National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ves sel bunkering

  1. Bunker Hill Sediment Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal A. Yancey; Debby F. Bruhn

    2009-12-01

    The long history of mineral extraction in the Coeur d’Alene Basin has left a legacy of heavy metal laden mine tailings that have accumulated along the Coeur d’Alene River and its tributaries (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001; Barton, 2002). Silver, lead and zinc were the primary metals of economic interest in the area, but the ores contained other elements that have become environmental hazards including zinc, cadmium, lead, arsenic, nickel, and copper. The metals have contaminated the water and sediments of Lake Coeur d’Alene, and continue to be transported downstream to Spokane Washington via the Spokane River. In 1983, the EPA listed the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex on the National Priorities List. Since that time, many of the most contaminated areas have been stabilized or isolated, however metal contaminants continue to migrate through the basin. Designation as a Superfund site causes significant problems for the economically depressed communities in the area. Identification of primary sources of contamination can help set priorities for cleanup and cleanup options, which can include source removal, water treatment or no action depending on knowledge about the mobility of contaminants relative to water flow. The mobility of contaminant mobility under natural or engineered conditions depends on multiple factors including the physical and chemical state (or speciation) of metals and the range of processes, some of which can be seasonal, that cause mobilization of metals. As a result, it is particularly important to understand metal speciation (National Research Council, 2005) and the link between speciation and the rates of metal migration and the impact of natural or engineered variations in flow, biological activity or water chemistry.

  2. Brigadier General (Sel.) Ronald J. Haeckel Appointed to NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Lisa Cutler, 202586-7371 Tuesday, September 4, 2001 Brigadier General (Sel.) Ronald J. Haeckel Appointed To NNSA Defense Programs Post Brigadier General (Sel.) Ronald J....

  3. Bunker Hill Village, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bunker Hill Village is a city in Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 7th congressional district.12 References ...

  4. Brigadier General (Sel.) Ronald J. Haeckel Appointed to NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (Sel.) Ronald J. Haeckel Appointed to NNSA Defense Programs Post | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  5. Earth-mounded concrete bunker PLAP technical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eng, R.

    1989-11-01

    Under the US DOE Prototype License Application Project (PLAP), Ebasco Services Incorporated was commissioned to develop a preliminary design of the Earth-Mounded Concrete Bunker (EMCB) concept for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. The EMCB disposal concept is of great interest because it represents the only engineered LLW disposal technology currently in use in the commercial sector. By definition, the EMCB disposal structure is located partially below grade and partially above grade. The concrete bunker is an engineered structure designed to be structurally stable for the prerequisite time horizon. The basic design parameters of the disposal facility were stipulated by US DOE, a northeast site location, representative waste, 30 year operational life, and a 250,000 ft{sup 3}/year disposal capacity. The design was developed to satisfy only US NRC Part 61 disposal requirements, not individual state requirements that may go beyond Part 61 requirements. The technical safety analysis of the preliminary design was documented according to the format specifications of NUREG-1199, to the extent practicable with quite limited resources.

  6. Overview of the earth mounded concrete bunker prototype license application project: Objectives and approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, J.E.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the objectives and approach taken in developing the Earth-mounded Concrete Bunker Prototype License Application Project. The Prototype License Application Project was initiated by the Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program in early 1987 and completed in November 1988. As part of this project a prototype safety analysis report was developed. The safety analysis report evaluates the licensibility of an earth-mounded concrete bunker for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility located on a hypothetical site in the northeastern United States. The project required approximately five person-years and twenty months to develop.

  7. A study on leakage radiation dose at ELV-4 electron accelerator bunker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chulan, Mohd Rizal Md E-mail: redzuwan@ukm.my; Yahaya, Redzuwan E-mail: redzuwan@ukm.my; Ghazali, Abu BakarMhd

    2014-09-03

    Shielding is an important aspect in the safety of an accelerator and the most important aspects of a bunker shielding is the door. The bunkers door should be designed properly to minimize the leakage radiation and shall not exceed the permitted limit of 2.5?Sv/hr. In determining the leakage radiation dose that passed through the door and gaps between the door and the wall, 2-dimensional manual calculations are often used. This method is hard to perform because visual 2-dimensional is limited and is also very difficult in the real situation. Therefore estimation values are normally performed. In doing so, the construction cost would be higher because of overestimate or underestimate which require costly modification to the bunker. Therefore in this study, two methods are introduced to overcome the problem such as simulation using MCNPX Version 2.6.0 software and manual calculation using 3-dimensional model from Autodesk Inventor 2010 software. The values from the two methods were eventually compared to the real values from direct measurements using Ludlum Model 3 with Model 44-9 probe survey meter.

  8. Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

    1990-10-01

    On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Chedabucto Bay 1992 shoreline oil conditions survey: Long-term fate of bunker C oil from the arrow spill in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, E.H.; McGuire, B.E.; Humphrey, B.

    1994-03-01

    The report presents a description of the activities related to and a summary of the information generated by a field survey carried out in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia, for Environment Canada from June to September 1992. The objective of the survey was to locate and document any residual oil on the shores of Chedabucto Bay. The grounding of the tanker Arrow in February 1970 resulted in the release of more than 11 million liters of Bunker C fuel oil. This oil was stranded over an estimated 305 km of shoreline in the Chedabucto Bay area.

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (IE) (United States) USDOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence (IN) (United ... simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an ...

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: Publication Date: ... Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with ...

  12. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials • CAS 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove

  13. SEL-2015-02

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SECTION 3161 ANNOUNCEMENT: New Draft Workforce Restructuring Plan for the [SITE] The Department of Energy (DOE) [DOE/NNSA field office] is today posting for comment a draft workforce restructuring plan (Plan). The draft Plan being developed is prepared pursuant to [IN THE CASE OF NON-3161 FACILITIES, SUBSTITUTE" "consistent with the purposes and policies of"] Section 3161 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 to mitigate the impact of any potential

  14. Alternative methods for dispoal of low-level radioactive wastes. Task 1. Description of methods and assessment of criteria. [Alternative methods are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults; earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, augered holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, R.D.; Miller, W.O.; Warriner, J.B.; Malone, P.G.; McAneny, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 1 of a four-task study entitled Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities. The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Agreement States. The alternative methods considered are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults, earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, and augered holes. Each of these alternatives is either being used by other countries for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal or is being considered by other countries or US agencies. In this report the performance requirements are listed, each alternative is described, the experience gained with its use is discussed, and the performance capabilities of each method are addressed. Next, the existing 10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D criteria with respect to paragraphs 61.50 through 61.53, pertaining to site suitability, design, operations and closure, and monitoring are assessed for applicability to evaluation of each alternative. Preliminary conclusions and recommendations are offered on each method's suitability as an LLW disposal alternative, the applicability of the criteria, and the need for supplemental or modified criteria.

  15. "application/vnd.ms-excel","AEGEAN BUNKERING USA LLC",2,510,"Residual Fuel, Over 1.00% Sulfur",1601,"CHARLESTON, SC","SOUTH CAROLINA",1,"TD","TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO",60,2.06,0,,,,,,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT_CODE","PORT_CITY","PORT_STATE","PORT_PADD","GCTRY_CODE","CNTRY_NAME","QUANTITY","SULFUR","APIGRAVITY","PCOMP_RNAM","PCOMP_SITEID","PCOMP_SNAM","PCOMP_STAT","STATE_NAME","PCOMP_PADD" "application/vnd.ms-excel","AEGEAN BUNKERING

  16. Sandia Enforcement Letter (SEL-2016-01)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy San Antonio Small Businesses "Seeing the Light" with Energy Upgrades San Antonio Small Businesses "Seeing the Light" with Energy Upgrades March 21, 2012 - 2:27pm Addthis KBK to the Trade 1 of 5 KBK to the Trade Thanks to the City Lights program, this design shop is saving an estimated 25,500 kilowatt-hours and $2,000 on electricity bills each year. | Photo Credit: City of San Antonio Date taken: 2011-05-24 15:06 Gallista Gallery 2 of 5 Gallista

  17. win0203SelUpdates.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    November 2002 Short-Term Energy Outlook Figure WF1. U.S. Winter Natural Gas Demand (Year-to-Year Percent Change) Table WF1. Illustrative Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Actual Actual Actual Base Forecast Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 81.7 99.1 81.3 92.5 Avg. Price ($/mcf) 6.69 9.54 7.34 8.06 Expenditures ($) 546 945 597 746 Heating Oil (Northeast) Consumption (gals) 644 731 584 703 Avg. Price ($/gal) 1.16 1.37

  18. win0203SelUpdates.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    December 2002 Short-Term Energy Outlook Figure WF1. U.S. Winter Natural Gas Demand (Year-to-Year Percent Change) Table WF1. Illustrative Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Actual Actual Actual Base Forecast Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 81.7 99.1 81.3 93.1 Avg. Price ($/mcf) 6.69 9.54 7.34 8.38 Expenditures ($) 546 945 597 780 Heating Oil (Northeast) Consumption (gals) 644 731 584 716 Avg. Price ($/gal) 1.16 1.37

  19. win0203SelUpdates.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    January 2003 Short-Term Energy Outlook Figure WF1. U.S. Winter Natural Gas Demand (Year-to-Year Percent Change) Table WF1. Illustrative Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Actual Actual Actual Base Forecast Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 81.7 99.1 81.3 91.9 Avg. Price ($/mcf) 6.69 9.55 7.33 8.71 Expenditures ($) 546 946 596 800 Heating Oil (Northeast) Consumption (gals) 644 731 584 719 Avg. Price ($/gal) 1.16 1.37

  20. win0203SelUpdates0203.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Updated Feb 2003) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2002-2003 Selected Table and Figure Updates Based on the February 2003 Short-Term Energy Outlook Figure WF1. U.S. Winter Natural Gas Demand (Year-to-Year Percent Change) -25% -20% -15% -10% -5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Residential Commercial Indust. (incl. CHP) Total Projections Table WF1. Illustrative Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Actual Actual

  1. win0203SelUpdates0303.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    En ergy Outlook -- October 2002 Updated Feb 2003) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2002-2003 Selected Table and Figure Updates Based on the March 2003 Short-Term Energy Outlook Figure WF1. U.S. Winter Natural Gas Demand (Year-to-Year Percent Change) Table WF1. Illustrative Consumer Prices and Expenditures for Heating Fuels During the Winter 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003 Actual Actual Actual Base Forecast Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 81.7 99.1 81.3 92.1 Avg. Price ($/mcf) 6.69 9.54

  2. CNS Enforcement Letter SEL-2015-01

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    incident involving the unclassified waste stream at the Y-12 National Security Complex ... event involving the unclassified waste stream found that this event resulted from ...

