99 1967-2015 Industrial 12.13 10.98 9.78 9.04 10.27 9.26 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 11.71 8.61 16.32 1990-2012 Electric Power 5.45 5.10 3.98 ...

  9. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngprisumdcusrim.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngprisumdcusrim.htm" ,"Source:","Energy ...

  10. Vehicle Emissions Review- 2011

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and general technology approaches for heavy- and light-duty vehicle emissions control - filter technology, new catalysts, NOx control, diesel oxidation catalysts, gasoline particulate filters

  11. Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994...

  12. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  13. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  14. Secondary Emission Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, David Roberts

    2015-03-24

    This report describes R&D on a new type of calorimeter using secondary emission to measure the energy of radiation, particularly high energy particles.

  15. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  16. Synthesis of ZnO nanorodnanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia; Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-03-15

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by solgel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorodnanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorodnanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 C against time. Highlights: Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  17. Facile synthesis of Cu{sub 2}O nanocube/polycarbazole composites and their high visible-light photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Wei; Sun Wendong; Zhuo Yujiang; Chu Ying

    2011-07-15

    Cu{sub 2}O nanocube/polycarbazole composites have been prepared by an one-pot solvothermal process using carbazole as a reductant. The polycarbazole layer not only protected and stabilized Cu{sub 2}O particles, but also prohibited the recombination of photogenerated electrons-holes pair and facilitated interfacial charge transfer between polycarbazole and Cu{sub 2}O. The composition, structure and morphology of the obtained products was systematically studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible spectrophotometer. Furthermore, the visible-light photocatalytic behavior of the Cu{sub 2}O nanocube/polycarbazole composites on the methyl orange was investigated. - Graphical abstract: The uniform and monodisperse Cu{sub 2}O nanocube/polycarbazole composites were prepared by an one-pot solvothermal process. As covered by polycarbazole, the photocatalytic activities of Cu{sub 2}O nanocubes were improved. The polycarbazole not only protected and stabilized Cu{sub 2}O cubes, but also prohibited the recombination of photogenerated electrons-holes pair and facilitated interfacial charge transfer between polycarbazole and Cu{sub 2}O. Highlights: > The Cu{sub 2}O/polycarbazole nanocube composite has a better photocatalytic activity. > We obtained the composite by an one-pot solvothermal process. > Carbazole monomers as reductants.

  18. CdSe self-assembled quantum dots with ZnCdMgSe barriers emitting throughout the visible spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Paz, M. Noemi; Zhou Xuecong; Munoz, Martin; Lu Hong; Sohel, Mohammad; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jean-Mary, Fleumingue; Akins, Daniel L.

    2004-12-27

    Self-assembled quantum dots of CdSe with ZnCdMgSe barriers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates. The optical and microstructural properties were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Control and reproducibility of the quantum dot (QD) size leading to light emission throughout the entire visible spectrum range has been obtained by varying the CdSe deposition time. Longer CdSe deposition times result in a redshift of the PL peaks as a consequence of an increase of QD size. AFM studies demonstrate the presence of QDs in uncapped structures. A comparison of this QD system with CdSe/ZnSe shows that not only the strain but also the chemical properties of the system play an important role in QD formation.

  19. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    1990-01-01

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  20. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    2011-03-22

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  1. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, low-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  2. ARM: Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Albert Mendoza; Yan Shi; Connor Flynn

    Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Hemispheric, VISible channel, high-sun angles [a0 data is uncalibrated

  3. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  4. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference ...

  5. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  6. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  7. Combustion and Emissions Modeling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion and Emissions Modeling This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background Modern transportation engines are designed to use the available fuel resources efficiently and minimize harmful emissions. Optimization of these designs is based on a wealth of practical design, construction and operating experiences, and use of modern testing facilities and sophisticated analyses of the combustion

  8. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  9. Electrodeposition of hierarchical ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O nanorod films for highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, S. T.; Fan, G. H.; Liang, M. L.; Wang, Q.; Zhao, G. L.

    2014-02-14

    The development of high-performance visible-light-responsive photocatalytic materials has attracted widespread interest due to their potential applications in the environmental and energy industries. In this work, hierarchical ZnO nanorods films were successfully prepared on the stainless steel mesh substrates via a simple two-step seed-assisted electrodeposition route. Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles were then electrodeposited on the surface of ZnO nanorods to form the core-shell heterostructure. The synthesized ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectrophotometer. Due to the branched hierarchical morphologies and core-shell structure, ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O nanomaterials show a prominent visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance under the low-intensity light irradiation (40 mW/cm{sup 2}). The influence of some experimental parameters, such as Cu{sub 2}O loading amount, ZnO morphologies, the substrate type, and the PH of the Cu{sub 2}O precursor solution on ZnO/Cu{sub 2}O photocatalytic performance was evaluated.

  10. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Infrastructure Investments | Department of Energy Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid Infrastructure Investments Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid Infrastructure Investments July 28, 2016 - 2:59pm Addthis In the face of extreme weather events, states, utilities, and other companies are increasingly seeking ways to boost resiliency while reducing their carbon footprint. The Emissions Quantification Tool (EQT), which was conceived of and

  11. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ‹ Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of

  12. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1995-02-01

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  13. Emission and transport of cesium-137 from boreal biomass burning in the summer of 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strode, S.; Ott, Lesley E.; Pawson, Steven; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2012-05-09

    While atmospheric concentrations of cesium-137 have decreased since the nuclear testing era, resuspension of Cs-137 during biomass burning provides an ongoing emission source. The summer of 2010 was an intense biomass burning season in western Russia, with high levels of particulate matter impacting air quality and visibility. A radionuclide monitoring station in western Russia shows enhanced airborne Cs-137 concentrations during the wildfire period. Since Cs-137 binds to aerosols, satellite observations of aerosols and fire occurrences can provide a global-scale context for Cs-137 emissions and transport during biomass burning events.

  14. Visible Light Absorption of N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using (LR/RT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using (LRRT)-TDDFT and Active Space EOMCCSD Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Visible Light Absorption of N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using ...

  15. Increasing Reliability of the Nation’s Power Grid through Greater Visibility

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Deputy Under Secretary for Science and Energy Adam Cohen today announced new funding that will build on recent progress in giving system operators greater visibility into the health of the...

  16. Visible light photoreduction of CO.sub.2 using heterostructured catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matranga, Christopher; Thompson, Robert L; Wang, Congjun

    2015-03-24

    The method provides for use of sensitized photocatalyst for the photocatalytic reduction of CO.sub.2 under visible light illumination. The photosensitized catalyst is comprised of a wide band gap semiconductor material, a transition metal co-catalyst, and a semiconductor sensitizer. The semiconductor sensitizer is photoexcited by visible light and forms a Type II band alignment with the wide band gap semiconductor material. The wide band gap semiconductor material and the semiconductor sensitizer may be a plurality of particles, and the particle diameters may be selected to accomplish desired band widths and optimize charge injection under visible light illumination by utilizing quantum size effects. In a particular embodiment, CO.sub.2 is reduced under visible light illumination using a CdSe/Pt/TiO2 sensitized photocatalyst with H.sub.2O as a hydrogen source.

  17. Innovation in Improving Visibility into the Health of the Grid | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Innovation in Improving Visibility into the Health of the Grid Innovation in Improving Visibility into the Health of the Grid October 29, 2015 - 3:12pm Addthis David Ortiz David Ortiz Former Deputy Assistant Secretary, Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis I have previously written about synchrophasors. These are systems that measure the status of the electric power grid at high resolution and enable a wide range of applications that allow operators to manage their systems

  18. Photo-oxidation of polymer-like amorphous hydrogenated carbon under visible light illumination

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Baxamusa, Salmaan; Laurence, Ted; Worthington, Matthew; Ehrmann, Paul

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), a polymer-like network typically synthesized by plasma chemical vapor deposition, has long been understood to exhibit optical absorption of visible light (? > 400 nm). In this report we explain that this absorption is accompanied by rapid photo-oxidation (within minutes) that behaves in most respects like classic polymer photo-oxidation with the exception that it occurs under visible light illumination rather than ultraviolet illumination.

  19. Photo-oxidation of polymer-like amorphous hydrogenated carbon under visible light illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxamusa, Salmaan; Laurence, Ted; Worthington, Matthew; Ehrmann, Paul

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), a polymer-like network typically synthesized by plasma chemical vapor deposition, has long been understood to exhibit optical absorption of visible light (λ > 400 nm). In this report we explain that this absorption is accompanied by rapid photo-oxidation (within minutes) that behaves in most respects like classic polymer photo-oxidation with the exception that it occurs under visible light illumination rather than ultraviolet illumination.

  20. LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interferometer (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LCLS X-ray mirror measurements using a large aperture visible light interferometer Synchrotron or FEL X-ray mirrors are required to deliver an X-ray beam from its source to an experiment location, without contributing significantly to wave front distortion. Accurate mirror figure measurements are required prior

  1. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells | Department of Energy Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential

  2. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  3. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  4. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  5. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    natural gas as a feedstock for conversion into liquid hydrocarbons (GTL). * Co-conversion of natural gas with biomass (GBTL) has the potential of increasing yield of liquid product while also having lower greenhouse gas emissions relative to petroleum. * DOE is interested in further understanding how the use of natural gas and biomass may be optimized and integrated into a conversion process to produce liquid fuels. - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Office of Fossil Energy -

  6. Power plant emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy

    2015-10-20

    A system for improved emissions performance of a power plant generally includes an exhaust gas recirculation system having an exhaust gas compressor disposed downstream from the combustor, a condensation collection system at least partially disposed upstream from the exhaust gas compressor, and a mixing chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust gas compressor and the condensation collection system, where the mixing chamber is in fluid communication with the combustor.

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  8. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel...

  9. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    GHG Emissions GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions EERE Presentation of Greenhouse Gas EmissionsResource Potential gbtlworkshopghgemissions.pdf (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications ...

  10. Preferred emission factor techniques for army emission inventories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polyak, L.M.; Robinson, D.L.; Alden, S.A.; Hopp, P.L.; Ruff, T.E.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA-90) present an unprecedented regulatory challenge to the Department of the Army and the entire US business community. Unlike previous legislation, which focused heavily on the substantive or emission control aspects of air quality management, this round of Amendments focused equal attention on the administrative aspects of air pollution control. Specifically, each new Title of the CAAA-90 is underpinned, either explicitly or implicitly, with the need to perform an emission inventory. The emission inventory is an implied prerequisite for determining the applicability of any of the emission control requirements of the 1990 Amendments, and it is the explicit center piece of the Title 5 operating permit program. Although the emission inventory is little more than a formal accounting of the number and type of emission sources and their associated air emissions, the resource requirements for preparing and maintaining the inventory can be substantial. The average contractor cost for preparing an initial emission inventory at an Army installation was over $100,000. Record keeping to support the inventory, and the annual inventory updates required for the Title 5 permit program will only expand these costs. In an effort to assist the Army community with the ongoing obligation to prepare these emission inventories, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) has compiled a list of preferred emission inventory techniques for the various emission sources found at Army installations. The USACHPPM guidance identifies emission sources most likely to be found at an Army installation, as well as the most effective and preferred emission factors associated with these sources. This guidance is designed to be widely disseminated, and may have relevant applications in the non-military community.

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  12. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  13. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning Resources with Additional Information Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National ...

  15. Study of mid-latitude 5577A CI dayglow emissions. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Summary of thesis: The green line (5577angstroms) is a bright, persistent component of the visible airglow. It is produced by an electric quadruple transition from the metastable second excited state (1So) to the first excited state (1D2) of atomic oxygen. These two excited states all lie in the same electron shell of the atom and have the same electron configuration as the ground state of 1s22s22p4, which is the 3P2,1,0. This emission is present in both the daytime and night airglow and in the aurora, and despite a long history of study it is still not fully understood. The emission in the dayglow and the nightglow is relatively homogeneous spatially and global in coverage. In the aurora, the emission is much brighter than the airglow, high structured and very localized being restricted to higher latitudes. The structure of the 5577angstroms emission with altitude and the chemistry responsible for the production of the emission are complex. The vertical structure for the emission has two distinct layers in the airglow each with its own set of production and loss mechanisms. the chemistry for either of these layers is not completely known. The auroral emission is not understood either since it overlaps the upper and lower layer altitudes and it tends to contain some parts of the chemistry of both layers as sources and losses.

  16. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  17. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  18. Synthesis of visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst via surface organic modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Dong Xu Yao Hou Bo; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

    2007-05-15

    A visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the surface organic modification to sol-gel-hydrothermal synthesized TiO{sub 2}. The surface hydroxyls of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles reacted with the active -NCO groups of tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) to form a surface complex that was confirmed by the FT-IR and XPS spectra. Due to the existence of surface complex, the absorption edge of as-prepared TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} nanomaterial extended well into visible region. Compared with unmodified TiO{sub 2} and Degussa P25, the TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts showed higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the surface organic modification to TiO{sub 2}. The surface hydroxyls of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles reacted with the active -NCO groups of tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) to form a surface complex. The TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts showed higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation.