  3. VES-0071- In the Matter of Mississippi Power Company

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 1, 2000, the Mississippi Power Company, of Gulfport, Mississippi (Mississippi Power), filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy an Application for...

  4. A Preliminary Resistivity Investigation (Ves) Of The Langada...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    measured in the major area, as revealed by the temperature map. Authors C. Thanassoulas, G. A. Tselentis and G. Traganos Published Journal Geothermics, 1987 DOI 10.1016...

  5. Lucrative Opportunities in Asia Pacific to Help Global Bunker...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow at 8.1% CAGR from 2013 to 2019 Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 more Group members (32)...

  6. Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Vessel Bunkering Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,912,984 2,002,834 2,133,395 1,768,324 1,675,521 1,593,398 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 276,013 259,319 296,947 283,254 274,142 289,674 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 45,147...

  7. Residual Fuel Oil Sales for Vessel Bunkering Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4,589,049 5,142,573 4,560,070 4,819,508 4,211,505 3,847,163 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 1,460,012 1,759,665 1,525,651 1,518,285 1,341,800 1,244,139 1984-2014 New England (PADD...

  8. Laboratory Performance Evaluation Report of SEL 421 Phasor Measurement Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; faris, Anthony J.; Martin, Kenneth E.; Hauer, John F.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Shaw, James M.

    2007-12-01

    PNNL and BPA have been in close collaboration on laboratory performance evaluation of phasor measurement units for over ten years. A series of evaluation tests are designed to confirm accuracy and determine measurement performance under a variety of conditions that may be encountered in actual use. Ultimately the testing conducted should provide parameters that can be used to adjust all measurements to a standardized basis. These tests are performed with a standard relay test set using recorded files of precisely generated test signals. The test set provides test signals at a level and in a format suitable for input to a PMU that accurately reproduces the signals in both signal amplitude and timing. Test set outputs are checked to confirm the accuracy of the output signal. The recorded signals include both current and voltage waveforms and a digital timing track used to relate the PMU measured value with the test signal. Test signals include steady-state waveforms to test amplitude, phase, and frequency accuracy, modulated signals to determine measurement and rejection bands, and step tests to determine timing and response accuracy. Additional tests are included as necessary to fully describe the PMU operation. Testing is done with a BPA phasor data concentrator (PDC) which provides communication support and monitors data input for dropouts and data errors.

  9. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 204: STORAGE BUNKERS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 330 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 6, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The unit is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as CAU 330: Areas 6, 22, and 23 Tanks and Spill Sites. CAU 330 consists of the following CASs: CAS 06-02-04, Underground Storage Tank (UST) and Piping CAS 22-99-06, Fuel Spill CAS 23-01-02, Large Aboveground Storage Tank (AST) Farm CAS 23-25-05, Asphalt Oil Spill/Tar Release

  10. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 214: BUNKERS AND STORAGE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this Closure Report is to document that the closure of CAU 214 complied with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan closure requirements. The closure activities specified in the Corrective Action Plan were based on the approved corrective action alternatives presented in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Decision Document.

  11. monolayers BUNKER,BRUCE C.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; ASSINK,ROGER A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    P.; GULLEY,GERALD L. 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SYNTHESIS; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; THIN FILMS; SILANES; HYDROLYSIS;...

  12. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enforcement Letter, Isotek Systems, LLC - January 20, 2010 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2012-01 - February 28, 2012 Enforcement Letter, Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC - ...

  13. MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY THROUGH: ARUN MAJUNIDAR SElVlOR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... DELIBERATIVE PROCESS, PRE-DECISIONAL MATERIAL 3 ATTACHMENT B Excerpts from Energy Policy Act of 2005 (PL 109-58) Title V - INDIAN ENERGY, Sec. 503 Sec. 2602(d) PREFERENCE (1) In ...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunkering Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","New Mexico Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunkering Consumers (Thousand...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distillate SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunkering Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","East Coast (PADD 1) Total Distillate SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunkering Consumers (Thousand...

  16. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System (VES-SFE-106)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Evans

    2006-08-15

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System located in the adjacent to the Sludge Tank Control House (CPP-648), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, was developed to meet the interim status closure requirements for a tank system. The system to be closed includes a tank and associated ancillary equipment that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System will be "cleaned closed" in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of acheiving those standards for the CPP-648 Radioactive Solid and Liquid Waste Storage Tank System.

  17. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and R- BCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain themore » flow rate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon valida- tion of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the \\all-or-nothing" phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis model.« less

  18. Software Defined Networking (SDN) Project

    Energy Savers

    with the SEL-2740S substation hardened switch, developed through the Watchdog Project. ... is developing a flow controller to be used with the SEL- 2740S substation hardened switch. ...

  19. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bunker pipeline No, if it is a petroleum-carrying pipeline. ... (stable) Thorium-232 Carbon tetrachloride Total uranium ... NO 2 nitrogen dioxide; WIDSWaste Information Data System. ...

  20. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion" Retrieved from "http:...

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... carbon dioxide from international bunker fuels, both civilian and military, which are excluded from the accounting of carbon dioxide emissions under the United Nations convention. ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Zavadil, Kevin Robert (65) Ohlhausen, James Anthony (14) Kotula, Paul ... Bunker, Bruce Conrad (3) Huang, Jian Yu (3) Kent, Michael Stuart (3) Lu, Ping (3) ...

  3. Biodiversity | Savannah River National Environmental Park

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    El biodiésel es un combustible renovable producido a nivel nacional que puede elaborarse a partir de aceites vegetales nuevos y usados, grasas animales y grasa reciclada proveniente de restaurantes. Las propiedades físicas del biodiésel son similares a las del diésel de petróleo, pero la primera es una alternativa renovable de combustión más limpia. Utilizar biodiésel en lugar de diésel de petróleo reduce signifcativamente las emisiones de carbono durante su vida útil. Las

  4. CNMS User Newsletter

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    parallel discussion sessions providing opportuni es for a endees to exchange perspec ves on various aspects of the CNMS Strategic Plan with CNMS management and staff. Results...

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    this, TOTE has partnered with WesPac Midstream LLC, a LNG supplier, and its affiliate Clean Marine Energy LLC to build North America's first LNG bunker (supply) barge to...

  6. Fact #896: October 26, 2015 More than 80% of Transportation Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Residual fuel oil is heavier oil which can be used in vessel bunkering. Fact 896 Dataset ... Type, 2013 Fuel Type Light Vehicles MedHeavy Trucks & Buses Air Water Rail Pipeline ...

  7. Proceedings, 26th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.

    2007-07-01

    Papers are presented under the following topic headings: multiple-seam mining, surface subsidence, coal pillar, bunker and roadway/entry supports, mine design and highwall mining, longwall, roof bolting, stone and hardrock mining, rock mechanics and mine seal.

  8. Manhattan Project: Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bunker at S-10,000 The "Trinity" atomic test was the most violent man-made explosion in history to that date. It also posed the single most significant safety hazard of the entire ...

  9. Reynolds County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Missouri. Its FIPS County Code is 179. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Reynolds County, Missouri Bunker, Missouri...

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Bunkering Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Military Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Other End ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Alam, Todd Michael (5) Brinker, C. Jeffrey (3) Cygan, Randall Timothy (3) Nenoff, Tina Maria (3) Xu, Hongwu (3) Bonhomme, Francois R. (2) Bunker, Bruce Conrad (2) Criscenti, Louise ...

  12. M E Environmental Management Environmental Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and R-Area production reactors which represent 385,000 ... passivation of residual sodium and grouting of reactor ... CPP-727 FAST HF Acid StorageVES-CS-169 EM Industrial 875 ...

  13. Helen He! NERSC User Services Group

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    --- Suggested OpenMP directives --- 1 4 --- Save the directives --- 1 5 --- Save d irec@ves t o the o riginal fi le Extensive "Help" topics in Reveal --- 1 6 --- Reveal helps to...

  14. CNMS User Newsletter

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    at the 4th annual Na onal User Facility Science Expo for the U.S. House of Representa ves in the foyer of the Ray- burn House Office Building, Capitol Hill Washington D.C.....

  15. Burden distribution control for maintaining the central gas flow at No. 1 blast furnace in Pohang Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, S.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Suh, Y.K.; Ahn, T.J.; Kim, S.M.

    1995-12-01

    The causes for temperature lowering at the upper shaft center in Pohang No. 1 blast furnace were investigated. The test operation with charging notch change in the actual blast furnace and with a 1/12 scale model to Pohang No. 1 blast furnace were carried out in order to improve central gas flow in the shaft. Finally, rebuilding of the lower bunker interior was performed using the results of model experiments. It was confirmed that the main reason for the gas temperature lowering at the upper shaft center was the smaller particle size at center than the wall according to the discharging characteristics of center feed bunker with stone box. The central gas flow could be secured through modifying the stone box in the bunker.

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    TO AMEI DMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS The above numbered solicitation is amended as sel forth in Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers is extended. is not...

  17. Secure Control Systems for the Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Rhett; Stewart, John; Chavez, Adrian

    2014-10-22

    The Padlock Project is an alliance between Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories Inc. (SEL). SEL is the prime contractor on the Padlock project. Rhett Smith (SEL) is the project director and Adrian Chaves (SNL) and John Stewart (TVA) are principle investigators. SEL is the world’s leader in microprocessor-based electronic equipment for protecting electric power systems. The Tennessee Valley Authority, a corporation owned by the U.S. government, provides electricity for 9 million people in parts of seven southeastern states at prices below the national average. TVA, which receives no taxpayer money and makes no profits, also provides flood control, navigation and land management for the Tennessee River system and assists utilities, and state and local governments with economic development.

  18. THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... , , (e) Ensuring that ,the bid proposal review board documents its reasons for not sel&lng low blds submitted by small and small disadvantaged busfness concerns. (f) Ensuilng the ...

  19. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1997 report provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. 24 tabs.