  19. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Hongbin

    2015-04-21

    Historical emission estimates for anthropogenic aerosol and precursor compounds are key data needed for Earth system models, climate models, and atmospheric chemistry and transport models; both for general analysis and assessment and also for model validation through comparisons with observations. Current global emission data sets have a number of shortcomings, including timeliness and transparency. Satellite and other earth-system data are increasingly available in near real-time, but global emission estimates lag by 5-10 years. The CEDS project will construct a data-driven, open source framework to produce annually updated emission estimates. The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory efforts. The goal of this system is to consistently extend current emission estimates both forward in time to recent years and also back over the entire industrial era. The project will produce improved datasets for global and (potentially) regional model, allow analysis of trends across time, countries, and sectors of emissions and emission factors, and facilitate improved scientific analysis in general. Consistent estimation of uncertainty will be an integral part of this system. This effort will facilitate community evaluation of emissions and further emission-related research more generally.

  20. Time-dependent analysis of visible helium line-ratios for electron temperature and density diagnostic using synthetic simulations on NSTX-U

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Barbui, T.; Schmitz, O.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.

    2016-07-11

    Helium line-ratios for electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) plasma diagnostic in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) and Edge regions of tokamaks are widely used. Due to their intensities and proximity of wavelengths, the singlet 667.8 and 728.1 nm, and triplet 706.5 nm visible lines have been typically preferred. Time-dependency of the triplet line (706.5 nm) has been previously analyzed in detail by including transient effects on line-ratios during gas-puff diagnostic applications. In this work, several line-ratio combinations within each of the two spin systems are analyzed with the purpose of eliminating transient effects to extend the application of this powerful diagnosticmore » to high temporal resolution characterization of plasmas. The analysis is done using synthetic emission modeling and diagnostic for low electron density NSTX SOL plasma conditions by several visible lines. Quasi-static equilibrium, and time-dependent models are employed to evaluate transient effects of the atomic population levels that may affect the derived electron temperatures and densities as the helium gas-puff penetrates the plasma. Ultimately, the analysis of a wider range of spectral lines will help to extend this powerful diagnostic to experiments where the wavelength range of the measured spectra may be constrained either by limitations of the spectrometer, or by other conflicting lines from different ions.« less

  1. ON THE ORIGIN OF RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz

    2015-02-10

    Magnetars are the most magnetized objects in the known universe. Powered by the magnetic energy, and not by the rotational energy as in the case of radio pulsars, they have long been regarded as a completely different class of neutron stars. The discovery of pulsed radio emission from a few magnetars weakened the idea of a clean separation between magnetars and normal pulsars. We use the partially screened gap (PSG) model to explain radio emission of magnetars. The PSG model requires that the temperature of the polar cap is equal to the so-called critical value, i.e., the temperature at which the thermal ions outflowing from the stellar surface screen the acceleration gap. We show that a magnetar has to fulfill the temperature, power, and visibility conditions in order to emit radio waves. First, in order to form PSG, the residual temperature of the surface has to be lower than the critical value. Second, since the radio emission is powered by the rotational energy, it has to be high enough to enable heating of the polar cap by backstreaming particles to the critical temperature. Finally, the structure of the magnetic field has to be altered by magnetospheric currents in order to widen a radio beam and increase the probability of detection. Our approach allows us to predict whether a magnetar can emit radio waves using only its rotational period, period derivative, and surface temperature in the quiescent mode.

  2. Nuclear Emissions During Self-Nucleated Acoustic Cavitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Xu, Y.; West, C.D.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Block, R.C.; Nigmatulin, R.I.

    2006-01-27

    A unique, new stand-alone acoustic inertial confinement nuclear fusion test device was successfully tested. Experiments using four different liquid types were conducted in which bubbles were self-nucleated without the use of external neutrons. Four independent detection systems were used (i.e., a neutron track plastic detector to provide unambiguous visible records for fast neutrons, a BF{sub 3} detector, a NE-113-type liquid scintillation detector, and a NaI {gamma} ray detector). Statistically significant nuclear emissions were observed for deuterated benzene and acetone mixtures but not for heavy water. The measured neutron energy was {<=}2.45 MeV, which is indicative of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion. Neutron emission rates were in the range {approx}5x10{sup 3} n/s to {approx}10{sup 4} n/s and followed the inverse law dependence with distance. Control experiments did not result in statistically significant neutron or {gamma} ray emissions.

  3. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  4. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel Disclosure: Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding...

  5. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  6. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Farthing

    2001-02-06

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  7. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Farthing; G. T. Amrhein; G. A. Kudlac; D. A. Yurchison; D. K. McDonald; M. G. Milobowski

    2001-03-31

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. This objective is being met by identifying ways to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (fabric filters), and wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  8. Fugitive Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fugitive emissions refers to the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from pressurized ... substitutes for high-impact fugitive greenhouse gases (GHGs) among the DOE sites. ...

  9. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-28

    The visible spectrum of H{sub 3}{sup +} is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H{sub 3}{sup +} up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H{sub 3}{sup +} and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  10. Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania for visible-light driven phenol degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu Hua; Subramaniam, Vishnu P.; Gong, Dangguo; Tang, Yuxin; Highfield, James; Pehkonen, Simo O.; Pichat, Pierre; Chen, Zhong

    2012-12-15

    A dual-phase material (DP-160) comprising hydrated titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}xH{sub 2}O) and anatase (TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized in a low-temperature one-pot process in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) as the N-source. The unique structure exhibits strong visible light absorption. The chromophore is linked to Ti-N bonds derived from both surface sensitization and sub-surface (bulk) doping. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) and textural studies by N{sub 2} physisorption, the composite exists as mesoporous particles with a grain size of {approx}20 nm and mean pore diameter of 3.5 nm, responsible for the high surface area ({approx}180 m{sup 2}/g). DP-160 demonstrated photocatalytic activity in the degradation of phenol under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The activity of the composite was further enhanced by a small addition (0.001 M) of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which also gave rise to some visible light activity in the control samples. This effect is believed to be associated with the surface peroxo-titanate complex. GC-MS analyses showed that the intermediate products of phenol degradation induced by visible light irradiation of DP-160 did not differ from those obtained by UV (band-gap) irradiation of TiO{sub 2}. The overall performance of the composite is attributed to efficient excitation via inter-band states (due to N-doping), surface sensitization, improved adsorptive properties of aromatic compounds due to the N-carbonaceous overlayer, and the presence of heterojunctions that are known to promote directional charge transfer in other mixed-phase titanias like Degussa P25. - graphical abstract: Nitrogen-sensitized dual phase titanate/titania photocatalyst showing extended visible light absorption and efficient photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature one-pot synthesis of visible light active dual phase photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dual phase consists of

  11. Toroidally Asymmetric Distributions of Hydrocarbon (CD) Emission and Chemical Sputtering Sources in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groth, M; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Watkins, J G

    2006-05-16

    Measurements in DIII-D show that the carbon chemical sputtering sources along the inner divertor and center post are toroidally periodic and highest at the upstream tile edge. Imaging with a tangentially viewing camera and visible spectroscopy were used to monitor the emission from molecular hydrocarbons (CH/CD) at 430.8 nm and deuterium neutrals in attached and partially detached divertors of low-confinement mode plasmas. In contrast to the toroidally periodic CD distribution, emission from deuterium neutrals was observed to be toroidally symmetric along the inner strike zone. The toroidal distribution of the measured tile surface temperature in the inner divertor correlates with that of the CD emission, suggesting larger parallel particle and heat fluxes to the upstream tile edge, either due to toroidal tile gaps or height steps between adjacent tiles.

  12. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  13. Visible and dark matter from a first-order phase transition in a baryon-symmetric universe

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Trodden, Mark; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2012-02-28

    The similar cosmological abundances observed for visible and dark matter suggest a common origin for both. By viewing the dark matter density as a dark-sector asymmetry, mirroring the situation in the visible sector, we show that the visible and dark matter asymmetries may have arisen simultaneously through a first-order phase transition in the early universe. The additional scalar particles in the theory can mix with the standard Higgs boson and provide other striking signatures.

  14. Synthesis of supported silver nano-spheres on zinc oxide nanorods for visible light photocatalytic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saoud, Khaled; Alsoubaihi, Rola; Bensalah, Nasr; Bora, Tanujjal; Bertino, Massimo; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: Synthesis of supported Ag NPs on ZnO nanorods using open vessel microwave reactor. Use of the Ag/ZnO NPs as an efficient visible light photocatalyst. Complete degradation of methylene blue in 1 h with 0.5 g/L Ag/ZnO NPs. - Abstract: We report the synthesis of silver (Ag) nano-spheres (NS) supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods through two step mechanism, using open vessel microwave reactor. Direct reduction of ZnO from zinc nitrates was followed by deposition precipitation of the silver on the ZnO nanorods. The supported Ag/ZnO nanoparticles were then characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, photoluminescence and UVvis spectroscopy. The visible light photocatalytic activity of Ag/ZnO system was investigated using a test contaminant, methylene blue (MB). Almost complete removal of MB in about 60 min for doses higher than 0.5 g/L of the Ag/ZnO photocatalyst was achieved. This significant improvement in the photocatalytic efficiency of Ag/ZnO photocatalyst under visible light irradiation can be attributed to the presence of Ag nanoparticles on the ZnO nanoparticles which greatly enhances absorption in the visible range of solar spectrum enabled by surface plasmon resonance effect from Ag nanoparticles.

  15. Synthesis of novel photocatalytic RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites with visible light photoactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jianfeng; Li, Xianfu; Huang, Weishi; Li, Na; Ye, Mingxin

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: A facile method for preparation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets supported indium vanadate (InVO{sub 4}) photocatalysts is reported. The visible light response and adsorption ability of RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites is greatly improved, which can effectively remove methyl orange and Cr (VI) from water. - Highlights: Supramolecular photocatalyst of RGO-InVO{sub 4} was achieved. Reduction of GO and preparation of RGO-InVO{sub 4} was simultaneous. The prepared RGO-InVO{sub 4} shows high photocatalytic activity and adsorption capacity under visible light. In situ growth of uniform InVO{sub 4} particles on RGO sheets is facile and efficient - Abstract: In this study, we report a facile method for preparation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets supported indium vanadate (InVO{sub 4}) photocatalysts. A wide range of characterization techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Thermogravimetric analysis and Transmission electron microscopy were applied to characterize the obtained composites. The results indicated that the composites consist of uniformly dispersed InVO{sub 4} nanocrystals on RGO sheets. Visible light responses of RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites are greatly improved as compared with the bulk InVO{sub 4}. The as-prepared RGO-InVO{sub 4} nanocomposites can effectively remove methyl orange and Cr (VI) from water under visible light irradiation, which can be used as novel photocatalysts for environmental protection.

  16. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  17. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Transportation Fuel Study The Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources (OER) will prepare a study on strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote alternative ...

  19. Vectrix Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Zip: 2842 Product: Rhode Island-based firm that develops and commercializes zero emission vehicle platform technologies focused on two-wheel applications. References: Vectrix...

  20. Property:Incentive/ContFax | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Regulations: No.27 - Control of Nitrogen Oxide Emissions (Rhode Island) + 401-222-2017 + Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) + (902) 424-0503 + Air Quality Approvals and Permits...

  1. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers

    The free, web-based calculator aims to estimate the impact of NOx, SO2 and CO2 emissions on smart grid infrastructure investments, taking into account specific context and project ...

  2. Metal tritides helium emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beavis, L.C.

    1980-02-01

    Over the past several years, we have been measuring the release of helium from metal tritides (primarily erbium tritide). We find that qualitatively all tritides of interest to us behave the same. When they are first formed, the helium is released at a low rate that appears to be related to the amount of surface area which has access to the outside of the material (either film or bulk). For example, erbium tritide films initially release about 0.3% of the helium generated. Most tritide films emit helium at about this rate initially. At some later time, which depends upon the amount of helium generated, the parent occluding element and the degree of tritium saturation of the dihydride phase the helium emission changes to a new mode in which it is released at approximately the rate at which it is generated (for example, we measure this value to be approx. = .31 He/Er for ErT/sub 1/./sub 9/ films). If erbium ditritide is saturated beyond 1.9 T/Er, the critical helium/metal ratio decreases. For example, in bulk powders ErT/sub 2/./sub 15/ reaches critical release concentration at approx. = 0.03. Moderate elevation of temperature above room temperature has little impact on the helium release rate. It appears that the process may have approx. = 2 kcal/mol activation energy. The first helium formed is well bound. As the tritide ages, the helium is found in higher energy sites. Similar but less extensive measurements on scandium, titanium, and zirconium tritides are also described. Finally, the thermal desorption of erbium tritides of various ages from 50 days to 3154 days is discussed. Significant helium is desorbed along with the tritium in all but the youngest samples during thermodesorption.

  3. Trading Emissions PLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Trading Emissions PLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trading Emissions PLC Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC2N 4AW Product: Trading Emissions PLC is an investment fund...

  4. Highly Active TiO2-Based Visible-Light Photocatalyst with Nonmetal Doping and Plasmonic Metal Decoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qiao; Lima, Diana Q.; Chi, Miaofang; Yin, Yadong

    2011-01-01

    A sandwich-structured photocatalyst shows an excellent performance in degradation reactions of a number of organic compounds under UV, visible light, and direct sunlight (see picture). The catalyst was synthesized by a combination of nonmetal doping and plasmonic metal decoration of TiO2 nanocrystals, which improves visible-light activity and enhances light harvesting and charge separation, respectively.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle

  6. Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czerwinski, Kenneth; Weck, Phil

    2013-09-13

    Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line analysis of actinide elements in a solvent extraction process in real time. These techniques have been used for measuring actinide speciation and concentration under laboratory conditions and are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques, researchers must determine the fundamental speciation of target actinides and the resulting influence on spectroscopic properties. Detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be established and utilized in a range of areas, particularly those related to materials accountability and process control. Through this project, researchers will develop tools and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate solution extraction conditions and concentrations of U, Pu, and Cm in extraction processes, addressing areas of process control and materials accountability. The team will evaluate UV– Visible and TRLFS for use in solvent extraction-based separations. Ongoing research is examining efficacy of UV-Visible spectroscopy to evaluate uranium and plutonium speciation under conditions found in the UREX process and using TRLFS to evaluate Cm speciation and concentration in the TALSPEAK process. A uranyl and plutonium nitrate UV–Visible spectroscopy study met with success, which supports the utility and continued exploration of spectroscopic methods for evaluation of actinide concentrations and solution conditions for other aspects of the UREX+ solvent extraction scheme. This project will examine U and Pu absorbance in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, perform detailed examination of Cm in TRUEX and TALSPEAK, study U laser fluorescence, and apply project data to contactors. The team will also determine peak ratios as a function of solution concentrations for the

  7. Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading |...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Jump to: navigation, search Name: Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Place: Augsburg, Bavaria,...

  8. Diesel Emission Control Technology in Review

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of light- and heavy-duty diesel emission regulations and state-of-the-art emission control technologies and strategies to meet them.

  9. IGES GHG Emissions Data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iges.or.jpencdmreportkyoto.html References: IGES GHG Emissions Data1 Summary "IGES GHG Emissions Data is aimed at...

  10. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction ...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel ...

  12. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    Reports and Publications

    2000-01-01

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  13. Dielectric Resonator Metamasurfaces: Optical Magnetism Emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optical Magnetism Emission and Optical Devices. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dielectric Resonator Metamasurfaces: Optical Magnetism Emission and Optical Devices. ...

  14. DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments DIesel Emission Control Technology Developments 2005deerandreoni.pdf (249.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Diesel ...

  15. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Measurement and Characterization ...

  16. Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh ...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Retrieved from...

  17. Zero Emissions Leasing LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zero Emissions Leasing LLC Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96822 Sector: Solar Product: Honolulu-based developer of solar...

  18. How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels...

  19. IPCC Emission Factor Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Emission Factor Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IPCC Emission Factor Database AgencyCompany Organization: World Meteorological Organization,...

  20. Emission Factors (EMFAC) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    The EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model is used to calculate emission rates from all motor vehicles, such as passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks, operating on highways, freeways...

  1. Diesel Emission Control in Review

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  2. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ACES is a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new, advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010.

  3. emissions | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller...

  4. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  5. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  6. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Annual Energy Outlook

    grasslands 34 Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps 35 Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuelbioenergy use by sector and fuel

  7. Cloud Properties Derived from Visible and Near-infrared Reflectance in the

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Presence of Aerosols Cloud Properties Derived from Visible and Near-infrared Reflectance in the Presence of Aerosols Hofmann, Odele University of Colorado at Boulder Pilewskie, Peter University of Colorado Gore, Warren NASA Ames Research Center Russell, Phil NASA Ames Research Center Livingston, John SRI International Redemann, Jens BAERI/NASA Ames Research Center Bergstrom, Robert Bay Area Environmental Research Institute Platnick, Steven NASA-GSFC Daniel, John NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory

  8. Tunable Transmittance of Near-infrared and Visible Light in Reconstructed

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanocrystal-in-Glass Composite Films | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Tunable Transmittance of Near-infrared and Visible Light in Reconstructed Nanocrystal-in-Glass Composite Films Thursday, October 31, 2013 The bonding arrangement in amorphous materials plays a dominant role in determining their electrochemical, optical and transport properties. However, it remains a challenge to manipulate amorphous structures in a controlled manner. Recently, scientists at the Molecular

  9. Bluewater Wind Rhode Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Island Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner NRG Bluewater Wind Developer NRG Bluewater Wind Location Atlantic Ocean RI Coordinates...

  10. Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp:...

  11. Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    158,911 MWh Coal Power 0 MWh Gas Power 7,553,278 MWh Petroleum Power 16,262 MWh Nuclear Power 0 MWh Other 0 MWh Total Energy Production 7,728,451 MWh Percent of Total...

  12. Rhode Island Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    25,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 236,323 1987-2015 Sales 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 236,323 1997-2015 Commercial Number of Consumers 23,049 23,177 23,359 23,742 23,934 24,088 1987-2015 Sales 21,507 21,421 21,442 21,731 21,947 22,084 1998-2015 Transported 1,542 1,756 1,917 2,011 1,987 2,004 1998-2015 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 454 468 432 490 551 499 1967-2015 Industrial Number of Consumers 249 245 248 271 266 260 1987-2015 Sales 57 53 56 62 62 48

  13. Rhode Island Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Propane-Air 1980-1998

  14. Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  15. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,026 1,022 1,023 2010's 1,017 1,020 1,031 1,032 Cubic Foot)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,032 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,032 1,033 1,034 1,031 1,031 2014 1,031 1,032 1,031 1,030 1,028 1,023 1,029 1,029 1,027 1,030 1,029 1,029 2015 1,029 1,029 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028 1,028 2016 1,032 1,027 1,025 1,034 1,029 1,028

  16. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  17. Efficient visible-light photocatalytic performance of cuprous oxide porous nanosheet arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xianghua; Wang, Jianqiang; Cao, Minhua

    2015-10-15

    Graphical Abstract: We demonstrated a facile and efficient process for fabricating Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh. Benefiting from the 1D array structure and porous structure, the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O sample exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh were synthesized via the facile and efficient process. • The Cu{sub 2}O sample exhibited the 1D array structure and porous nanosheet morphology. • The as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: One-dimensional nanostructures are of great interest for a wide range of applications. In this work, we demonstrated the fabrication of visible-light-responsive Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays. The synthesis involved the growth of Cu(OH){sub 2} nanosheet arrays on Cu mesh by solution-based corrosion and thermal transformation of Cu(OH){sub 2} nanosheet to Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheets on Cu mesh. Benefiting from the one dimensional array structure and porous structure, the as-prepared Cu{sub 2}O porous nanosheet arrays exhibited significantly improved photocatalytic activity for methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation.

  18. Photodegradation of aniline by goethite doped with boron under ultraviolet and visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guanglong; Liao, Shuijiao; College of Basic Sciences of Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 ; Zhu, Duanwei; Liu, Linghua; Cheng, Dongsheng; Zhou, Huaidong

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Goethite modified by boron was prepared by sol-gel method in presence of boron acid at the low temperature. {yields} B-goethite has slight red shift in the band gap transition beside their stronger light absorption compared with pristine goethite. {yields} The results showed that semiconductor photocatalytic reaction mechanism should exist in the process of aniline degradation with goethite and B-goethite as photocatalyst. -- Abstract: In the present study, goethite and goethite doped with boron (B-goethite) were employed to detect the presence or absence of semiconductor photocatalytic reaction mechanism in the reaction systems. B-goethite was prepared by sol-gel method in presence of boron acid in order to improve its photocatalystic efficiency under the ultraviolet and visible light irradiation. The optical properties of goethite and B-goethite were characterized by ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra and the result indicated that B-goethite has slight red shift in the band gap transition beside their stronger light absorption compared with pristine goethite. Degradation of aniline was investigated in presence of goethite and B-goethite in aqueous solution. It was found that the B-goethite photocatalyst exhibited enhanced ultraviolet and visible light photocatalytic activity in degradation of aniline compared with the pristine goethite. The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of B-goethite was discussed.

  19. Photo-enhanced field emission characteristics of SnS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, Mahendra A.; Warule, Sambhaji S.; Chaudhari, Nilima S.; Ogale, Satishchandra B.

    2014-04-24

    In the present studies, we demonstrate a facile hydrothermal route to synthesize elegant SnS{sub 2} nanosheets. The x-ray diffraction pattern clearly revealed formation of SnS{sub 2} phase under the hydrothermal conditions. SEM and TEM analysis indicated formation of very thin SnS{sub 2} nanosheets. Field electron emission studies of the SnS{sub 2} nanosheets emitter were preformed at base pressure of 110{sup ?8} mbar. The value of turn-on field, corresponding to an emission current density of ?1 ?A/ cm2, was found to be ? 4.6 V/?m. Interestingly, when the cathode was illuminated with visible light, it exhibited lower turn-on field of ? 4.2 V/?m, along with nearly 2.5 times enhancement in the emission current. Furthermore, the photo-enhanced emission characteristic shows a reproducible switching behavior. The photo-enhanced filed emission characteristics along with reproducible switching behaviour propose the SnS{sub 2} nanosheets emitter as a promising candidate for nano-optoelectronic devices.

  20. Indium oxide thin film as potential photoanodes for corrosion protection of stainless steel under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yan; Yu, Jianqiang; Sun, Kai; Zhu, Yukun; Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: If the conduction band potential of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more negative than the corrosion potential of stainless steel, photo-induced electrons will be transferred from In{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the steel, thus shifting the potential of the steel into a corrosion immunity region and preventing the steel from the corrosion. - Highlights: • Indium oxide performed novel application under visible light. • Indium oxide by sol–gel method behaved better photoelectrochemical properties. • Electrons were transferred to stainless steel from indium oxide once light on. - Abstract: This paper reports the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel by In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin-film under visible-light. The films were fabricated with In{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders, synthesized by both sol–gel (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg) and solid-state (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss) processes. The photo-induced open circuit potential and the photo-to-current efficiency measurements suggested that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} could be a promising candidate material for photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of metallic alloys under visible light. Moreover, the polarization curve experimental results indicated that In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film can mitigate the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel to much more negative values with a higher photocurrent density than the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss film under visible-light illumination. All the results demonstrated that the In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg thin-film provides a better photoelectrochemical cathodic protection for 304 stainless steel than In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ss thin-film under visible-light illumination. The higher photoelectrochemical efficiency is possibly due to the uniform thin films produced with the smaller particle size of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sg, which facilitates the transfer of the photo-induced electrons from bulk to the surface and suppresses the charge recombination of the electrons and holes.

  1. Visible light activated photocatalytic behaviour of rare earth modified commercial TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobaldi, D.M.; Seabra, M.P.; Labrincha, J.A.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: RE gave more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface. RE gave the modified and fired samples a high specific surface area. Photocatalytic activity was assessed in gassolid phase under visible-light exposure. Thermal treated RE-TiO{sub 2}s showed a superior visible-light photocatalytic activity. La-TiO{sub 2} was the best performing photocatalyst. - Abstract: A commercial TiO{sub 2} nanopowder, Degussa P25, was modified with several rare earth (RE) elements in order to extend its photocatalytic activity into the visible range. The mixtures were prepared via solid-state reaction of the precursor oxides, and thermally treated at high temperature (900 and 1000 C), with the aim of investigating the photocatalytic activity of the thermally treated samples. This thermal treatment was chosen for a prospective application as a surface layer in materials that need to be processed at high temperatures. The photocatalytic activity (PCA) of the samples was assessed in gassolid phase monitoring the degradation of isopropanol (IPA) under visible-light irradiation. Results showed that the addition of the REs lanthanum, europium and yttrium to TiO{sub 2} greatly improved its photocatalytic activity, despite the thermal treatment, because of the presence of more surface hydroxyl groups attached to the photocatalyst's surface, together with a higher specific surface area (SSA) of the modified and thermally treated samples, with regard to the unmodified and thermally treated Degussa P25. The samples doped with La, Eu and Y all had excellent PCA under visible-light irradiation, even higher than the untreated Degussa P25 reference sample, despite their thermal treatment at 900 C, with lanthanum producing the best results (i.e. the La-, Eu- and Y-TiO{sub 2} samples, thermally treated at 900 C, had, respectively, a PCA equal to 26, 27 and 18 ppm h{sup ?1} in terms of acetone formation versus 15 ppm h{sup ?1} for the 900 C

  2. PHEV Engine Cold Start Emissions Management

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coordination of engine and powertrain supervisory control strategies to minimize cold start emissions

  3. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  4. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  5. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A P

    1998-12-03

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W's new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  6. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  7. Emission Market Opportunities for Federal Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Shah, C.

    2005-06-01

    This document assists federal agencies in incorporating emissions market opportunities in their energy projects, including emission reduction credit markets and cap and trade. It looks at how potential emissions costs/revenues can be incorporated into project proposals, how groups can apply for emissions allowances, and how agencies can sell emissions allowances and receive the financial benefit. The fact sheet also outlines how FEMP can provide assistance throughout the process.

  8. Software solutions for emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriez, H.; Schillinger, S.; Seraji, H.

    1996-12-31

    Industry and state and federal environmental regulatory agencies are becoming ever more conciliatory due to the high cost of implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) for the operation of Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). In many cases the modifications do nothing to reduce emissions or even to measure the pollution, but simply let the source owner or operator and the permitting authority agree on a monitoring method and/or program. The EPA methods and standards developed under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) have proven to be extremely costly and burdensome. Now, the USEPA and state agencies are making efforts to assure that emissions data has a strong technical basis to demonstrate compliance with regulations such as Title V.