  20. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs.Methods: Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0 to 330, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results.Results: For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary barriers was found to be caused by linac head leakage.Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that IMRT workload corrections are unnecessary, for survey measurements made at and alongside primary barriers. Use of reduced IMRT workload correction factors is recommended when evaluating survey measurements around a bunker door, provided that a subset of the measurements used in

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seneca Army Depot - NY 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seneca Army Depot - NY 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SENECA ARMY DEPOT (NY.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Romulus , New York Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.11-2 NY.11-3 Site Operations: Eleven bunkers were used to store approximately 2,000 drums of pitchblende ore in the early 1940's. The bunkers were returned to munitions storage service after removal of the ore drums. NY.11-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to

  2. Safety equipment list for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORRIS, K.L.

    1999-06-29

    This document provides the safety classification for the safety (safety class and safety RAPID Mitigation Project. This document is being issued as the project SEL until the supporting authorization basis documentation, this document will be superseded by the TWRS SEL (LMHC 1999), documentation istlralized. Upon implementation of the authorization basis significant) structures, systems, and components (SSCS) associated with the 241-SY-1O1 which will be updated to include the information contained herein.

  3. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Information Resources » Tools » Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally enhanced lighting (SEL) is a cost-effective, low-risk design method for achieving significant energy savings. It entails shifting the color of lamps from the warmer to the cooler (whiter) end of the color spectrum, more closely matching daylight. Studies show that, with this color shift, occupants perceive lighting to be brighter and they are able to see more clearly. Since SEL provides the

  4. Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Electricity...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Jet Fuel ( Jet A, JP-8) 70.88 kg CO2 MMBtu 9.57 kg CO2 gallon Kerosene 72.31 kg CO2 MMBtu 9.76 kg CO2 gallon Heavy Fuel Oil (No. 5, 6 fuel oil), bunker fuel 78.80 kg CO2 ...

  5. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—02: A Nested Neutron Spectrometer to Measure Neutron Spectra in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Licea, A

    2014-08-15

    During high-energy radiotherapy treatments, neutrons are produced in the head of the linac through photonuclear interactions. This has been a concern for many years as photoneutrons contribute to the accepted, yet unwanted, out-of-field doses that pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel. Presently, in-room neutron measurements are difficult and time-consuming and have traditionally been carried out using Bonner spheres with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a new detector, the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS) is tested for use in radiotherapy bunkers. The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional Bonner spheres. The NNS, operated in current mode, was used to measure the dose equivalent, average energy and energy spectrum at several positions in a radiotherapy bunker. The average energy and spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations while the dose equivalent was compared to bubble detector measurements. The average energies, as measured by the NNS and Monte Carlo simulations, differed by approximately 30% across the bunker. Measurements of the dose equivalent using the NNS and the bubble detectors agreed within 50% in the maze and less than 10% close to the linac head. Apart from some discrepancies at thermal energies, we also found reasonable agreement between NNS-measured and Monte Carlo-simulated spectra at a number of locations within our radiotherapy bunker. Our results demonstrate that the NNS is a suitable detector to be used in high dose-rate radiotherapy environments.

  6. Overview of NRC review process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokar, M.; Kane, J.D.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the NRC staff`s review of the Prototype License Application Safety Analysis Report (PLASAR) for an Earth-Mounded Concrete Bunker low-level waste disposal facility. Described are the objectives of the review, the resources (e.g., background guidance documents and staff technical disciplines) used, and the products produced. Evaluation conclusions are summarized.

  7. International Energy Statistics - EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    International > International Energy Statistics International Energy Statistics Petroleum Production | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Consumption | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Capacity | Bunker Fuels | Stocks | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Reserves | Imports | Annual Monthly/Quarterly Exports | CO2 Emissions | Heat Content Natural Gas All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports | Exports | Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Heat Content Coal All Flows | Production | Consumption | Reserves | Imports

  8. Texas Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vessel Bunkering 198,625 323,153 306,887 210,408 208,962 281,626 1984-2014 On-Highway 3,711,173 3,849,991 4,114,193 4,375,991 4,672,287 5,210,804 1984-2014 Military 28,385 33,020 ...

  9. Florida Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vessel Bunkering 84,718 118,991 142,198 131,685 126,464 124,343 1984-2014 On-Highway 1,322,703 1,340,494 1,329,312 1,340,337 1,394,235 1,420,204 1984-2014 Military 4,370 5,481 ...

  10. Automated remote control of fuel supply section for the coal fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chudin, O.V.; Maidan, B.V.; Tsymbal, A.A.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 6,000 miles east of Moscow, lays the city of Khabarovsk. This city`s coal-fired Power Plant 3 supplies electricity, heat and hot water to approximately 250,000 customers. Plant 3 has three units with a combined turbine capacity of 540 MW, (3 {times} 180) electrical and 780 (3 {times} 260) Gkal an hour thermal capacity with steam productivity of 2010 (3 {times} 670) tons per hour at 540 C. Coal fired thermal electric power plants rely on the equipment of the fuel supply section. The mechanism of the fuel supply section includes: conveyor belts, hammer crushers, guiding devices, dumping devices, systems for dust neutralizing, iron separators, metal detectors and other devices. As a rule, the fuel path in the power plant has three main directions: from the railroad car unloading terminal to the coal warehouse; from the coal warehouse to the acceptance bunkers of the power units, and the railroad car unloading terminal to the acceptance bunkers of power units. The fuel supply section always has a reserve and is capable of uninterruptible fuel supply during routine maintenance and/or repair work. This flexibility requires a large number of fuel traffic routes, some of which operate simultaneously with the feeding of coal from the warehouse to the acceptance bunkers of the power units, or in cases when rapid filling of the bunkers is needed, two fuel supply routes operate at the same time. The remote control of the fuel handling system at Power Plant 3 is described.

  11. Barbara Helland, Facilities Division Director Advanced Scientific...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    r egime ( 2020---2025 5 meframe). HEP: I den+fy k ey c omputa+onal s cience o bjec+ves f rom H igh E nergy P hysics t hat p ush exascale and d escribe t he H PC e cosystem -...

  12. montoya_qer_santafe.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AGENDA * Pipeline S afety P rogram - Pipeline S afety a nd S tate P rogram O verview - NAPSR's T op P riori;es f or 2 014 - NAPSR's N a;onal P erspec;ves * Excava;on Damage ...

  13. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms.

  14. BP and Hydrogen Pipelines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ng n va ves, a ow ng mo ecu ar H to s p by Concern about H auto- gn on near nv e f ame prox ty to other chem ca nes Stay to conservat ve s de of a owab e t me frame for DOT va ve ...

  15. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a Folleto para colorear y de actividades 1 ¿Qué es bioenergía y de dónde proviene? ? Bioenergía es un tipo de energía renovable que se deriva de la biomasa para generar calor, electricidad, productos renovables y combustibles líquidos para el transporte. 2 Biocombustibles provienen de la biomasa (plantas-árboles) y desechos Pacas Rastrojo de maíz Pastos altos Trocitos de madera D E SEC H O S Algas 2 3 BIOMASA Combustible Etanol Biodiésel Combustible de aviones Diésel Gasolina

  16. Biocombustibles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    a Folleto para colorear y de actividades 1 ¿Qué es bioenergía y de dónde proviene? ? Bioenergía es un tipo de energía renovable que se deriva de la biomasa para generar calor, electricidad, productos renovables y combustibles líquidos para el transporte. 2 Biocombustibles provienen de la biomasa (plantas-árboles) y desechos Pacas Rastrojo de maíz Pastos altos Trocitos de madera D E SEC H O S Algas 2 3 BIOMASA Combustible Etanol Biodiésel Combustible de aviones Diésel Gasolina

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D&D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  19. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Zhongxian Cheng; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2006-09-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2006 through September 30, 2006. The following activities have been completed: the steel floor grating around the riser in all levels and the three-phase power supply for CFBC System was installed. Erection of downcomers, loop seals, ash bunker, thermal expansion joints, fuel and bed material bunkers with load cells, rotary air-lock valves and fuel flow monitors is underway. Pilot-scale slipstream tests conducted with bromine compound addition were performed for two typical types of coal. The purposes of the tests were to study the effect of bromine addition on mercury oxidization. From the test results, it was observed that there was a strong oxidization effect for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The proposed work for next quarter and project schedule are also described.

  20. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996 report provides information, illustrations and State-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996. 24 tabs.

  1. Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Sept. 18

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Explosives exhibit opens at the Bradbury Science Museum Sept. 18 To highlight the Laboratory's work in the field of explosives, the museum is opening a new exhibit titled "The Science of Explosives." September 12, 2013 A typical explosives experiment fired in front of the PHERMEX bunker produces a brilliant fireball long after the hydrodynamics measurements have been recorded. PHERMEX was the location for more than 1,000

  2. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Newmark Groundwater Contamination Site, San Bernardino, CA, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-04

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Newmark Operable Unit, Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. EPA has selected an interim remedy for the Newmark plume of groundwater contamination in the Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site. This portion of the site cleanup is referred to as the Newmark Operable Unit (OU). The Newmark OU is an interim action focusing on contamination in the undergound water supply in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino, north and east of the Shandin Hills.

  3. Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 3: Waste characterization, waste reduction and minimization, prototype licensing application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-11-01

    Thirteen papers are presented in volume 3. The seven papers on waste characterization discuss sampling, analysis, and certification techniques for low-level radioactive wastes. Three papers discuss US DOE waste minimization policies and regulations, Y-12 Plant`s reduction of chlorinated solvents, and C-14 removal from spent resins. The last three papers discuss the licensing studies for earth-mounded concrete bunkers for LLW disposal. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Dialkylenecarbonate-Bridged Polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Sol-Gels with a Thermally Labile Bridging Group Assink, Roger A.; Baugher, Brigitta M.; Beach, James V.; Loy, Douglas A.; Shea, Kenneth J.; Small, James H.; Tran, Joseph The impact of solution agglomeration on the deposition of self-assembled monolayers BUNKER,BRUCE C.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; ASSINK,ROGER A.; THOMAS,MICHAEL L.;

  5. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-13

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented.

  6. IZI: INFERRING THE GAS PHASE METALLICITY (Z) AND IONIZATION PARAMETER (q) OF IONIZED NEBULAE USING BAYESIAN STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Kewley, Lisa; Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2015-01-10

    We present a new method for inferring the metallicity (Z) and ionization parameter (q) of H II regions and star-forming galaxies using strong nebular emission lines (SELs). We use Bayesian inference to derive the joint and marginalized posterior probability density functions for Z and q given a set of observed line fluxes and an input photoionization model. Our approach allows the use of arbitrary sets of SELs and the inclusion of flux upper limits. The method provides a self-consistent way of determining the physical conditions of ionized nebulae that is not tied to the arbitrary choice of a particular SEL diagnostic and uses all the available information. Unlike theoretically calibrated SEL diagnostics, the method is flexible and not tied to a particular photoionization model. We describe our algorithm, validate it against other methods, and present a tool that implements it called IZI. Using a sample of nearby extragalactic H II regions, we assess the performance of commonly used SEL abundance diagnostics. We also use a sample of 22 local H II regions having both direct and recombination line (RL) oxygen abundance measurements in the literature to study discrepancies in the abundance scale between different methods. We find that oxygen abundances derived through Bayesian inference using currently available photoionization models in the literature can be in good (∼30%) agreement with RL abundances, although some models perform significantly better than others. We also confirm that abundances measured using the direct method are typically ∼0.2 dex lower than both RL and photoionization-model-based abundances.