  9. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M.

    2008-10-06

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  10. Emission Properties from ZnO Quantum Dots Dispersed in SiO{sub 2} Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Basak, Durga

    2011-07-15

    Dispersion of ZnO quantum dots in SiO{sub 2} matrix has been achieved in two techniques based on StOeber method to form ZnO QDs-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. Sample A is formed with random dispersion by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to an ethanolic solution of ZnO nanoparticles and sample B is formed with a chain-like ordered dispersion by adding ZnO nanoparticles to an already hydrolyzed ethanolic TEOS solution. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-grown nanocomposites show strong emission in the ultraviolet region. When annealed at higher temperature, depending on the sample type, these show strong red or white emission. Interestingly, when the excitation is removed, the orderly dispersed ZnO QDs-SiO{sub 2} composite shows a very bright blue fluorescence visible by naked eyes for few seconds indicating their promise for display applications.

  11. White light emission from silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yi; Shirai, Hajime

    2009-02-15

    An atmospheric pressure microplasma jet was employed as a deposition tool to fabricate silicon oxycarbide films from tetraethoxysilane-argon (Ar) mixture gas at room temperature. Resultant films exhibit intense visible emission under a 325 nm excitation which appears white to naked eyes in the range from {approx}1.75 to {approx}3.5 eV at room temperature. The origin of photoluminescence is attributed to the electron-hole pair recombination through neutral oxygen vacancies (NOVs) in the film. The density of NOV defects was found in the range from 3.48x10{sup 15} to 2.23x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The photoluminescence quantum efficiencies were estimated to be 1.48%-4.15%. Present experiment results demonstrate that the silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet would be a competitive candidate for the development of white light emission devices.

  12. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  13. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  14. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  15. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

  16. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  17. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fisher, A.S.; Friedman, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Kirk, H.; Kramer, S.; Lin, L.; Rogers, J.T.; Sheehan, J.F.; van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Xie, J.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, R. ); Bhowmik, A. . Rocketdyne Div.)

    1991-01-01

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  18. OSTI Works to Increase Visibility of All DOE Scientific Research Data |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Works to Increase Visibility of All DOE Scientific Research Data Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2007 OSTI has added a new section to its Web site. This section highlights the DOE Data Centers, where much of the Energy Department's non-text data resides. DOE generates scientific research data in many forms, both text and non-text. While OSTI's databases make the Department's text-based information easily available (see

  19. OSTI increases visibility of DOE science via WorldCat | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information increases visibility of DOE science via WorldCat Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2006 Librarians from around the world have a new avenue of access to research results from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This one-stop search is free of charge, free of ads, and returns only reliable science information. More than 120,000 records for DOE scientific and technical information are now available in WorldCat, a database merging catalogues

  20. Visible Light Photocatalysis via CdS/TiO2Nanocomposite Materials

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wade, Jeremy; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2006-01-01

    Nanostructured colloidal semiconductors with heterogeneous photocatalytic behavior have drawn considerable attention over the past few years. This is due to their large surface area, high redox potential of the photogenerated charge carriers, and selective reduction/oxidation of different classes of organic compounds. In the present paper, we have carried out a systematic synthesis of nanostructured CdS-TiO2via reverse micelle process. The structural and microstructural characterizations of the as-prepared CdS-TiO2nanocomposites are determined using XRD and SEM-EDS techniques. The visible light assisted photocatalytic performance is monitored by means of degradation of phenol in water suspension.

  1. Kinetics of visible light photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals:Theory and in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yuan, C.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Ager III, J.W.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-11-14

    Photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals illuminated with visible laser light under ambient conditions was investigated. The photo-oxidation kinetics were monitored by in situ measurement of the crystalline Ge volume fraction by Raman spectroscopy. The effects of laser power and energy on the extent of oxidation were measured using both in situ and ex situ Raman scattering techniques. A mechanistic model in which the tunneling of photo-excited carriers to the oxide surface for electron activated molecular oxygen dissociation is proposed. This quantitative model successfully describes all experimental photo-oxidation observations using physical parameters.

  2. Visible/Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Sensing of Solids under Controlled Environmental Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Anheier, Norman C.; Mendoza, Albert; Fritz, Brad G.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the use of a wind tunnel for conducting controlled passive hyperspectral imaging experiments. Passive techniques are potentially useful for detecting explosives, solid-phase chemicals and other materials of interest from a distance so as to provide operator safety. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates a wind tunnel facility that can generate and circulate artificial atmospheres to control lighting, humidity, temperature, aerosol burdens, and obscurants. We will present recent results describing optimized sensing of solids over tens of meters distance using both visible and near-infrared cameras, as well as the effects of certain environmental parameters on data retrieval.

  3. A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-ho; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2008-05-05

    A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

  4. OSTI Increases Visibility of DOE Science via WorldCat | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information 16, 2006 OSTI Increases Visibility of DOE Science via WorldCat Oak Ridge, TN - Librarians from around the world have a new avenue of access to research results from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than 120,000 records for DOE scientific and technical information are now available in WorldCat, a database merging catalogues of more than 50,000 libraries in 96 countries and territories. "The library community will have access

  5. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  6. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Olsen, Khris B.

    1992-01-01

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  7. Fission Particle Emission Multiplicity Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-27

    Simulates discrete neutron and gamma-ray emission from the fission of heavy nuclei that is either spontaneous or neutron induced. This is a function library that encapsulates the fission physics and is intended to be called Monte Carlo transport code.

  8. Ozone and other air quality related variables affecting visibility in the southeast United States. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brittig, J.S.

    1997-07-11

    An analysis of ozone (03) concentrations and several other air quality related variables was performed to assess their relationship with visibility at five urban and semi-urban locations in the Southeast United States during the summer seasons of 1980 to 1996. The role and impact of ozone on aerosols was investigated to ascertain a relationship with visibility. Regional trend analysis of the 1980s reveals an increase in maximum ozone concentration coupled with a decrease in visibility. However, the 1990s shows a leveling off of both ozone and visibility; in both cases the results were not statistically significant at the 5% level. Site specific trends at Nashville Tennessee followed similar trends. To better ascertain the relationships and forcing mechanisms, the analysis was changed from yearly to daily and hourly averaged values. This increased resolution showed a statistically significant inverse relationship between visibility and ozone. Additionally, by performing back trajectory analysis, it was observed that the visibility degraded both by airmass migration over polluted areas and chemical kinetics.

  9. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Mullins, David R; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Wu, Zili

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging

  10. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; McLean, II, William; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  11. Enhanced single photon emission from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots coupled to a confined Tamm-plasmon mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, T.; Baumann, V.; Iff, O.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report on the enhancement of the spontaneous emission in the visible red spectral range from site-controlled InP/GaInP quantum dots by resonant coupling to Tamm-plasmon modes confined beneath gold disks in a hybrid metal/semiconductor structure. The enhancement of the emission intensity is confirmed by spatially resolved micro-photoluminescence area scans and temperature dependent measurements. Single photon emission from our coupled system is verified via second order autocorrelation measurements. We observe bright single quantum dot emission of up to ∼173 000 detected photons per second at a repetition rate of the excitation source of 82 MHz, and calculate an extraction efficiency of our device as high as 7%.

  12. A versatile femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy setup with tunable pulses in the visible to near infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Liangdong; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate a versatile and efficient setup to perform femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Technical innovations are implemented to achieve the wavelength tunability for both the picosecond narrowband Raman pump pulse and femtosecond broadband Raman probe pulse. Using a simplified one-grating scheme in a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor followed by a two-stage noncollinear optical parametric amplifier, we tune the Raman pump pulse from ca. 480 to 750 nm. To generate the suitable Raman probe pulse in tandem, we rely on our recently demonstrated broadband up-converted multicolor array technique that readily provides tunable broadband laser sidebands across the visible to near-infrared range. This unique setup has unparalleled flexibility for conducting FSRS. We measure the ground-state Raman spectra of a cyclohexane standard using tunable pump-probe pairs at various wavelengths across the visible region. The best spectral resolution is ∼12 cm{sup −1}. By tuning the pump wavelength closer to the electronic absorption band of a photoacid pyranine in water, we observe the pre-resonantly enhanced Raman signal. The stimulated Raman gain of the 1627 cm{sup −1} mode is increased by over 15 times.

  13. Visible light carrier generation in co-doped epitaxial titanate films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comes, Ryan B.; Smolin, Sergey Y.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gao, Ran; Apgar, Brent A.; Martin, Lane W.; Bowden, Mark E.; Baxter, Jason; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-03-02

    Perovskite titanates such as SrTiO3 (STO) exhibit a wide range of important functional properties, including high electron mobility, ferroelectricitywhich may be valuable in photovoltaic applicationsand excellent photocatalytic performance. The wide optical band gap of titanates limits their use in these applications, however, making them ill-suited for integration into solar energy harvesting technologies. Our recent work has shown that by doping STO with equal concentrations of La and Cr we can enhance visible light absorption in epitaxial thin films while avoiding any compensating defects. In this work, we explore the optical properties of photoexcited carriers in these films. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry, we show that the Cr3+ dopants, which produce electronic states immediately above the top of the O 2p valence band in STO reduce the direct band gap of the material from 3.75 eV to between 2.4 and 2.7 eV depending on doping levels. Transient reflectance measurements confirm that optically generated carriers have a recombination lifetime comparable to that of STO and are in agreement with the observations from ellipsometry. Finally, through photoelectrochemical yield measurements, we show that these co-doped films exhibit enhanced visible light photocatalysis when compared to pure STO.

  14. Visible light carrier generation in co-doped epitaxial titanate films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comes, Ryan B. Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Smolin, Sergey Y.; Baxter, Jason B.; Gao, Ran; Apgar, Brent A.; Martin, Lane W.; Bowden, Mark E.

    2015-03-02

    Perovskite titanates such as SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) exhibit a wide range of important functional properties, including ferroelectricity and excellent photocatalytic performance. The wide optical band gap of titanates limits their use in these applications; however, making them ill-suited for integration into solar energy harvesting technologies. Our recent work has shown that by doping STO with equal concentrations of La and Cr, we can enhance visible light absorption in epitaxial thin films while avoiding any compensating defects. In this work, we explore the optical properties of photoexcited carriers in these films. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry, we show that the Cr{sup 3+} dopants, which produce electronic states immediately above the top of the O 2p valence band in STO reduce the direct band gap of the material from 3.75?eV to 2.42.7?eV depending on doping levels. Transient reflectance spectroscopy measurements are in agreement with the observations from ellipsometry and confirm that optically generated carriers are present for longer than 2?ns. Finally, through photoelectrochemical methylene blue degradation measurements, we show that these co-doped films exhibit enhanced visible light photocatalysis when compared to pure STO.

  15. Novel visible-light AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids photocatalysts with surface plasma resonance effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yunfang Li, Xiuli; Wang, Yawen; Fan, Caimei

    2013-06-01

    Three kinds of AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids were synthesised via an anion-exchange precipitation method and characterised by XRD, XPS, SEM, EDS, and UVvis. The results showed that AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids displayed much higher photocatalytic activities than single Ag?PO? or AgBr under visible light (?>420 nm), and OH and h? were the major active species during the degradation process. Considering interstitial ions Ag?? on lattice gap of AgBr are easy to become sliver particle, we deduced the possible photocatalytic mechanism could be ascribed to the synergistic effects of the appropriate valence band position of Ag?PO? and AgBr, surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag?, reactive radical species Br?, and the Ag vacancy on the surface of catalysts. - Graphical abstract: The optical absorption and structural morphology of the as-prepared AgBr@Ag?PO? photocatalyst using an anion-exchange precipitation method are conductive to the photocatalytic degradation of organics in water. Highlights: Novel AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids are synthesised by a facile method. AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids show excellent photocatalytic activities under visible light. Interstitial ions are in favour of the formation of Ag particle. Surface plasmon resonance effect plays a key factor for light absorption. The photocatalytic mechanism for AgBr/Ag?PO? hybrids is studied.

  16. Wide-angle ITER-prototype tangential infrared and visible viewing system for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasnier, C. J. Allen, S. L.; Ellis, R. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McLean, A. G.; Meyer, W. H.; Morris, K.; Seppala, L. G.; Crabtree, K.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2014-11-15

    An imaging system with a wide-angle tangential view of the full poloidal cross-section of the tokamak in simultaneous infrared and visible light has been installed on DIII-D. The optical train includes three polished stainless steel mirrors in vacuum, which view the tokamak through an aperture in the first mirror, similar to the design concept proposed for ITER. A dichroic beam splitter outside the vacuum separates visible and infrared (IR) light. Spatial calibration is accomplished by warping a CAD-rendered image to align with landmarks in a data image. The IR camera provides scrape-off layer heat flux profile deposition features in diverted and inner-wall-limited plasmas, such as heat flux reduction in pumped radiative divertor shots. Demonstration of the system to date includes observation of fast-ion losses to the outer wall during neutral beam injection, and shows reduced peak wall heat loading with disruption mitigation by injection of a massive gas puff.

  17. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  18. Visibility and artifacts of gold fiducial markers used for image guided radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer on MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J.; Lens, Eelco; Horst, Astrid van der; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan; Klaassen, Remy; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer, tumor alignment prior to each treatment fraction is improved when intratumoral gold fiducial markers (from here onwards: markers), which are visible on computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, are used. Visibility of these markers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might improve image registration between CT and magnetic resonance (MR) images for tumor delineation purposes. However, concomitant image artifacts induced by markers are undesirable. The extent of visibility and artifact size depend on MRI-sequence parameters. The authors’ goal was to determine for various markers their potential to be visible and to generate artifacts, using measures that are independent of the MRI-sequence parameters. Methods: The authors selected ten different markers suitable for endoscopic placement in the pancreas and placed them into a phantom. The markers varied in diameter (0.28–0.6 mm), shape, and iron content (0%–0.5%). For each marker, the authors calculated T{sub 2}{sup ∗}-maps and ΔB{sub 0}-maps using MRI measurements. A decrease in relaxation time T{sub 2}{sup ∗} can cause signal voids, associated with visibility, while a change in the magnetic field B{sub 0} can cause signal shifts, which are associated with artifacts. These shifts inhibit accurate tumor delineation. As a measure for potential visibility, the authors used the volume of low T{sub 2}{sup ∗}, i.e., the volume for which T{sub 2}{sup ∗} differed from the background by >15 ms. As a measure for potential artifacts, the authors used the volume for which |ΔB{sub 0}| > 9.4 × 10{sup −8} T (4 Hz). To test whether there is a correlation between visibility and artifact size, the authors calculated the Spearman’s correlation coefficient (R{sub s}) between the volume of low T{sub 2}{sup ∗} and the volume of high |ΔB{sub 0}|. The authors compared the maps with images obtained using a clinical MR-sequence. Finally, for the best visible marker

  19. School Bus Emissions Study | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Investigation of the Effects of Fuels and Aftertreatment Devices on the Emission Profiles of Trucks and Buses ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses ...

  20. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  1. Effects of Biodiesel on NOx Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.

    2005-06-01

    A presentation about the effects of biodiesel on nitrogen oxide emissions presented at the ARB Biodiesel Workshop June 8, 2005.

  2. Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles that use internal combustion engines. These vehicles can run on gasoline, diesel, biofuels, natural gas, or propane. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

  3. Emissions Quantification Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Services » Technology Development » Smart Grid » Emissions Quantification Tool Emissions Quantification Tool As part of its efforts to quantify benefits from the smart grid, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with developing a tool that can estimate the potential energy and emissions benefits that can result from the deployment of smart grid technologies. The Emissions Quantification Tool (EQT), which was developed

  4. Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation |...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Website: www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-estimating-historical Cost: Free Language: English Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation Screenshot...

  5. FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SRP radioactive waste releases. Startup through 1959 Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS;...

  6. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email,

  7. Anisotropic Lyman-alpha emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zheng; Wallace, Joshua

    2014-10-20

    As a result of resonant scatterings off hydrogen atoms, Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies provides a probe of the (hardly isotropic) neutral gas environment around them. We study the effect of the environmental anisotropy on the observed Lyα emission by performing radiative transfer calculations for models of neutral hydrogen clouds with prescriptions of spatial and kinematic anisotropies. The environmental anisotropy leads to corresponding anisotropy in the Lyα flux and spectral properties and induces correlations among them. The Lyα flux (or observed luminosity) depends on the viewing angle and shows an approximate correlation with the initial Lyα optical depth in the viewing direction relative to those in all other directions. The distribution of Lyα flux from a set of randomly oriented clouds is skewed to high values, providing a natural contribution to the Lyα equivalent width (EW) distribution seen in observation. A narrower EW distribution is found at a larger peak offset of the Lyα line, similar to the trend suggested in observation. The peak offset appears to correlate with the line shape (full width at half-maximum and asymmetry), pointing to a possibility of using Lyα line features alone to determine the systemic redshifts of galaxies. The study suggests that anisotropies in the spatial and kinematic distributions of neutral hydrogen can be an important ingredient in shaping the observed properties of Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies. We discuss the implications of using Lyα emission to probe the circumgalactic and intergalactic environments of galaxies.

  8. Emission

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Emily Duong About Us Emily Duong - National Director for Petrocon Corporation Emily Duong Emily Duong was the 2013 Pacific Miss Asian America representing the United States for Miss Asia World. She received degrees in Communications and Business Administration from George Mason University's School of Social Science and Humanities. Ms. Duong is the External Vice President of the Mid-Atlantic Union of Vietnamese Students Association (MAUVSA) highly involved in the national Asian-American

  9. Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-emission-factors-defo Cost: Free Language: English Module: Emission Factors for Deforestation Screenshot Logo: Module: Emission...

  10. Impact of Biodiesel on Modern Diesel Engine Emissions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Modern Diesel Engine Emissions Impact of Biodiesel on Modern Diesel Engine Emissions 2011 ... Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel DPF Performance with ...

  11. Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) ...

  12. Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference ...

  13. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference ...

  14. Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast Perspectives Regarding Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction in the Northeast 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions ...

  15. 2010 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emissions from an Electronics Perspective 2010 Emissions from an Electronics Perspective 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon ...

  16. Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation Advanced Diesel Common Rail Injection System for Future Emission Legislation 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  17. Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Security ... Home NNSA Blog Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Reducing emissions ...

  18. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million...

  19. Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency Combustion Targets for Low Emissions and High Efficiency 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and ...

  20. Catalyzing Cooperative Action for Low Emissions Development Agenda...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Emissions Development Agenda Jump to: navigation, search Low Emission Development Strategies Global Partnership Advancing climate-resilient, low-emission development around the...

  1. Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Emission Credit Brokers 2002deersloan.pdf (184.47 KB) ...

  2. Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Characterized particulate emissions from U.S.-legal ...

  3. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Emission...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Emission Factors Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Emission Factors and Global Warming Potentials The greenhouse gas emission factors and global warming potentials ...

  4. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Environmental Respiratory Center

  5. A design of Si-based nanoplasmonic structure as an antenna and reception amplifier for visible light communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, J. H.; Lin, Z. Y.; Liu, P.; Yang, G. W.

    2014-10-21

    Visible light communication has been widely investigated due to its larger bandwidth and higher bit rate, and it can combine with the indoor illumination system that makes it more convenient to carry out. Receiving and processing the visible light signal on chip request for nanophotonics devices performing well. However, conventional optical device cannot be used for light-on-chip integration at subwavelength dimensions due to the diffraction limit. Herein, we propose a design of Si-based nanoplasmonic structure as an antenna and reception amplifier for visible light communication based on the interaction between Si nanoparticle and Au nanorod. This device integrates the unique scattering property of high-refractive index dielectric Si nanoparticles, whose scattering spectrum is dependent on the particle size, with the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au nanorod. We calculated the spectra collected by plane detector and near field distribution of nanostructure, and theoretically demonstrate that the proposed device can act as good receiver, amplifier and superlens during the visible light signal receiving and processing. Besides, unlike some other designs of nanoantenna devices focused less on how to detect the signals, our hybrid nanoantenna can realize the transfer between the scattering source and the detector effectively by Au nanorod waveguides. These findings suggest that the designed nanoplasmonic structure is expected to be used in on-chip nanophotonics as antenna, spectral splitter and demultiplexer for visible light communication.

  6. Limits of survivability and damage for optical components used in a high repetition rate visible laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.R.; Stolz, C.J.; Sarginson, T.G.

    1991-10-01

    An effort is being made to understand the limits of survivability and damage for optical components exposed to a visible laser operating continuously at a high repetition rate over 4 kHz. Results of this work are reported and related to the materials and manufacturing conditions for coatings and substrates as well as defects seen at the surface under laser illumination. These results were obtained for a variety of optical coatings and conditions using lasers from the Laser Demonstration Facility, part of the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at LLNL. Better understanding of the reliability of optical components in this environment could lead to improvements in design and manufacture that would result in reduced size for the laser optical system and correspondingly lower costs for the facilities that can use this technology.

  7. Scintillating fiber tracking at high luminosities using Visible Light Photon counter readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atac, M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper reviews the research work on the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC) that have been developed for the scintillating fiber tracking at high luminosity colliders and high rate fixed target experiments. The devices originated from the joint work between UCLA and Rockwell International Science Center. The VLPCs are capable of counting photons very efficiently down to a single photon level with high avalanche gain, producing pulses at very high rates with very short rise times. Due to small gain dispersions they can be used in counting photons with high quantum efficiencies, therefore they are excellent devices for charged particle tracking using small diameter scintillating plastic fibers. In this paper, fiber tracking for the CDF and D0 upgrades and a possible usage of the VLPC readout for the experiment E803 at Fermilab will be discussed.

  8. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  9. Visible Light Photocatalysis via CdS/ TiO 2 Nanocomposite Materials

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wade, Jeremy; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2006-01-01

    Nmore » anostructured colloidal semiconductors with heterogeneous photocatalytic behavior have drawn considerable attention over the past few years. This is due to their large surface area, high redox potential of the photogenerated charge carriers, and selective reduction/oxidation of different classes of organic compounds. In the present paper, we have carried out a systematic synthesis of nanostructured CdS- TiO 2 via reverse micelle process. The structural and microstructural characterizations of the as-prepared CdS- TiO 2 nanocomposites are determined using XRD and SEM-EDS techniques. The visible light assisted photocatalytic performance is monitored by means of degradation of phenol in water suspension.« less

  10. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnMgBeSe Schottky barrier diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigue, F.; Tournie, E.; Faurie, J.-P.; Monroy, E.; Calle, F.; Munoz, E.

    2001-06-25

    Planar geometry Schottky barrier photodiodes designed for visible-blind ultraviolet detection have been fabricated. They are based on ZnMgBeSe alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. High crystalline quality is achieved, which leads to a high responsivity (0.17 A/W at 375 nm) and a sharp cutoff of more than three orders of magnitude. As attested by the linear variation of the photocurrent with the optical excitation, there is no internal gain mechanism. A detectivity of 2{times}10{sup 10}mHz{sup 1/2}W{sup {minus}1} is obtained showing that low-noise devices with high sensitivity have been fabricated. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  12. Ultrathin metal-semiconductor-metal resonator for angle invariant visible band transmission filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Yong Lee, Jae; Jay Guo, L.

    2014-06-09

    We present transmission visible wavelength filters based on strong interference behaviors in an ultrathin semiconductor material between two metal layers. The proposed devices were fabricated on 2?cm??2?cm glass substrate, and the transmission characteristics show good agreement with the design. Due to a significantly reduced light propagation phase change associated with the ultrathin semiconductor layer and the compensation in phase shift of light reflecting from the metal surface, the filters show an angle insensitive performance up to 70, thus, addressing one of the key challenges facing the previously reported photonic and plasmonic color filters. This principle, described in this paper, can have potential for diverse applications ranging from color display devices to the image sensors.

  13. Visible bremsstrahlung tomographic diagnostic for the pulsed high density field-reversed configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H.; Andreason, S. P.; Votroubek, G. R.; Pihl, C. J.; Slough, J. T.

    2006-10-15

    A diagnostic suite for the source section of the pulsed high density field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment has been constructed to investigate the equilibrium and stability of FRC plasmas. In particular, a visible bremsstrahlung tomographic system has been designed and implemented. Three types of tomographic analyses for FRCs are performed: a Fourier fit method (Cormack-Granetz), a maximum entropy method, and a minimum Fisher method utilizing code developed for the TCV tokamak experiment in Switzerland [Anton et al., Plasma Phys. Controled Fusion 38, 1849 (1996)]. Results from the different methods and end-on imaging from the fast-framing camera are compared showing relative agreement of FRC internal structures between all measurements.

  14. Visible wide angle view imaging system of KTM tokamak based on multielement image fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chektybayev, B. Shapovalov, G.; Kolodeshnikov, A.

    2015-05-15

    In the paper, new visible wide angle view imaging system of KTM tokamak is described. The system has been designed to observe processes inside of plasma and the processes occurring due to plasma-wall interactions through the long equatorial port. Imaging system is designed based on special image fiber bundle and entrance wide angle lens, which provide image of large section of the vacuum chamber, both poloidal half-section and divertor through the sufficiently long equatorial port. The system also consists of two video cameras: slow and fast with image intensifier. Commercial equipment had been used in design of the system that allowed reducing the cost and time for research and development. The paper also discusses advantages and disadvantages of the system in comparison with conventional endoscopes based on a lens system and considers its promising utilization in future tokamaks and future steady state fusion reactors.

  15. Solvothermal synthesis of designed nonstoichiometric strontium titanate for efficient visible-light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulaeman, Uyi; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2010-09-06

    SrTiO{sub 3} powders with various Sr/Ti atomic ratios were synthesized by microwave-assisted solvothermal reactions of SrCl{sub 2} and Ti(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4} in KOH aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles of perovskite type SrTiO{sub 3} structure with the particle size of 30-40 nm were synthesized. The photocatalytic activity was determined by deNO{sub x} ability using light emitting diode lamps of various wavelengths such as 627 nm (red), 530 nm (green), 445 nm (blue), and 390 nm (UV). The photocatalytic activity significantly changed depending on the Sr/Ti atomic ratio, i.e., the strontium rich sample (Sr/Ti atomic ratio>1) showed excellent visible light responsive photocatalytic activity for the oxidative destruction of NO.