  7. P

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    erformance A nalysis for H PC LLNL---PRES---508651 1. Op6mize s ingle---node c ode 2. Fix a ny l oad i mbalance - c onsider d ecomposi6on a nd r ank o rder 3. Fix y our h otspots 1. Communica6on * Pre---post r eceives * Overlap c omputa6on a nd c ommunica6on * Reduce c ollec6ves * Adjust M PI e nvironment v ariables * Use r ank r eordering 2. Computa6on * Examine t he h ardware c ounters a nd c ompiler f eedback * Adjust t he c ompiler fl ags, d irec6ves, o r c ode s tructure t o i mprove p

  8. P

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Image P rocessing O ccupancy S ensing Luigi G en5le P olese, C ommercial B uildings R esearch Na5onal R enewable E nergy L aboratory September 10, 2013 2 The O ccupancy S ensing P roblem * Problem: * Current o ccupancy d etec/on t echnologies* infer o ccupancy v ia m o/on * False n ega/ves r esult i n o ccupant d iscomfort, f alse p osi/ves i n e nergy waste * Sensors a re u ndertuned o r e ven d efeated, t rading o ff e nergy s avings * Sensors h ave v ery l imited r ange * Sensors p erform a s

  9. DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Reports from the Breakout Sessions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Reports from the Breakout Sessions MATERIALS-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SUMMIT: Defining pathways for onboard automotive applications hosted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO January 27 & 28, 2015 Metal Hydride Session Report-out METAL HYDRIDES BREAKOUT SESSION REPORT - Objec8ves and Approach - OBJECTIVES * To candidly assess the current status of metal hydride materials as hydrogen storage media for vehicular and sta9onary power applica9ons. * To iden9fy the cri-cal challenges

  10. Newsletter Nov draft 110211pm.pub

    Energy Savers

    2011 DOE Sustainability Awards DOE presented the first annual DOE Sustainability Awards on November 3rd. The awards recognize teams and individuals at DOE sites and field offices for outstanding contribu ons to DOE's sustainability including accomplishments in managing pollu on, waste, energy, water, and vehicle fleets. For more informa on visit: h p://www1.eere.energy.gov/sustainability/ awards.html. You Have The Power-Energy Champion Christopher Evans leads ini a ves to iden fy energy and

  11. IG-0739 Report Cover.pub

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Performance-Based Contract Incentives at the Hanford Site DOE/IG-0739 September 2006 Department of Energy Washing ton, DC 20585 September 20, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SLrBJECT: INFORMA'TION: Audit Report on the ' Performance-Bdsed Contract Incent~ves at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND In 2002. the Office of Environmental Management (EM) directed its field organization LO ensure thar the structure of environmental remediation contracts emphasized he completior~ of specific

  12. Safety equipment list for the light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-02

    The initial issue (Revision 0) of this Safety Equipment List (SEL) for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) requires an explanation for both its existence and its being what it is. All LDUA documentation leading up to creation of this SEL, and the SEL itself, is predicated on the LDUA only being approved for use in waste tanks designated as Facility Group 3, i.e., it is not approved for use in Facility Group 1 or 2 waste tanks. Facility Group 3 tanks are those in which a spontaneous or induced hydrogen gas release would be small, localized, and would not exceed 25% of the LFL when mixed with the remaining air volume in the dome space; exceeding these parameters is considered unlikely. Thus, from a NFPA flammable gas environment perspective the waste tank interior is not classified as a hazardous location. Furthermore, a hazards identification and evaluation (HNF-SD-WM-HIE-010, REV 0) performed for the LDUA system concluded that the consequences of actual LDUA system postulated accidents in Flammable Gas Facility Group 3 waste tanks would have either NO IMPACT or LOW IMPACT on the offsite public and onsite worker. Therefore, from a flammable gas perspective, there is not a rationale for classifying any of SSCs associated with the LDUA as either Safety Class (SC) or Safety Significant (SS) SSCs, which, by default, categorizes them as General Service (GS) SSCs. It follows then, based on current PHMC procedures (HNF-PRO-704 and HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Section 5.2) for SEL creation and content, and from a flammable gas perspective, that an SEL is NOT REQ@D HOWEVER!!! There is both a precedent and a prudency to capture all SSCS, which although GS, contribute to a Defense-In-Depth (DID) approach to the design and use of equipment in potentially flammable gas environments. This Revision 0 of the LDUA SEL has been created to capture these SSCs and they are designated as GS-DID in this document. The specific reasons for doing this are listed.

  13. Enhancing Staging Capabilities at the Device Assembly Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanning, R. A.; Long, R. G.; Garcia, B. O.; Williams, V. D.

    2013-06-08

    The radioactive material limits allowed by the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Device Assembly Facility (DAF) can support larger quantities than the floor space will accommodate. In order to maximize the full staging bunker capability, National Security Technologies, LLC, (NSTec) is developing a plan to take advantage of these high inventory limits and evaluate staging options such as shelves, racks, and mezzanines. This plan will investigate cost and evaluate U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex-wide alternatives used at other sites (Highly Enriched Uranium Manufacturing Facility, Pantex, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, etc.) that addressed similar situations.

  14. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 55,664,448 58,258,830 59,769,444 57,512,994 58,675,008 61,890,990 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 18,219,180 17,965,794 17,864,868 16,754,388

  15. Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 7,835,436 8,203,062 7,068,306 5,668,530 4,883,466 3,942,750 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 3,339,162 3,359,265 2,667,576 1,906,700 1,699,418 1,393,068 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 318,184

  16. Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 54,100,092 56,093,645 57,082,558 57,020,840 58,107,155 60,827,930 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 17,821,973 18,136,965 17,757,005 17,382,566

  17. Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Information Resources » Tools Tools Below are links to tools that assist users with project planning and analysis. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Spectrally Enhanced Lighting (SEL) is a cost-effective, low-risk design method for achieving significant energy savings by shifting lamp color from the warmer to the cooler (whiter) end of the color spectrum, more closely matching daylight. Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool The Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool is a companion to the

  18. Enforcement Letter, Los Alamos National Security, LLC | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Los Alamos National Security, LLC Enforcement Letter, Los Alamos National Security, LLC September 18, 2015 Security Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC On September 18, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement issued an Enforcement Letter (SEL-2015-02) to Los Alamos National Security, LLC relating to the unauthorized disclosure of classified information at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. Environmental report 1994. Volume No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, K.S.; Harrach, R.J.; Gallegos, G.M.; Failor, R.A.; Christofferson, E.

    1995-09-01

    This volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1994 is a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable, along with some summary data and more detailed accounts of sample collection and analytical methods. Six chapters have information on monitoring of air, surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, and environmental radiation; two other chapters cover compliance sel-monitoring and quality assurance.

  20. CO-OPTIMIZATION OF FUELS AND ENGINES FOA INFORMATIONAL WEBINAR PRESENTATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3, 2015 Mr. James R. Haynes Chief Executive Officer Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC Post Office Box 2009 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-8245 SEL-2015-01 Dear Mr. Haynes: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement has completed an investigation into a security incident involving the unclassified waste stream at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), as identified in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Safeguards and Security Information Management System (SSIMS) report NPOY12-

  1. DOEFIX'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOEFIX' G-r 3 - 1 ' -(s-EL, Effi (07-W) Urited States Government memorandum CT. 3 Department of Energy ~~~~~~ EM-421 (W. R. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: -Authorization for Remedial Action at the Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut T0 i. Price, OR The Combustion Engineering facility in Windsor, Connecticut, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey,

  2. Co-firing High Sulfur Coal with Refuse Derived Fuels. Technical Progress Report {number_sign}11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wei-Ping; Riley, John T.; Lloyd, William G.

    1997-05-31

    The objective of this quarter of study was to prepare fuel pellets containing PVC, newspaper and plastics to be co-fired with coal in the AFBC combustor. The Western Kentucky University atmospheric fluidized bed combustion system requires the fuel to fall from a bunker into a lock-hopper, and from there into a mixing box where the fuel is auger-fed under pressure into the bottom of the fluidized bed. The fuel must flow freely out of the bunker and through the lock- hopper for proper feeding into the combustor. In order for the fuel to continuously fall through these units and into the mixing box during combustion, the density of the fuel and the size of the particles must meet certain requirements. The particles must be no larger than 3/8 inches in diameter and must have a density approaching that of coal. Loose materials such as sawdust, shredded paper products and most shredded plastics do not feed properly in the WKU AFBC system. Bridging and blockage of feed chutes result, even with constant vibration of parts of the feed mechanism. It is not possible to run the AFBC system powered solely by these loose materials.

  3. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  4. Development of explosive event scale model testing capability at Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, T.K.; Davie, N.T.; Calderone, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    Geotechnical structures such as underground bunkers, tunnels, and building foundations are subjected to stress fields produced by the gravity load on the structure and/or any overlying strata. These stress fields may be reproduced on a scaled model of the structure by proportionally increasing the gravity field through the use of a centrifuge. This technology can then be used to assess the vulnerability of various geotechnical structures to explosive loading. Applications of this technology include assessing the effectiveness of earth penetrating weapons, evaluating the vulnerability of various structures, counter-terrorism, and model validation. This document describes the development of expertise in scale model explosive testing on geotechnical structures using Sandia`s large scale centrifuge facility. This study focused on buried structures such as hardened storage bunkers or tunnels. Data from this study was used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of existing hydrocodes and structural dynamics codes developed at Sandia National Laboratories (such as Pronto/SPH, Pronto/CTH, and ALEGRA). 7 refs., 50 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Qin, Yining

    2011-03-31

    Although China became the world's largest emitter of energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007, China does not publish annual estimates of CO{sub 2} emissions and most published estimates of China's emissions have been done by other international organizations. Undertaken at the request of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy, this study examines the feasibility of applying the EIA emissions inventory methodology to estimate China's emissions from published Chinese data. Besides serving as a proof of concept, this study also helps develop a consistent and transparent method for estimating China's CO{sub 2} emissions using an Excel model and identified China-specific data issues and areas for improvement. This study takes a core set of data from the energy balances published in the China Energy Statistical Yearbook 2009 and China Petrochemical Corporation Yearbook 2009 and applies the EIA's eight-step methodology to estimate China's 2008 CO{sub 2} emissions. First, China's primary and secondary fuel types and consumption by end use are determined with slight discrepancies identified between the two data sources and inconsistencies in product categorization with the EIA. Second, energy consumption data are adjusted to eliminate double counting in the four potential areas identified by EIA; consumption data from China's Special Administrative Regions are not included. Physical fuel units are then converted to energy equivalents using China's standard energy measure of coal equivalent (1 kilogram = 29.27 MJ) and IPCC carbon emissions coefficients are used to calculate each fuel's carbon content. Next, carbon sequestration is estimated following EIA conventions for other petroleum products and non-energy use of secondary fuels. Emissions from international bunker fuels are also subtracted under the 'reference' calculation of estimating apparent energy consumption by fuel type and the 'sectoral' calculation of summing emissions

  6. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  7. A laboratory approach for determining the effect of oils and dispersants on mangroves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baca, B.J.