  16. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros

    2013-11-19

    Techniques are provided for enhancing the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium such as tissue, water and smoke. Examples of such an object include a vein located below the skin, a mine located below the surface of the sea and a human in a location covered by smoke. The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the utilization of structured illumination. In the specific application of this invention to image the veins in the arm or other part of the body, the issue of how to control the intensity of the image of a metal object (such as a needle) that must be inserted into the vein is also addressed.

  17. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  18. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  19. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  20. MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite photoanode for visible light induced water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Reyhani, Ali; Naseri, Naimeh; Moshfegh, Alireza Z.

    2013-08-15

    The Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films with different MWCNTs weight percentages were prepared by solgel method as visible light induced photoanode in water splitting reaction. Weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films was confirmed by TGA/DSC analysis. According to XPS analysis, oxygenated groups at the surface of the MWCNT and stoichiometric formation of WO{sub 3} thin films were determined, while the crystalline structure of the nanocomposite samples was studied by XRD indicating (0 0 2) peak of MWCNT in the monoclinic phase of WO{sub 3}. The influence of different weight percentage (wt%) of MWCNT on WO{sub 3} photoactivity showed that the electron conductivity, charge transfer and electron life time had improved as compared with the pure WO{sub 3}. Based on linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements, the (1 wt%) MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films photoanode has a maximum photocurrent density of ?4.5 A/m{sup 2} and electron life time of about 57 s. - Graphical abstract: Photocurrent density versus time at constant potential (0.7 V) for the WO{sub 3} films containing different MWCNT weight percentages annealed at 400 C under 1000 Wm{sup ?2} visible photo-illumination. Display Omitted - Highlights: MWCNT/ WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films were synthesized using solgel derived method. TGA/DSC confirmed the weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films. XPS analysis revealed that WO{sub 3} was attached on the oxygenated group of MWCNT surface. The Highest Photoelectrochemical activity is achieved for (1 wt%)MWCNT/WO{sub 3} thin film.

  1. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  2. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  3. Visible light photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol using vanadium and nitrogen co-doped TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, R.; Kothari, D. C.; Patel, N.; Miotello, A.

    2013-02-05

    Vanadium and Nitrogen were codoped in TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst by Sol-gel method to utilize visible light more efficiently for photocatalytic reactions. A noticeable shift of absorption edge to visible light region was obtained for the singly-doped namely V-TiO{sub 2}, N-TiO{sub 2} and codoped V-N-TiO{sub 2} samples in comparison with undoped TiO{sub 2}, with smallest band gap obtained with codoped-TiO{sub 2}. The photocatalytic activities for all TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts were tested by 4-chlorophenol (organic pollutant) degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that codoped TiO{sub 2} exhibits the best photocatalytic activity, which could be attributed to the synergistic effect produced by V and N dopants.

  4. High-emission cold cathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mancebo, L.

    1974-01-29

    A field-emission cathode having a multitude of field emission points for emitting a copious stream of electrons when subjected to a high field is described. The cathode is constructed by compressing a multitude of tungsten strips alternately arranged with molybdenum strips and copper ribbons or compressing alternately arranged copper plated tungsten and molybdenum strips, heating the arrangement to braze the tungsten and molybdenum strips together with the copper, machining and grinding the exposed strip edges of one side of the brazed arrangement to obtain a precisely planar surface, etching a portion of the molybdenum and copper to leave the edges of the tungsten strips protruding for electron emission, and subjecting the protruding edges of the tungsten strips to a high electric field to degas and roughen the surface to pnovide a large number of emitting points. The resulting structure is particularly useful as a cathode in a transversely excited gaseous laser where the cathode is mounted in a vacuum chamber for emitting electrons under the influence of a high electric field between the cathode and an extractor grid. The electrons pass through the extractor grid, a thin window in the wall of the laser chamber and into the laser chamber which is filled with a gaseous mixture of helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. A second grid is mounted on the gaseous side of the window. The electrons pass into the laser chamber under the influence of a second electric field between the second grid and an anode in the laser chamber to raise selected gas atoms of the gaseous mixture to appropriately excited states so that a subsequent coherent light beam passing through the mixture transversely to the electron stream through windows in opposite ends of the laser chamber stimulates the excited atoms to amplify the beam. (Official Gazette)

  5. Ag@AgHPW as a plasmonic catalyst for visible-light photocatalytic degradation of environmentally harmful organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenhui; Cao, Minhua Li, Na; Su, Shuangyue; Zhao, Xinyu; Wang, Jiangqiang; Li, Xianghua; Hu, Changwen

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW12O40 (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant, which show a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: A new visible-light driven photocatalyst Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} was designed. The photocatalyst shows a high activity for the degradation of methyl blue. The high activity can be ascribed to the synergy of photoexcited AgHPW and Ag. - Abstract: Ag@Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (Ag@AgHPW) nanoparticles (NPs), a new visible-light driven plasmonic photocatalyst, are prepared by a green photoreduction strategy without the addition of any surfactant. They show strong absorption in the visible region because of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag NPs. This plasmonic photocatalyst shows a high activity and stability for the degradation of methyl blue (MB) under visible light irradiation, which could be attributed to the highly synergy of photoexcited Ag{sub x}H{sub 3?x}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} (AgHPW) and plasmon-excited Ag NPs and the confinement effects at interfaces between polyoxometalates (POMs) and silver. POM anions have redox ability and high photocatalytic activity, whereas Ag NPs could effectively accelerate the separation of electrons and holes, both of which contribute to their high activity.

  6. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of mesoporous cerium doped TiO{sub 2} as visible light sensitive photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aman, Noor; Satapathy, P.K.; Mishra, T.; Mahato, M.; Das, N.N.

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Cerium doped titania having optimum 5 wt% of cerium can decompose methylene blue and reduce selenium (IV) efficiently under visible light. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of cerium doping on the surface properties and visible light mediated photocatalytic reaction is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cerium doping increases the anatase phase stability, surface area (up to 137 m{sup 2}/g) and visible light absorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Importance of Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}, oxygen vacancy, surface area and crystallinity is correlated with improved catalytic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Material with 5 wt% Ce is found to be most active photocatalyst for methylene blue decomposition and Se (IV) reduction. -- Abstract: Cerium doped titania materials were synthesized varying the cerium concentration from 0 to 10 wt%. Materials are characterised by XRD, TEM, XPS and N{sub 2} adsorption desorption method. Surface area and visible light absorption substantially increases and crystallite size decreases with the increasing cerium content. Cerium doping stabilizes the anatase phase and surface area even at 600 Degree-Sign C calcination. Photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue decomposition and selenium (IV) reduction is found to increase with the cerium content up to 5 wt% and then decreases. Materials calcined at 600 Degree-Sign C shows better activity than that calcined at 400 Degree-Sign C, even though surface area decreases. Anatase crystallinity mostly decides the photocatalytic activity rather than only surface area. It can be concluded that the optimum visible light absorption and oxygen vacancy with 5% cerium doping enhances the photocatalytic activity. In addition photocatalytic performance is found to depend on the presence of Ce{sup 4+}/Ce{sup 3+} rather than only visible light absorption.

  7. Modeling of Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems Modeling of Lean Exhaust Emissions Control Systems 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  8. Emissions Technology Gives Company Clean Win as Energy Innovator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Umpqua Energy produced an emission control system that can potentially reduce the emissions from vehicles by 90 percent.

  9. All-silicon Michelson instrument on chip: Distance and surface profile measurement and prospects for visible light spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malak, M.; Marty, F.; Bourouina, T.; Nouira, H.; Vailleau, G.

    2013-04-08

    A miniature Michelson interferometer is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The fabricated micro-interferometer is incorporated at the tip of a monolithic silicon probe to achieve contactless distance measurements and surface profilometry. For infrared operation, two approaches are studied, based on the use of monochromatic light and wavelength sweep, respectively. A theoretical model is devised to depict the system characteristics taking into account Gaussian beam divergence and light spot size. Furthermore, preliminary results using visible light demonstrate operation of the probe as a visible light spectrometer, despite silicon absorbance, thanks to the micrometer thickness involved in the beam splitter.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Efficiency & Emissions » Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All engines that enter the vehicle market must comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions regulations. Harmful pollutants in these emissions include: Carbon monoxide Nitrogen oxides Unburned

  11. SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 SUMMARY GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS DATA WORKSHEET JANUARY 2015 SUMMARY_GREENHOUSE_GAS_EMISSIONS_DATA_WORKSHEET_JANUARY_2015.xlsx (36.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Amendment: Energy and Emissions Benefit Table (December 30, 2008)

  12. ARCADE 2 OBSERVATIONS OF GALACTIC RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Mirel, P.; Wollack, E.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Seiffert, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-06-10

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in 2006 July to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index {beta}{sub synch} = -2.5 {+-} 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 {+-} 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc |b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of C II emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission toward the north polar cap T{sub Gal} = 10.12 {+-} 0.90 K and spectral index {beta} = -2.55 {+-} 0.03 at reference frequency 0.31 GHz. Emission associated with the plane-parallel structure accounts for only 30% of the observed high-latitude sky temperature, with the residual in either a Galactic halo or an isotropic extragalactic background. The well-calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 {+-} 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 23 GHz.

  13. In-plane visibility of lesions using breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timberg, P.; Baath, M.; Andersson, I.; Mattsson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Ruschin, M.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the visibility of simulated lesions in 2D digital mammography (DM) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) images of patients. Methods: Images of the same women were acquired on both a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and a BT prototype system adapted from the same type of DM system. Using the geometrical properties of the two systems, simulated lesions were projected and added to each DM image as well as to each BT projection image prior to 3D reconstruction. The same beam quality and approximately the same total absorbed dose to the glandular tissue were used for each breast image acquisition on the two systems. A series of four-alternative forced choice human observer experiments was conducted for each of five simulated lesion diameters: 0.2, 1, 3, 8, and 25 mm. An additional experiment was conducted for the 0.2 mm lesion in BT only at twice the dose level (BT{sub 2x}). Threshold signal was defined as the lesion signal intensity required for a detectability index (d{sup '}) of 2.5. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments. One experiment, consisting of 60 cases, was conducted per test condition (i.e., lesion size and signal combination). Results: For the smallest lesions (0.2 mm), the threshold signal for DM was 21% lower than for BT at equivalent dose levels, and BT{sub 2x} was 26% lower than DM. For the lesions larger than 1 mm, the threshold signal increased linearly (in log space) with the lesion diameter for both DM and BT, with DM requiring around twice the signal as BT. The difference in the threshold signal between BT and DM at each lesion size was statistically significant, except for the 0.2 mm lesion between BT{sub 2x} and DM. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that low-signal lesions larger than 1.0 mm may be more visible in BT compared to DM, whereas 0.2 mm lesions may be better visualized with DM compared to BT, when compared at equal dose.

  14. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Roy, David; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  15. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  16. Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tietenberg, T.H.

    2006-02-15

    The author demonstrates how emissions trading became an attractive alternative to command-and-control policies that would have required the EPA to disallow the opening of new plants in the middle of the recession-burdened 1970s. His examination of the evolution of this system includes, among other applications, the largest multinational trading system ever conceived, the European Union's Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Scheme (EUETG), and the use of emissions trading in the Kyoto Protocol.

  17. Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Technology | Department of Energy Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power

  18. UV-visible spectroscopy of macrocyclic alkyl, nitrosyl and halide complexes of cobalt and rhodium. Experiment and calculation

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hull, Emily A.; West, Aaron C.; Pestovsky, Oleg; Kristian, Kathleen E.; Ellern, Arkady; Dunne, James F.; Carraher, Jack M.; Bakac, Andreja; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, transition metal complexes (NH3)5CoX2+ (X = CH3, Cl) and L(H2O)MX2+, where M = Rh or Co, X = CH3, NO, or Cl, and L is a macrocyclic N4 ligand are examined by both experiment and computation to better understand their electronic spectra and associated photochemistry. Specifically, irradiation into weak visible bands of nitrosyl and alkyl complexes (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L(H2O)MIIIX2+ (X = CH3 or NO) leads to photohomolysis that generates the divalent metal complex and ˙CH3 or ˙NO, respectively. On the other hand, when X = halide or NO2, visible light photolysis leads to dissociation of X– and/ormore » cis/trans isomerization. Computations show that visible bands for alkyl and nitrosyl complexes involve transitions from M–X bonding orbitals and/or metal d orbitals to M–X antibonding orbitals. In contrast, complexes with X = Cl or NO2 exhibit only d–d bands in the visible, so that homolytic cleavage of the M–X bond requires UV photolysis. UV-Vis spectra are not significantly dependent on the structure of the equatorial ligands, as shown by similar spectral features for (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L1(H2O)CoCH32+.« less

  19. The visible light degradation activity and the photocatalytic mechanism of tetra(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin sensitized TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huigang; Zhou, Dongmei; Wu, Zhangzhu; Wan, Junmin; Zheng, Xuming; Yu, Lihong; Phillips, David Lee

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: Tetra(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin were chemically sensitized on TiO{sub 2}. S2S0 fluorescence intensity is enhanced and lifetime prolonged noticeably by TiO{sub 2}. The TCPP-TiO{sub 2} exhibits better photoactivity under visible light than that of TiO{sub 2}. The electronic relaxation dynamics is presented, catalytic mechanism is discussed. Adsorption and photo degradation of MB were systematically investigated. - Abstract: Tetra(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin(TCPP) were chemically sensitized on TiO{sub 2} to act as visible light antenna and to modify the photoresponse properties of TiO{sub 2} particles, their properties of photo-generated holes and electrons were studied by transient absorption spectroscopes. The time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique revealed that the S2S0 fluorescence intensity of TCPP is enhanced noticeably by TiO{sub 2}, and the lifetime prolonged. Adsorption and photo degradation of methylene blue (MB) over TCPP-TiO{sub 2} were systematically investigated. Moreover the overall picture of electronic relaxation dynamics for TCPP-TiO{sub 2} is presented, and the detailed short-time dynamics for visible-light induced catalytic mechanism was discussed. The development of the porphyrin-based photocatalyst provides an alternative approach in harnessing solar visible light and show promising prospect for the treatment of dye pollutants from wastewaters in future industrial application.