    1982-10-01

    An experimental approach was developed and applied to testing the effects of oil and dispersant combinations on the growth of mangrove seedlings (trees of the intertidal tropics). A controlled growth chamber was employed to test the effects of different oils and dispersed oils in an array of dosages applied to different parts of the plants. Preliminary test results are reported for two species of mangroves collected from five localities, including both oiled and unoiled estuaries. Differences occurred between species, substances, dosages, the part of the plant dosed, and the presence of chronic oil pollution at localities from which the stocks were collected. Avicennia germinans (L.) L. (black mangrove) was more sensitive than Rhizophora mangle L. (red mangrove) when exposed to almost all substances tested. Light Arabian crude oil (LA) and light Arabian crude oil dispersed (LAD) were the most toxic substances tested. No. 2 fuel oil (N2) and No. 2 fuel oil dispersed (N2D) were as toxic as LA and LAD, except for an increase (an enhancement effect) in foliage and stem growth in Avicennia at lower dosages. Bunker C oil (BC) was the least toxic of the oils tested, resulting in the reduction of foliage and stem growth only at the highest dosage tested in Avicennia. Bunker C oil dispersed (BCD) failed to show effects in either species at any dosage tested. The leaves of Rhizophora were the most sensitive part of the plant tested.

  8. Gerber-Intro.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Director Review Overview, Goals & Process --- 1 --- April 2 9, 2 014 Requirements Reviews 1½-day reviews with each Program Office 2 High Energy Physics Fusion R esearch Adv. C omp. S cience R esearch J an. 2 014 * Participants - DOE Program Managers & ADs - Leading NERSC users & key potential users - NERSC staff Computing and storage requirements for next 5 years Scien:fic O bjec:ves Compu:ng, S torage, SoCware, S ervices Requirements Reports From 9 Requirements Reviews Have Been

  9. Summary - Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n the TRLs

  10. Characterization Plan for Soils Around Drain Line PLA-100115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Shanklin

    2006-05-24

    This Characterization Plan supports the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) closure of soils that may have been contaminated by releases from drain line PLA-100115, located within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The requirements to address the closure of soils contaminated by a potential release from this line in a characterization plan was identified in the "HWMA/RCRA Less Than 90-day Generator Closure Report for the VES-SFE-126."

  11. Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    TRA R Un Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n

  12. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  13. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  14. A CAMAC based knob controller for the LAMPF control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.; Bjorklund, E.

    1987-01-01

    The control computer for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) has been recently upgraded from an SEL-840 to a VAX 11/780 running the VMS operating system. As part of this upgrade, a CAMAC-based knob controller was developed for the new control system. The knobs allow the facility operators to have slew control over software selectable accelerator devices. An alphanumeric display associated with each knob monitors the progress of the selected device. This paper describes the system requirements for the new LAMPF knob controller, and the resulting hardware and software design.

  15. RELAP5-3D Code Validation for RBMK Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, James Ebberly

    1999-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic code was assessed against Japanese Safety Experiment Loop (SEL) and Heat Transfer Loop (HTL) tests. These tests were chosen because the phenomena present are applicable to analyses of Russian RBMK reactor designs. The assessment cases included parallel channel flow fluctuation tests at reduced and normal water levels, a channel inlet pipe rupture test, and a high power, density wave oscillation test. The results showed that RELAP5-3D has the capability to adequately represent these RBMK-related phenomena.

  16. RELAP5-3D code validation for RBMK phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, J.E.

    1999-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic code was assessed against Japanese Safety Experiment Loop (SEL) and Heat Transfer Loop (HTL) tests. These tests were chosen because the phenomena present are applicable to analyses of Russian RBMK reactor designs. The assessment cases included parallel channel flow fluctuation tests at reduced and normal water levels, a channel inlet pipe rupture test, and a high power, density wave oscillation test. The results showed that RELAP5-3D has the capability to adequately represent these RBMK-related phenomena.

  17. Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, 1984-2010 (Thousand Gallons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, 1984-2010 (Thousand Gallons) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 8,215,722 5,538,184 2,555,898 848,083 3,201,600 648,665 2,944,694 1,763,782 16,797,423 700,788 1,756,077 700,864 45,671,779 1985 7,728,057 4,463,226 2,440,661 684,227 3,102,106 523,010 2,786,479 1,698,985 17,279,650 661,644 1,522,041 168,625 43,058,711 1986

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, Selected Years, 1984-2010 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 534 360 166 55 208 42 192 115 1,093 46 114 46 2,971 1985 504 291 159 45 202 34 182 111 1,127 43 99 11 2,809 1990 475 260 169 49 222 50 203 135 1,393 46 118 (s) 3,120 1991 442 246 151 48 206 39 188 133 1,336 53 107 (s) 2,949

  19. Simulating Afterburn with LLNL Hydrocodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, L D

    2004-06-11

    Presented here is a working methodology for adapting a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) developed hydrocode, ALE3D, to simulate weapon damage effects when afterburn is a consideration in the blast propagation. Experiments have shown that afterburn is of great consequence in enclosed environments (i.e. bomb in tunnel scenario, penetrating conventional munition in a bunker, or satchel charge placed in a deep underground facility). This empirical energy deposition methodology simulates the anticipated addition of kinetic energy that has been demonstrated by experiment (Kuhl, et. al. 1998), without explicitly solving the chemistry, or resolving the mesh to capture small-scale vorticity. This effort is intended to complement the existing capability of either coupling ALE3D blast simulations with DYNA3D or performing fully coupled ALE3D simulations to predict building or component failure, for applications in National Security offensive strike planning as well as Homeland Defense infrastructure protection.

  20. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund Site, Muscoy Plume Operable Unit, San Bernardino, CA, March 24, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Muscoy Plume Operable Unit, Newmark Groundwater Contamination Superfund site. The Muscoy Plume OU is an interim action focusing on contamination in the underground water supply in the Bunker Hill Basin of San Bernardino, west of the Shandin Hills. The remedy involves groundwater extraction (pumping) and treatment of 6,200 gallons per minute (gpm) in San Bernardino at the leading edge of the contaminant plume. All the extracted contaminated groundwater shall be treated to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) by either of two proven treatment technologies: granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration or air stripping. The treated water will be transferred to a public water supply agency for distribution. Groundwater monitoring wells will be installed and sampled regularly to help evaluate the effectiveness of the remedy.

  2. The new bern PET cyclotron, its research beam line, and the development of an innovative beam monitor detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braccini, Saverio

    2013-04-19

    The new Bern cyclotron laboratory aims at industrial radioisotope production for PET diagnostics and multidisciplinary research by means of a specifically conceived beam transfer line, terminated in a separate bunker. In this framework, an innovative beam monitor detector based on doped silica and optical fibres has been designed, constructed, and tested. Scintillation light produced by Ce and Sb doped silica fibres moving across the beam is measured, giving information on beam position, shape, and intensity. The doped fibres are coupled to commercial optical fibres, allowing the read-out of the signal far away from the radiation source. This general-purpose device can be easily adapted for any accelerator used in medical applications and is suitable either for low currents used in hadrontherapy or for currents up to a few {mu}A for radioisotope production, as well as for both pulsed and continuous beams.

  3. TRNSYS HYBRID wind diesel PV simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinlan, P.J.A.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.; Blair, N.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Solar Energy Laboratory (SEL) has developed a wind diesel PV hybrid systems simulator, UW-HYBRID 1.0, an application of the TRNSYS 14.2 time-series simulation environment. An AC/DC bus links up to five diesels and wind turbine models, along with PV modules, a battery bank, and an AC/DC converter. Multiple units can be selected. PV system simulations include solar angle and peak power tracking options. Weather data are Typical Meteorological Year data, parametrically generated synthesized data, or external data files. PV performance simulations rely on long-standing SEL-developed algorithms. Loads data are read as scalable time series. Diesel simulations include estimated fuel-use and waste heat output, and are dispatched using a least-cost of fuel strategy. Wind system simulations include varying air density, wind shear and wake effects. Time step duration is user-selectable. UW-HYBRID 1.0 runs in Windows{reg_sign}, with TRNSED providing a customizable user interface. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  4. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-05-18

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  5. Secure Control Systems for the Energy Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Rhett; Campbell, Jack; Hadley, Mark

    2012-03-31

    Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL) will conduct the Hallmark Project to address the need to reduce the risk of energy disruptions because of cyber incidents on control systems. The goals is to develop solutions that can be both applied to existing control systems and designed into new control systems to add the security measures needed to mitigate energy network vulnerabilities. The scope of the Hallmark Project contains four primary elements: 1. Technology transfer of the Secure Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Communications Protocol (SSCP) from Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL). The project shall use this technology to develop a Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 140-2 compliant original equipment manufacturer (OEM) module to be called a Cryptographic Daughter Card (CDC) with the ability to directly connect to any PC enabling that computer to securely communicate across serial to field devices. Validate the OEM capabilities with another vendor. 2. Development of a Link Authenticator Module (LAM) using the FIPS 140-2 validated Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) CDC module with a central management software kit. 3. Validation of the CDC and Link Authenticator modules via laboratory and field tests. 4. Creation of documents that record the impact of the Link Authenticator to the operators of control systems and on the control system itself. The information in the documents can assist others with technology deployment and maintenance.

  6. NERSC Staff

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Introduction to OpenMP Programming Agenda * Basic i nforma,on - An s elec(ve i ntroduc(on t o t he p rogramming m odel. - Direc(ves f or w ork p aralleliza(on a nd s ynchroniza(on. - Some h ints o n u sage * Hands---on Lab - Wri(ng c ompiling a nd e xecu(ng s imple O penMP programs. * Presenta,on a vailable a t - module load training! - cp $EXAMPLES/NUG/Presentations/ IntroToOpenMP.pptx! Agenda * New stuff - Constructs i ntroduced i n OpenMP 3 .0 * Not t asking * Hands---on Lab What is

  7. Conceptual design report for the project to install leak detection in FAST-FT-534/548/549

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, K.J.

    1992-07-01

    This report provides conceptual designs and design recommendations for installing secondary containment and leak detection systems for three sumps at the Fluorinel and Storage Facility (FAST), CPP-666. The FAST facility is located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The three sumps receive various materials from the FAST water treatment process. This project involves sump upgrades to meet appropriate environmental requirements. The steps include: providing sump modifications or designs for the installation of leak chases and/or leakage accumulation, coating the sump concrete with a chemical resistant sealant (except for sump VES-FT-534 which is already lined with stainless steel) to act as secondary containment, lining the sumps with a primary containment system, and providing a means to detect and remove primary containment leakage that may occur.

  8. Memorial W.Gentner

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG H.Schopper fait une introduction pour la commémoration et cérémonie de la vie et du travail du Prof.Wolfgang Gentner. W. Gentner, physicien allemand, né en 1906 à Francfort et mort en septembre 1980 à Heidelberg, était directeur au Cern de 1955 à 1960, président du "scientific policy commitee" de 1968 à 1971 et président du Conseil du Cern de 1972 à 1974. Il était un des fondateurs du Cern et 4 personnes qui l'ont bien connu lui rendent hommage, entre autres un de ses élèves, ainsi que Mme ?, J.B.Adams et O.Sheffard(?)

  9. F

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    " Development o f F rameworks f or R obust Regional C limate M odeling" L. R uby L eung Pacific N orthwest N a0onal L aboratory NERSC BER Requirements for 2017 September 11-12, 2012 Rockville, MD 1. P roject D escrip0on Ruby L eung, P NNL; T odd R ingler, L ANL; B ill C ollins, L BNL, a nd M oet Ashfaq, O RNL; M ark T aylor, S NL * Objec0ves: * Applies a h ierarchical f ramework t o e valuate t hree d ynamical approaches t o m odeling r egional c limate t hrough g lobal h igh resolu0on

  10. M

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    M icroBooNE T PC t rigger and G PS 6 ming s tudies Leonidas N . K alousis ( Virginia T ech.) for t he M icroBooNE c ollabora6on APS m ee6ng, D enver, A pril 2 013 MicroBooNE * MicroBooNE will be the largest Liquid Argon Time Projec6on Chamber ( LAr T PC) o pera6ng i n t he U nited S tates ( US). * The p rimary o bjec6ves o f t his e xperiment a re: - The i nves6ga6on o f t he M iniBooNE l ow e nergy e xcess - Detailed m easurements o f n eutrino i nterac6on c ross---sec6ons a nd, - Study of the

  11. MI C H I GA N M E M O R I A L P H O E N I X PROJECT

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    M M P P - N P C - I - 4 MI C H I GA N M E M O R I A L P H O E N I X PROJECT THE U N I V E R S I T Y OF MI CHI GAN Facsimile Price $ Ij) Microfilm Price $ y / Avoiloble from the O ffic e of Technical Services Department o f Commerce Washington 25, D. C. LATTICE W A VES, SPIN W AVES A N D NEUTRON SCATTERING By B. N . BROCKHOUSE CHALK RIVER PROJECT A T O M IC ENERGY O F C A N A D A LIMITED A PAPER BASED O N LECTURES PRESENTED AT THE NEUTRON PHYSICS CONFERENCE M A C K IN A C ISLAND, M IC H IG A N JU

  12. tfm_BESPowerpoint.ppt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sampling d iffusive d ynamics o n l ong 0 mescales, and s imula0ng t he c oupled dynamics o f e lectrons a nd n uclei Thomas M iller Caltech NERSC BES Requirements for 2017 October 8-9, 2013 Gaithersburg, MD 1. P roject D escrip0on T homas F . M iller / C altech * Summarize y our p roject(s) a nd i ts s cien0fic o bjec0ves through 2 017 * Our p resent f ocus i s: * To u nderstand r eac0ve t unneling i n e nzyme---catalyzed hydrogen---transfer, e lectron---transfer, a nd p roton---coupled

  13. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse November 2009

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Vogel receiVes lANsce Director's excelleNce AwArD 2 AccelerAtor struc- ture DeVelopmeNt AND thiN coAtiNg oN Niobium sAmples 3 NANogrAiNs DemoN- strAte extrAorDiNAry thermAl stAbility 3 competitiVe ADsorp- tioN of luNg surfAc- tANt AND AlbumiN 4 heADs up! For more than 15 years, Yusheng Zhao has been on a scientifc journey

  14. Nick Balthaser! Storage Systems Group

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Systems Group Introduction to Archival Storage at NERSC --- 1 --- February 1 5, 2 013 Agenda * Objec2ves - Describe t he r ole o f a rchival s torage i n a 4 ered s torage s trategy - Log i nto t he N ERSC a rchive - Store a nd r etrieve fi les f rom t he a rchive - Avoid c ommon p roblems * Archive B asics - What i s a n a rchive? - Why s hould I u se o ne? - Features o f t he N ERSC a rchive * Using t he N ERSC A rchive Note: U nix/Linux c ommand---line f amiliarity r equired - How t o

  15. Transaction-Based Operation of Resource Constrained Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transac'on---Based O pera'on o f Resource C onstrained S ystems - T ROPEC T ransac.ve E nergy M icrogrid C ontroller - Vol$ron T echnical M ee/ng July 24, 2015 Rich B rown, B ruce N ordman, S tephen C zarnecki, M ike Spears, A nna L iao, M ichael V on H ippel, M ary A nn P ie$e Lawrence B erkeley N a/onal L aboratory Funded b y D OE/EERE, D oD/TROPEC 1 Objec'ves * Integrate r epresenta/ve c on/ngency---base l oad a nd g enera/on a ssets i nto transac/onal n etwork * Demonstrate o pera/on o f m

  16. SherryLi.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    for SuperLU a nd T OORSES X. S herry L i Scien0fic C ompu0ng G roup, L BNL NERSC ASCR Requirements for 2017 January 15, 2014 LBNL 1. P roject D escrip0on ( 1 o f 2 ) PI: S herry L i, L BNL * Summarize y our p roject(s) a nd i ts s cien0fic o bjec0ves through 2 017 * SuperLU i s a d irect s olver l ibrary f or s parse l inear s ystems * Most p arallel o ne i s SuperLU_DIST, M PI---only a t p resent * Many u sers: 2 7,403 d ownloads i n F Y13 * Included i n C ray's LibSci, F EMLAB, H P's M athLib,

  17. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  18. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore » receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  19. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650C to 1000C. Selective efficiency (?sel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ?sel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  20. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  1. Alabama Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    987,571 1,038,133 1,094,359 1,132,711 1,047,981 1,027,777 1984-2014 Residential 3,971 4,895 432 750 639 722 1984-2014 Commercial 39,802 46,009 48,475 46,654 30,536 27,874 1984-2014 Industrial 90,659 77,542 81,120 120,347 77,119 65,322 1984-2014 Oil Company 0 328 1,035 2,640 2,929 2,985 1984-2014 Farm 17,882 19,881 24,518 24,503 24,651 20,459 1984-2014 Electric Power 8,276 10,372 22,490 9,375 6,514 10,071 1984-2014 Railroad 44,546 42,465 97,177 125,439 63,570 56,873 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering

  2. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  3. A 12 GHz RF Power Source for the CLIC Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schirm, Karl; Curt, Stephane; Dobert, Steffen; McMonagle, Gerard; Rossat, Ghislain; Syratchev, Igor; Timeo, Luca; Haase, Andrew Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Sprehn, Daryl; Vlieks, Arnold; Hamdi, Abdallah; Peauger, Franck; Kuzikov, Sergey; Vikharev, Alexandr; /Nizhnii Novgorod, IAP

    2012-07-03

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  4. The Esso-Bernicia oil spill, Shetland, 1978-79: Experiences and lessons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, W. ); Kingham, L.V. )

    1991-03-01

    About 200 tons of Bunker C fuel oil escaped from a ruptured tank in a berthing incident in the winter of 1978-79. The worst weather conditions in a decade and failure of equipment led to widespread environmental damage. Local crofters also suffered some loss of sheep through oiling and subsequent drowning (sheep graze backshore beach areas of Shetland). The environmental response to the experiences of this accident produced reinforcement of baseline and operational monitoring of the physical and biological environments. SOTEAG (the Shetland Oil Terminal Environmental Group - a committee set up and funded jointly by industry (the terminal and pipeline operators) and Shetland Island Council and including the Port of Sullom Voe Harbour Authority) also commissioned special surveys to investigate other claims of environmental damage. At a managerial level, links between the Sullom Voe Oil Spills Advisory Committee (SVOSAC) and SOTEAG were reinforced. To prevent any recurrence of the widespread damage caused by 'Bernicia' a multimillion dollar engineering project was completed to build permanent spill booms to intercept oil moving along the coast at strategic points and to boom-off environmentally sensitive areas. Oil spill response equipment and deployment capacity were also increased substantially. Although not related directly to 'Bernicia,' other improvements over the last decade have included an 'area of avoidance' for the prescribed westerly, Atlantic, tanker approach to the terminal (effectively at least 10 mi away from land), aerial and video inspection of all inbound tankers, and the introduction of legislation relating to the amount and quality of ballast water.