  20. Research Challenge 5: Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... dielectric structures and assemblies of emitters (2D photonic crystals and quantum dots, QDs). research-challenge-5-enhanced-spontaneous-emission-5001 (a) Coreshell ...

  1. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Fine Structure Studies in Proton Emission

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    (2006). " Fine Structure in Proton Emission from 145 Tm discovered with the Novel technique of Digital Signal Processing" M. Karny, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 012502 (2003)....

  3. Emissions from US waste collection vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maimoun, Mousa A.; Reinhart, Debra R.; Gammoh, Fatina T.; McCauley Bush, Pamela

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Life-cycle emissions for alternative fuel technologies. ► Fuel consumption of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles. ► Actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles. ► Diesel-fueled waste collection vehicle emissions. - Abstract: This research is an in-depth environmental analysis of potential alternative fuel technologies for waste collection vehicles. Life-cycle emissions, cost, fuel and energy consumption were evaluated for a wide range of fossil and bio-fuel technologies. Emission factors were calculated for a typical waste collection driving cycle as well as constant speed. In brief, natural gas waste collection vehicles (compressed and liquid) fueled with North-American natural gas had 6–10% higher well-to-wheel (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to diesel-fueled vehicles; however the pump-to-wheel (PTW) GHG emissions of natural gas waste collection vehicles averaged 6% less than diesel-fueled vehicles. Landfill gas had about 80% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel. Biodiesel waste collection vehicles had between 12% and 75% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel depending on the fuel source and the blend. In 2011, natural gas waste collection vehicles had the lowest fuel cost per collection vehicle kilometer travel. Finally, the actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles consists of repetitive stops and starts during waste collection; this generates more emissions than constant speed driving.

  4. SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    include X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES), Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS), High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection (HERFD) and X-ray Raman Spectroscopy (XRS). ...

  5. Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions By enabling process ...

  6. Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Michael Wang, Amgad Elgowainy, Jeongwoo Han ... Assumptions Approach: build LCA modeling capacity with the GREET model - Build a ...

  7. PNNL: About: Air Emissions (Radioactive) Reports

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    from unacceptable risks resulting from its operations. These reports document PNNL Campus and Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) radionuclide air emissions that result in the...

  8. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Poster ...

  9. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap ...

  10. Planetary Emissions Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Planetary Emissions Management Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Sector: Carbon Product: US-based, company offering measurements of...

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging. ... Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for Imaging Body Chemistry, a Fermilab Colloquium ...

  12. Urban Transportation Emission Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Calculator (UTEC) is a user-friendly tool for estimating annual emissions from personal, commercial, and public transit vehicles. It estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) and...

  13. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd325846553489.pdf Low...

  14. The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Maritime Administration PDF icon 2002deergore1.pdf More Documents & Publications Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy ...

  15. The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Maritime Administration PDF icon 2002deergore2.pdf More Documents & Publications Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy ...

  16. French perspective on diesel engines & emissions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    for Diesel Emission Control: Euruopean Experience and Worldwide Perspectives Performance and durability of PSA Peugeot Citroen's DPF System on a Taxi Fleet in the Paris Area

  17. Exhaust emission control and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazur, Christopher John; Upadhyay, Devesh

    2006-11-14

    A diesel engine emission control system uses an upstream oxidation catalyst and a downstream SCR catalyst to reduce NOx in a lean exhaust gas environment. The engine and upstream oxidation catalyst are configured to provide approximately a 1:1 ratio of NO to NO2 entering the downstream catalyst. In this way, the downstream catalyst is insensitive to sulfur contamination, and also has improved overall catalyst NOx conversion efficiency. Degradation of the system is determined when the ratio provided is no longer near the desired 1:1 ratio. This condition is detected using measurements of engine operating conditions such as from a NOx sensor located downstream of the catalysts. Finally, control action to adjust an injected amount of reductant in the exhaust gas based on the actual NO to NO2 ratio upstream of the SCR catalyst and downstream of the oxidation catalyst.

  18. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  19. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic property of red phosphorus via surface roughening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Weibing; Yue, Jiguang; Hua, Fangxia; Feng, Chang; Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Photocatalytic RhB degradation of red phosphorus was studied for the first time. • Surface rough can increase the photocatalysis reaction active sites. • Surface rough red phosphorus possesses high photocatalytic performance. • Surface rough red phosphorus has high industrial application value. - Abstract: Red phosphorus with rough surface (SRP) was prepared by catalyst-assisted hydrothermal synthesis using Co{sup 2+} catalyst. The photocatalytic Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation of red phosphorus (RP) and SRP was studied for the first time in this work. Rough surface can enhance the dye adsorption ability of RP. About 75% RhB was absorbed by SRP after 30-min adsorption in 100 ml RhB solution with concentration of 10 mg l{sup −1} in dark. After only 10 min of illumination by visible light, more than 95% RhB was degraded, indicating that SRP has a great application potential in the area of photocatalysis. The photocatalytic RhB degradation properties of RP are much weaker than those of SRP. The increase of the number of the active sites for the photocatalytic reactions, the electron mobility and the lifetime of the photogenerated electrons cause the significant improvement of the photocatalytic performance of SRP based on the experimental results obtained.

  20. When will low-contrast features be visible in a STEM X-ray spectrum image?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-02-03

    When will a small or low-contrast feature, such as an embedded second-phase particle, be visible in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray map? This work illustrates a computationally inexpensive method to simulate X-ray maps and spectrum images (SIs), based upon the equations of X-ray generation and detection. To particularize the general procedure, an example of nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) containing nm-sized Y2Ti2O7 embedded precipitates in ferritic stainless steel matrix is chosen. The proposed model produces physically appearing simulated SI data sets, which can either be reduced to X-ray dot maps or analyzed via multivariate statistical analysis. Comparison to NFA X-ray maps acquired using three different STEM instruments match the generated simulations quite well, despite the large number of simplifying assumptions used. A figure of merit of electron dose multiplied by X-ray collection solid angle is proposed to compare feature detectability from one data set (simulated or experimental) to another. The proposed method can scope experiments that are feasible under specific analysis conditions on a given microscope. As a result, future applications, such as spallation proton–neutron irradiations, core-shell nanoparticles, or dopants in polycrystalline photovoltaic solar cells, are proposed.

  1. When will low-contrast features be visible in a STEM X-ray spectrum image?

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-02-03

    When will a small or low-contrast feature, such as an embedded second-phase particle, be visible in a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) X-ray map? This work illustrates a computationally inexpensive method to simulate X-ray maps and spectrum images (SIs), based upon the equations of X-ray generation and detection. To particularize the general procedure, an example of nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) containing nm-sized Y2Ti2O7 embedded precipitates in ferritic stainless steel matrix is chosen. The proposed model produces physically appearing simulated SI data sets, which can either be reduced to X-ray dot maps or analyzed via multivariate statistical analysis. Comparison to NFAmore » X-ray maps acquired using three different STEM instruments match the generated simulations quite well, despite the large number of simplifying assumptions used. A figure of merit of electron dose multiplied by X-ray collection solid angle is proposed to compare feature detectability from one data set (simulated or experimental) to another. The proposed method can scope experiments that are feasible under specific analysis conditions on a given microscope. As a result, future applications, such as spallation proton–neutron irradiations, core-shell nanoparticles, or dopants in polycrystalline photovoltaic solar cells, are proposed.« less

  2. Beam quality and wavelength limitation in visible and UV FEL oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomimasu, T.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI linac beam has succeeded in visible-FEL oscillation on the third harmonics at 0.64 {mu}m using a 3-m undulator and a 6.72-m optical cavity with two Au-coated mirrors in Feb. 28, 1995. The beam is a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 26 {pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 1%. In 1993, an ultraviolet (UV) FEL oscillation was already achieved on the third harmonics at 0.37{mu} m using a 46-MeV, 130-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 3{pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 0.24% from the APEX L-band linac with an rf photocathode electron gun. However, we are now trying to achieve an FEL oscillation in the UV range using the FELI linac with the thermionic gun because of long-life, easy-operation, and low-cost of the thermionic gun, as the FELI ring with 9.8-m long straight sections capable of storing a long lived 1-A beam is in the design stage. Recent experimental and theoretical results on relations between beam quality and short wavelength FEL oscillations have been also reviewed and wavelength limitations due to normalized emittance and relative energy spread are discussed.

  3. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small

  4. Investigation of mechanisms for He-I emission radial profile broadening in a weakly ionized cylindrical helium plasma with recombining edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Brandt, C.; Hudson, B.; Nishijima, D.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Kumar, D.

    2013-09-15

    Spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of He-I line emission are used to study the causes of emission profile broadening radially across the cylinder of a weakly ionized helium plasma. The plasma consists of an ionizing core (r < 2 cm) surrounded by a recombining edge (r > 2 cm) plasma. The brightness profiles of low-n EUV He-I resonance lines are shown to be strongly radially broadened due to opacity. The brightness profiles of high-n visible lines are also found to be strongly radially broadened, but dominantly due to edge recombination. Visible low-n lines are less strongly radially broadened, apparently by a combination of both recombination and EUV opacity. The low-n visible He-I line ratio method with central opacity correction is found to calculate central electron density and temperature well, with poor agreement at the edge, as expected for recombining plasma. In the recombining edge, high-n Boltzmann analysis is found to accurately measure the cold (T{sub e} < 0.2 eV) edge temperature. Near the core, however, high-n Boltzmann analysis can be complicated by electron-impact excitation, giving incorrect (T{sub e}? 0.1 eV) apparent temperatures. Probe measurements were not able to capture the cold edge temperature accurately, probably due to large potential fluctuations, even when using fast triple probe measurements. Fast spectroscopic measurements show that this discrepancy is not explained by recombining plasma alternating with ionizing plasma in the edge region.

  5. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, 1993 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the 1993 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the Air Emission Inventory is to commence the preparation of the permit to operate application for the INEL, as required by the recently promulgated Title V regulations of the Clean Air Act. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL and provides emissions estimates for both mobile and stationary sources.

  6. Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

  7. Method and means for measuring acoustic emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renken, Jr., Claus J.

    1976-01-06

    The detection of acoustic emissions emanating from an object is achieved with a capacitive transducer coupled to the object. The capacitive transducer is charged and then allowed to discharge with the rate of discharge being monitored. Oscillations in the rate of discharge about the normally exponential discharge curve for the capacitive transducer indicate the presence of acoustic emissions.

  8. Fuel-based motor vehicle emission inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    A fuel-based methodology for calculating motor vehicle emission inventories is presented. In the fuel-based method, emission factors are normalized to fuel consumption and expressed as grams of pollutant emitted per gallon of gasoline burned. Fleet-average emission factors are calculated from the measured on-road emissions of a large, random sample of vehicles. Using this method, a fuel-based motor vehicle CO inventory was calculated for the South Coast Air Basin in California for summer 1991. Emission factors were calculated from remote sensing measurements of more than 70,000 in-use vehicles. Results of the study are presented and a conclusion is provided. 40 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  10. Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emissions Control Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ft007_sluder_2012_o.pdf (1.85 MB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

  11. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  12. TOWARD AN EMPIRICAL THEORY OF PULSAR EMISSION. X. ON THE PRECURSOR AND POSTCURSOR EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2015-01-10

    Precursors and postcursors (PPCs) are rare emission components, which appear beyond the main pulse emission, in some cases far away from it, and are detected in a handful of pulsar. In this paper we attempt to characterize the PPC emission in relation to the pulsar main pulse geometry. In our analysis we find that PPC components have properties very different from that of outer conal emission. The separation of the PPC components from the main pulse center remains constant with frequency. In addition the beam opening angles corresponding to the separation of PPC components from the pulsar center are much larger than the largest encountered in conal emission. Pulsar radio emission is believed to originate within the magnetic polar flux tubes due to the growth of instabilities in the outflowing relativistic plasma. Observationally, there is strong evidence that the main pulse emission originates at altitudes of about 50 neutron star radii for a canonical pulsar. Currently, the most plausible radio emission model that can explain main pulse emission is the coherent curvature radiation mechanism, wherein relativistic charged solitons are formed in a non-stationary electron-positron-pair plasma. The wider beam opening angles of PPC require the emission to emanate from larger altitudes as compared to the main pulse, if both these components originate by the same emission mechanism. We explore this possibility and find that this emission mechanism is probably inapplicable at the height of the PPC emission. We propose that the PPC emission represents a new type of radiation from pulsars with a mechanism different from that of the main pulse.

  13. UV-visible spectroscopy of macrocyclic alkyl, nitrosyl and halide complexes of cobalt and rhodium. Experiment and calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Emily A.; West, Aaron C.; Pestovsky, Oleg; Kristian, Kathleen E.; Ellern, Arkady; Dunne, James F.; Carraher, Jack M.; Bakac, Andreja; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-01-22

    In this paper, transition metal complexes (NH3)5CoX2+ (X = CH3, Cl) and L(H2O)MX2+, where M = Rh or Co, X = CH3, NO, or Cl, and L is a macrocyclic N4 ligand are examined by both experiment and computation to better understand their electronic spectra and associated photochemistry. Specifically, irradiation into weak visible bands of nitrosyl and alkyl complexes (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L(H2O)MIIIX2+ (X = CH3 or NO) leads to photohomolysis that generates the divalent metal complex and ˙CH3 or ˙NO, respectively. On the other hand, when X = halide or NO2, visible light photolysis leads to dissociation of X and/or cis/trans isomerization. Computations show that visible bands for alkyl and nitrosyl complexes involve transitions from M–X bonding orbitals and/or metal d orbitals to M–X antibonding orbitals. In contrast, complexes with X = Cl or NO2 exhibit only d–d bands in the visible, so that homolytic cleavage of the M–X bond requires UV photolysis. UV-Vis spectra are not significantly dependent on the structure of the equatorial ligands, as shown by similar spectral features for (NH3)5CoCH32+ and L1(H2O)CoCH32+.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of F-N-W-codoped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst with enhanced visible light response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiaoliang; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 ; Qin, Haibo; Yang, Xingyong; Zhang, Qiaoxin; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Anatase F-N-W-codoped TiO{sub 2} was prepared by a solgel-hydrothermal method. ? Under visible illumination, carbon removal rate of RB reached 94% using F-7NW-TiO{sub 2}. ? F, N and W dopants narrowed band gap and lowed charge pairs recombination rate. ? There were W{sub x}Ti{sub 1?x}O{sub 2}, O-Ti-N and valence variation of W ions existing. -- Abstract: Anatase F-N-W-codoped TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully prepared by a method combining solgel with hydrothermal treatment. Effects of F, N and W ion dosage concentration on the crystallinity, morphology, grain size and chemical status of the photocatalyst were investigated. The results showed that the F-7NW-TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst composed of uniform ellipsoidal particles around 20 nm in length and 10 nm in width, and the photocatalyst displayed enhanced visible-light absorption and photocatalytic activities. Using the photocatalyst and under visible irradiation for 1.5 h, the decoloration percent of RB and carbon removal rate were about 98% and 94% respectively, which were much higher than that of commercial P25, TiO{sub 2}, N-W-TiO{sub 2} and F-TiO{sub 2}. The high visible-light photocatalytic activity of F-7NW-TiO{sub 2} might result from narrowing the band gap and lowing charge pairs recombination rate for the W{sub x}Ti{sub 1?x}O{sub 2}, O-Ti-N and valence variation of W ions existing.

  15. Minimising greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freund, P.

    1997-07-01

    Combustion of fossil fuels is the main anthropogenic source of carbon dioxide, the principal greenhouse gas. Generation of electricity is the single largest user of fossil fuels, world-wide. If there is international agreement about the need to make substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, then having access to suitable, effective technology would be important. This would help avoid the need for precipitate action, such as radical changes in the energy supply systems. Capture and disposal of greenhouse gases from flue gases can achieve substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This can be realized with known technology. In this paper, the range of options will be summarized and steps needed to achieve further progress will be identified. Emissions of other gases, such as methane, are also expected to influence the climate. Methane is emitted from many anthropogenic sources; the IEA Greenhouse Gas programme is investigating ways of reducing these emissions. Opportunities for abatement of methane emissions associated with coal mining will be described. Reduction in emissions from drainage gas is relatively straightforward and can, in appropriate circumstances, generate useful income for the none operator. More substantial amounts of methane are discharged in mine ventilation air but these are more difficult to deal with. In this paper, a summary will be given of recent progress in reducing methane emissions. Opportunities will be examined for further research to progress these technologies.

  16. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  17. Template synthesis of Ag/AgCl microrods and their efficient visible light-driven photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hua; Xiao, Liang; Huang, Jianhua

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: Preparation ofAg/AgCl microrods by reaction of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} microrods with NaCl solution. Generation of metallic Ag is induced by the ambient light in the synthesis process. Ag/AgCl shows excellent visible light-driven photodegradation of organic dyes. - Abstract: Ag/AgCl microrods, aggregated by nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 100 nm to 2 ?m, were prepared by an ion-exchange reaction at 80 C between Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} template and NaCl solution. The existence of metallic Ag species was confirmed by XRD, DRS and XPS measurements. Ag/AgCl microrods showed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B and methylene blue under visible light irradiation. The degradation rate constants of rhodamine B and methylene blue are 0.176 and 0.114 min{sup ?1}, respectively. The cycling photodegradation experiments suggest that Ag/AgCl microds could be employed as stable plasmonic photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes under visible light irradiation.

  18. Preparation, characterization of the Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles and their photocatalytic activity under visible-light illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Jizhou; Li Aidong; Zhai Haifa; Gong Youpin; Li Hui; Wu Di

    2009-08-15

    This paper describes a novel catalyst of the Ta-doped ZnO nanocrystals prepared by a modified polymerizable complex method using the water-soluble tantalum precursor as the sources of Ta. The catalysts were characterized by means of various analytical techniques as a function of Ta content (x=0-4 mol%) systematically. A remarkable advantage of the results was confirmed that dopant Ta enhanced the visible-light absorption of ZnO and the low-solubility tantalum doping could restrain the growth of crystal and minish the particle size. The relationship between the physicochemical property and the photocatalytic performance was discussed, and it was found that the photocatalytic activity in the photochemical degradation of methylene blue under visible-light irradiation (lambda>=420 nm) was dependent on the contents of the dopant, which could affect the particle size, concentration of surface hydroxyl groups and active hydrogen-related defect sites, and the visible-light absorption. The highest photocatalytic activity was obtained for the 1.0 mol% Ta-doped ZnO sample. - Graphical abstract: The addition of the tantalum into ZnO prepared by a modified polymerizable complex method not only restrains the growth of crystal, minish the particle size, but also changes the nanocrystal morphology.

  19. Emission abatement system utilizing particulate traps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2004-04-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  20. Methane sources and emissions in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, G.R.; Castagnola, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    Methane emissions in Italy were assessed in the framework of the measures taken to follow out the commitments undertaken at the 1992 U.N. Conference for Environment and Development. Methane emissions of anthropic origin were estimated to be in the range of 1.6 to 2.3 million ton of methane per year. Some of these methane sources (natural gas production, transmission and distribution; rice paddies; managed livestock enteric fermentation and waste; solid waste landfills) are given here particular care as they mainly contribute to the total methane emission budget.

  1. OTC NOx baseline emission inventory, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this effort was to compile and quality assure a data base of NOx emissions from fossil fuel-fired boilers and indirect heat exchanges greater than or equal to 250 million British thermal units per hour (MMBtu/hr) capacity and electric generating units greater than or equal to 15 megawatts (MW) in the Northeast Ozone Transport Region (OTR). Emissions for the period May 1 through September 30, 1990 (referred to as the 5-month summer season) were compiled and will be used as a basis for emission reduction targeting and trading.

  2. Comparison of On-Road Portable and Bench Emission Measurements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Chassis dynamometer testing using a conventional emissions bench and on-road testing with a portable emissions system were performed to compare exhaust emissions from selected vehicles by both techniques.

  3. Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions Los Alamos achieves 20-year low on radioactive air emissions The Lab measures air emissions through a comprehensive system of ...

  4. Concentrations and Size Distributions of Particulate Matter Emissions...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Devices on the Emission Profiles of Trucks and Buses CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses

  5. Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C - Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL (33.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Attachment C

  6. Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment C Summary GHG Emissions Data FINAL Attachment-C-Summary-GHG-Emissions-Data-FINAL.xlsx (34.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Attachment C -

  7. Organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2012-03-27

    An organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers is provided. Each emissive layer may define an exciton formation region, allowing exciton formation to occur across the entire emissive region. By aligning the energy levels of each emissive layer with the adjacent emissive layers, exciton formation in each layer may be improved. Devices incorporating multiple emissive layers with multiple exciton formation regions may exhibit improved performance, including internal quantum efficiencies of up to 100%.

  8. NREL: Transportation Research - Emissions and Fuel Economy Analysis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Emissions and Fuel Economy Analysis Photo of a man hooking up test instruments to an engine mounted on an engine dynamometer. An NREL engineer maintains an engine fuel economy and emissions test stand at the ReFUEL Laboratory. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's emissions and fuel economy testing and analysis projects help address greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions by advancing the development of new fuels and engines that deliver both high efficiency and reduced emissions. Emissions that

  9. Urea/Ammonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System Through the Use of CFD Analysis UreaAmmonia Distribution Optimization in an SCR Emission Control System ...

  10. Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cells Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per ...

  11. Directionally-Tailored Infrared Emission. AFRL STTR Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul; Resnick, Paul J.; Clem, Paul G.; Ginn, James; Figueiredo, Pedro; Shelton, David

    2015-10-30

    The purpose of this program is to investigate emissive metamaterials (EMM) as a path to realizing surfaces with directional absorption/emission.

  12. Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using Model-Based Transient Calibration Fuel Efficiency and Emissions Optimization of Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines using ...

  13. EIA Energy Efficiency-Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Posted Date: May 2007 Page Last Modified: September 2010 EIA Links Disclaimer: These pages...

  14. Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project Finding Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project Finding ...

  15. Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Alloy Foam Diesel Emissions Control School Bus Implementation Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, ...

  16. Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes - ORNL-FEERC Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). ...

  17. Emission Control Systems and Components for Retrofit and First...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Control Systems and Components for Retrofit and First-Fit Applications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Cleaire Advanced Emissions Control ...

  18. Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Emission Regulations Reduced Impact of Climate Change in CA Study shows clean diesel programs slashed black carbon, a ...

  19. Emissions from the European Light Duty Diesel Vehicle During...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of diesel solid nanoparticle emissions using a catalytic stripper for comparison with Europe's PMP protocol Emission Performance of Modern Diesel Engines Fueled with Biodiesel

  20. Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

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    Gateway Edit History Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies (Redirected from LEDS) Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Edit History Gateway:Low Emission Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Leds-Graphics 03.PNG Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Gateway Hello why do you...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of Batangas City, Philippines Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE): Case of...

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    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance Comparison of Clean Diesel Buses to CNG Buses

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    National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baseline Scenarios: Learning from Experiences in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Liechtenstein, Poland and Turkey provided updated information on emission projections and national programmes in 2009." References "Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis Presentation given by Argonne National ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus ... Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus Robb Barnitt and ...

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    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deererkkila.pdf (398.95 KB) More Documents & Publications Evaluating Exhaust Emission ...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating global and North American methane emissions ...

  18. Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the ...

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    Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology 2005 Diesel ...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    for allocation of GHG emissions from a combined heat and power (CHP) plant is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to determine the GHG emissions attributable to the...

  1. Advanced Ceramic Filter For Diesel Emission Control | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

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  3. Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    of low-emission development strategies (LEDS). Key Outputs Greenhouse gas and air toxic emissions. How to Use This Tool Training Available Training available at http:...

  6. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Benefits of Workplace Charging...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    commutes, also known as Scope 3 emissions, is a top priority for many organizations interested in minimizing their carbon footprint. Scope 3 emissions are indirect GHG ...

  7. Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance Heavy Duty Vehicle In-Use Emission Performance 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ...

  8. Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using...

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    Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis Dynamometer Evaluating Exhaust Emission Performance of Urban Buses Using Transient Heavy-Duty Chassis ...

  9. Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT’ Emission Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Johnson Matthey ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 1 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Johnson Matthey ...

  11. Spontaneous emission spectrum of a diabatically pulsed silicon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spontaneous emission spectrum of a diabatically pulsed silicon charge qubit. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spontaneous emission spectrum of a diabatically pulsed ...

  12. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements Real Time Tailpipe Emission Measurements 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Brookhaven National Laboratory 2002deerimre.pdf (1.23 MB) ...

  14. Development and Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for the Retrofit Market Development and Deployment of Advanced Emission Controls for the Retrofit Market 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: ...

  15. Strategies for Integrated Emission Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Integrated Emission Control Strategies for Integrated Emission Control A new filter system technology significantly reduces harmful pollutants, uses less precious metals, and ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime ...

  18. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Corning, Inc. deer2003johnson.pdf (1.53 MB) More Documents & Publications Review of Diesel Emission ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Control Technology and Regulations Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology ... Light Duty Diesels in the United States - Some Perspectives Review of Diesel Emission ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transport Refrigeration Units Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport ... More Documents & Publications Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits RYPOS - ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Passive Catalytic Approach to Low Temperature NOx Emission Abatement Numerically evaluated and optimized proposed ...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First Comparisong Using External Costs on Urban Buses Potential Effect of Pollutantn Emissions on Global Warming: First ...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Building Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme AgencyCompany...

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    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

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    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    customers the fuel mix of its electricity production and the associated sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions emissions, expressed in pounds per 1000...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd Place: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip: 600 034 Sector:...