  5. Alaska (with Total Offshore) Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    987,571 1,038,133 1,094,359 1,132,711 1,047,981 1,027,777 1984-2014 Residential 3,971 4,895 432 750 639 722 1984-2014 Commercial 39,802 46,009 48,475 46,654 30,536 27,874 1984-2014 Industrial 90,659 77,542 81,120 120,347 77,119 65,322 1984-2014 Oil Company 0 328 1,035 2,640 2,929 2,985 1984-2014 Farm 17,882 19,881 24,518 24,503 24,651 20,459 1984-2014 Electric Power 8,276 10,372 22,490 9,375 6,514 10,071 1984-2014 Railroad 44,546 42,465 97,177 125,439 63,570 56,873 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering

  6. Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    835,855 800,065 771,577 830,756 806,396 819,763 1984-2014 Residential 5 5 4 7 7 8 1984-2014 Commercial 26,641 23,713 26,383 26,386 24,019 28,803 1984-2014 Industrial 21,853 18,362 15,450 20,153 21,186 19,595 1984-2014 Oil Company 3,955 4,262 4,058 6,226 7,450 6,419 1984-2014 Farm 41,080 57,087 52,559 81,878 84,753 79,443 1984-2014 Electric Power 3,796 3,393 2,019 1,674 2,223 1,921 1984-2014 Railroad 24,727 17,936 37,741 29,848 32,550 35,578 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 141,302 93,384 58,285 58,505

  7. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M.; Scampoli, P.; Bremen, K. von

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  8. Mississippi Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    835,855 800,065 771,577 830,756 806,396 819,763 1984-2014 Residential 5 5 4 7 7 8 1984-2014 Commercial 26,641 23,713 26,383 26,386 24,019 28,803 1984-2014 Industrial 21,853 18,362 15,450 20,153 21,186 19,595 1984-2014 Oil Company 3,955 4,262 4,058 6,226 7,450 6,419 1984-2014 Farm 41,080 57,087 52,559 81,878 84,753 79,443 1984-2014 Electric Power 3,796 3,393 2,019 1,674 2,223 1,921 1984-2014 Railroad 24,727 17,936 37,741 29,848 32,550 35,578 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 141,302 93,384 58,285 58,505

  9. New Mexico Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    09,709 554,352 574,557 608,490 621,430 669,923 1984-2014 Residential 55 46 37 27 72 53 1984-2014 Commercial 11,030 9,435 9,609 9,145 9,112 12,114 1984-2014 Industrial 33,804 24,429 27,110 31,316 32,029 32,917 1984-2014 Oil Company 9,871 1,705 2,127 5,857 11,218 27,016 1984-2014 Farm 11,278 14,821 10,955 12,816 15,784 11,752 1984-2014 Electric Power 4,321 4,000 1,689 5,155 4,816 3,826 1984-2014 Railroad 245 1,780 1,707 19,123 38,543 45,446 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984-2014

  10. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  11. Airborne measured analytic signal for UXO detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamey, T.J.; Holladay, J.S. [Aerodat Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Mahler, R. [Industrieanlagen Betriebsgesellschaft, Deutschland (Australia)

    1997-10-01

    The Altmark Tank Training Range north of Haldensleben, Germany has been in operation since WWI. Weapons training and testing has included cavalry, cannon, small arms, rail guns, and tank battalions. Current plans are to convert the area to a fully digital combat training facility. Instead of using blank or dummy ordnance, hits will be registered with lasers and computers. Before this can happen, the 25,000 ha must be cleared of old debris. In support of this cleanup operation, Aerodat Inc., in conjunction with IABG of Germany, demonstrated a new high resolution magnetic survey technique involving the measurement of 3-component magnetic gradient data. The survey was conducted in May 1996, and covered 500 ha in two blocks. The nominal line spacing was 10 m, and the average sensor altitude was 7 m. The geologic column consisted of sands over a sedimentary basin. Topographic relief was generally flat with approximately 3 m rolling dunes and occasional man-made features such as fox holes, bunkers, tank traps and reviewing stands. Trees were sparse and short (2-3 metres) due to frequent burn off and tank activity. As such, this site was nearly ideal for low altitude airborne surveying.

  12. Preferred frame parameters in the tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity and its generalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagi, Eva

    2009-08-15

    The tensor-vector-scalar theory of gravity, which was designed as a relativistic implementation to the modified dynamics paradigm, has fared quite well as an alternative to dark matter, on both galactic and cosmological scales. However, its performance in the Solar System, as embodied in the post-Newtonian formalism, has not yet been fully investigated. We calculate the post-Newtonian parameters for TeVeS with the cosmological value of the scalar field taken into account, and show that in this situation the cosmological value of the scalar field is tightly linked to the vector field coupling constant K, preventing the former from evolving as predicted by its equation of motion. We show that generalizing TeVeS to have an Aether-type vector action, as suggested by Skordis, removes the aforesaid link, and this generalized version of TeVes has its {beta}, {gamma}, and {xi} parameterized post-Newtonian parameters identical to those in GR, while solar system constraints on the preferred frame parameters {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} can be satisfied within a modest range of small values of the scalar and vector fields coupling parameters, and for cosmological values of the scalar field consistent with evolution within the framework of existing cosmological models.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

    2001-11-21

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3; 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC uncertainty

  14. California energy flow in 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1993-04-01

    Energy consumption in California fell in 1991 for the first time in five years. The State`s economy was especially hard hit by a continuing national recession. The construction industry for the second year experienced a dramatic downturn. Energy use in the industrial sector showed a modest increase, but consumption in other end-use categories declined. The decrease in energy used in transportation can be traced to a substantial fall in the sales of both highway diesel fuels and vessel bunkering fuels at California ports, the latter reflecting a mid-year increase in taxes. Gasoline sales by contrast increased as did the number of miles traveled and the number of automobiles in the State. Production in California`s oil and gas fields was at 1990 levels thus arresting a steady decline in output. Due to enlarged steam flooding operations, production at several fields reached record levels. Also countering the decline in many of California fields was new production from the Port Arguello offshore field. California natural gas production, despite a modest 1991 increase, will not fill the use within the State. Petroleum comprised more than half of the State`s energy supply principally for transportation. Natural gas use showed a small increase. Oil products play virtually no role in electrical production. The largest single source of electricity to the State is imports from the Pacific Northwest and from coal-fired plants in the Southwest. Combined contributions to transmitted electricity from renewable and alternate sources declined as hydropower was constrained by a prolonged drought and as geothermal power from the largest and oldest field at The Geysers fell. Windpower grew slightly; however solar power remained at 1990 levels and made no substantial contribution to total power generation.

  15. Research and development of a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Progress report for Quarter 4 of the Phase II report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-20

    This 4th quarter report summarizes activity from July 1, 1995 through October 1, 1995; the report is organized as usual into sections describing background information and work performed under the main WBS categories: The Fuel Processor (WBS 1.0) team activity during this quarter focused on the continued design/development of the full scale fuel processing hardware. The combustor test stand has been completed allowing more detailed testing of the various parts of the combustor subsystem; this subsystem is currently being evaluated using the dual fuel (methanol/hydrogen) option to gain a better understanding of the control issues. The Fuel Cell Stack (WBS 2.0) team activity focused on material analysis and testing to determine the appropriate approach for the first GM stack. Five hundred hours of durability was achieved on a single cell fixture using coated titanium plates (anode and cathode) with no appreciable voltage degradation of the SEL (Stack Engineering Lab) produced MEA. Additionally, the voltage level drop across each of the plates remained low (<5mv) over the full test period; The system integration and control team focused on the initial layout and configuration of the system; and the Reference powertrain and commercialization studies are currently under review.

  16. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

    2004-12-22

    In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive

  17. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pelfrey, Daniel S; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    . As part of our technology review we analyzed several current virtualization solutions to assess their vulnerabilities. This included a review of common vulnerabilities and exposures (CVEs) for Xen, KVM, LXC and Docker to gauge their susceptibility to different attacks. The complete details are provided in Section 5 on page 33. Based on this review we concluded that system-level virtualization solutions have many more vulnerabilities than OS level virtualization solutions. As such, security mechanisms like sVirt (Section 3.3) should be considered when using system-level virtualization solutions in order to protect the host against exploits. The majority of vulnerabilities related to KVM, LXC, and Docker are in specific regions of the system. Therefore, future "zero day attacks" are likely to be in the same regions, which suggests that protecting these areas can simplify the protection of the host and maintain the isolation between users. The evaluations of virtualization technologies done thus far are discussed in Section 4. This includes experiments with 'user' namespaces in VEs, which provides the ability to isolate user privileges and allow a user to run with different UIDs within the container while mapping them to non-privileged UIDs in the host. We have identified Linux namespaces as a promising mechanism to isolate shared resources, while maintaining good performance. In Section 4.1 we describe our tests with LXC as a non-root user and leveraging namespaces to control UID/GID mappings and support controlled sharing of parallel file-systems. We highlight several of these namespace capabilities in Section 6.2.3. The other evaluations that were performed during this initial phase of work provide baseline performance data for comparing VEs and VMs to purely native execution. In Section 4.2 we performed tests using the High-Performance Computing Conjugate Gradient (HPCCG) benchmark to establish baseline performance for a scientific application when run on the Native

  18. Circumsolar Radiation Data: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base contains approximately 288 megabytes of information, including detailed intensity profiles of the solar and circumsolar region, the total and spectrally divided direct normal radiation data, as well as the total hemispherical solar radiation in the horizontal plane and the plane facing the sun. Data are available for 11 locations in the United States in the period 1976 to 1981. The measurements were made by four circumsolar telescopes operating about 16 hours per day. The Reduced Data Base represents about one-tenth of the total data taken by the circumsolar telescopes. The sites, the amount of data available for each site, and the collection dates are: • Albuquerque (STTF), New Mexico (28,971 data sets from 4/77 to 10/79 • Albuquerque (TETF), New Mexico (13,851 data sets from 5/76 to 3/77) • Argonne, Illinois (9,702 data sets from 8/77 to 8/78) • Atlanta, Georgia (38,405 data sets from 6/77 to 6/80) • Barstow, California (36,632 data sets from 7/77 to 10/79) • Boardman, Oregon (4,782 data sets from 2/77 to 5/77) • China Lake, California (10,683 data sets from 7/76 to 3/77) • Colstrip, Montana (616 data sets from 5/77 to 6/77) • Edwards Air Force Base, California (27,344 data sets from 10/79 to 6/81) • Fort Hood (Bunker), Texas (5,150 data sets from 7/76 to 11/76) • Fort Hood (TES), Texas (8,250 data sets from 11/76 to 8/77) Note that each data set is composed of 20 lines of information with each line consistingof 77 characters. These are archived ASCII files. [Information on sites, number of data sets, etc. taken from the online publication (out of print) at http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/pubs/circumsolar/index.html

  19. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Roberrt C; Drollinger, Harold

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16

  20. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2000-10-05

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at

  2. A Historical Evaluation of the U16a Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, robert C; Drollinger, Harold; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2013-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U16a Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U16a Tunnel was used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Shoshone Mountain in Area 16 of the Nevada National Security Site. Six nuclear tests were conducted in the U16a Tunnel from 1962 to 1971. These tests are Marshmallow, Gum Drop, Double Play, Ming Vase, Diamond Dust, and Diamond Mine. The U.S. Department of Defense Threat Reduction Agency, with participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Las Alamos National Laboratory, sponsored the tests. Fifteen high explosives tests were also conducted at the tunnel. Two were calibration tests during nuclear testing and the remaining were U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency tunnel defeat tests. The U16a Tunnel complex is on the top and slopes of Shoshone Mountain, encompassing an area of approximately 16.7 hectares (41.1 acres). Major modifications to the landscape are a result of three principal activities, road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, and site preparation for activities related to testing. Forty-seven cultural features were recorded at the portal and on the slopes of Shoshone Mountain. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general every day operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, equipment pads, and rail lines. Features on the slopes above the tunnel relate to tunnel ventilation, borehole drilling, and data recording. Feature types include soil-covered bunkers, concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, and ventilation shafts. The U16

  3. Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Fischer, Marc

    2008-06-11

    This report allocates California's 2004 statewide carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fuel combustion to the 58 counties in the state. The total emissions are allocated to counties using several different methods, based on the availability of data for each sector. Data on natural gas use in all sectors are available by county. Fuel consumption by power and combined heat and power generation plants is available for individual plants. Bottom-up models were used to distribute statewide fuel sales-based CO2 emissions by county for on-road vehicles, aircraft, and watercraft. All other sources of CO2 emissions were allocated to counties based on surrogates for activity. CO2 emissions by sector were estimated for each county, as well as for the South Coast Air Basin. It is important to note that emissions from some sources, notably electricity generation, were allocated to counties based on where the emissions were generated, rather than where the electricity was actually consumed. In addition, several sources of CO2 emissions, such as electricity generated in and imported from other states and international marine bunker fuels, were not included in the analysis. California Air Resource Board (CARB) does not include CO2 emissions from interstate and international air travel, in the official California greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, so those emissions were allocated to counties for informational purposes only. Los Angeles County is responsible for by far the largest CO2 emissions from combustion in the state: 83 Million metric tonnes (Mt), or 24percent of total CO2 emissions in California, more than twice that of the next county (Kern, with 38 Mt, or 11percent of statewide emissions). The South Coast Air Basin accounts for 122 MtCO2, or 35percent of all emissions from fuel combustion in the state. The distribution of emissions by sector varies considerably by county, with on-road motor vehicles dominating most counties, but large stationary sources and rail travel

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 2 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each corrective action site (CAS) within CAU 168. The corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted in accordance with the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26, Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'', as developed under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 168 is located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada and is comprised of the following 12 CASs: CAS 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; CAS 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; CAS 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; CAS 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; CAS 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-99-16, USW G3; CAS 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; CAS 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; and CAS 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) to determine contaminants of concern (COCs) for CASs within CAU 168. Radiological measurements of railroad cars and test equipment were compared to unrestricted (free) release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from the CAI activities revealed the following: (1) Corrective Action Site 25-16-01 contains hydrocarbon-contaminated soil at concentrations exceeding the PAL. The contamination is at discrete locations associated with asphalt debris. (2) No COCs were identified at CAS 25-16-03. Buried construction waste is present in at least two disposal cells contained within the

  5. BOCC Blueprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, Shan T.

    2015-01-08

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Facility and Operations (F&O) Division strives to manage performance, to assure long-term health and sustainability for the organization and our staff through innovation and learning. The F&O organization is committed to achieving five strategic outcomes over the next several years. The strategic outcomes are aligned with the Department of Energy (DOE) and PNNL mission and vision. One key outcome important to enabling our vision is to integrate the smartest facilities, connected to the smartest people, by the smartest systems. We call this our SMART3 Initiative. The F&O SMART3 Initiative will connect human capital with intelligent systems, resulting in a best-in-class, integrated facility-operations strategy that improves productivity and optimizes operational costs. The Building Operations Control Center (BOCC) Blueprint is a key deliverable in this effort and will define near-term and long-term objectives aligned with the SMART3 Initiative. The BOCC Blueprint provides a plan to successfully position the BOCC and assure full integration into the new Systems Engineering Laboratory (SEL). The BOCC Blueprint near-term objectives will satisfy each of the three elements of the SMART3 Initiative. 1. The facilities element will be achieved by defining the minimum set of smart sensors for deployment, establishing dashboards and metrics, and initiating a Real-Time Commissioning Program (RT-Cx). 2. The people element will be achieved as F&O and the Energy and Environment Directorate (EED) collaborate, mentor, and cross-train within F&O. The collaboration effort will provide proof of concept by testing, applying and sharing information on facility systems through smart grid, facility re-tuning & audits, and DSOM fault detection and diagnostics. The mentoring and cross-training will be realized by integrating air balance operators, power operators and FMCS specialists within the BOCC. 3. The systems element will be achieved by

  6. The Stochastic Engine Initiative: Improving Prediction of Behavior in Geologic Environments We Cannot Directly Observe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R; Nitao, J; Newmark, R; Carle, S; Ramirez, A; Harris, D; Johnson, J; Johnson, V; Ermak, D; Sugiyama, G; Hanley, W; Sengupta, S; Daily, W; Glaser, R; Dyer, K; Fogg, G; Zhang, Y; Yu, Z; Levine, R

    2002-05-09

    The stochastic engine uses modern computational capabilities to combine simulations with observations. We integrate the general knowledge represented by models with specific knowledge represented by data, using Bayesian inferencing and a highly efficient staged Metropolis-type search algorithm. From this, we obtain a probability distribution characterizing the likely configurations of the system consistent with existing data. The primary use will be optimizing knowledge about the configuration of a system for which sufficient direct observations cannot be made. Programmatic applications include underground systems ranging from environmental contamination to military bunkers, optimization of complex nonlinear systems, and timely decision-making for complex, hostile environments such as battlefields or the detection of secret facilities. We create a stochastic ''base representation'' of system configurations (states) from which the values of measurable parameters can be calculated using forward simulators. Comparison of these predictions to actual measurements drives embedded Bayesian inferencing, updating the distributions of states in the base representation using the Metropolis method. Unlike inversion methods that generate a single bestcase deterministic solution, this method produces all the likely solutions, weighted by their likelihoods. This flexible method is best applied to highly non-linear, multi-dimensional problems. Staging of the Metropolis searches permits us to run the simplest model systems, such as lithology estimators, at the lower stages. The majority of possible configurations are thus eliminated from further consideration by more complex simulators, such as flow and transport models. Because the method is fully automated, large data sets of a variety of types can be used to refine the system configurations. The most important prerequisites for optimal use of this method are well-characterized forward simulators, realistic base representations

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site; (2) 25-34-06, Test Cell A Bunker; and (3) 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 375 based on the implementation of corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at CAS 25-23-22, no further action at CAS 25-34-06, and closure in place with administrative controls and removal of potential source material (PSM) at CAS 30-45-01. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 28, 2010, through April 4, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 375 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were assumed to be present within the default contamination boundaries at CASs 25-23-22 and 30-45-01. No contaminants were identified at CAS 25-34-06, and no corrective action is necessary. Potential source material in the form of lead plate, lead-acid batteries, and oil within an abandoned transformer were identified at CAS 30-45-01, and corrective actions were undertaken that

  8. Exe-Guard Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Rhett; Marshall, Tim; Chavez, Adrian; Bratus, Sergey

    2015-12-26

    The exe-Guard Project is an alliance between Dominion Virginia Power (DVP), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Dartmouth University, and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL). SEL is primary recipient on this project. The exe-Guard project was selected for award under DE-FOA-0000359 with CFDA number 81.122 to address Topic Area of Interest 4: Hardened platforms and Systems. The exe-Guard project developed an antivirus solution for control system embedded devices to prevent the execution of unauthorized code and maintain settings and configuration integrity. This project created a white list antivirus solution for control systems capable of running on embedded Linux® operating systems. White list antivirus methods allow only credible programs to run through the use of digital signatures and hash functions. Once a system’s secure state is baselined, white list antivirus software denies deviations from that state because of the installation of malicious code as this changes hash results. Black list antivirus software has been effective in traditional IT environments but has negative implications for control systems. Black list antivirus uses pattern matching and behavioral analysis to identify system threats while relying on regular updates to the signature file and recurrent system scanning. Black list antivirus is vulnerable to zero day exploits which have not yet been incorporated into a signature file update. System scans hamper the performance of high availability applications, as revealed in NIST special publication 1058 which summarizes the impact of blacklist antivirus on control systems: Manual or “on-demand” scanning has a major effect on control processes in that they take CPU time needed by the control process (Sometimes close to 100% of CPU time). Minimizing the antivirus software throttle setting will reduce but not eliminate this effect. Signature updates can also take up to 100% of CPU time, but for a much shorter period than a typical

  9. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user fa­cil­i­ties such as syn­chrotron ra­di­a­tion light sources and free elec­tron lasers re­quire ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures that sup­port elec­tric fields of 10-100 MV/m, es­pe­cial­ly at the start of the ac­cel­er­a­tor chain where ce­ram­ic in­su­la­tors are used for very high gra­di­ent DC guns. These in­su­la­tors are dif­fi­cult to man­u­fac­ture, re­quire long com­mis­sion­ing times, and often ex­hib­it poor re­li­a­bil­i­ty. Two tech­ni­cal ap­proach­es to solv­ing this prob­lem will be in­ves­ti­gat­ed. First­ly, in­vert­ed ce­ram­ics offer so­lu­tions for re­duced gra­di­ents be­tween the elec­trodes and ground. An in­vert­ed de­sign will be pre­sent­ed for 350 kV, with max­i­mum gra­di­ents in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Sec­ond­ly, novel ce­ram­ic man­u­fac­tur­ing pro­cess­es will be stud­ied, in order to pro­tect triple junc­tion lo­ca­tions from emis­sion, by ap­ply­ing a coat­ing with a bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty. The pro­cess­es for cre­at­ing this coat­ing will be op­ti­mized to pro­vide pro­tec­tion as well as be used to coat a ce­ram­ic with an ap­pro­pri­ate gra­di­ent in bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty from the vac­u­um side to the air side of an HV stand­off ce­ram­ic cylin­der. Ex­am­ple in­su­la­tor de­signs are being com­put­er mod­elled, and in­su­la­tor sam­ples are being man­u­fac­tured and test­ed

  10. Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

    2012-09-26

    ‚ of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165°F or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts