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  1. Title 43 CFR 3206.12 What are the Minimum and Maximum Lease Sizes...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    .12 What are the Minimum and Maximum Lease Sizes? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 43...

  2. A new look at maximum and minimum temperature trends for the globe

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, D.R.; Peterson, T.C.; Karl, T.R.

    1997-11-01

    A number of recent studies have established that differential changes in daily maximum and minimum temperatures are occurring, resulting in changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) for many parts of the globe. Large-scale trends in the USA indicate that minimum temperatures are increasing at a faster rate than maximum temperatures, resulting in a narrowing in the DTR. This paper updates and extends the analysis of changes in the DTR in three ways: (1) by increasing the areal coverage to more than half the global landmass, (2) by addressing the issue of homogeneity of the data, and (3) by examining the potential effects of urban stations on the calculated trends. The update includes data for an additional 15% of the global land area and an extension of the analysis period used in a previous study. Homogeneity techniques were used on the data to adjust individual station data for undocumented discontinuities. Annual maximum and minimum temperature and DTR time series for the 1950-1993 period averaged over 54% of the total global land area are presented. The trend for the maximum temperature is 0.88 C/100 years, which is consistent with earlier findings. However, the trend for the minimum temperature is 1.86 C/100 years; this is less than found in previous analyses and leads to a smaller trend in the DTR. This finding is not surprising since much of the data added in this study are for tropical and sub-tropical regions where temperature trends are not expected to be as large as in higher latitude regions. The effect of urbanization on the global trends is found to be on the order of 0.1 C/100 years or less, which is consistent with previous investigations. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Maximum and Minimum Forecast for SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.C.

    1994-10-01

    This report is the third phase (Phase III) of the Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Phase I of the forecast, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast for Facilities at SRS, forecasts the yearly quantities of low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, and transuranic (TRU) wastes generated over the next 30 years by operations, decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration (ER) activities at the Savannah River Site. The Phase II report, Thirty-Year Solid Waste Generation Forecast by Treatability Group (U), provides a 30-year forecast by waste treatability group for operations, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities. In addition, a 30-year forecast by waste stream has been provided for operations in Appendix A of the Phase II report. The solid wastes stored or generated at SRS must be treated and disposed of in accordance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. To evaluate, select, and justify the use of promising treatment technologies and to evaluate the potential impact to the environment, the generic waste categories described in the Phase I report were divided into smaller classifications with similar physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics. These smaller classifications, defined within the Phase II report as treatability groups, can then be used in the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement process to evaluate treatment options. The waste generation forecasts in the Phase II report includes existing waste inventories. Existing waste inventories, which include waste streams from continuing operations and stored wastes from discontinued operations, were not included in the Phase I report. Maximum and minimum forecasts serve as upper and lower boundaries for waste generation. This report provides the maximum and minimum forecast by waste treatability group for operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and ER activities.

  4. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar

  5. "Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Fa... States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million ... of Energy Markets and End" "Use, Energy End Use ...

  6. Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption,...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... for which payment was made," "quantities transferred in, quantities purchased and paid for by a central" "purchasing entity, and quantities for which payment was made in kind. ...

  7. Maximum-likelihood

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jurisdiction waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Alaska is all onshore. Total crews includes crews with unknown survey dimension. Data are reported on the first and fifteenth of each month, except January when they are reported only on the fifteenth. When semi-monthly values differ for the month, the larger of the two values is shown here. Consequently, this table reflects the maximum number of crews at work at any time during the month. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more

  8. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOEpatents

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  9. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOEpatents

    Theodosiou, George E.; Dawson, John W.

    1983-01-01

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  10. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOEpatents

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  11. The Maximum Value Method. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): SAND2011-1176C 471256 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: SIAM CS&E Conference held February 28, 2011 - ...

  12. Removal to Maximum Extent Practical

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

  13. Program Evaluation: Minimum EERE Requirements

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The minimum requirements for EERE's in-progress peer reviews are described below. Given the diversity of EERE programs and activities, a great deal of flexibility is provided within these...

  14. Change of Maximum Standardized Uptake Value Slope in Dynamic Triphasic [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Distinguishes Malignancy From Postradiation Inflammation in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Carryn M.; Chang, Tangel; Graham, Michael M.; Marquardt, Michael D.; Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J.; Menda, Yusuf; Sun, Wenqing; Pagedar, Nitin A.; Buatti, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake methodology as a post–radiation therapy (RT) response assessment tool, potentially enabling accurate tumor and therapy-related inflammation differentiation, improving the posttherapy value of FDG–positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). Methods and Materials: We prospectively enrolled head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients who completed RT, with scheduled 3-month post-RT FDG-PET/CT. Patients underwent our standard whole-body PET/CT scan at 90 minutes, with the addition of head-and-neck PET/CT scans at 60 and 120 minutes. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of regions of interest were measured at 60, 90, and 120 minutes. The SUV{sub max} slope between 60 and 120 minutes and change of SUV{sub max} slope before and after 90 minutes were calculated. Data were analyzed by primary site and nodal site disease status using the Cox regression model and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Outcomes were based on pathologic and clinical follow-up. Results: A total of 84 patients were enrolled, with 79 primary and 43 nodal evaluable sites. Twenty-eight sites were interpreted as positive or equivocal (18 primary, 8 nodal, 2 distant) on 3-month 90-minute FDG-PET/CT. Median follow-up was 13.3 months. All measured SUV endpoints predicted recurrence. Change of SUV{sub max} slope after 90 minutes more accurately identified nonrecurrence in positive or equivocal sites than our current standard of SUV{sub max} ≥2.5 (P=.02). Conclusions: The positive predictive value of post-RT FDG-PET/CT may significantly improve using novel second derivative analysis of dynamic triphasic FDG-PET/CT SUV{sub max} slope, accurately distinguishing tumor from inflammation on positive and equivocal scans.

  15. Maximum U.S. Active Seismic Crew Counts

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    differ for the month, the larger of the two values is shown here. Consequently, this table reflects the maximum number of crews at work at any time during the month. See...

  16. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  17. Weakest solar wind of the space age and the current 'MINI' solar maximum

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D. J.; Angold, N.; Elliott, H. A.; Livadiotis, G.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.; Skoug, R. M.

    2013-12-10

    The last solar minimum, which extended into 2009, was especially deep and prolonged. Since then, sunspot activity has gone through a very small peak while the heliospheric current sheet achieved large tilt angles similar to prior solar maxima. The solar wind fluid properties and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have declined through the prolonged solar minimum and continued to be low through the current mini solar maximum. Compared to values typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s, the following proton parameters are lower on average from 2009 through day 79 of 2013: solar wind speed and beta (?11%), temperature (?40%), thermal pressure (?55%), mass flux (?34%), momentum flux or dynamic pressure (?41%), energy flux (?48%), IMF magnitude (?31%), and radial component of the IMF (?38%). These results have important implications for the solar wind's interaction with planetary magnetospheres and the heliosphere's interaction with the local interstellar medium, with the proton dynamic pressure remaining near the lowest values observed in the space age: ?1.4 nPa, compared to ?2.4 nPa typically observed from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. The combination of lower magnetic flux emergence from the Sun (carried out in the solar wind as the IMF) and associated low power in the solar wind points to the causal relationship between them. Our results indicate that the low solar wind output is driven by an internal trend in the Sun that is longer than the ?11 yr solar cycle, and they suggest that this current weak solar maximum is driven by the same trend.

  18. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  19. Recommended Parameter Values for INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area Source Release Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Lopresti, Charles A.

    2004-06-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize 1) associated information and values for key release model parameters (i.e., best estimate, minimum and maximum) obtained where possible from published experimental data, 2) a structure for selection of sensitivity tests cases that can be used to identify test cases, and 3) recommended test cases for selected contaminants of potential concern to assess remedy effectiveness against a no-treatment base case.

  20. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PRIME Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by ...

  1. Maximum Performance Group MPG | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Maximum Performance Group MPG Jump to: navigation, search Name: Maximum Performance Group (MPG) Place: College Point, New York Zip: 11356 Product: Technology based energy and asset...

  2. Pretreatment [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Tomography Maximum Standardized Uptake Value as Predictor of Distant Metastasis in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy: Rethinking the Role of Positron Emission Tomography in Personalizing Treatment Based on Risk Status

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Vimoj J.; MacRae, Robert; Sirisegaram, Abby; Pantarotto, Jason R.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether the preradiation maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumor for [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has a prognostic significance in patients with Stage T1 or T2N0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative radiation therapy, whether conventional or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 163 patients (180 tumors) with medically inoperable histologically proven Stage T1 or T2N0 NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy (both conventional and SBRT) were entered in a research ethics board approved database. All patients received pretreatment FDG-PET / computed tomography (CT) at 1 institution with consistent acquisition technique. The medical records and radiologic images of these patients were analyzed. Results: The overall survival at 2 years and 3 years for the whole group was 76% and 67%, respectively. The mean and median SUV{sub max} were 8.1 and 7, respectively. Progression-free survival at 2 years with SUV{sub max} <7 was better than that of the patients with tumor SUV{sub max} ?7 (67% vs 51%; P=.0096). Tumors with SUV{sub max} ?7 were associated with a worse regional recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival. In the multivariate analysis, SUV{sub max} ?7 was an independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: In early-stage NSCLC managed with radiation alone, patients with SUV{sub max} ?7 on FDG-PET / CT scan have poorer outcomes and high risk of progression, possibly because of aggressive biology. There is a potential role for adjuvant therapies for these high-risk patients with intent to improve outcomes.

  3. Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie E.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael A.

    2012-07-01

    This study analyzes the financial impacts on consumers of minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances that could be implemented in 13 major economies around the world. We use the Bottom-Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), to analyze various appliance efficiency target levels to estimate the net present value (NPV) of policies designed to provide maximum energy savings while not penalizing consumers financially. These policies constitute what we call the “cost-effective potential” (CEP) scenario. The CEP scenario is designed to answer the question: How high can we raise the efficiency bar in mandatory programs while still saving consumers money?

  4. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Standardization of Daytime Minimum Load Approach and Data Needs Next Steps 4 Distribution System 5 Planning Criteria for the Distribution System The distribution system shall be ...

  5. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 5, 1, 2 SO2 Case Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts ...

  6. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1, 2 SO2 Case Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts ...

  7. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts ...

  8. Value Engineering

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-30

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that establishs and maintains cost-effective value procedures and processes.

  9. A study of the minimum wetting rate of isothermal films flowing down on outer surface of vertical pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Ueda, Tatsuhiro

    1999-07-01

    The minimum wetting rate (MWR) was investigated experimentally with an isothermal water film flowing down on the outer surface of test pipes arranged vertically. A dry patch was generated by blowing a small air jet onto the film temporally, and observation was made to discriminate whether the dry patch was rewetted or not. The contact angle of the film at the top edge of the dry patch and the amplitude, length and velocity of large waves on the film were measured. The MWR decreased rapidly as the film flowed down and reached a nearly constant value at a position around 0.6 m down from the film inlet. There were large waves on the film. The tendency of the variation of MWR with the distance coincided well with the growth of the amplitude of large waves with the distance. The contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch varied periodically in a range synchronizing with the arrival of the waves. When the contact angle exceeded the maximum advancing contact angle, the rewetting of the dry patch was initiated. The existing correlations where the smooth surface film was assumed considerably over-predicted the MWR. The MWR was properly given by supposing that the dry patch is rewetted when the maximum of the fluctuating dynamic pressure of the film exceeds the upward component of the surface tension corresponding to the maximum advancing contact angle at the top edge of the dry patch.

  10. Theoretical Estimate of Maximum Possible Nuclear Explosion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Bethe, H. A.

    1950-01-31

    The maximum nuclear accident which could occur in a Na-cooled, Be moderated, Pu and power producing reactor is estimated theoretically. (T.R.H.) 2O82 Results of nuclear calculations for a variety of compositions of fast, heterogeneous, sodium-cooled, U-235-fueled, plutonium- and power-producing reactors are reported. Core compositions typical of plate-, pin-, or wire-type fuel elements and with uranium as metal, alloy, and oxide were considered. These compositions included atom ratios in the following range: U-23B to U-235 from 2 to 8; sodium to U-235 from 1.5 to 12; iron to U-235 from 5 to 18; and vanadium to U-235 from 11 to 33. Calculations were performed to determine the effect of lead and iron reflectors between the core and blanket. Both natural and depleted uranium were evaluated as the blanket fertile material. Reactors were compared on a basis of conversion ratio, specific power, and the product of both. The calculated results are in general agreement with the experimental results from fast reactor assemblies. An analysis of the effect of new cross-section values as they became available is included. (auth)

  11. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Energy Saver

    you must meet the following minimum standards listed below. * New natural gas or propane boilers must be at least 90% AFUE to be eligible. * New oil boilers must be at least...

  12. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Daytime Load Calculation and Screening Page 1 of 30 Kristen Ardani, Dora Nakfuji, Anthony Hong, and Babak Enayati Page 1 of 30 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Thank you everyone for joining us today for our DG interconnection collaborative informational webinar. Today we are going to talk about minimum day time load calculation and screening procedures and their role in the distributed PV interconnection process. We're going to hear from Babak Enayati of the Massachusetts

  13. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS puzzle-693870960720.jpg DOE CYBER SECURITY ...

  14. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 ...

  15. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage :

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash flow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the

  16. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of Distribution Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Standardization of

  18. Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative (DGIC) "Minimum Day Time Load Calculation and Screening" Dora Nakafuji and Anthony Hong, Hawaiian Electric Co. Babak Enayati, DG Techincal Standards Review Group April 30, 2014 2 Speakers Babak Enayati Chair of Massachusetts DG Technical Standards Review Group Dora Nakafuji Director of Renewable Energy Planning Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) Kristen Ardani Solar Analyst, (today's moderator) NREL Anthony Hong Director of

  19. Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Ke, Jing; McNeil, Michael

    2012-07-01

    As part of the ongoing effort to estimate the foreseeable impacts of aggressive minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) programs in the worlds major economies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a scenario to analyze the technical potential of MEPS in 13 major economies around the world1 . The best available technology (BAT) scenario seeks to determine the maximum potential savings that would result from diffusion of the most efficient available technologies in these major economies.

  20. VALUE STUDY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PREPARED FOR: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF CONTRACT RESOURCES AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SEPTEMBER 2008 UPDATE BY: AON CONSULTING INC. FEBRUARY 1999 UPDATED SEPTEMBER 29, 2008 VALUE STUDY DESK MANUAL Prepared for: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY By: BUCK CONSULTANTS Under DE-AC01-96AD38107 Update Prepared for: DOE By: AON CONSULTING, INC. Under Delivery Order DE-BP01-08MA345678, Contract No. DE-AB01-08-ME11881 Contents PART I Overview of Value Study Illustrative Flow

  1. Value Engineering

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-01-07

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that meets the requirements of Public Law 104-106, Section 4306 as codified by 41 United States Code 432. Canceled by DOE N 251.94. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R.J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H.W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-05-01

    The energy used to produce liquid steel in today's integrated and electric arc furnace (EAF) facilities is significantly higher than the theoretical minimum energy requirements. This study presents the absolute minimum energy required to produce steel from ore and mixtures of scrap and scrap alternatives. Additional cases in which the assumptions are changed to more closely approximate actual operating conditions are also analyzed. The results, summarized in Table E-1, should give insight into the theoretical and practical potentials for reducing steelmaking energy requirements. The energy values have also been converted to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to indicate the potential for reduction in emissions of this greenhouse gas (Table E-2). The study showed that increasing scrap melting has the largest impact on energy consumption. However, scrap should be viewed as having ''invested'' energy since at one time it was produced by reducing ore. Increasing scrap melting in the BOF mayor may not decrease energy if the ''invested'' energy in scrap is considered.

  3. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements. Minimum Standards and Requirements (63.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Building America Best Practices Series Vol. 14: Energy Renovations - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners STEP Financial Incentives Summary Energy Saver 101: Home

  4. Minimum wear tube support hole design

    DOEpatents

    Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

    1986-01-01

    A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

  5. Oxidation State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber Catalysts Oxidation State Optimization for Maximum Efficiency of NOx Adsorber Catalysts Presentation given at the 16th ...

  6. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum ...

  7. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption ...

  8. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  9. THE TURBULENT CASCADE AND PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Joshua.Stawarz@Colorado.edu

    2012-08-01

    The recently protracted solar minimum provided years of interplanetary data that were largely absent in any association with observed large-scale transient behavior on the Sun. With large-scale shear at 1 AU generally isolated to corotating interaction regions, it is reasonable to ask whether the solar wind is significantly turbulent at this time. We perform a series of third-moment analyses using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer. We show that the solar wind at 1 AU is just as turbulent as at any other time in the solar cycle. Specifically, the turbulent cascade of energy scales in the same manner proportional to the product of wind speed and temperature. Energy cascade rates during solar minimum average a factor of 2-4 higher than during solar maximum, but we contend that this is likely the result of having a different admixture of high-latitude sources.

  10. ESTIMATE OF SOLAR MAXIMUM USING THE 1-8 Å GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES X-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 Å band from 1986 to the present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and the date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in solar cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in spring 2013.

  11. Changes in maximum and minimal temperatures at high elevation stations in the central Andes of South America

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana-Gomez, R.A.

    1997-11-01

    Temperature trends and deviations were evaluated for the central Andes portion of Bolivia. Data were collected primarily from stations located at very high altitude (3,000 m above sea level and higher) for a 73-year period from 1918 to 1990. The analysis determined maximum and minimum temperature trends and the daily temperature range (DTR) at each station. The minimum temperature series showed a rather sustained increase starting in the 1960s and continuing to the present, and a reduction of the differential rate of warming for the same interval. The high elevation, rural area data appears to reinforce evidence of a global and generalized rise of minimum temperature and decrease of the DTR. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Categories | Department of Energy Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product

  13. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    into Federal Acquisition Documents Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents The Federal Energy Management ...

  14. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: Linear-response free energyspin-flip density functional theory approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  15. Optimum coil shape for a given volume of conductor to obtain maximum central field in an air core solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, P.

    1995-02-01

    This paper is an expansion of engineering notes prepared in 1961 to address the question of how to wind circular coils so as to obtain the maximum axial field with the minimum volume of conductor. At the time this was a germain question because of the advent of superconducting wires which were in very limited supply, and the rapid push for generation of very high fields, with little concern for uniformity.

  16. Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Velocity(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity(ms)" Showing 25 pages using this...

  17. Property:Maximum Wave Length(m) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Length(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Length(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Length(m)" Showing 18 pages using this...

  18. Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property....

  19. Theoretical minimum energies to produce steel for selected conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R. J.; Fortini, O.; Paxton, H. W.; Brindle, R.

    2000-03-01

    An ITP study has determined the theoretical minimum energy requirements for producing steel from ore, scrap, and direct reduced iron. Dr. Richard Fruehan's report, Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, provides insight into the potential energy savings (and associated reductions in carbon dioxide emissions) for ironmaking, steelmaking, and rolling processes (PDF459 KB).

  20. Minimum Velocity Required to Transport Solid Particles from the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Required to Transport Solid Particles from the 2H-Evaporator to the Tank Farm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Minimum Velocity Required to Transport Solid Particles ...

  1. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AERMOD-PRIME | Department of Energy PRIME Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Compliance based on highest, second-highest, short-term, and highest annual concentrations. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME (24.52

  2. Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fact Sheet, April 2015 | Department of Energy Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, April 2015 This fact sheet about AMO's Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (Boiler MACT) Technical Assistance Program was last updated in April 2015. Boiler_MACT_factsheet.pdf (995.81 KB) More Documents & Publications CHP: A Technical & Economic

  3. Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Products into Federal Acquisition Documents | Department of Energy Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents Incorporate Minimum Efficiency Requirements for Heating and Cooling Products into Federal Acquisition Documents The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) organized information about FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) and water heating products into tables

  4. Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits for visible and middle-near infrared repetitively pulsed lasers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laser ...

  5. Montana Total Maximum Daily Load Development Projects Wiki |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wiki Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Total Maximum Daily Load Development Projects Wiki Abstract Provides information on...

  6. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses

  7. Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications

    2005-01-01

    As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

  8. Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in maximum Rate of Penetration. Current methods for computing MSE make it possible to ... Mathematical relationships between the parameters were established, and the conventional ...

  9. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case | Department of Energy PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case. Compliance based on highest, second-highest, short-term, and highest annual concentrations. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME,

  10. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1, 2 SO2 Case | Department of Energy 4, 1, 2 SO2 Case Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1, 2 SO2 Case Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1, 2 SO2 Case. Compliance based on highest, second-highest, short-term, and highest annual concentrations. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1, 2

  11. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AERMOD-PRIME, Units 5, 1, 2 SO2 Case | Department of Energy 5, 1, 2 SO2 Case Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 5, 1, 2 SO2 Case Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 5, 1, 2 SO2 Case. Compliance based on highest, second-highest, short-term, and highest annual concentrations. Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 5, 1, 2

  12. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-06-13

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  13. 2-D image segmentation using minimum spanning trees

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for partitioning a gray-level image into connected homogeneous regions. The novelty of this algorithm lies in the fact that by constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of a gray-level image, it reduces a region partitioning problem to a minimum spanning tree partitioning problem, and hence reduces the computational complexity of the region partitioning problem. The tree-partitioning algorithm, in essence, partitions a minimum spanning tree into subtrees, representing different homogeneous regions, by minimizing the sum of variations of gray levels over all subtrees under the constraints that each subtree should have at least a specified number of nodes, and two adjacent subtrees should have significantly different average gray-levels. Two (faster) heuristic implementations are also given for large-scale region partitioning problems. Test results have shown that the segmentation results are satisfactory and insensitive to noise.

  14. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-20

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  15. Theoretical solution of the minimum charge problem for gaseous detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1990-12-01

    A theoretical model was developed for the minimum charge to trigger a gaseous detonation in spherical geometry as a generalization of the Zeldovich model. Careful comparisons were made between the theoretical predictions and experimental data on the minimum charge to trigger detonations in propane-air mixtures. The predictions are an order of magnitude too high, and there is no apparent resolution to the discrepancy. A dynamic model, which takes into account the experimentally observed oscillations in the detonation zone, may be necessary for reliable predictions. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

  17. Sandia Energy - PV Value

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    PV Value Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation PV Value PV ValueTara Camacho-Lopez2015-06-12T20:36:38+00:0...

  18. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  19. A general maximum entropy framework for thermodynamic variational principles

    SciTech Connect

    Dewar, Roderick C.

    2014-12-05

    Minimum free energy principles are familiar in equilibrium thermodynamics, as expressions of the second law. They also appear in statistical mechanics as variational approximation schemes, such as the mean-field and steepest-descent approximations. These well-known minimum free energy principles are here unified and extended to any system analyzable by MaxEnt, including non-equilibrium systems. The MaxEnt Lagrangian associated with a generic MaxEnt distribution p defines a generalized potential Ψ for an arbitrary probability distribution p-hat, such that Ψ is a minimum at (p-hat) = p. Minimization of Ψ with respect to p-hat thus constitutes a generic variational principle, and is equivalent to minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between p-hat and p. Illustrative examples of min–Ψ are given for equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. An interpretation of changes in Ψ is given in terms of the second law, although min–Ψ itself is an intrinsic variational property of MaxEnt that is distinct from the second law.

  20. Quality, precision and accuracy of the maximum No. 40 anemometer

    SciTech Connect

    Obermeir, J.; Blittersdorf, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper synthesizes available calibration data for the Maximum No. 40 anemometer. Despite its long history in the wind industry, controversy surrounds the choice of transfer function for this anemometer. Many users are unaware that recent changes in default transfer functions in data loggers are producing output wind speed differences as large as 7.6%. Comparison of two calibration methods used for large samples of Maximum No. 40 anemometers shows a consistent difference of 4.6% in output speeds. This difference is significantly larger than estimated uncertainty levels. Testing, initially performed to investigate related issues, reveals that Gill and Maximum cup anemometers change their calibration transfer functions significantly when calibrated in the open atmosphere compared with calibration in a laminar wind tunnel. This indicates that atmospheric turbulence changes the calibration transfer function of cup anemometers. These results call into question the suitability of standard wind tunnel calibration testing for cup anemometers. 6 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  2. VALUE STUDY | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    VALUE STUDY More Documents & Publications Contractor Human Resources Management VALUE STUDY Value Study Desk Manual...

  3. Improved initial guess for minimum energy path calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Smidstrup, Sren; Pedersen, Andreas; Stokbro, Kurt

    2014-06-07

    A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of a minimum energy path on an energy surface obtained, for example, by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to a minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50% to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used.

  4. Dynamic Programming and Error Estimates for Stochastic Control Problems with Maximum Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bokanowski, Olivier; Picarelli, Athena; Zidani, Hasnaa

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stochastic optimal control for a running maximum cost. A direct approach based on dynamic programming techniques is studied leading to the characterization of the value function as the unique viscosity solution of a second order Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman (HJB) equation with an oblique derivative boundary condition. A general numerical scheme is proposed and a convergence result is provided. Error estimates are obtained for the semi-Lagrangian scheme. These results can apply to the case of lookback options in finance. Moreover, optimal control problems with maximum cost arise in the characterization of the reachable sets for a system of controlled stochastic differential equations. Some numerical simulations on examples of reachable analysis are included to illustrate our approach.

  5. VALUE STUDY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    VALUE STUDY VALUE STUDY PDF icon VALUE STUDY More Documents & Publications Contractor Human Resources Management VALUE STUDY Value Study Desk Manual

  6. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J. R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences - the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  7. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging.

  8. LITERATURE REVIEW ON MAXIMUM LOADING OF RADIONUCLIDES ON CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-10-13

    Plans are underway to use small column ion exchange (SCIX) units installed in high-level waste tanks to remove Cs-137 from highly alkaline salt solutions at Savannah River Site. The ion exchange material slated for the SCIX project is engineered or granular crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Information on the maximum loading of radionuclides on CST is needed by Savannah River Remediation for safety evaluations. A literature review has been conducted that culminated in the estimation of the maximum loading of all but one of the radionuclides of interest (Cs-137, Sr-90, Ba-137m, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Am-241, and Cm-244). No data was found for Cm-244.

  9. A reliable, fast and low cost maximum power point tracker for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, J.M.; Andujar, J.M.; Bohorquez, M.A.

    2010-01-15

    This work presents a new maximum power point tracker system for photovoltaic applications. The developed system is an analog version of the ''P and O-oriented'' algorithm. It maintains its main advantages: simplicity, reliability and easy practical implementation, and avoids its main disadvantages: inaccurateness and relatively slow response. Additionally, the developed system can be implemented in a practical way at a low cost, which means an added value. The system also shows an excellent behavior for very fast variables in incident radiation levels. (author)

  10. Method for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Estimation - Energy Innovation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Method for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Estimation National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary With the increased penetration of connected photovoltaic (PV) power systems in large-scale transmission grids and in consumer-scale distribution grids, the conventional rotating machines that have supplied rotational inertia and primary frequency

  11. Maximum entanglement in squeezed boson and fermion states

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E.; Santos, E. S.

    2007-08-15

    A class of squeezed boson and fermion states is studied with particular emphasis on the nature of entanglement. We first investigate the case of bosons, considering two-mode squeezed states. Then we construct the fermion version to show that such states are maximum entangled, for both bosons and fermions. To achieve these results, we demonstrate some relations involving squeezed boson states. The generalization to the case of fermions is made by using Grassmann variables.

  12. Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

  13. Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, supersedes DOE P 310.1.

  14. Industry guidelines for the calibration of maximum anemometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to report on a framework of guidelines for the calibration of the Maximum Type 40 anemometer. This anemometer model is the wind speed sensor of choice in the majority of wind resource assessment programs in the U.S. These guidelines were established by the Utility Wind Resource Assessment Program. In addition to providing guidelines for anemometers, the appropriate use of non-calibrated anemometers is also discussed. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  16. Extended maximum likelihood halo-independent analysis of dark matter direct detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2015-11-24

    We extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct dark matter detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as independent variable we use the minimum speed a dark matter particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio f{sub n}/f{sub p}=−0.7, the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed by CDMS-II-Si is compatible with the constraints imposed by all other experiments with null results. We also find a similar compatibility for exothermic inelastic spin-independent interactions with f{sub n}/f{sub p}=−0.8.

  17. Hanford Advisory Board Values

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of work are fundamental core values. Workers should receive appropriate training and programs should be in place to ensure a safety-conscious work environment, without...

  18. On the minimum dark matter mass testable by neutrinos from the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Huang, Wei-Chih E-mail: andrea.desimone@sissa.it

    2013-07-01

    We discuss a limitation on extracting bounds on the scattering cross section of dark matter with nucleons, using neutrinos from the Sun. If the dark matter particle is sufficiently light (less than about 4 GeV), the effect of evaporation is not negligible and the capture process goes in equilibrium with the evaporation. In this regime, the flux of solar neutrinos of dark matter origin becomes independent of the scattering cross section and therefore no constraint can be placed on it. We find the minimum values of dark matter masses for which the scattering cross section on nucleons can be probed using neutrinos from the Sun. We also provide simple and accurate fitting functions for all the relevant processes of GeV-scale dark matter in the Sun.

  19. High coking value pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  20. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life

  1. Possible dynamical explanations for Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production

    SciTech Connect

    Virgo, Nathaniel Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-12-05

    Throughout the history of non-equilibrium thermodynamics a number of theories have been proposed in which complex, far from equilibrium flow systems are hypothesised to reach a steady state that maximises some quantity. Perhaps the most celebrated is Paltridge's principle of maximum entropy production for the horizontal heat flux in Earth's atmosphere, for which there is some empirical support. There have been a number of attempts to derive such a principle from maximum entropy considerations. However, we currently lack a more mechanistic explanation of how any particular system might self-organise into a state that maximises some quantity. This is in contrast to equilibrium thermodynamics, in which models such as the Ising model have been a great help in understanding the relationship between the predictions of MaxEnt and the dynamics of physical systems. In this paper we show that, unlike in the equilibrium case, Paltridge-type maximisation in non-equilibrium systems cannot be achieved by a simple dynamical feedback mechanism. Nevertheless, we propose several possible mechanisms by which maximisation could occur. Showing that these occur in any real system is a task for future work. The possibilities presented here may not be the only ones. We hope that by presenting them we can provoke further discussion about the possible dynamical mechanisms behind extremum principles for non-equilibrium systems, and their relationship to predictions obtained through MaxEnt.

  2. Development of a New Fast Shower Maximum Detector Based on Microchannel Plates Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) as an Active Element

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-09-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photodetectors based on microchannel plates (MCPs) as the secondary emitter. We performed the measurements at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with 120GeV proton beam and 12GeV and 32GeV secondary beams. The goal of the measurement with 120GeV protons was to determine time resolution for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The SM time resolution we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP. This work can be considered as the first step in building a new type of calorimeter based on this principle.

  3. VALUE ENGINEERING.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6 I N S P E C T I O N R E P O R T U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS FOLLOW-ON INSPECTION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S VALUE ENGINEERING PROGRAM DECEMBER 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 December 20, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Follow-on Inspection of the Department of Energy's Value Engineering Program" BACKGROUND Value Engineering is a

  4. Photovoltaics Value Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, J.L.; Frantzis, L.; Blazewicz, S.; Pinault, D.; Sawyer, H.

    2008-02-01

    The goals of this report are to identify best practices in methodologies for estimating the value of distributed PV technologies, identify gaps in existing knowledge, and outline R&D opportunities.

  5. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer

    Morency, Christina

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  6. Value of Information References

    DOE Data Explorer

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  7. Earned Value Management

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Earned Value Management (EVM) is a systematic approach to the integration and measurement of cost, schedule, and technical (scope) accomplishments on a project or task. It provides both the...

  8. Evaluation of a photovoltaic energy mechatronics system with a built-in quadratic maximum power point tracking algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, R.M.; Ko, S.H.; Lin, I.H.; Pai, F.S.; Chang, C.C.

    2009-12-15

    The historically high cost of crude oil price is stimulating research into solar (green) energy as an alternative energy source. In general, applications with large solar energy output require a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm to optimize the power generated by the photovoltaic effect. This work aims to provide a stand-alone solution for solar energy applications by integrating a DC/DC buck converter to a newly developed quadratic MPPT algorithm along with its appropriate software and hardware. The quadratic MPPT method utilizes three previously used duty cycles with their corresponding power outputs. It approaches the maximum value by using a second order polynomial formula, which converges faster than the existing MPPT algorithm. The hardware implementation takes advantage of the real-time controller system from National Instruments, USA. Experimental results have shown that the proposed solar mechatronics system can correctly and effectively track the maximum power point without any difficulties. (author)

  9. HSEP Value Statement

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    7/9/2012 HSEP Value Statement Safe and environmentally conscious performance of work is our fundamental core value. Integrated Safety Management should be used as the principal vehicle to protect the worker and the environment, and to guide work planning of all types. This includes practicing the proper principles of behavior conducive to a positive safety culture and incorporating safety and environmental risk identification and mitigation in facility designs. Workers should receive appropriate

  10. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  11. Speech processing using conditional observable maximum likelihood continuity mapping

    DOEpatents

    Hogden, John; Nix, David

    2004-01-13

    A computer implemented method enables the recognition of speech and speech characteristics. Parameters are initialized of first probability density functions that map between the symbols in the vocabulary of one or more sequences of speech codes that represent speech sounds and a continuity map. Parameters are also initialized of second probability density functions that map between the elements in the vocabulary of one or more desired sequences of speech transcription symbols and the continuity map. The parameters of the probability density functions are then trained to maximize the probabilities of the desired sequences of speech-transcription symbols. A new sequence of speech codes is then input to the continuity map having the trained first and second probability function parameters. A smooth path is identified on the continuity map that has the maximum probability for the new sequence of speech codes. The probability of each speech transcription symbol for each input speech code can then be output.

  12. Property:Maximum Velocity with Constriction(m/s) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Velocity with Constriction(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity with Constriction(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity...

  13. Table 2. Value and average value of photovoltaic module shipments...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Value and average value of photovoltaic module shipments, 2015" "Module value, total ... Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic CellModule Shipments Report' Note: ...

  14. Value of Information spreadsheet

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2014-05-12

    This spreadsheet represents the information posteriors derived from synthetic data of magnetotellurics (MT). These were used to calculate value of information of MT for geothermal exploration. Information posteriors describe how well MT was able to locate the "throat" of clay caps, which are indicative of hidden geothermal resources. This data is full explained in the peer-reviewed publication: Trainor-Guitton, W., Hoversten, G. M., Ramirez, A., Roberts, J., Júlíusson, E., Key, K., Mellors, R. (Sept-Oct. 2014) The value of spatial information for determining well placement: a geothermal example, Geophysics.

  15. Value of Information spreadsheet

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2014-05-12

    This spreadsheet represents the information posteriors derived from synthetic data of magnetotellurics (MT). These were used to calculate value of information of MT for geothermal exploration. Information posteriors describe how well MT was able to locate the "throat" of clay caps, which are indicative of hidden geothermal resources. This data is full explained in the peer-reviewed publication: Trainor-Guitton, W., Hoversten, G. M., Ramirez, A., Roberts, J., Jlusson, E., Key, K., Mellors, R. (Sept-Oct. 2014) The value of spatial information for determining well placement: a geothermal example, Geophysics.

  16. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in ourmore » data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.« less

  17. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    SciTech Connect

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-11-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

  18. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein

    2001-02-01

    The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

  19. Maximum-likelihood fitting of data dominated by Poisson statistical uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Den Hartog, D.J.

    1996-06-01

    The fitting of data by {chi}{sup 2}-minimization is valid only when the uncertainties in the data are normally distributed. When analyzing spectroscopic or particle counting data at very low signal level (e.g., a Thomson scattering diagnostic), the uncertainties are distributed with a Poisson distribution. The authors have developed a maximum-likelihood method for fitting data that correctly treats the Poisson statistical character of the uncertainties. This method maximizes the total probability that the observed data are drawn from the assumed fit function using the Poisson probability function to determine the probability for each data point. The algorithm also returns uncertainty estimates for the fit parameters. They compare this method with a {chi}{sup 2}-minimization routine applied to both simulated and real data. Differences in the returned fits are greater at low signal level (less than {approximately}20 counts per measurement). the maximum-likelihood method is found to be more accurate and robust, returning a narrower distribution of values for the fit parameters with fewer outliers.

  20. Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States

    Reports and Publications

    2006-01-01

    This report examines the aggregate maximum capacity for U.S. natural gas storage. Although the concept of maximum capacity seems quite straightforward, there are numerous issues that preclude the determination of a definitive maximum volume. The report presents three alternative estimates for maximum capacity, indicating appropriate caveats for each.

  1. A new maximum-likelihood change estimator for two-pass SAR coherent change detection

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V.; Simonson, Katherine Mary

    2016-01-11

    In past research, two-pass repeat-geometry synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD) predominantly utilized the sample degree of coherence as a measure of the temporal change occurring between two complex-valued image collects. Previous coherence-based CCD approaches tend to show temporal change when there is none in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio. Instead of employing the sample coherence magnitude as a change metric, in this paper, we derive a new maximum-likelihood (ML) temporal change estimate—the complex reflectance change detection (CRCD) metric to be used for SAR coherent temporal change detection. The new CRCD estimatormore » is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and optimal in the ML sense. As a result, this new estimate produces improved results in the coherent pair collects that we have tested.« less

  2. Core Values | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Values What we do and how we do it is determined by our core values. Our core values are how we operate and what we value most. They are the qualities that define our culture...

  3. Social Values | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Social Values Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSocialValues&oldid612345...

  4. Economic Values | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Economic Values Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEconomicValues&oldid612356...

  5. The value of volunteering

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    volunteering Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit The value of volunteering Volunteers help fill gaps in staffing at regional nonprofits March 1, 2016 Betty Ehart Senior Center staffer Susie Eash challenges Pat Day on their daily match of "Aggravation." Betty Ehart Senior Center staffer Susie Eash challenges Pat Day on their daily match of Aggravation. Contacts

  6. IDAPA 37.03.03 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    3 - Rules and Minimum Standards for the Construction and Use of Injection Wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  7. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional

  8. Value Study Desk Manual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PREPARED FOR: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Contractor Human Resources Policy Division September 26, 2012 UPDATE VALUE STUDY DESK MANUAL Prepared for: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY By: BUCK CONSULTANTS Under DE-AC01-96AD38107 Update Prepared for: DOE By: AON CONSULTING, INC. Under Delivery Order DE-BP01-08MA345678, Contract No. DE-AB01-08-ME11881 September 28, 2008 Update Prepared for: DOE By: Aon Hewitt Inc. Under Delivery Order DE-BP01-08MA345678, Contract No. DE-AB01-08-ME11881 September 26, 2012

  9. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore » result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  10. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The absolute theoretical minimum energies to produce liquid steel from idealized scrap (100% Fe) and ore (100% Fe2O3) are much lower than consumed in practice, as are the theoretical minimum energies to roll the steel into its final shape.

  11. 2011-07 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    7 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" 2011-07 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" The intent of this recommendation is to ...

  12. Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave...

  13. PV Value | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PV Value PV Value PV Value Sandia National Laboratories has developed a prospective model of determining the value of PV. Sandia uses an income capitalization approach, which considers the present value of future energy production to determine the remaining value of a PV system. An online tool developed by Energy Sense Finance, has been released to the public. https://www.pvvalue.com/ PV Value (332.15 KB) More Documents & Publications PV Value® Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States

  14. The value of money

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    Today, more than ever before, power plant engineers find themselves in a new arena of competition. It is no longer enough to address the technical problems. Today is also an era of financial competition. This is not just competition in the sense of {open_quotes}the enemy out there{close_quotes}. Engineers are competing with a myriad of other good projects within their own company for precious budget dollars. Utility budget scrutiny is increasing every year. To be successful, engineers have to be prepared to justify their projects in clear, measurable terms that withstand management`s scrutiny. Today`s engineer is faced with a technical and financial challenge and must be prepared if he or she is to succeed. This paper addresses methods used at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company for justification of feedwater heater replacements. Though only a suggested method; it is nonetheless a method that has worked well. This paper covers how a feedwater heater replacement is evaluated, from the identified need to the proposed solution. Expectations are defined. Realistic assessments are made. Measurement criteria is established, in advance. Responsibility is assigned. The project is evaluated on its technical and financial merits, reflecting today`s {open_quotes}value of money{close_quotes}.

  15. Thermal properties for the thermal-hydraulics analyses of the BR2 maximum nominal heat flux.

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L.

    2011-05-23

    This memo describes the assumptions and references used in determining the thermal properties for the various materials used in the BR2 HEU (93% enriched in {sup 235}U) to LEU (19.75% enriched in {sup 235}U) conversion feasibility analysis. More specifically, this memo focuses on the materials contained within the pressure vessel (PV), i.e., the materials that are most relevant to the study of impact of the change of fuel from HEU to LEU. This section is regrouping all of the thermal property tables. Section 2 provides a summary of the thermal properties in form of tables while the following sections present the justification of these values. Section 3 presents a brief background on the approach used to evaluate the thermal properties of the dispersion fuel meat and specific heat capacity. Sections 4 to 7 discuss the material properties for the following materials: (i) aluminum, (ii) dispersion fuel meat (UAlx-Al and U-7Mo-Al), (iii) beryllium, and (iv) stainless steel. Section 8 discusses the impact of irradiation on material properties. Section 9 summarizes the material properties for typical operating temperatures. Appendix A elaborates on how to calculate dispersed phase's volume fraction. Appendix B shows the evolution of the BR2 maximum heat flux with burnup.

  16. Prestack mid-value filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Changlian, X. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes mid-value filtering, a specific nonlinear smoothing filtering, and widely used in graphic processing, etc. Mid-value filtering before stack of seismic data can remove wild value (inconceivable particular big value) and improve signal-noise ratio. In view of big data volume before stack, computation efficiency of mid-value filtering is critical to its feasibility. The algorithm used here is sufficiently based on the properties of mid-value filtering, so that the computation efficiency is greatly improved. It is experimentally shown that prestack mid-value filtering can quite well eliminate wild value, abnormal traces as well as surface waves, and raise signal-noise ratio. After lateral low frequency noises are removed by high pass filtering, mid-value filtering works better.

  17. From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Hallam, Steven

    2016-07-12

    Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated

  19. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states Title: Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated

  20. PV Value | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PV Value is a web-based tool that calculates the energy production value for a residential or commercial photovoltaic (PV) system. The tool is Uniform Standards of Progressional ...

  1. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  2. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar...

  3. Maximum allowable hydraulic ram force for heel jet removal Tank 241-C-106

    SciTech Connect

    PAULSEN, S.S.

    2003-01-10

    This document contains an evaluation of the maximum force that can be used to actuate the hydraulic ram assembly without causing permanent damage to the riser or pit.

  4. Quantum physics and human values

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following concepts: the quantum conception of nature; the quantum conception of man; and the impact upon human values. (LSP).

  5. The value of energy data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The value of energy data DOE SSL Program Connected Lighting Meeting November 16, 2015 2 ... methods, passfail criteria 13 DOE SSL Program activities: energy reporting Based ...

  6. Earned Value Management System (EVMS)

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-03-13

    This Guide provides approaches for implementing the Earned Value Management System (EVMS) requirements of DOE O 413.3B. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-10.

  7. Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, P.H.

    A point-sensitive NMR imaging system in which a main solenoid coil produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An rf generator irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

  8. Point sensitive NMR imaging system using a magnetic field configuration with a spatial minimum

    DOEpatents

    Eberhard, Philippe H.

    1985-01-01

    A point-sensitive NMR imaging system (10) in which a main solenoid coil (11) produces a relatively strong and substantially uniform magnetic field and a pair of perturbing coils (PZ1 and PZ2) powered by current in the same direction superimposes a pair of relatively weak perturbing fields on the main field to produce a resultant point of minimum field strength at a desired location in a direction along the Z-axis. Two other pairs of perturbing coils (PX1, PX2; PY1, PY2) superimpose relatively weak field gradients on the main field in directions along the X- and Y-axes to locate the minimum field point at a desired location in a plane normal to the Z-axes. An RF generator (22) irradiates a tissue specimen in the field with radio frequency energy so that desired nuclei in a small volume at the point of minimum field strength will resonate.

  9. SEPARATION OF SCANDIUM VALUES FORM IRON VALUES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Kuhlman, C.W. Jr.; Lang, G.P.

    1961-12-19

    A process is given for separating scandium from trivalent iron values. In this process, an aqueous nitric acid solution is contacted with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate solution, the aqueous solution containing the values to be separated, whereby the scandium is taken up by the alkyl phosphate. The aqueous so1ution is preferably saturated with magnesium nitrate to retain the iron in the aqueous solution. (AEC)

  10. Earned Value Management System (EVMS)

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-03-13

    To support DOE's initiatives to improve program, project, and contract management through the implementation and surveillance of a contractor's Earned Value Management System (EVMS) that is in conformance with DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, the American National Standards Institute/Electronic Industries Alliance (ANSI/EIA)-748-B, Earned Value Management System (or as required by contract), and Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 52.234-4, Earned Value Management System (EVMS). Admin Chg 1 dated 10-22-2015.

  11. CMI Values | Critical Materials Institute

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Values CMI Values -- we listen, we are safe, we collaborate, we respect, we move fast, we are agile, we are responsible, and we deliver. We Listen: We are driven by the needs of technology and our best information comes from our industry partners. We Are Safe: We conduct all of our work in a manner that protects our workers, the public and the environment. We Collaborate: We bring together the best available expertise to solve the problems at hand. We Respect: We treat each other well and value

  12. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

  13. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers | Department of Energy A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers Comment that a requirement to reduce the BTU input rate of existing decorative

  14. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Leonard; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  15. Earned Value Management System (EVMS)

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-05-06

    The Guide supports the Departments initiatives to improve program, project, and contract management through the implementation and surveillance of contractors earned value management systems. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-10A.

  16. ASHRAE Minimum Efficiency Requirements Tables for Heating and Cooling Product Categories

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) created tables that mirror American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2013 tables, which include minimum efficiency requirements for FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified heating and cooling product categories. Download the tables below to incorporate FEMP and ENERGY STAR purchasing requirements into federal product acquisition documents.

  17. A generalized methodology for estimating minimum fluidization velocity at elevated pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Ching Yang; Chitester, D.C.; Keairns, D.L.; Kornosky, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    A generalized methodology for estimating minimum fluidization velocity at elevated pressure and temperature was developed on the basis of a general correlation for pressure drop through fixed beds of spherical particles proposed by Barnea and Mizrahi (1973) and extended by Barnea and Mednick (1975). Comparison with experimental results shows good agreement.

  18. Core Values | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Core Values Core Values People - People are our most important resource. We respect and use our experience and skills and appreciate our diversity. Business Excellence - We are fiscally responsible and actively pursue best business practices. Safety - We protect our human and material resources and promote safe work practices within the office and at our sites. Communication - We take full advantage of our virtual organization's strengths and share information freely across all levels of the

  19. Photovoltaics Value Clearinghouse | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Photovoltaics Value Clearinghouse Jump to: navigation, search The Photovoltaics Value Clearinghouse was developed by NREL and Clean Power Research.1 The PV Value Clearinghouse is...

  20. Verification of maximum impact force for interim storage cask for the Fast Flux Testing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.W.; Chang, S.J.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform an impact analysis of the Interim Storage Cask (ISC) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) for a 4-ft end drop. The ISC is a concrete cask used to store spent nuclear fuels. The analysis is to justify the impact force calculated by General Atomics (General Atomics, 1994) using the ILMOD computer code. ILMOD determines the maximum force developed by the concrete crushing which occurs when the drop energy has been absorbed. The maximum force, multiplied by the dynamic load factor (DLF), was used to determine the maximum g-level on the cask during a 4-ft end drop accident onto the heavily reinforced FFTF Reactor Service Building`s concrete surface. For the analysis, this surface was assumed to be unyielding and the cask absorbed all the drop energy. This conservative assumption simplified the modeling used to qualify the cask`s structural integrity for this accident condition.

  1. INERTIAL RANGE TURBULENCE OF FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND AT 0.72 AU AND SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel; Zhang, Tielong; Bruno, Roberto; Kovacs, Peter

    2015-05-10

    We investigate Venus Express observations of magnetic field fluctuations performed systematically in the solar wind at 0.72 Astronomical Units (AU), between 2007 and 2009, during the deep minimum of solar cycle 24. The power spectral densities (PSDs) of the magnetic field components have been computed for time intervals that satisfy the data integrity criteria and have been grouped according to the type of wind, fast and slow, defined for speeds larger and smaller, respectively, than 450 km s{sup −1}. The PSDs show higher levels of power for the fast wind than for the slow. The spectral slopes estimated for all PSDs in the frequency range 0.005–0.1 Hz exhibit a normal distribution. The average value of the trace of the spectral matrix is −1.60 for fast solar wind and −1.65 for slow wind. Compared to the corresponding average slopes at 1 AU, the PSDs are shallower at 0.72 AU for slow wind conditions suggesting a steepening of the solar wind spectra between Venus and Earth. No significant time variation trend is observed for the spectral behavior of both the slow and fast wind.

  2. Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Daddy; Rohman, Budi

    2014-09-30

    Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

  3. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of z{sub L} = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (M{sub max}) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts z∼> 13 detected in the angular region θ{sub E}/2 ≤ θ ≤ 2θ{sub E} (where θ{sub E} is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ∼ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of z∼> 6 and z∼> 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as M{sub max} ∼ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (L{sub min} ≈ 2.5 × 10{sup 26} and 1.2 × 10{sup 27} erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1}) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  4. A novel cell weighing method based on the minimum immobilization pressure for biological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Qili; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Cui, Maosheng; Sun, Mingzhu; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Xin

    2015-07-28

    A novel weighing method for cells with spherical and other regular shapes is proposed in this paper. In this method, the relationship between the cell mass and the minimum aspiration pressure to immobilize the cell (referred to as minimum immobilization pressure) is derived for the first time according to static theory. Based on this relationship, a robotic cell weighing process is established using a traditional micro-injection system. Experimental results on porcine oocytes demonstrate that the proposed method is able to weigh cells at an average speed of 16.3 s/cell and with a success rate of more than 90%. The derived cell mass and density are in accordance with those reported in other published results. The experimental results also demonstrated that this method is able to detect less than 1% variation of the porcine oocyte mass quantitatively. It can be conducted by a pair of traditional micropipettes and a commercial pneumatic micro-injection system, and is expected to perform robotic operation on batch cells. At present, the minimum resolution of the proposed method for measuring the cell mass can be 1.25 × 10{sup −15 }kg. Above advantages make it very appropriate for quantifying the amount of the materials injected into or moved out of the cells in the biological applications, such as nuclear enucleations and embryo microinjections.

  5. Core Values Postcard | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Core Values Postcard Document Number: NA Effective Date: 09/2014 File (public): PDF icon Print_CoreValuesPostcard

  6. Process for recovering actinide values

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Mason, George W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for rendering actinide values recoverable from sodium carbonate scrub waste solutions containing these and other values along with organic compounds resulting from the radiolytic and hydrolytic degradation of neutral organophosphorous extractants such as tri-n butyl phosphate (TBP) and dihexyl-N,N-diethyl carbamylmethylene phosphonate (DHDECAMP) which have been used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear reactor fuels. The scrub waste solution is preferably made acidic with mineral acid, to form a feed solution which is then contacted with a water-immiscible, highly polar organic extractant which selectively extracts the degradation products from the feed solution. The feed solution can then be processed to recover the actinides for storage or recycled back into the high-level waste process stream. The extractant is recycled after stripping the degradation products with a neutral sodium carbonate solution.

  7. Value Study Desk Manual | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Value Study Desk Manual Value Study Desk Manual Updated September 26, 2012. Memo from Robert Myers regarding DOE Benefit Value Desk Manual (56.76 KB) Value Study Desk Manual (1005.83 KB) More Documents & Publications Contractor Human Resources Management VALUE STUDY VALUE STUDY

  8. On the Stochastic Maximum Principle in Optimal Control of Degenerate Diffusions with Lipschitz Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Bahlali, Khaled Djehiche, Boualem Mezerdi, Brahim

    2007-12-15

    We establish a stochastic maximum principle in optimal control of a general class of degenerate diffusion processes with global Lipschitz coefficients, generalizing the existing results on stochastic control of diffusion processes. We use distributional derivatives of the coefficients and the Bouleau Hirsh flow property, in order to define the adjoint process on an extension of the initial probability space.

  9. U.S. Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 435 512 417 343 455 511 600 710 NA 663 2010's 616

  10. U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Elements) Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 615 717 624 481 563 655 728 848 NA 787 2010's 774

  11. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING THORIUM VALUES FROM URANIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Schubert, J.

    1959-08-01

    An improved ion exchange method is described for recovery of uranium and thorium values as separate functions from an aqueous acidic solution containing less than 10/sup -3/ M thorium ions and between 0.1 and 1 M uranyl ions. The solution is passed through a bed of cation exchange resin in the acid form to adsorb all the thorium ions and a portion of the uranyl ions. The uranium is eluted by means of aqueous 0.1 to 0.4 M sulfuric acid. The thorium may then be stripped from the resin by elution with aqueous 0.5 M oxalic acid.

  12. SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY: DETERMINATION OF THE PROBABLE MAXIMUM WATER TABLE ELEVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R

    2005-04-01

    A coverage depicting the configuration of the probable maximum water table elevation in the vicinity of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was developed to support the Saltstone program. This coverage is needed to support the construction of saltstone vaults to assure that they remain above the maximum elevation of the water table during the Performance Assessment (PA) period of compliance. A previous investigation to calculate the historical high water table beneath the SDF (Cook, 1983) was built upon to incorporate new data that has since become available to refine that estimate and develop a coverage that could be extended to the perennial streams adjacent to the SDF. This investigation incorporated the method used in the Cook, 1983 report to develop an estimate of the probable maximum water table for a group of wells that either existed at one time at or near the SDF or which currently exist. Estimates of the probable maximum water table at these wells were used to construct 2D contour lines depicting this surface beneath the SDF and extend them to the nearby hydrologic boundaries at the perennial streams adjacent to the SDF. Although certain measures were implemented to assure that the contour lines depict a surface above which the water table will not rise, the exact elevation of this surface cannot be known with complete certainty. It is therefore recommended that the construction of saltstone vaults incorporate a vertical buffer of at least 5-feet between the base of the vaults and the depicted probable maximum water table elevation. This should provide assurance that the water table under the wet extreme climatic condition will never rise to intercept the base of a vault.

  13. SU-F-18C-01: Minimum Detectability Analysis for Comprehensive Sized Based Optimization of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Across CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, C; Chen, B; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work involved a comprehensive modeling of task-based performance of CT across a wide range of protocols. The approach was used for optimization and consistency of dose and image quality within a large multi-vendor clinical facility. Methods: 150 adult protocols from the Duke University Medical Center were grouped into sub-protocols with similar acquisition characteristics. A size based image quality phantom (Duke Mercury Phantom) was imaged using these sub-protocols for a range of clinically relevant doses on two CT manufacturer platforms (Siemens, GE). The images were analyzed to extract task-based image quality metrics such as the Task Transfer Function (TTF), Noise Power Spectrum, and Az based on designer nodule task functions. The data were analyzed in terms of the detectability of a lesion size/contrast as a function of dose, patient size, and protocol. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed to predict image quality and dose to achieve a minimum level of detectability. Results: Image quality trends with variations in dose, patient size, and lesion contrast/size were evaluated and calculated data behaved as predicted. The GUI proved effective to predict the Az values representing radiologist confidence for a targeted lesion, patient size, and dose. As an example, an abdomen pelvis exam for the GE scanner, with a task size/contrast of 5-mm/50-HU, and an Az of 0.9 requires a dose of 4.0, 8.9, and 16.9 mGy for patient diameters of 25, 30, and 35 cm, respectively. For a constant patient diameter of 30 cm, the minimum detected lesion size at those dose levels would be 8.4, 5, and 3.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The designed CT protocol optimization platform can be used to evaluate minimum detectability across dose levels and patient diameters. The method can be used to improve individual protocols as well as to improve protocol consistency across CT scanners.

  14. Environment and energy in Iceland: A comparative analysis of values and impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen . E-mail: theth@hi.is

    2007-08-15

    Within an Icelandic framework plan for energy, environmental values and impacts were estimated in multicriteria analyses for 19 hydroelectric and 22 geothermal developments. Four natural environment classes were defined (geology + hydrology, species, ecosystems + soils, landscape + wilderness) with cultural heritage as the fifth class. Values and impacts were assessed through 6 agglomerated attributes: richness/diversity, rarity, size/continuity/pristineness, information/symbolic value, international responsibility and visual value. The project offers a unique opportunity for comparing environmental values and impacts within a large sample of sites and energy alternatives treated within a common methodological framework. Total values were higher in hydroelectric than in geothermal areas. Hydroelectric areas scored high for cultural heritage (particularly in rarity and information value), landscape and wilderness. Geothermal areas had high bedrock and hydrological diversity and information values, and a high landscape visual value but little cultural heritage. High values were correlated among some classes of the natural environment, all of which are likely to reflect functional relationships. In contrast, cultural heritage values were not related to natural environment values. Overall, landscape and wilderness had the highest mean value and were also most affected by energy development. Over 40% of the hydroelectric development had a predicted mean impact value of > 4 (out of a maximum of 10), compared with 10% of the geothermal projects. Excluding two outsized hydropower options, there was a significant correlation between plant capacity and impact on geology and hydrology but not with other environmental variables.

  15. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guidingmore » structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.« less

  16. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guiding structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.

  17. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-02

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y⁻¹. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; (c) Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and (d) Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  18. U.S. Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 41 41 38 43 44 45 43 46 46 48 2001 44 45 45 47 45 42 42 41 39 39 42 41 2002 38 40 35 32 32 32 34 33 37 38 35 31 2003 28 29 28 27 24 25 28 30 30 31 31 32 2004 33 35 35 36 35 39 38 39 40 42 42 41

  19. U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Elements) Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 62 63 59 63 58 61 59 63 62 65 2001 61 61 63 65 64 60 58 56 54 58 59 58 2002 54 57 54 50 51 50 52 50 56 57 50 43 2003 40 41 41 40 38 39 41 43 39 39 38 42 2004 43 45 45 45 44 49 48 49 48 48 49 50 2005 52 53 51 50 55 57 54 55 56 57 57 58 2006 55 57 59 58 58 57

  20. Three dimensional winds: A maximum cross-correlation application to elastic lidar data

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, W.T.

    1996-05-01

    Maximum cross-correlation techniques have been used with satellite data to estimate winds and sea surface velocities for several years. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently using a variation of the basic maximum cross-correlation technique, coupled with a deterministic application of a vector median filter, to measure transverse winds as a function of range and altitude from incoherent elastic backscatter lidar (light detection and ranging) data taken throughout large volumes within the atmospheric boundary layer. Hourly representations of three-dimensional wind fields, derived from elastic lidar data taken during an air-quality study performed in a region of complex terrain near Sunland Park, New Mexico, are presented and compared with results from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved laser doppler velocimeter. The wind fields showed persistent large scale eddies as well as general terrain-following winds in the Rio Grande valley.

  1. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  2. Exotic equilibria of Harary graphs and a new minimum degree lower bound for synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Canale, Eduardo A.; Monzn, Pablo

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stability of equilibria in the homogeneous (equal frequencies) Kuramoto model of weakly coupled oscillators. In 2012 [R. Taylor, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45, 115 (2012)], a sufficient condition for almost global synchronization was found in terms of the minimum degreeorder ratio of the graph. In this work, a new lower bound for this ratio is given. The improvement is achieved by a concrete infinite sequence of regular graphs. Besides, non standard unstable equilibria of the graphs studied in Wiley et al. [Chaos 16, 015103 (2006)] are shown to exist as conjectured in that work.

  3. Confronting Regulatory Cost and Quality Expectations. An Exploration of Technical Change in Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Margaret; Spurlock, C. Anna; Yang, Hung-Chia

    2015-09-21

    The dual purpose of this project was to contribute to basic knowledge about the interaction between regulation and innovation and to inform the cost and benefit expectations related to technical change which are embedded in the rulemaking process of an important area of national regulation. The area of regulation focused on here is minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances and other energy-using products. Relevant both to U.S. climate policy and energy policy for buildings, MEPS remove certain product models from the market that do not meet specified efficiency thresholds.

  4. Hydrodynamic equations for electrons in graphene obtained from the maximum entropy principle

    SciTech Connect

    Barletti, Luigi

    2014-08-15

    The maximum entropy principle is applied to the formal derivation of isothermal, Euler-like equations for semiclassical fermions (electrons and holes) in graphene. After proving general mathematical properties of the equations so obtained, their asymptotic form corresponding to significant physical regimes is investigated. In particular, the diffusive regime, the Maxwell-Boltzmann regime (high temperature), the collimation regime and the degenerate gas limit (vanishing temperature) are considered.

  5. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    of Elements) Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 2 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2003 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2

  6. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. In conclusion, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  7. Ensuring scientific digital data is preserved for maximum use | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Ensuring scientific digital data is preserved for maximum use Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2009 The report, Harnessing the Power of Digital Data for Science and Society, released by the Interagency Working Group on Digital Data (IWGDD) to the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council, describes a strategy to promote preservation and access to digital scientific data. According to press information

  8. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  9. On Parallel Push-Relabel based Algorithms for Bipartite Maximum Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Langguth, Johannes; Azad, Md Ariful; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Manne, Fredrik

    2014-07-01

    We study multithreaded push-relabel based algorithms for computing maximum cardinality matching in bipartite graphs. Matching is a fundamental combinatorial (graph) problem with applications in a wide variety of problems in science and engineering. We are motivated by its use in the context of sparse linear solvers for computing maximum transversal of a matrix. We implement and test our algorithms on several multi-socket multicore systems and compare their performance to state-of-the-art augmenting path-based serial and parallel algorithms using a testset comprised of a wide range of real-world instances. Building on several heuristics for enhancing performance, we demonstrate good scaling for the parallel push-relabel algorithm. We show that it is comparable to the best augmenting path-based algorithms for bipartite matching. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first extensive study of multithreaded push-relabel based algorithms. In addition to a direct impact on the applications using matching, the proposed algorithmic techniques can be extended to preflow-push based algorithms for computing maximum flow in graphs.

  10. Shale Oil Value Enhancement Research

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Bunger

    2006-11-30

    Raw kerogen oil is rich in heteroatom-containing compounds. Heteroatoms, N, S & O, are undesirable as components of a refinery feedstock, but are the basis for product value in agrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, surfactants, solvents, polymers, and a host of industrial materials. An economically viable, technologically feasible process scheme was developed in this research that promises to enhance the economics of oil shale development, both in the US and elsewhere in the world, in particular Estonia. Products will compete in existing markets for products now manufactured by costly synthesis routes. A premium petroleum refinery feedstock is also produced. The technology is now ready for pilot plant engineering studies and is likely to play an important role in developing a US oil shale industry.

  11. Sharing values, sharing a vision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Teamwork, partnership and shared values emerged as recurring themes at the Third Technology Transfer/Communications Conference. The program drew about 100 participants who sat through a packed two days to find ways for their laboratories and facilities to better help American business and the economy. Co-hosts were the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where most meetings took place. The conference followed traditions established at the First Technology Transfer/Communications Conference, conceived of and hosted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in May 1992 in Richmond, Washington, and the second conference, hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in January 1993 in Golden, Colorado. As at the other conferences, participants at the third session represented the fields of technology transfer, public affairs and communications. They came from Department of Energy headquarters and DOE offices, laboratories and production facilities. Continued in this report are keynote address; panel discussion; workshops; and presentations in technology transfer.

  12. Chapter 48 - Value Engineering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8 - Value Engineering Chapter 48 - Value Engineering PDF icon 48ValueEngineering0.pdf More Documents & Publications Audit Report: OAS-L-07-08 Emerging Lighting Technology...

  13. CONSTRAINTS ON THE MINIMUM ELECTRON LORENTZ FACTOR AND MATTER CONTENT OF JETS FOR A SAMPLE OF BRIGHT FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shi-Ju; Wu, Qingwen; Chen, Liang

    2014-11-01

    We fit (quasi-)simultaneous multi-waveband spectral energy distributions for a sample of low-synchrotron-peaked (LSP) blazars with a one-zone leptonic model. The seed photons that predominantly come from the broad line region (BLR) and infrared (IR) molecular torus are considered in the context of an external Compton process. We find that modeling with IR seed photons is systematically better than that with BLR photons based on a ?{sup 2} test, which suggests that ?-ray-emitting regions are most likely found outside the BLR. The minimum electron Lorentz factor, ?{sub min}, is constrained from the modeling of these LSP blazars with good soft X-ray data (ranging from 5 to 160 with a median value of 55), which plays a key role in jet power estimation. Assuming a one-to-one ratio of protons to electrons, we find that the jet power for LSP blazars is systematically higher than that of FR II radio galaxies at a 151 MHz radio luminosity, L {sub 151} {sub MHz} even though FR IIs are regarded as the same as LSP blazars in a unification scheme except at the jet viewing angle. A possible reason for this is that there are some e {sup } pairs in the jets of these blazars. If this is the case, we find that the number density of e {sup } pairs should be several times higher than that of e {sup }-p pairs by assuming the jet power is the same for LSP blazars and FR IIs at the given L {sub 151} {sub MHz}.

  14. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Jr., John A.

    1988-11-01

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  15. Minimum separation distances for natural gas pipeline and boilers in the 300 area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Graham, T.M.

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing actions to reduce energy expenditures and improve energy system reliability at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. These actions include replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing a new natural gas distribution system to provide a fuel source for many of these units, and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. The individual heating units will include steam boilers that are to be housed in individual annex buildings located at some distance away from nearby 300 Area nuclear facilities. This analysis develops the basis for siting the package boilers and natural gas distribution systems to be used to supply steam to 300 Area nuclear facilities. The effects of four potential fire and explosion scenarios involving the boiler and natural gas pipeline were quantified to determine minimum separation distances that would reduce the risks to nearby nuclear facilities. The resulting minimum separation distances are shown in Table ES.1.

  16. Earned Value Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Earned Value Management Earned Value Management Earned Value Management The mission of the DOE Earned Value Management website is to educate and train on theory and practice of Earned Value Management, and use it as an integrated Project Management process. Earned Value Management (EVM) is a systematic approach to the integration and measurement of cost, schedule, and technical (scope) accomplishments on a project or task. It provides both the government and contractors the ability to examine

  17. Development of the Minimum Information Specification for in situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Ball, Catherine A.; Bova, G. Steven; Brazma, Alvis; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Campbell, David; Causton, Helen C.; Christiansen, Jeff; Davidson, Duncan; Eichner, Lillian J.; Goo, Young Ah; Grimmond, Sean; Henrich, Thorsten; Johnson, Michael H.; Korb, Martin; Mills, Jason C.; Oudes, Asa; Parkinson, Helen E.; Pascal, Laura E.; Quackenbush, John; Ramialison, Mirana; Ringwald, Martin; Sansone, Susanna A.; Sherlock, Gavin; Stoeckert, Christian Jr. J.; Swedlow, Jason; Taylor, Ronald C.; Walashek, Laura; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Alvin Y.; True, Lawrence D.

    2006-06-06

    Background One purpose of the biomedical literature is to report results in sufficient detail so that the methods of data collection and analysis can be independently replicated and verified. In order to ensure that this level of detail is provided in published works, a minimum information specification is needed for each experimental data type and for this specification to be a requirement for publication in peer-reviewed journals. This is especially beneficial for researchers working with complex data types and experiments. A data content specification has already been widely accepted by, and directly benefited, the microarray community, and efforts are well underway to develop a comparable specification for proteomics data types. However, no similar specification exists for visual interpretation-based tissue protein and transcript abundance/localization experiments (hereafter referred to as ‘gene expression localization experiments’), such as in situ hybridization and experiments involving immunohistochemistry. Results Here we present for consideration a specification, called the “Minimum Information Specification For In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemistry Experiments (MISFISHIE)”. It is modelled after the MIAME (Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment) specification for microarray experiments. Data specifications like MIAME and MISFISHIE specify the information content without specifying a format for encoding that information. The MISFISHIE specification describes six types of information that should be provided for each gene expression localization experiment: Experimental Design, Biomaterials and Treatments, Reporters, Staining, Imaging Data, and Image Characterizations. A general checklist is provided for quick and easy reference and to promote adherence to the specification. We consider that most articles describing gene expression localization studies do not fully provide the minimum information needed for independent verification

  18. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pranikar, Jure [Institute Joef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Primorska, (Slovenia); Turk, Duan, E-mail: dusan.turk@ijs.si [Institute Joef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, (Slovenia)

    2014-12-01

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  19. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  20. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF THE TYPE Ia SN 2007sr TWO MONTHS AFTER MAXIMUM LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Zelaya, P.; Quinn, J. R.; Clocchiatti, A.; Baade, D.; Patat, F.; Hoeflich, P.; Maund, J.; Wang, L.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2013-02-01

    We present late-time spectropolarimetric observations of SN 2007sr, obtained with the Very Large Telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory when the object was 63 days after maximum light. The late-time spectrum displays strong line polarization in the Ca II absorption features. SN 2007sr adds to the case of some normal Type Ia supernovae that show high line polarization or repolarization at late times, a fact that might be connected with the presence of high-velocity features at early times.

  1. Comparative High Field Magneto-transport Of Rare Earth Oxypnictides With Maximum Transition Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Balakirev, Fedor F; Migliori, A; Riggs, S; Hunte, F; Gurevich, A; Larbalestier, D; Boebinger, G; Jaroszynski, J; Ren, Z; Lu, W; Yang, J; Shen, X; Dong, X; Zhao, Z; Jin, R; Sefat, A; Mcguire, M; Sales, B; Christen, D; Mandrus, D

    2008-01-01

    We compare magnetotransport of the three iron-arsenide-based compounds ReFeAsO (Re=La, Sm, Nd) in very high DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 and 54 T, respectively. Each sample studied exhibits a superconducting transition temperature near the maximum reported to date for that particular compound. While high magnetic fields do not suppress the superconducting state appreciably, the resistivity, Hall coefficient, and critical magnetic fields, taken together, suggest that the phenomenology and superconducting parameters of the oxypnictide superconductors bridges the gap between MgB{sub 2} and YBCO.

  2. Minimum Fisher regularization of image reconstruction for infrared imaging bolometer on HL-2A

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Lu, J.; Dong, Y. B.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2013-09-15

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been developed recently for the HL-2A tokamak to measure the temporal and spatial distribution of plasma radiation. The three-dimensional tomography, reduced to a two-dimensional problem by the assumption of plasma radiation toroidal symmetry, has been performed. A three-dimensional geometry matrix is calculated with the one-dimensional pencil beam approximation. The solid angles viewed by the detector elements are taken into account in defining the chord brightness. And the local plasma emission is obtained by inverting the measured brightness with the minimum Fisher regularization method. A typical HL-2A plasma radiation model was chosen to optimize a regularization parameter on the criterion of generalized cross validation. Finally, this method was applied to HL-2A experiments, demonstrating the plasma radiated power density distribution in limiter and divertor discharges.

  3. A fast tomographic method for searching the minimum free energy path

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao; Xiao, Yi; Jiang, Xuewei

    2014-10-21

    Minimum Free Energy Path (MFEP) provides a lot of important information about the chemical reactions, like the free energy barrier, the location of the transition state, and the relative stability between reactant and product. With MFEP, one can study the mechanisms of the reaction in an efficient way. Due to a large number of degrees of freedom, searching the MFEP is a very time-consuming process. Here, we present a fast tomographic method to perform the search. Our approach first calculates the free energy surfaces in a sequence of hyperplanes perpendicular to a transition path. Based on an objective function and the free energy gradient, the transition path is optimized in the collective variable space iteratively. Applications of the present method to model systems show that our method is practical. It can be an alternative approach for finding the state-to-state MFEP.

  4. Estimates of maximum strains induced in buried pipelines by dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, G.; Al-Chaar, G.; Brady, P.

    1995-12-31

    An evaluation of pipe strains measured during full scale blast in-situ tests was carried out to assess the effects produced by a nearby quarry blast in a buried, steel pipeline carrying pressurized gas. The result of the blast tests indicated that the magnitude of the maximum circumferential strain is equal or larger than the magnitude of the maximum axial strain measured in the pipe. It was also observed that circumferential strains can develop simultaneously with the dynamic-induced axial strains, resulting in a more critical loading condition than the one contemplated by the ASCE (1983) design guidelines for seismic loading. This behavior can become critical in pressurized pipes where significant circumferential stresses are already present under normal operating conditions. Based on the results of these tests, recommendations for including circumferential strains are suggested to the ASCE (1983) Design Guidelines. Consideration should be given to a compressive wave traveling at a high angle which respect to the longitudinal axis of the pipe which can induce squeezing or ovaling of the pipe section, resulting in significant circumferential strains in the pipe.

  5. Analysis to determine the maximum dimensions of flexible apertures in sensored security netting products.

    SciTech Connect

    Murton, Mark; Bouchier, Francis A.; vanDongen, Dale T.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Cutler, Robert Paul; Ross, Michael P.

    2013-08-01

    Although technological advances provide new capabilities to increase the robustness of security systems, they also potentially introduce new vulnerabilities. New capability sometimes requires new performance requirements. This paper outlines an approach to establishing a key performance requirement for an emerging intrusion detection sensor: the sensored net. Throughout the security industry, the commonly adopted standard for maximum opening size through barriers is a requirement based on square inches-typically 96 square inches. Unlike standard rigid opening, the dimensions of a flexible aperture are not fixed, but variable and conformable. It is demonstrably simple for a human intruder to move through a 96-square-inch opening that is conformable to the human body. The longstanding 96-square-inch requirement itself, though firmly embedded in policy and best practice, lacks a documented empirical basis. This analysis concluded that the traditional 96-square-inch standard for openings is insufficient for flexible openings that are conformable to the human body. Instead, a circumference standard is recommended for these newer types of sensored barriers. The recommended maximum circumference for a flexible opening should be no more than 26 inches, as measured on the inside of the netting material.

  6. Observed Minimum Illuminance Threshold for Night Market Vendors in Kenya who use LED Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan; Radecsky, Kristen

    2009-03-21

    Creation of light for work, socializing, and general illumination is a fundamental application of technology around the world. For those who lack access to electricity, an emerging and diverse range of LED based lighting products hold promise for replacing and/or augmenting their current fuel-based lighting sources that are costly and dirty. Along with analysis of environmental factors, economic models for total cost-ofownership of LED lighting products are an important tool for studying the impacts of these products as they emerge in markets of developing countries. One important metric in those models is the minimum illuminance demanded by end-users for a given task before recharging the lamp or replacing batteries. It impacts the lighting service cost per unit time if charging is done with purchased electricity, batteries, or charging services. The concept is illustrated in figure 1: LED lighting products are generally brightest immediately after the battery is charged or replaced and the illuminance degrades as the battery is discharged. When a minimum threshold level of illuminance is reached, the operational time for the battery charge cycle is over. The cost to recharge depends on the method utilized; these include charging at a shop at a fixed price per charge, charging on personal grid connections, using solar chargers, and purchasing dry cell batteries. This Research Note reports on the observed"charge-triggering" illuminance level threshold for night market vendors who use LED lighting products to provide general and task oriented illumination. All the study participants charged with AC power, either at a fixed-price charge shop or with electricity at their home.

  7. NEWLY DISCOVERED GLOBAL TEMPERATURE STRUCTURES IN THE QUIET SUN AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Zhenguang; Frazin, Richard A.; Landi, Enrico; Manchester, Ward B.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Vasquez, Alberto M.

    2012-08-20

    Magnetic loops are building blocks of the closed-field corona. While active region loops are readily seen in images taken at EUV and X-ray wavelengths, quiet-Sun (QS) loops are seldom identifiable and are therefore difficult to study on an individual basis. The first analysis of solar minimum (Carrington Rotation 2077) QS coronal loops utilizing a novel technique called the Michigan Loop Diagnostic Technique (MLDT) is presented. This technique combines Differential Emission Measure Tomography and a potential field source surface (PFSS) model, and consists of tracing PFSS field lines through the tomographic grid on which the local differential emission measure is determined. As a result, the electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} at each point along each individual field line can be obtained. Using data from STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/MDI, the MLDT identifies two types of QS loops in the corona: so-called up loops in which the temperature increases with height and so-called down loops in which the temperature decreases with height. Up loops are expected, however, down loops are a surprise, and furthermore, they are ubiquitous in the low-latitude corona. Up loops dominate the QS at higher latitudes. The MLDT allows independent determination of the empirical pressure and density scale heights, and the differences between the two remain to be explained. The down loops appear to be a newly discovered property of the solar minimum corona that may shed light on the physics of coronal heating. The results are shown to be robust to the calibration uncertainties of the EUVI instrument.

  8. Physiological and growth responses of C3 and C4 plants at the Pleistocene glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B.R.

    1995-06-01

    A C3 plant (Abutilon theophrasti) and a C4 plant (Amaranthus retroflexus) were grown from seed in the Duke University Phytotron under four CO2 concentrations (15 Pa, below the Pleistocene minimum), 27 Pa (pre-industrial), 35 Pa (current), and 70 Pa (future) to examine photosynthetic, growth and reproduction responses of annual plants to historic and future levels of CO2. Net photosynthesis and growth were greatly inhibited at 15 Pa and greatly stimulated at 70 Pa. in the C3 Abutilon but only slightly affected in the C4 Amaranthus. Flower bud initiation was not affected by CO2 treatment in either species but all flower buds in 15 Pa CO2 aborted in the C3 within two days of appearance while no inhibition of reproduction was observed at low CO2 in the C4. Differences in physiology, growth and reproduction to the low levels of atmospheric CO2 of the Pleistocene suggest that competitive interactions of C3 and C4 annuals have changed through geologic time. A major question concerning the survival and evolution of obligate C3 annuals during the CO2 minima of the Pleistocene is raised by the results of this study.

  9. Challenges in determining b value in the Northwest Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Saltiel, S.; Boyle, K.; Majer, E.

    2011-02-01

    Past analyses of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value in the Geysers and other geothermal settings have revealed a deviation from the assumed linear relationship in log space between magnitude and the number of earthquakes. In this study of the Northwest Geysers, we found a gently-sloping discontinuity in the b-value curve. This is especially apparent when comparing the least-squares fit (LSQ) of the curve to the fit obtained by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), a widely-respected method of analyzing magnitude-frequency relationships. This study will describe the assumptions made when using each of these two methods and will also explore how they can be used in conjunction to investigate the characteristics of the observed b-value curve. To understand whether slope-fit differences in the LSQR and MLE methods is due to physical properties of the system or due to artifacts from errors in sampling, it is extremely important to consider the catalog completeness, magnitude bin size, number of events, and differences in source mechanisms for the events comprising the study volume. This work will hopefully lead to informative interpretations of frequency-magnitude curves for the Northwest Geysers, a geothermal area of ongoing high-volume coldwater injection and steam production. Through this statistical investigation of the catalog contents, we hope to better understand the dominant source mechanisms and the role of injected fluids in the creation of seismic clustering around nearly 60 wells of varying depths and injection volumes.

  10. Dithering Digital Ripple Correlation Control for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, C; Pilawa-Podgurski, RCN

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrates a new method for rapid and precise maximum power point tracking in photovoltaic (PV) applications using dithered PWM control. Constraints imposed by efficiency, cost, and component size limit the available PWM resolution of a power converter, and may in turn limit the MPP tracking efficiency of the PV system. In these scenarios, PWM dithering can be used to improve average PWM resolution. In this study, we present a control technique that uses ripple correlation control (RCC) on the dithering ripple, thereby achieving simultaneous fast tracking speed and high tracking accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method solves some of the practical challenges that have to date limited the effectiveness of RCC in solar PV applications. We present a theoretical derivation of the principles behind dithering digital ripple correlation control, as well as experimental results that show excellent tracking speed and accuracy with basic hardware requirements.

  11. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore » using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  12. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  13. Application of Markov chain model to daily maximum temperature for thermal comfort in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Nordin, Muhamad Asyraf bin Che; Hassan, Husna

    2015-10-22

    The Markov chain’s first order principle has been widely used to model various meteorological fields, for prediction purposes. In this study, a 14-year (2000-2013) data of daily maximum temperatures in Bayan Lepas were used. Earlier studies showed that the outdoor thermal comfort range based on physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) index in Malaysia is less than 34°C, thus the data obtained were classified into two state: normal state (within thermal comfort range) and hot state (above thermal comfort range). The long-run results show the probability of daily temperature exceed TCR will be only 2.2%. On the other hand, the probability daily temperature within TCR will be 97.8%.

  14. A Distributed Approach to Maximum Power Point Tracking for Photovoltaic Submodule Differential Power Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, SB; Cady, ST; Dominguez-Garcia, AD; Pilawa-Podgurski, RCN

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the theory and implementation of a distributed algorithm for controlling differential power processing converters in photovoltaic (PV) applications. This distributed algorithm achieves true maximum power point tracking of series-connected PV submodules by relying only on local voltage measurements and neighbor-to-neighbor communication between the differential power converters. Compared to previous solutions, the proposed algorithm achieves reduced number of perturbations at each step and potentially faster tracking without adding extra hardware; all these features make this algorithm well-suited for long submodule strings. The formulation of the algorithm, discussion of its properties, as well as three case studies are presented. The performance of the distributed tracking algorithm has been verified via experiments, which yielded quantifiable improvements over other techniques that have been implemented in practice. Both simulations and hardware experiments have confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed distributed algorithm.

  15. Online Robot Dead Reckoning Localization Using Maximum Relative Entropy Optimization With Model Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Urniezius, Renaldas

    2011-03-14

    The principle of Maximum relative Entropy optimization was analyzed for dead reckoning localization of a rigid body when observation data of two attached accelerometers was collected. Model constraints were derived from the relationships between the sensors. The experiment's results confirmed that accelerometers each axis' noise can be successfully filtered utilizing dependency between channels and the dependency between time series data. Dependency between channels was used for a priori calculation, and a posteriori distribution was derived utilizing dependency between time series data. There was revisited data of autocalibration experiment by removing the initial assumption that instantaneous rotation axis of a rigid body was known. Performance results confirmed that such an approach could be used for online dead reckoning localization.

  16. U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 11 11 11 9 6 7 8 9 8 8 2001 7 7 9 9 8 7 8 8 9 10 10 9 2002 6 6 7 7 8 7 8 7 7 7 5 4 2003 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 3 3 5 2004 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 4 4 2005 4 4 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 2006 5 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5

  17. U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Offshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 7 7 6 7 6 7 7 7 7 8 2001 9 8 9 9 9 9 8 7 6 9 7 8 2002 8 9 10 9 9 9 8 8 10 10 8 7 2003 8 8 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 5 4 5 2004 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 2 1 3 2005 5 5 6 6 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 2006 6 6 6 5 5 7 4 3 2 2 3 3

  18. U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Four-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2001 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  19. U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Three-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 36 36 34 37 39 40 39 41 40 41 2001 38 38 38 39 37 35 35 32 30 33 34 33 2002 32 31 26 25 24 23 26 26 28 30 27 22 2003 19 20 20 20 17 18 21 22 22 24 24 25 2004 25 27 27 27 26 30 30 31 32 34 33 32

  20. U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S.Lower 48 States Onshore Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Two-Dimensional Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 4 4 3 5 4 4 3 4 4 5 2001 5 6 6 7 7 6 6 8 8 5 7 7 2002 6 9 9 7 8 9 8 7 9 8 8 8 2003 8 9 8 7 7 7 7 8 8 7 7 7 2004 8 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 8 9 9 2005 8 8 6 8 8 9 8 8 7 6 5 6 2006 5 5 4 4 4 9 5 4 4 5 5 5 2007

  1. The transition from the open minimum to the ring minimum on the ground state and on the lowest excited state of like symmetry in ozone: A configuration interaction study

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Theis, Daniel; Ivanic, Joseph; Windus, Theresa L.; Ruedenberg, Klaus

    2016-03-10

    The metastable ring structure of the ozone 11A1 ground state, which theoretical calculations have shown to exist, has so far eluded experimental detection. An accurate prediction for the energy difference between this isomer and the lower open structure is therefore of interest, as is a prediction for the isomerization barrier between them, which results from interactions between the lowest two 1A1 states. In the present work, valence correlated energies of the 11A1 state and the 21A1 state were calculated at the 11A1 open minimum, the 11A1 ring minimum, the transition state between these two minima, the minimum of the 21A1more » state, and the conical intersection between the two states. The geometries were determined at the full-valence multi-configuration self-consistent-field level. Configuration interaction (CI) expansions up to quadruple excitations were calculated with triple-zeta atomic basis sets. The CI expansions based on eight different reference configuration spaces were explored. To obtain some of the quadruple excitation energies, the method of CorrelationEnergy Extrapolation by Intrinsic Scaling was generalized to the simultaneous extrapolation for two states. This extrapolation method was shown to be very accurate. On the other hand, none of the CI expansions were found to have converged to millihartree (mh) accuracy at the quadruple excitation level. The data suggest that convergence to mh accuracy is probably attained at the sextuple excitation level. On the 11A1 state, the present calculations yield the estimates of (ring minimum—open minimum) ~45–50 mh and (transition state—open minimum) ~85–90 mh. For the (21A1–1A1) excitation energy, the estimate of ~130–170 mh is found at the open minimum and 270–310 mh at the ring minimum. At the transition state, the difference (21A1–1A1) is found to be between 1 and 10 mh. The geometry of the transition state on the 11A1 surface and that of the minimum on the 21A1 surface nearly coincide

  2. Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki ... DOESC-ARMTR-148 Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product Version 1.0 RK Newsom C Sivaraman ...

  3. Effects of minimum monitor unit threshold on spot scanning proton plan quality

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Michelle Beltran, Chris; Mayo, Charles S.; Herman, Michael G.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the minimum monitor unit (MU) on the quality of clinical treatment plans for scanned proton therapy. Methods: Delivery system characteristics limit the minimum number of protons that can be delivered per spot, resulting in a min-MU limit. Plan quality can be impacted by the min-MU limit. Two sites were used to investigate the impact of min-MU on treatment plans: pediatric brain tumor at a depth of 5–10 cm; a head and neck tumor at a depth of 1–20 cm. Three-field, intensity modulated spot scanning proton plans were created for each site with the following parameter variations: min-MU limit range of 0.0000–0.0060; and spot spacing range of 2–8 mm. Comparisons were based on target homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. For the pediatric brain, two versions of the treatment planning system were also compared to judge the effects of the min-MU limit based on when it is accounted for in the optimization process (Eclipse v.10 and v.13, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Results: The increase of the min-MU limit with a fixed spot spacing decreases plan quality both in homogeneous target coverage and in the avoidance of critical structures. Both head and neck and pediatric brain plans show a 20% increase in relative dose for the hot spot in the CTV and 10% increase in key critical structures when comparing min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0060 with a fixed spot spacing of 4 mm. The DVHs of CTVs show min-MU limits of 0.0000 and 0.0010 produce similar plan quality and quality decreases as the min-MU limit increases beyond 0.0020. As spot spacing approaches 8 mm, degradation in plan quality is observed when no min-MU limit is imposed. Conclusions: Given a fixed spot spacing of ≤4 mm, plan quality decreases as min-MU increased beyond 0.0020. The effect of min-MU needs to be taken into consideration while planning proton therapy treatments.

  4. Value of Information Evaluation using Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor-Guitton, W.

    2015-06-15

    Value of information (VOI) provides the ability to identify and prioritize useful information gathering for a geothermal prospect, either hydrothermal or for enhanced geothermal systems. Useful information provides a value greater than the cost of the information; wasteful information costs more than the expected value of the information. In this project we applied and refined VOI methodologies on selected geothermal prospects.

  5. core values | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    core values Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous improvement process At their recent off-site continuous improvement session, the NNSA Livermore Field Office (LFO) in California unveiled their new set of core values: Integrity - Trustworthy, Reliable, Ethical We are responsible stewards of federal resources Collaboration - Communicate, Support, Team-Focused

  6. Two color laser fields for studying the Cooper minimum with phase-matched high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ba Dinh, Khuong Vu Le, Hoang; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap

    2014-05-28

    We experimentally study the observation of the Cooper minimum in a semi-infinite argon-filled gas cell using two-color laser fields at wavelengths of 1400 nm and 800 nm. The experimental results show that the additional 800 nm field can change the macroscopic phase-matching condition through change of the atomic dipole phase associated with the electron in the continuum state and that this approach can be used to control the appearance of the Cooper minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum in order to study the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

  7. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  8. SphinX MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2009 SOLAR MINIMUM X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Bakala, J.; Gryciuk, M.; Podgorski, P.; Sylwester, B.; Kuzin, S.; Farnik, F.; Reale, F.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    2012-06-01

    The SphinX X-ray spectrophotometer on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft measured soft X-ray emission in the 1-15 keV energy range during the deep solar minimum of 2009 with a sensitivity much greater than GOES. Several intervals are identified when the X-ray flux was exceptionally low, and the flux and solar X-ray luminosity are estimated. Spectral fits to the emission at these times give temperatures of 1.7-1.9 MK and emission measures between 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 47} cm{sup -3} and 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 48} cm{sup -3}. Comparing SphinX emission with that from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, we deduce that most of the emission is from general coronal structures rather than confined features like bright points. For one of 27 intervals of exceptionally low activity identified in the SphinX data, the Sun's X-ray luminosity in an energy range roughly extrapolated to that of ROSAT (0.1-2.4 keV) was less than most nearby K and M dwarfs.

  9. Designing a minimum-functionality neutron and gamma measurement instrument with a focus on authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Karpius, Peter J; Williams, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    During the design and construction of the Next-Generation Attribute-Measurement System, which included a largely commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), nondestructive assay (NDA) system, we realized that commercial NDA equipment tends to include numerous features that are not required for an attribute-measurement system. Authentication of the hardware, firmware, and software in these instruments is still required, even for those features not used in this application. However, such a process adds to the complexity, cost, and time required for authentication. To avoid these added authenticat ion difficulties, we began to design NDA systems capable of performing neutron multiplicity and gamma-ray spectrometry measurements by using simplified hardware and software that avoids unused features and complexity. This paper discusses one possible approach to this design: A hardware-centric system that attempts to perform signal analysis as much as possible in the hardware. Simpler processors and minimal firmware are used because computational requirements are kept to a bare minimum. By hard-coding the majority of the device's operational parameters, we could cull large sections of flexible, configurable hardware and software found in COTS instruments, thus yielding a functional core that is more straightforward to authenticate.

  10. Use of finite volume radiation for predicting the Knudsen minimum in 2D channel flow

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, Chetan P.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2014-12-09

    In an earlier paper we employed an analogy between surface-to-surface radiation and free-molecular flow to model Knudsen flow through tubes and onto planes. In the current paper we extend the analogy between thermal radiation and molecular flow to model the flow of a gas in a 2D channel across all regimes of rarefaction. To accomplish this, we break down the problem of gaseous flow into three sub-problems (self-diffusion, mass-motion and generation of pressure gradient) and use the finite volume method for modeling radiation through participating media to model the transport in each sub-problem as a radiation problem. We first model molecular self-diffusion in the stationary gas by modeling the transport of the molecular number density through the gas starting from the analytical asymptote for free-molecular flow to the kinetic theory limit of gaseous self-diffusion. We then model the transport of momentum through the gas at unit pressure gradient to predict Poiseuille flow and slip flow in the 2D gas. Lastly, we predict the generation of pressure gradient within the gas due to molecular collisions by modeling the transport of the forces generated due to collisions per unit volume of gas. We then proceed to combine the three radiation problems to predict flow of the gas over the entire Knudsen number regime from free-molecular to transition to continuum flow and successfully capture the Knudsen minimum at Kn ? 1.

  11. VSD and minimum pump speed: How to calculate it and why

    SciTech Connect

    Vaillencourt, R.R.

    1995-06-01

    The potential of the Affinity Laws for energy savings is almost unbelievable. In the simplest situations, the savings are absolutely true. The true test is to be able to recognize when things are not simple and the evaluation needs to be modified. Remember: the evaluation needs to be modified. The laws are the laws. Rest assured, the modifications all follow the Affinity Laws and the calculations are simple. But the savings potential will be less, and in some cases too small to consider when certain easily recognized situations exist. The reduction in expected savings comes from the misapplication of the affinity laws, or more correctly, the application of the wrong affinity law, when evaluating the real world of pumps in action. If the application is to reduce flow in a closed loop circulation system without any devices that require a significant inlet pressure at all times to perform properly, then using the affinity laws, in their simplest form, i.e., the flow vs. rpm relationship, is the correct way to go. If, however, there is a minimum pressure required on the system at all times for the end use devices to work properly, or a static head that must be overcome, then the evaluation must first focus on the second Affinity Law.

  12. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Girard, S. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Meng, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jin, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Zhou, J. S. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Shi, L [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-01-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  13. Searching for Minimum in Dependence of Squared Speed-of-Sound on Collision Energy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Fu-Hu; Gao, Li-Na; Lacey, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimore » mental results of the rapidity distributions of negatively charged pions produced in proton-proton ( p - p ) and beryllium-beryllium (Be-Be) collisions at different beam momentums, measured by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the super proton synchrotron (SPS), are described by a revised (three-source) Landau hydrodynamic model. The squared speed-of-sound parameter c s 2 is then extracted from the width of rapidity distribution. There is a local minimum (knee point) which indicates a softest point in the equation of state (EoS) appearing at about 40 A  GeV/ c (or 8.8 GeV) in c s 2 excitation function (the dependence of c s 2 on incident beam momentum (or center-of-mass energy)). This knee point should be related to the searching for the onset of quark deconfinement and the critical point of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase transition.« less

  14. Metaproteomics reveals differential modes of metabolic coupling among ubiquitous oxygen minimum zone microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Alyse K.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J.

    2014-08-05

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are intrinsic water column features arising from respiratory oxygen demand during organic matter degradation in stratified marine waters. Currently OMZs are expanding due to global climate change. This expansion alters marine ecosystem function and the productivity of fisheries due to habitat compression and changes in biogeochemical cycling leading to fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Here we use metaproteomics to chart spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression along defined redox gradients in a seasonally anoxic fjord, Saanich Inlet to better understand microbial community responses to OMZ expansion. The expression of metabolic pathway components for nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), denitrification and inorganic carbon fixation predominantly co-varied with abundance and distribution patterns of Thaumarchaeota, Nitrospira, Planctomycetes and SUP05/ARCTIC96BD-19 Gammaproteobacteria. Within these groups, pathways mediating inorganic carbon fixation and nitrogen and sulfur transformations were differentially expressed across the redoxcline. Nitrification and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with Thaumarchaeota dominated dysoxic waters and denitrification, sulfur-oxidation and inorganic carbon fixation pathways affiliated with SUP05 dominated suboxic and anoxic waters. Nitrite-oxidation and anammox pathways affiliated with Nitrospina and Planctomycetes respectively, also exhibited redox partitioning between dysoxic and suboxic waters. The differential expression of these pathways under changing water column redox conditions has quantitative implications for coupled biogeochemical cycling linking different modes of inorganic carbon fixation with distributed nitrogen and sulfur-based energy metabolism extensible to coastal and open ocean OMZs.

  15. A reassessment of surface friction model for maximum cold fusion reactions in superheavy mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, A.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Nasirov, A.; Aritomo, Y.

    2007-02-26

    We have made a study on the capture process of 40,48Ca+ 208Pb systems with a dynamical approach based on the surface friction model. The deformation of the nuclei due to the mutual excitation is taken into account. We have calculated the capture cross sections for several values of the friction coefficients. It was shown that, in the cold fusion reactions, the friction parameters of the surface friction model needs to be reexamined.

  16. Evaluation of methods to predict safe welding conditions and maximum HAZ hardness in steel welding

    SciTech Connect

    Tronskar, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    During the last ten years new structural steels of improved weldability have been introduced. In particular, structural steels for the fabrication of offshore structures have been greatly improved in this respect throughout this period. These steels have lean chemical compositions which are generally outside the range for which the existing HAZ hardness criteria and the International Institute of Welding carbon equivalent (CEIIW) formula were originally developed. This paper presents the results from investigations of the weldability of three normalized (R{sub e} min 350 MPa) and three quenched and tempered (R{sub e} min 500 MPa) offshore structural steels. Weldability testing was conducted to study the relative performance of the different steels and to obtain a comparison between the capability of the different methods to predict safe welding conditions to avoid cold cracking in steel welding. It has become a widespread practice in welding high-strength steels to incorporate maximum HAZ hardness restrictions in fabrication specifications, particularly so in the offshore industry. This paper presents some of the more successful approaches proposed to date and compares their performance.

  17. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  18. Maximum Reasonable Radioxenon Releases from Medical Isotope Production Facilities and Their Effect on Monitoring Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, Ted W.; Kephart, Rosara F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Miley, Harry S.; Saey, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Fission gases such as 133Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of 99Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Saey, et al., 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5×109 Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

  19. 2011-07 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy 7 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" 2011-07 "Maximum Utilization of WIPP by Increasing MDA G TRU Shipments" The intent of this recommendation is to ensure optimization of WIPP shipment schedules while helping to keep commitments to Consent Order milestones at MDA-G. Rec 2011-07 - July 27, 2011 (78.0

  20. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  1. Glassy slags for minimum additive waste stabilization. Interim progress report, May 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Gong, M.; Emery, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) for supporting DOE`s environmental restoration efforts. The glassy slag waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. The MAWS approach was adopted by blending multiple waste streams to achieve up to 100% waste loadings. The crystalline phases, such as spinels, are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. These crystalline phases may account for up to 80% of the total volume of slags having over 80% metal loading. The structural bond strength model was used to quantify the correlation between glassy slag composition and chemical durability so that optimized slag compositions were obtained with limited crucible melting and testing. Slag compositions developed through crucible melts were also successfully generated in a pilot-scale Retech plasma centrifugal furnace at Ukiah, California. Utilization of glassy slag waste forms allows the MAWS approach to be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than glass waste forms. The initial work at ANL has indicated that glassy slags are good final waste forms because of (1) their high chemical durability; (2) their ability to incorporate large amounts of metal oxides; (3) their ability to incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components; (4) their less stringent requirements on processing parameters, compared to glass waste forms; and (5) their low requirements for purchased additives, which means greater waste volume reduction and treatment cost savings.

  2. Solar Energy and Capacity Value (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    This is a one-page, two-sided fact sheet on the capacity of solar power to provide value to utilities and power system operators.

  3. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2011-06-01

    This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

  4. Photovoltaics Value Analysis | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Value Analysis Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Environmental Website: www.nrel.govanalysispdfs42303.pdf Equivalent URI:...

  5. PV Value® | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PV Value® PV Value® PV Value® is a free solar PV Valuation tool that answers the question of "How much is solar PV worth" and is compliant with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice. It is available for and being used by real estate appraisers, realtors, homeowners, commercial building owners, home builders, solar installers, green raters, insurance companies, and mortgage lenders in all 50 states along with D.C. and Puerto Rico. PV Value® allows for the

  6. Analytic Challenges to Valuing Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ookie; O'Malley, Mark; Cheung, Kerry; Larochelle, Philippe; Scheer, Rich

    2011-10-25

    Electric grid energy storage value. System-level asset focus for mechanical and electrochemical energy storage. Analysis questions for power system planning, operations, and customer-side solutions.

  7. Shared Value in Utility and Efficiency Partnerships

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions Conference: Shared Value in Utility and Efficiency Partnerships, July 10, 2012. Presents four case studies highlighting partnerships between local utilities and energy efficiency programs.

  8. ZERH Architect Training: Understanding the Value, Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Architect Training: Understanding the Value, Technology and Benefits of the Zero Energy ... Consumer demand for market options that offer improved comfort, health, safety, resale ...

  9. Earned Value Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    development. DOE EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix - (MS Word) Formulas and Terminology "Gold Card" - September 2011 Road Show Presentation: Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using ...

  10. Analytic Challenges to Valuing Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    analytical task. Market Conditions - Markets are continually evolving, and the long-term value of energy storage is difficult to capture. Niche markets have emerged, but...

  11. Austin Energy- Value of Solar Residential Rate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: In August 2014, the City Council of Austin, Texas, enacted Resolution No. 20140828, which directed program changes to the Value of Solar Tariff as follows:

  12. Setting the Renormalization Scale in QCD: The Principle of Maximum Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Di Giustino, Leonardo; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale {mu} of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}): The purpose of the running coupling in any gauge theory is to sum all terms involving the {beta} function; in fact, when the renormalization scale is set properly, all non-conformal {beta} {ne} 0 terms in a perturbative expansion arising from renormalization are summed into the running coupling. The remaining terms in the perturbative series are then identical to that of a conformal theory; i.e., the corresponding theory with {beta} = 0. The resulting scale-fixed predictions using the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme - a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC is also the theoretical principle underlying the BLM procedure, commensurate scale relations between observables, and the scale-setting method used in lattice gauge theory. The number of active flavors nf in the QCD {beta} function is also correctly determined. We discuss several methods for determining the PMC/BLM scale for QCD processes. We show that a single global PMC scale, valid at leading order, can be derived from basic properties of the perturbative QCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increase the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of collider experiments to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Maximum likelihood Bayesian model averaging and its predictive analysis for groundwater reactive transport models

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming; Curtis, Gary P.

    2015-08-01

    While Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has been widely used in groundwater modeling, it is infrequently applied to groundwater reactive transport modeling because of multiple sources of uncertainty in the coupled hydrogeochemical processes and because of the long execution time of each model run. To resolve these problems, this study analyzed different levels of uncertainty in a hierarchical way, and used the maximum likelihood version of BMA, i.e., MLBMA, to improve the computational efficiency. Our study demonstrates the applicability of MLBMA to groundwater reactive transport modeling in a synthetic case in which twenty-seven reactive transport models were designed to predict themore » reactive transport of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) based on observations at a former uranium mill site near Naturita, CO. Moreover, these reactive transport models contain three uncertain model components, i.e., parameterization of hydraulic conductivity, configuration of model boundary, and surface complexation reactions that simulate U(VI) adsorption. These uncertain model components were aggregated into the alternative models by integrating a hierarchical structure into MLBMA. The modeling results of the individual models and MLBMA were analyzed to investigate their predictive performance. The predictive logscore results show that MLBMA generally outperforms the best model, suggesting that using MLBMA is a sound strategy to achieve more robust model predictions relative to a single model. MLBMA works best when the alternative models are structurally distinct and have diverse model predictions. When correlation in model structure exists, two strategies were used to improve predictive performance by retaining structurally distinct models or assigning smaller prior model probabilities to correlated models. Since the synthetic models were designed using data from the Naturita site, the results of this study are expected to provide guidance for real-world modeling. Finally

  14. Maximum likelihood Bayesian model averaging and its predictive analysis for groundwater reactive transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming; Curtis, Gary P.

    2015-08-01

    While Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has been widely used in groundwater modeling, it is infrequently applied to groundwater reactive transport modeling because of multiple sources of uncertainty in the coupled hydrogeochemical processes and because of the long execution time of each model run. To resolve these problems, this study analyzed different levels of uncertainty in a hierarchical way, and used the maximum likelihood version of BMA, i.e., MLBMA, to improve the computational efficiency. Our study demonstrates the applicability of MLBMA to groundwater reactive transport modeling in a synthetic case in which twenty-seven reactive transport models were designed to predict the reactive transport of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) based on observations at a former uranium mill site near Naturita, CO. Moreover, these reactive transport models contain three uncertain model components, i.e., parameterization of hydraulic conductivity, configuration of model boundary, and surface complexation reactions that simulate U(VI) adsorption. These uncertain model components were aggregated into the alternative models by integrating a hierarchical structure into MLBMA. The modeling results of the individual models and MLBMA were analyzed to investigate their predictive performance. The predictive logscore results show that MLBMA generally outperforms the best model, suggesting that using MLBMA is a sound strategy to achieve more robust model predictions relative to a single model. MLBMA works best when the alternative models are structurally distinct and have diverse model predictions. When correlation in model structure exists, two strategies were used to improve predictive performance by retaining structurally distinct models or assigning smaller prior model probabilities to correlated models. Since the synthetic models were designed using data from the Naturita site, the results of this study are expected to provide guidance for real-world modeling. Finally, limitations of

  15. COST OF ADDRESSING TARGETS OF UNEQUAL VALUE

    SciTech Connect

    G.H. CANAVAN

    2001-08-01

    The formalism for evaluating first strike costs and incentives for military targeting generalize to include higher value targets. That introduces two new allocations to the usual allocation between missiles and military targets, but they can be performed analytically. As the number of weapons on each side decreases, the optimal fraction of second strike weapons allocated to military values falls. The shift to high value targets is more pronounced below about 1,000 weapons for nominal parameters. Below 500 weapons the first striker's cost of action drops below its cost of inaction. A strike would induce a second strike of about 250 weapons on high value targets. An increase in the first striker's preference for damage to the other's high value targets increases or a decrease in its preference for preventing damage to its own high value targets decreases first strike costs and stability margins. Including defenses complicates allocations slightly. The main effect is increased attrition of second strikes, particularly at larger defenses, which makes it possible to significantly reduce damage to high value targets. At 1,000 weapons, by 300 to 400 interceptors the first striker's costs are reduced to 30% below that of inaction and the number of weapons delivered on the first striker's high value targets is reduced to about 100.

  16. Applying vitrification to meet customers` values

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B. [Scientific Ecology Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Cost-effective waste management solutions that maximize customer value require a thorough and flexible evaluation and integration of approaches, technology applications, and disposal options. This is particulary true in the application of vitrification to low-level radioactive and mixed waste stabilization. Case-specific evaluations are the required to determine the highest value, most cost-effective approaches.

  17. EERE Takes Important Steps to Ensure Maximum Impact of Technology Program Investments

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is at the center of creating the clean energy economy today, developing and delivering market-driven solutions for energy-saving homes, buildings, and manufacturing; sustainable transportation; and renewable electricity generation. Such a large and critical goal requires EERE to leverage a number of management techniques and tools to ensure taxpayer-funded investments are directed to achieve the intended high value impact. One such tool is to perform “retrospective impact analysis,” effectively looking backwards over time and assessing how EERE has accelerated development and commercialization of technologies and produced a return on public investment that contributes to the nation’s economic growth.

  18. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Song, Junhua; Chan, Siu-Wai; Walker, David; Clark, Simon M.; Kalkan, Bora

    2015-04-20

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size.

  19. Revisions included in HUD Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2, 1977 edition: solar heating and domestic hot-water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This addendum to a 1977 HUD publication contains revisions and additions to the existing intermediate minimum property standards supplment for solar heating and cooling systems. Building design revisions cover fire protection, penetrations, and roof coverings. Changes to guidelines for materials, such as those for thermal and ultraviolet stability and moisture resistance, are detailed. Flash points of toxic and combustive fluids, chemical and physical compatibility, and flame spread and resistance of insulation materials are also explained. Construction standards were revised for hail loads; waterproofing insulated exterior storage containers, pipes, and ducts; and for passive systems. Standards also were revised for power-operated protection, dust and dirt prevention, and chimney and vent heights. Radiation temperature, draft control, and thermal energy storage and loss standards were deleted. Other standards for insulation values for thermal devices, lighting protection, and sealing and testing air distribution systems were added. Appended materials contain revisions to calculation procedures for determining the thermal performance of active, solar space heating, and domestic hot water systems. A revised materials list for properties of typical cover materials, absorptive coatings, thermal storage unit containers, and heat-transfer liquids is provided. Revisions to acceptable engineering practice standards are also included.

  20. Relaxation and critical strain for maximum In incorporation in AlInGaN on GaN grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Reuters, Benjamin; Finken, M.; Wille, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Hollaender, B.; Heuken, M.

    2012-11-01

    Quaternary AlInGaN layers were grown on conventional GaN buffer layers on sapphire by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy at different surface temperatures and different reactor pressures with constant precursor flow conditions. A wide range in compositions within 30-62% Al, 5-29% In, and 23-53% Ga was covered, which leads to different strain states from high tensile to high compressive. From high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we determined the compositions, strain states, and crystal quality of the AlInGaN layers. Atomic force microscopy measurements were performed to characterize the surface morphology. A critical strain value for maximum In incorporation near the AlInGaN/GaN interface is presented. For compressively strained layers, In incorporation is limited at the interface as residual strain cannot exceed an empirical critical value of about 1.1%. Relaxation occurs at about 15 nm thickness accompanied by strong In pulling. Tensile strained layers can be grown pseudomorphically up to 70 nm at a strain state of 0.96%. A model for relaxation in compressively strained AlInGaN with virtual discrete sub-layers, which illustrates the gradually changing lattice constant during stress reduction is presented.

  1. Application of the Principle of Maximum Conformality to Top-Pair Production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Wu, Xing-Gang; /SLAC /Chongqing U.

    2013-05-13

    A major contribution to the uncertainty of finite-order perturbative QCD predictions is the perceived ambiguity in setting the renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}. For example, by using the conventional way of setting {mu}{sub r} {element_of} [m{sub t}/2, 2m{sub t}], one obtains the total t{bar t} production cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} with the uncertainty {Delta}{sigma}{sub t{bar t}}/{sigma}{sub t{bar t}} {approx} (+3%/-4%) at the Tevatron and LHC even for the present NNLO level. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the renormalization scale ambiguity in precision tests of Abelian QED and non-Abelian QCD theories. By using the PMC, all nonconformal {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling constant, and the resulting scale-fixed predictions are independent of the renormalization scheme. The correct scale-displacement between the arguments of different renormalization schemes is automatically set, and the number of active flavors n{sub f} in the {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-function is correctly determined. The PMC is consistent with the renormalization group property that a physical result is independent of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}{sup init}. The PMC scale {mu}{sub r}{sup PMC} is unambiguous at finite order. Any residual dependence on {mu}{sub r}{sup init} for a finite-order calculation will be highly suppressed since the unknown higher-order {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms will be absorbed into the PMC scales higher-order perturbative terms. We find that such renormalization group invariance can be satisfied to high accuracy for {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the NNLO level. In this paper we apply PMC scale-setting to predict the t{bar t} cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. It is found that {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} remains almost unchanged by varying {mu}{sub r}{sup init

  2. An estimate for the sum of a Dirichlet series in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a vertical line segment

    SciTech Connect

    Gaisin, Ahtyar M; Rakhmatullina, Zhanna G

    2011-12-31

    The behaviour of the sum of an entire Dirichlet series is analyzed in terms of the minimum of its modulus on a system of vertical line segments. Also a more general problem, connected with the Polya conjecture is posed and solved. It concerns the minimum modulus of an entire function with Fabri gaps and its growth along curves going to infinity. Bibliography: 33 titles.

  3. Geothermal heating retrofit at the Utah State Prison Minimum Security Facility. Final report, March 1979-January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report is a summary of progress and results of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project. Initiated in 1978 by the Utah State Energy Office and developed with assistance from DOE's Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies PON program, final construction was completed in 1984. The completed system provides space and water heating for the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. It consists of an artesian flowing geothermal well, plate heat exchangers, and underground distribution pipeline that connects to the existing hydronic heating system in the State Prison's Minimum Security Facility. Geothermal water disposal consists of a gravity drain line carrying spent geothermal water to a cooling pond which discharges into the Jordan River, approximately one mile from the well site. The system has been in operation for two years with mixed results. Continuing operation and maintenance problems have reduced the expected seasonal operation from 9 months per year to 3 months. Problems with the Minimum Security heating system have reduced the expected energy contribution by approximately 60%. To date the system has saved the prison approximately $18,060. The total expenditure including resource assessment and development, design, construction, performance verification, and reporting is approximately $827,558.

  4. Chapter 48 - Value Engineering | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    48ValueEngineering0.pdf More Documents & Publications Audit Report: OAS-L-07-08 Emerging Lighting Technology Microsoft PowerPoint - 12 Holman White PM Conference 2010 Rev 2...

  5. ARM - Value-Added Product Status Reports

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Status Reports Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents & Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Value-Added Product Status Reports ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report July 1-September 30, 2015 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility

  6. Value of Flexibility in the Markets

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Value of Flexibility in the Markets * Basic overview of the SPP and MISO markets * Potential benefit to some SPA customers of using markets to schedule energy * Increasing need for ancillary services, and the value of ancillary services in the markets 3 From presentation by ERCOT: Operational Challenges due to High Wind * Higher frequency deviations due to large system excursions * Inadequate transmission for projected wind growth * Constraint management under high and low wind * Difficulty in

  7. Potential value of Cs-137 capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Hazelton, R.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lezberg, A.J.; Tingey, G.L.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    We determined the value of Cs-137 compared to Co-60 as a source for the irradiation of fruit (apples and cherries), pork and medical supplies. Cs-137, in the WESF capsule form, had a value of approximately $0.40/Ci as a substitute for Co-60 priced at approximately $1.00/Ci. The comparison was based on the available curies emitted from the surface of each capsule. We developed preliminary designs for fourteen irradiation facilities; seven were based on Co-60 and seven were based on Cs-137. These designs provided the basis for estimating capital and operating costs which, in turn, provided the basis for determining the value of Cs-137 relative to Co-60 in these applications. We evaluated the effect of the size of the irradiation facility on the value of Cs-137. The cost of irradiation is low compared to the value of the product. Irradiation of apples for disinfestation costs $.01 to .02 per pound. Irradiation for trichina-safe pork costs $.02 per pound. Irradiation of medical supplies for sterilization costs $.07 to .12 per pound. The cost of the irradiation source, either Co-60 or Cs-137, contributed only a minor amount to the total cost of irradiation, about 5% for the fruit and hog cases and about 20% for the medical supply cases. We analyzed the sensitivity of the irradiation costs and Cs-137 value to several key assumptions.

  8. Safe disposal of metal values in slag

    SciTech Connect

    Halpin, P.T.; Zarur, G.L.

    1982-10-26

    The method of safely disposing of sludge containing metal values capable of displaying toxic ecological properties includes the steps of deriving from an organic or inorganic sludge an intermediate product such as a dewatered sludge or an incinerated ash, and adding this intermediate product to a metal smelting step of a type producing a slag such that most of the metal values become encapsulated in the slag. Some precious metal values may be recovered with the metal being smelted, and may be subsequently separated therefrom by appropriate metal winning steps. The sludge product brings to the smelting process certain additives needed therein such as silica and phosphates for the slag, alumina and magnesium to lower the viscosity of the molten slag, and organic matter serving as reducing agents.

  9. Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.

    2010-05-04

    A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

  10. Value of solar thermal industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1986-03-01

    This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

  11. Determine and Communicate the Value of Replication | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Communicate the Value of Replication Determine and Communicate the Value of Replication This presentation shares how to determine and later communicate the value of ...

  12. Value Creation Through Integrated Networks and Convergence

    SciTech Connect

    De Martini, Paul; Taft, Jeffrey D.

    2015-04-01

    Customer adoption of distributed energy resources and public policies are driving changes in the uses of the distribution system. A system originally designed and built for one-way energy flows from central generating facilities to end-use customers is now experiencing injections of energy from customers anywhere on the grid and frequent reversals in the direction of energy flow. In response, regulators and utilities are re-thinking the design and operations of the grid to create more open and transactive electric networks. This evolution has the opportunity to unlock significant value for customers and utilities. Alternatively, failure to seize this potential may instead lead to an erosion of value if customers seek to defect and disconnect from the system. This paper will discuss how current grid modernization investments may be leveraged to create open networks that increase value through the interaction of intelligent devices on the grid and prosumerization of customers. Moreover, even greater value can be realized through the synergistic effects of convergence of multiple networks. This paper will highlight examples of the emerging nexus of non-electric networks with electricity.

  13. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  14. Matrix-valued polynomials in Lanczos type methods

    SciTech Connect

    Simoncini, V.; Gallopoulos, E.

    1994-12-31

    It is well known that convergence properties of iterative methods can be derived by studying the behavior of the residual polynomial over a suitable domain of the complex plane. Block Krylov subspace methods for the solution of linear systems A[x{sub 1},{hor_ellipsis}, x{sub s}] = [b{sub 1},{hor_ellipsis}, b{sub s}] lead to the generation of residual polynomials {phi}{sub m} {element_of} {bar P}{sub m,s} where {bar P}{sub m,s} is the subset of matrix-valued polynomials of maximum degree m and size s such that {phi}{sub m}(0) = I{sub s}, R{sub m} := B - AX{sub m} = {phi}{sub m}(A) {circ} R{sub 0}, where {phi}{sub m}(A) {circ} R{sub 0} := R{sub 0} - A{summation}{sub j=0}{sup m-1} A{sup j}R{sub 0}{xi}{sub j}, {xi}{sub j} {element_of} R{sup sxs}. An effective method has to balance adequate approximation with economical computation of iterates defined by the polynomial. Matrix valued polynomials can be used to improve the performance of block methods. Another approach is to solve for a single right-hand side at a time and use the generated information in order to update the approximations of the remaining systems. In light of this, a more general scheme is as follows: A subset of residuals (seeds) is selected and a block short term recurrence method is used to compute approximate solutions for the corresponding systems. At the same time the generated matrix valued polynomial is implicitly applied to the remaining residuals. Subsequently a new set of seeds is selected and the process is continued as above, till convergence of all right-hand sides. The use of a quasi-minimization technique ensures a smooth convergence behavior for all systems. In this talk the authors discuss the implementation of this class of algorithms and formulate strategies for the selection of parameters involved in the computation. Experiments and comparisons with other methods will be presented.

  15. The Business Value of Superior Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Evans, Tracy; Glatt, Sandy; Meffert, William

    2015-08-04

    Industrial facilities participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s (US DOE) Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program are finding that it provides them with significant business value. This value starts with the implementation of ISO 50001-Energy management system standard, which provides an internationally-relevant framework for integration of energy management into an organization’s business processes. The resulting structure emphasizes effective use of available data and supports continual improvement of energy performance. International relevance is particularly important for companies with a global presence or trading interests, providing them with access to supporting ISO standards and a growing body of certified companies representing the collective knowledge of communities of practice. This paper examines the business value of SEP, a voluntary program that builds on ISO 50001, inviting industry to demonstrate an even greater commitment through third-party verification of energy performance improvement to a specified level of achievement. Information from 28 facilities that have already achieved SEP certification will illustrate key findings concerning both the value and the challenges from SEP/ISO 50001 implementation. These include the facilities’ experience with implementation, internal and external value of third-party verification of energy performance improvement; attractive payback periods and the importance of SEP tools and guidance. US DOE is working to bring the program to scale, including the Enterprise-Wide Accelerator (SEP for multiple facilities in a company), the Ratepayer-Funded Program Accelerator (supporting tools for utilities and program administrators to include SEP in their program offerings), and expansion of the program to other sectors and industry supply chains.

  16. Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, John H.; Kemeny, John; King, Fraser; Ross, Alan M.; Ross, Benjamen

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

  17. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

    2010-02-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  18. Short gamma-ray burst formation rate from BATSE data using E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation and the minimum gravitational-wave event rate of a coalescing compact binary

    SciTech Connect

    Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Toyanago, Asuka [College of Science and Engineering, School of Mathematics and Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-1192 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Takahashi, Keitaro, E-mail: yonetoku@astro.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takashi@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Using 72 short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) with well determined spectral data observed by BATSE, we determine their redshift and luminosity by applying the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs found by Tsutsui et al. For 53 SGRBs with an observed flux brighter than 4 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup 1}, the cumulative redshift distribution up to z = 1 agrees well with that of 22 Swift SGRBs. This suggests that the redshift determination by the E{sub p} -L{sub p} correlation for SGRBs works well. The minimum event rate at z = 0 is estimated as R{sub on?axis}{sup min}=6.3{sub ?3.9}{sup +3.1} 10{sup ?10} events Mpc{sup ?3} yr{sup ?1}, so that the minimum beaming angle is 0.6-7.8 assuming a merging rate of 10{sup 7}- 4 10{sup 6} events Mpc{sup 3} yr{sup 1} suggested from the binary pulsar data. Interestingly, this angle is consistent with that for SGRB 130603B of ?4-8. On the other hand, if we assume a beaming angle of ?6 suggested from four SGRBs with the observed beaming angle value, then the minimum event rate including off-axis SGRBs is estimated as R{sub all}{sup min}=1.15{sub ?0.66}{sup +0.56} 10{sup ?7} events Mpc{sup ?3} yr{sup ?1}. If SGRBs are induced by the coalescence of binary neutron stars (NSs) and/or black holes (BHs), then this event rate leads to a minimum gravitational-wave detection rate of 3.8{sub ?2.2}{sup +1.8} (146{sub ?83}{sup +71}) events yr{sup ?1} for an NS-NS (NS-BH) binary, respectively, by a worldwide network with KAGRA, advanced-LIGO, advanced-VIRGO, and GEO.

  19. Test report on the Abacus 30 kW bimode{reg_sign} inverter and maximum power tracker (MPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonn, R.; Ginn, J.; Zirzow, J.

    1995-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories conducts the photovoltaic balance of systems (BOS) program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. Under this program, SNL lets commercialization contracts and conducts a laboratory program designed to advance BOS technology, improve BOS component reliability, and reduce the BOS life-cycle-cost. This report details the testing of the first large US manufactured hybrid inverter and its associated maximum power tracker.

  20. HUD (Housing and Urban Development) Intermediate Minimum Property Standards Supplement 4930. 2 (1989 edition). Solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1 were developed to provide a sound technical basis for housing under numerous programs of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These Intermediate Minimum Property Standards for Solar Heating and Domestic Hot Water Systems are intended to provide a companion technical basis for the planning and design of solar heating and domestic hot water systems. These standards have been prepared as a supplement to the Minimum Property Standards (MPS) and deal only with aspects of planning and design that are different from conventional housing by reason of the solar systems under consideration. The document contains requirements and standards applicable to one- and two-family dwellings, multifamily housing, and nursing homes and intermediate care facilities references made in the text to the MPS refer to the same section in the Minimum Property Standards for Housing 4910.1.

  1. Value Streams in Microgrids: A literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Gonçalo; Mashayekh, Salman; Forget, Thibault; DeForest, Nicholas; Agarwal, Ankit; Schönbein, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Microgrids are an increasingly common component of the evolving electricity grids with the potential to improve local reliability, reduce costs, and increase penetration rates for distributed renewable generation. The additional complexity of microgrids often leads to increased investment costs, creating a barrier for widespread adoption. These costs may result directly from specific needs for islanding detection, protection systems and power quality assurance that would otherwise be avoided in simpler system configurations. However, microgrids also facilitate additional value streams that may make up for their increased costs and improve the economic viability of microgrid deployment. This paper analyses the literature currently available on research relevant to value streams occurring in microgrids that may contribute to offset the increased investment costs. A review on research related to specific microgrid requirements is also presented.

  2. ARM - Value-Added Product (VAP) Reports

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (VAP) Reports Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents & Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Value-Added Product (VAP) Reports For proper viewing, technical reports should be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Download the latest version from the Adobe Reader

  3. ARM - Value-Added Products - Status

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    - Status Report Expand Orange | Expand Blue | Expand Green | Collapse All See Legend for Data Availability explanation. ARM - Value-Added Products - Status Last Update: March 21 2016 19:00:50 +/- Vap Name Translator Developer Frequency Tier Producer Data Availability ACRED (ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data) Shaocheng Xie Chuanfeng Zhao, Renata Mc Coy Periodically Evaluation Developer ARM Overview: Developer Description: The ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Dataset (ACRED) is a multi-year cloud

  4. Merged Sounding Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Troyan, D

    2010-03-03

    The Merged Sounding value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), surface meteorological instruments, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output with a sophisticated scaling/interpolation/smoothing scheme in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of 266 altitude levels.

  5. Survey to determine the value of DYNA

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, J.W.; Bellshaw, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the value of the DYNA software program to US Industry. The software conducts dynamic finite element analysis tailored specifically to simulating high energy impacts, such as car crashes or aircraft collisions with birds. DYNA is available at nearly zero cost to the public in two-dimensional (DYNA2D) and three-dimensional versions (DYNA3D). DYNA has had a major impact on US industry. Measuring this impact using conventional approaches, such as profitability or revenue size, does not apply to DYNA. A new approach is needed that will capture DYNA's value to US industry. Our challenge was two fold: (1) to develop a methodology for valuing technology transferred to the public domain; and (2) to apply this methodology to DYNA. We accomplished the evaluation task by using indirect measurements of value. These indicators encompassed three broad categories, answering three key questions: (1) Use of DYNA and DYNA-like'' codes: Are companies, academic institutions, government agencies actually using DYNA and codes like it (2) Savings generated from using these codes: Is the use of DYNA and codes like it creating a positive economic impact (3) Market size of afl DYNA-like'' codes: Has a commercial market developed for DYNA-like'' codes This study represents the results of interviews with people identified by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as users of DYNA. Some of the people surveyed for this study do not use DYNA. They rely upon other dynamic finite element analysis codes. We refer to these individuals as users of DYNA-like'' codes or codes like DYNA.'' Several of the DYNA-like'' codes used DYNA as their core. These codes are descendants of DYNA.

  6. Survey to determine the value of DYNA

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, J.W.; Bellshaw, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the value of the DYNA software program to US Industry. The software conducts dynamic finite element analysis tailored specifically to simulating high energy impacts, such as car crashes or aircraft collisions with birds. DYNA is available at nearly zero cost to the public in two-dimensional (DYNA2D) and three-dimensional versions (DYNA3D). DYNA has had a major impact on US industry. Measuring this impact using conventional approaches, such as profitability or revenue size, does not apply to DYNA. A new approach is needed that will capture DYNA`s value to US industry. Our challenge was two fold: (1) to develop a methodology for valuing technology transferred to the public domain; and (2) to apply this methodology to DYNA. We accomplished the evaluation task by using indirect measurements of value. These indicators encompassed three broad categories, answering three key questions: (1) Use of DYNA and ``DYNA-like`` codes: Are companies, academic institutions, government agencies actually using DYNA and codes like it? (2) Savings generated from using these codes: Is the use of DYNA and codes like it creating a positive economic impact (3) Market size of afl ``DYNA-like`` codes: Has a commercial market developed for ``DYNA-like`` codes? This study represents the results of interviews with people identified by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as users of DYNA. Some of the people surveyed for this study do not use DYNA. They rely upon other dynamic finite element analysis codes. We refer to these individuals as users of ``DYNA-like`` codes or ``codes like DYNA.`` Several of the ``DYNA-like`` codes used DYNA as their core. These codes are descendants of DYNA.

  7. PROCESS OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM VALUES BY ELECTRODEPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Whal, A.C.

    1958-04-15

    A process is described of separating plutonium values from an aqueous solution by electrodeposition. The process consists of subjecting an aqueous 0.1 to 1.0 N nitric acid solution containing plutonium ions to electrolysis between inert metallic electrodes. A current density of one milliampere io one ampere per square centimeter of cathode surface and a temperature between 10 and 60 d C are maintained. Plutonium is electrodeposited on the cathode surface and recovered.

  8. ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Michael

    The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

  9. ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jensen, Michael

    2012-09-28

    The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

  10. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants Seyed Hossein Madaeni and Ramteen Sioshansi Ohio State University Paul Denholm National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51253 June 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract

  11. D0 results on three-jet production, multijet cross-section ratios, and minimum bias angular correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; /Louisiana Tech. U.

    2010-01-01

    We report the measurement of the cross-section for three-jet production and the ratio of inclusive three-jet to two-jet cross-sections, as well as a study of angular correlations in minimum bias events, based on data taken with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The differential inclusive three-jet cross section as a function of the invariant three-jetmass (M{sub 3jet}) is measured in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1}. The measurement is performed in three rapidity regions (|y| < 0.8, |y| < 1.6 and |y| < 2.4) and in three regions of the third (ordered in p{sub T}) jet transverse momenta (p{sub T3} > 40 GeV, p{sub T3} > 70 GeV, p{sub T3} > 100 GeV) for events with leading jet transverse momentum larger than 150 GeV and well separated jets. NLO QCD calculations are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the measured cross sections. Based on the same data set, we present the first measurement of ratios of multi-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The ratio of inclusive trijet and dijet cross sections, R{sub 3/2}, has been measured as a function of the transverse jet momenta. The data are compared to QCD model predictions in different approximations. Finally, we present a new way to describe minimum bias events based on angular distributions in {approx}5 million minimum bias p{bar p} collisions collected between April 2002 and February 2006 with the D0 detector. We demonstrate that the distribution of {Delta}{phi} in the detector transverse plane between the leading track and all other tracks is a robust observable that can be used for tuning of multiple color interaction models. Pseudorapidity correlations of the {Delta}{phi} distributions are also studied.

  12. Maximum mass of stable magnetized highly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs: stable solutions with varying magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2014-06-01

    We address the issue of stability of recently proposed significantly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs. We present stable solutions of magnetostatic equilibrium models for super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs pertaining to various magnetic field profiles. This has been obtained by self-consistently including the effects of the magnetic pressure gradient and total magnetic density in a general relativistic framework. We estimate that the maximum stable mass of magnetized white dwarfs could be more than 3 solar mass. This is very useful to explain peculiar, overluminous type Ia supernovae which do not conform to the traditional Chandrasekhar mass-limit.

  13. Interpolated Sounding Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Troyan, D

    2013-04-01

    The Interpolated Sounding (INTERPSONDE) value-added product (VAP) uses a combination of observations from radiosonde soundings, the microwave radiometer (MWR), and surface meteorological instruments in order to define profiles of the atmospheric thermodynamic state at one-minute temporal intervals and a total of at least 266 altitude levels. This VAP is part of the Merged Sounding (MERGESONDE) suite of VAPs. INTERPSONDE is the profile of the atmospheric thermodynamic state created using the algorithms of MERGESONDE without including the model data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). More specifically, INTERPSONDE VAP represents an intermediate step within the larger MERGESONDE process.

  14. Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. | Department of Energy Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of

  15. SOURCE OF BURNUP VALUES FOR COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    SciTech Connect

    BSC

    2004-12-01

    Waste packages are loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that satisfies the minimum burnup requirements of a criticality loading curve. The burnup value assigned by the originating nuclear utility to each SNF assembly (assigned burnup) is used to load waste packages in compliance with a criticality loading curve. The burnup provided by a nuclear utility has uncertainties, so conservative calculation methods are used to characterize those uncertainties for incorporation into the criticality loading curves. Procedural safety controls ensure that the correct assembly is loaded into each waste package to prevent a misload that could create a condition affecting the safety margins. Probabilistic analyses show that procedural safety controls can minimize the chance of a misload but can not completely eliminate the possibility. Physical measurements of burnup with instrumentation in the surface facility are not necessary due to the conservative calculation methods used to produce the criticality loading curves. The reactor records assigned burnup of a commercial SNF assembly contains about two percent uncertainty, which is increased to five-percent to ensure conservatism. This five-percent uncertainty is accommodated by adjusting the criticality loading curve. Also, the record keeping methods of nuclear utilities are not uniform and the level of detail required by the NRC has varied over the last several decades. Thus, some SNF assemblies may have assigned burnups that are averages for a batch of assemblies with similar characteristics. Utilities typically have access to more detailed core-follow records that allow the batch average burnup to be changed to an assembly specific burnup. Alternatively, an additional safety margin is incorporated into the criticality loading curve to accommodate SNF assemblies with batch average burnups or greater uncertainties due to the methodology used by the nuclear utility. The utility records provide the assembly identifier

  16. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  17. Value-based reliability transmission planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, J.G. III; Garrison, D.L.; Fallon, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    This paper presents a new value-based reliability planning (VBRP) process proposed for planning Duke Power Company`s (DPC) regional transmission system. All transmission served customers are fed from DPC`s regional transmission system which consists of a 44-kV predominantly radial system and a 100-kV predominantly non-radial system. In the past, any single contingency that could occur during system peak conditions and cause a thermal overload required the overloaded facility to be upgraded, regardless of the costs or the likelihood of the overload occurring. The new VBRP process is based on transmission system reliability evaluation and includes the following important elements: (1) a ten-year historical data base describing the probabilities of forced outages for lines and transformers; (2) a five-year average load duration curve describing the probability of an overload should a contingency occur; (3) a customer outage cost data base; (4) and probabilistic techniques. The new process attempts to balance the costs of improving service reliability with the benefits or value that these improvements bring to these customers. The objective is to provide the customers their required level of reliability while minimizing the Total Cost of their electric service.

  18. Droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2015-08-06

    Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration (Nd) will increase and droplet size will decrease, for a given liquid water path. This will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation; however, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain.McComiskey et al. (2009) have implemented a method, based onBoers andmore » Mitchell (1994), for calculating Nd from ground-based remote sensing measurements of optical depth and liquid water path. They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol size distribution, and the cloud updraft velocity. Estimates of Nd under a range of cloud types and conditions and at a variety of sites are needed to further quantify the impacts of aerosol cloud interactions. In order to provide data sets for studying aerosol-cloud interactions, the McComiskey et al. (2009) method was implemented as the Droplet Number Concentration (NDROP) value-added product (VAP).« less

  19. Application of asymptotic expansions for maximum likelihood estimators errors to gravitational waves from binary mergers: The single interferometer case

    SciTech Connect

    Zanolin, M.; Vitale, S.; Makris, N.

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we apply to gravitational waves (GW) from the inspiral phase of binary systems a recently derived frequentist methodology to calculate analytically the error for a maximum likelihood estimate of physical parameters. We use expansions of the covariance and the bias of a maximum likelihood estimate in terms of inverse powers of the signal-to-noise ration (SNR)s where the square root of the first order in the covariance expansion is the Cramer Rao lower bound (CRLB). We evaluate the expansions, for the first time, for GW signals in noises of GW interferometers. The examples are limited to a single, optimally oriented, interferometer. We also compare the error estimates using the first two orders of the expansions with existing numerical Monte Carlo simulations. The first two orders of the covariance allow us to get error predictions closer to what is observed in numerical simulations than the CRLB. The methodology also predicts a necessary SNR to approximate the error with the CRLB and provides new insight on the relationship between waveform properties, SNR, dimension of the parameter space and estimation errors. For example the timing match filtering can achieve the CRLB only if the SNR is larger than the Kurtosis of the gravitational wave spectrum and the necessary SNR is much larger if other physical parameters are also unknown.

  20. The effect of maximum-allowable payload temperature on the mass of a multimegawatt space-based platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-08-01

    Calculations were performed to determine the mass of a space-based platform as a function of the maximum-allowed operating temperature of the electrical equipment within the platform payload. Two computer programs were used in conjunction to perform these calculations. The first program was used to determine the mass of the platform reactor, shield, and power conversion system. The second program was used to determine the mass of the main and secondary radiators of the platform. The main radiator removes the waste heat associated with the power conversion system and the secondary radiator removes the waste heat associated with the platform payload. These calculations were performed for both Brayton and Rankine cycle platforms with two different types of payload cooling systems: a pumped-loop system (a heat exchanger with a liquid coolant) and a refrigerator system. The results indicate that increases in the maximum-allowed payload temperature offer significant platform mass savings for both the Brayton and Rankine cycle platforms with either the pumped-loop or refrigerator payload cooling systems. Therefore, with respect to platform mass, the development of high temperature electrical equipment would be advantageous. 3 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Value Stream Mapping: Foam Collection and Processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The effort to collect and process foam for the purpose of recycling performed by the Material Sustainability and Pollution Prevention (MSP2) team at Sandia National Laboratories is an incredible one, but in order to make it run more efficiently it needed some tweaking. This project started in June of 2015. We used the Value Stream Mapping process to allow us to look at the current state of the foam collection and processing operation. We then thought of all the possible ways the process could be improved. Soon after that we discussed which of the "dreams" were feasible. And finally, we assigned action items to members of the team so as to ensure that the improvements actually occur. These improvements will then, due to varying factors, continue to occur over the next couple years.

  2. SUV: Standard uptake or silly useless value?

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, J.W. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Quantification has always held a pervasive allure for nuclear medicine. There is a sense that anything that can be quantified should be. Once we have the numbers in hand, there is a mysterious tendency to accord them special value. Why this should be the case is unclear. Perhaps it is because of the functional nature of nuclear medicine studies, which seem as if they should be quantified. Perhaps it is because it is so easy to extract numbers from our studies. Whatever the cause, the phenomenon has been particularly strong in PET, in which we hear at every turn that PET is {open_quotes}quantitative.{close_quotes} DiChiro and Brooks commented on this phenomenon years ago, noting that, in many applications, subjective interpretation of PET images is actually superior to the use of quantitative data. Undaunted, however, the field has continued to lean heavily toward numbers as the final arbiter of correctness. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Values and the quantum conception of man

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-06-01

    Classical mechanics is based upon a mechanical picture of nature that is fundamentally incorrect. It has been replaced at the basic level by a radically different theory: quantum mechanics. This change entails an enormous shift in one`s basic conception of nature, one that can profoundly alter the scientific image of man himself. Self-image is the foundation of values, and the replacement of the mechanistic self-image derived from classical mechanics by one concordant with quantum mechanics may provide the foundation of a moral order better suited to today`s times, a self-image that endows human life with meaning, responsibility, and a deeper linkage to nature as a whole.

  4. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR

  5. Techno-Economic Analysis of the Deacetylation and Disk Refining Process. Characterizing the Effect of Refining Energy and Enzyme Usage on Minimum Sugar Selling Price and Minimum Ethanol Selling Price

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiaowen; Shekiro, Joseph; Pschorn, Thomas; Sabourin, Marc; Tucker, Melvin P.; Tao, Ling

    2015-10-29

    A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibilitymore » of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The

  6. Sandia Energy - Sandia Tool Determines Value of Solar Photovoltaic...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tool Determines Value of Solar Photovoltaic Power Systems Home Renewable Energy Energy Partnership News News & Events Photovoltaic Solar Sandia Tool Determines Value of Solar...

  7. Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Upgrade Value Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Star Building Upgrade Value Calculator (for Office Properties) AgencyCompany...

  8. Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results Humphreys & Associates, Inc. (H&A) conducted a survey of ...

  9. CBEI: Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Susan Wachter, ...

  10. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program Document: ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added ...

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report ...

  12. Methods for Analyzing the Economic Value of Concentrating Solar...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (CSP-TES) provides multiple quantifiable benefits compared to CSP without storage or to solar photovoltaic (PV) technology, including higher energy value, ancillary services value,...

  13. Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value of Co-Firing Biomass in Pulverized Coal Plants Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value of Co-Firing...

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added ...

  15. The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale Power Markets, September 2005 The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale Power Markets, ...

  16. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The ...

  17. Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower ...

  18. Best Practices for Getting the Best Value from Federal Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Utility Energy Service Contracts Best Practices for Getting the Best Value from Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts Best Practices for Getting the Best Value from Federal ...

  19. Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Value Analysis Tool (CVAT) AgencyCompany Organization: World Resources Institute...

  20. The value of energy storage in decarbonizing the electricity...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The value of energy storage in decarbonizing the electricity sector Title The value of energy storage in decarbonizing the electricity sector Publication Type Journal Article Year ...

  1. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications This analysis evaluates several operational ...

  2. Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved Solar Power Forecasting ... Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved Solar Power Forecasting Jie ...

  3. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil ...

  4. Optimization of a Nucleic Acids united-RESidue 2-Point model (NARES-2P) with a maximum-likelihood approach

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Liwo, Adam

    2015-12-28

    Coarse-grained models are useful tools to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of biomolecules. They are obtained by merging several atoms into one interaction site. Such simplified models try to capture as much as possible information of the original biomolecular system in all-atom representation but the resulting parameters of these coarse-grained force fields still need further optimization. In this paper, a force field optimization method, which is based on maximum-likelihood fitting of the simulated to the experimental conformational ensembles and least-squares fitting of the simulated to the experimental heat-capacity curves, is applied to optimize the Nucleic Acid united-RESidue 2-point (NARES-2P) model for coarse-grained simulations of nucleic acids recently developed in our laboratory. The optimized NARES-2P force field reproduces the structural and thermodynamic data of small DNA molecules much better than the original force field.

  5. Frequency dependence of the maximum operating temperature for quantum-cascade lasers up to 5.4 THz

    SciTech Connect

    Wienold, M.; Röben, B.; Lü, X.; Rozas, G.; Schrottke, L.; Biermann, K.; Grahn, H. T.

    2015-11-16

    We report on the observation of an approximately linear reduction in the maximum operating temperature with an increasing emission frequency for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers between 4.2 and 5.4 THz. These lasers are based on the same design type, but vary in period length and barrier height for the cascade structure. The sample emitting at the highest frequency around 5.4 THz can be operated in pulsed mode up to 56 K. We identify an additional relaxation channel for electrons by longitudinal optical phonon scattering from the upper to the lower laser level and increasing optical losses toward higher frequencies as major processes, leading to the observed temperature behavior.

  6. Analysis of offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. Maximum credible accident fourth (1988--1991) review

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of the Fourth (1988--1990) Maximum Credible Accident (MCA) Review was to determine if changes in waste storage or operational inventories at the Rocky Flats Plant have affected the basis for the current MCA. This report documents the Fourth MCA Review and the activities performed to identify and affirm the inventories-at-risk and estimate the release of Pu/Am that might occur due to the MCA. The State of Colorado has defined, for its Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) determination, that the MCA is a release of 100 grams of respirable Pu (and/or its equivalent as americium) dispersed into the RFP ambient air, regardless of the specific scenario that produces the release.

  7. Basement Fill Model Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Concentrations for Initial Suite of Radionuclides. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-10

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y⁻¹ as specified in 10 CFR 20 Subpart E. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on radionuclide concentrations in the fill material and the water in the interstitial spaces of the fill. (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use by ZSRP in selecting ROCs for detailed dose assessment calculations.

  8. Production of High Value Cellulose from Tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Berson, R Eric; Dvaid, Keith; McGinley, W Mark; Meduri, Praveen; Clark, Ezra; Dayalan, Ethirajulu; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Sunkara, Mahendra; Colliver, Donald

    2011-06-15

    The Kentucky Rural Energy Supply Program was established in 2005 by a federal direct appropriation to benefit the citizens of the Commonwealth by creating a unified statewide consortium to promote renewable energy and energy efficiency in Kentucky. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Biomass Programs initially funded the consortium in 2005 with a $2 million operational grant. The Kentucky Rural Energy Consortium (KREC) was formed at the outset of the program to advance energy efficiency and comprehensive research on biomass and bioenergy of importance to Kentucky agriculture, rural communities, and related industries. In recognition of the successful efforts of the program, KREC received an additional $1.96 million federal appropriation in 2008 for renewal of the DOE grant. From the beginning, KREC understood the value of providing a statewide forum for the discussion of Kentucky's long term energy needs and economic development potential. The new funding allowed KREC to continue to serve as a clearinghouse and support new research and development and outreach programs for energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  9. Value of Laboratory Experiments for Code Validations

    SciTech Connect

    Wawersik, W.R.

    1998-12-14

    Numerical codes have become indispensable for designing underground structures and interpretating the behavior of geologic systems. Because of the complexities of geologic systems, however, code calculations often are associated with large quantitative uncertainties. This papers presents three examples to demonstrate the value of laboratory(or bench scale) experiments to evaluate the predictive capabilities of such codes with five major conclusions: Laboratory or bench-scale experiments are a very cost-effective, controlled means of evaluating and validating numerical codes, not instead of but before or at least concurrent with the implementation of in situ studies. The design of good laboratory validation tests must identifj what aspects of a code are to be scrutinized in order to optimize the size, geometry, boundary conditions, and duration of the experiments. The design of good and sometimes difficult numerical analyses and sensitivity studies. Laboratory validation tests must involve: Good validation experiments will generate independent data sets to identify the combined effect of constitutive models, model generalizations, material parameters, and numerical algorithms. Successfid validations of numerical codes mandate a close collaboration between experimentalists and analysts drawing from the full gamut of observations, measurements, and mathematical results.

  10. Energy conservation standards for new federal residential buildings: A decision analysis study using relative value discounting

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, C. . Coll. of Business Administration); Merkhofer, M.M.; Hamm, G.L. )

    1990-07-02

    This report presents a reassessment of the proposed standard for energy conservation in new federal residential buildings. The analysis uses the data presented in the report, Economic Analysis: In Support of Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings (June 1988)-to be referred to as the EASIECS report. The reassessment differs from that report in several respects. In modeling factual information, it uses more recent forecasts of future energy prices and it uses data from the Bureau of the Census in order to estimate the distribution of lifetimes of residential buildings rather than assuming a hypothetical 25-year lifetime. In modeling social preferences decision analysis techniques are used in order to examine issues of public values that often are not included in traditional cost-benefit analyses. The present report concludes that the public would benefit from the proposed standard. Several issues of public values regarding energy use are illustrated with methods to include them in a formal analysis of a proposed energy policy. The first issue places a value on costs and benefits that will occur in the future as an irreversible consequence of current policy choices. This report discusses an alternative method, called relative value discounting which permits flexible discounting of future events-and the possibility of placing greater values on future events. The second issue places a value on the indirect benefits of energy savings so that benefits accrue to everyone rather than only to the person who saves the energy. This report includes non-zero estimates of the indirect benefits. The third issue is how the costs and benefits discussed in a public policy evaluation should be compared. In summary, selection of individual projects with larger benefit to cost ratios leads to a portfolio of projects with the maximum benefit to cost difference. 30 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs. (JF)

  11. Contractor Earned Value Management System Certification Status | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Earned Value Management System Certification Status Contractor Earned Value Management System Certification Status Certification Status for major EM Contracts Contractor Earned Value Management System Certification Status (129.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results VPP Participant Status EM Major Contracts Awarded Since 2006

  12. Lithium-coated polymeric matrix as a minimum volume-change and dendrite-free lithium metal anode

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Liang, Zheng; Zhao, Jie; Yan, Kai; Cui, Yi

    2016-03-18

    Lithium metal is the ideal anode for the next generation of high-energy-density batteries. Nevertheless, dendrite growth, side reactions and infinite relative volume change have prevented it from practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a promising metallic lithium anode design by infusing molten lithium into a polymeric matrix. The electrospun polyimide employed is stable against highly reactive molten lithium and, via a conformal layer of zinc oxide coating to render the surface lithiophilic, molten lithium can be drawn into the matrix, affording a nano-porous lithium electrode. Importantly, the polymeric backbone enables uniform lithium stripping/plating, which successfully confines lithium within the matrix, realizingmore » minimum volume change and effective dendrite suppression. The porous electrode reduces the effective current density; thus, flat voltage profiles and stable cycling of more than 100 cycles is achieved even at a high current density of 5 mA cm-2 in both carbonate and ether electrolyte. Furthermore, the advantages of the porous, polymeric matrix provide important insights into the design principles of lithium metal anodes.« less

  13. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinko, J.

    2013-06-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of {approx}78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs-but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the H{alpha} line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  14. Introduction to the Value of Program Evaluation Case Study Series |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Introduction to the Value of Program Evaluation Case Study Series Introduction to the Value of Program Evaluation Case Study Series Case Studies Show the Value of Program Evaluation, part of the Value of Program Evaluation Case Study Series, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, November 2009. Case Studies Show the Value of Program Evaluation (124.48 KB) More Documents & Publications Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than

  15. Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne ; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Dunn, Leon; Thompson, Mick; Siva, Shankar; Aarons, Yolanda; Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne ; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney J.; Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently

  16. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM OTHER METAL VALUES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY SELECTIVE COMPLEXING AND ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1960-06-28

    A process is given for separating tri- or tetravalent plutonium from fission products in an aqueous solution by complexing the fission products with oxalate, tannate, citrate, or tartrate anions at a pH value of at least 2.4 (preferably between 2.4 and 4), and contacting a cation exchange resin with the solution whereby the plutonium is adsorbed while the complexed fission products remain in solution.

  17. Application of Maximum Likelihood Bayesian Model Averaging to Groundwater Flow and Transport at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2008-06-01

    A methodology to systematically and quantitatively assess model predictive uncertainty was applied to saturated zone uranium transport at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Washington State, USA. The methodology extends Maximum Likelihood Bayesian Model Averaging (MLBMA) to account jointly for uncertainties due to the conceptual-mathematical basis of models, model parameters, and the scenarios to which the models are applied. Conceptual uncertainty was represented by postulating four alternative models of hydrogeology and uranium adsorption. Parameter uncertainties were represented by estimation covariances resulting from the joint calibration of each model to observed heads and uranium concentration. Posterior model probability was dominated by one model. Results demonstrated the role of model complexity and fidelity to observed system behavior in determining model probabilities, as well as the impact of prior information. Two scenarios representing alternative future behavior of the Columbia River adjacent to the site were considered. Predictive simulations carried out with the calibrated models illustrated the computation of model- and scenario-averaged predictions and how results can be displayed to clearly indicate the individual contributions to predictive uncertainty of the model, parameter, and scenario uncertainties. The application demonstrated the practicability of applying a comprehensive uncertainty assessment to large-scale, detailed groundwater flow and transport modelling.

  18. THE EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS ON A CORONAL SOURCE SURFACE AT 2.3 R{sub Sun} DURING SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Kohl, J. L.; Lamy, P.

    2012-01-20

    We analyze data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory to produce global maps of coronal outflow velocities and densities in the regions where the solar wind is undergoing acceleration. The maps use UV and white light coronal data obtained from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer and the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, respectively, and a Doppler dimming analysis to determine the mean outflow velocities. The outflow velocities are defined on a sphere at 2.3 R{sub Sun} from Sun-center and are organized by Carrington Rotations during the solar minimum period at the start of solar cycle 23. We use the outflow velocity and density maps to show that while the solar minimum corona is relatively stable during its early stages, the shrinkage of the north polar hole in the later stages leads to changes in both the global areal expansion of the coronal hole and the derived internal flux tube expansion factors of the solar wind. The polar hole areal expansion factor and the flux tube expansion factors (between the coronal base and 2.3 R{sub Sun }) start out as super-radial but then they become more nearly radial as the corona progresses away from solar minimum. The results also support the idea that the largest flux tube expansion factors are located near the coronal hole/streamer interface, at least during the deepest part of the solar minimum period.

  19. Expedited site characterization (ESC) using the M{sup 3} approach, M{sup 3} = massive, moderate, minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Tindall, S.

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of this approach is to quickly and cost effectively identify and classify potential Areas of Concern (AOCS) as clean or contaminated, thus allowing potentially responsible parties (PRPS) to save limited resources by ceasing costly investigations and undertaking removal type actions expeditiously. The ESC M{sup 3} approach also overcomes the high degree of uncertainty typically associated with traditional site investigations resulting from a lack of comprehensive scoping. Thus, EPA Region 9 has agreed to accept and use, for risk assessment purposes, the data generated from the ESC M{sup 3} approach, providing the data quality is known and confirmation analyses are performed. The extraordinary benefit will be to eliminate any further action on those AOCs found to be clean using this approach. Finally this approach reduces the large number of non-detect samples that are customarily submitted for CLP-type (i.e., Contract Laboratory Program) analyses. The ESC M{sup 3} approach consists of the following three steps: (1) a massive sampling effort is first conducted at an AOC (e.g., 200 samples are collected using a grid approach); the samples are analyzed on a daily basis using real time onsite methods and field screening (FS)-type data are generated; (2) a moderate sampling effort is then conducted to provide onsite verification of the FS-type data; the samples are analyzed using onsite CLP-type methods and field quantitation (FQ)-type data are generated with an agreed upon level of QC; and finally, (3) a minimum sampling effort is conducted to provide verification of the FQ-type data; these confirmation samples are sent to an offsite laboratory for analysis, and CLP-type data are generated.

  20. Distribution coefficient values describing iodine, neptunium, selenium, technetium, and uranium sorption to Hanford sediments. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J.

    1995-03-01

    Burial of vitrified low-level waste (LLW) in the vadose zone of the Hanford Site is being considered as a long-term disposal option. Regulations dealing with LLW disposal require that performance assessment (PA) analyses be conducted. Preliminary modeling efforts for the Hanford Site LLW PA were conducted to evaluate the potential health risk of a number of radionuclides, including Ac, Am, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cs, Eu, 1, Nb, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pu, Ra, Ru, Se, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, U, and Zr (Piepho et al. 1994). The radionuclides, {sup 129}I, {sup 237}Np, {sup 79}Se, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 234,235,238}U, were identified as posing the greatest potential health hazard. It was also determined that the outcome of these simulations were very sensitive to the parameter describing the extent to which radionuclides sorbed to the subsurface matrix, described as a distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). The distribution coefficient is a ratio of the radionuclide concentration associated with the solid phase to that in the liquid phase. The literature-derived K{sub d} values used in these simulations were conservative, i.e., lowest values within the range of reasonable values used to provide an estimate of the maximum health threat. Thus, these preliminary modeling results reflect a conservative estimate rather than a best estimate of what is likely to occur. The potential problem with providing only a conservative estimate is that it may mislead us into directing resources to resolve nonexisting problems.

  1. Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, K.L.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

  2. Thermoluminescence Characteristics of Nanocrystalline LiF Phosphors Synthesized at Different pH Values

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Dogra, R.; Kumar, Shalendra; Mishra, S. K.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2011-07-15

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The thermolumniscence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses have been studied. The analysis of TL glow curve has revealed the existence of two well resolved glow peaks, one low temperature peak at around 145 deg. C and other one at higher temperature around 375 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH have been found to show maximum TL intensity at studied gamma doses (0.1 Gy-15 Gy).

  3. METHOD OF SEPARATING TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM CERIUM SUB-GROUP RARE EARTH VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium from the cerium sub-group of rare earths when both are present in an aqueous solution. The method consists in adding an excess of alkali metal carbonate to the solution, which causes the formation of a soluble plutonium carbonate precipitate and at the same time forms an insoluble cerium-group rare earth carbonate. The pH value must be adjusted to bctween 5.5 and 7.5, and prior to the precipitation step the plutonium must be reduced to the tetravalent state since only tetravalent plutonium will form the soluble carbonate complex.

  4. 2D Gridded Surface Data Value-Added Product

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 2D Gridded Surface Data Value-Added Product Q Tang S Xie July 2015 DISCLAIMER This ... DOESC-ARMTR-152 2D Gridded Surface Data Value-Added Product Version 1.0 Q Tang S Xie ...

  5. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a ... DE-AC36-08GO28308 Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy ...

  6. Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL-TP-6A2-45833 February 2010 The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy ... February 2010 The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage Ramteen ...

  7. NREL Quantifies Value of CSP to the Grid (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    In California study, greater penetration of renewable energy means greater value of CSP with thermal energy storage.

  8. Superior Energy Performance: Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Superior Energy Performance: Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001 Superior Energy Performance: Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001 This presentation describes ISO 50001 and explains how Superior Energy Performance can help get the most value from implementation of an Energy Management Standard. Superior Energy Performance: Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001 (March 13, 2012) (1.73 MB) More Documents & Publications Becoming a Certified Practitioner or a Certified

  9. RECOVERY AND SEPARATION OF LITHIUM VALUES FROM SALVAGE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Hansford, D.L.; Raabe, E.W.

    1963-08-20

    Lithium values can be recovered from an aqueous basic solution by reacting the values with a phosphate salt soluble in the solution, forming an aqueous slurry of the resultant aqueous insoluble lithium phosphate, contacting the slurry with an organic cation exchange resin in the acid form until the slurry has been clarified, and thereafter recovering lithium values from the resin. (AEC)

  10. Method for selectively reducing plutonium values by a photochemical process

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Horace A.; Toth, Louis M.; Bell, Jimmy T.

    1978-01-01

    The rate of reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) in nitric acid solution containing a reducing agent is enhanced by exposing the solution to 200-500 nm electromagnetic radiation. Pu values are recovered from an organic extractant solution containing Pu(IV) values and U(VI) values by the method of contacting the extractant solution with an aqueous nitric acid solution in the presence of a reducing agent and exposing the aqueous solution to electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength of 200-500 nm. Under these conditions, Pu values preferentially distribute to the aqueous phase and U values preferentially distribute to the organic phase.

  11. A stochastically forced time delay solar dynamo model: Self-consistent recovery from a maunder-like grand minimum necessitates a mean-field alpha effect

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Soumitra; Nandy, Dibyendu; Passos, Dário E-mail: dariopassos@ist.utl.pt

    2014-07-01

    Fluctuations in the Sun's magnetic activity, including episodes of grand minima such as the Maunder minimum have important consequences for space and planetary environments. However, the underlying dynamics of such extreme fluctuations remain ill-understood. Here, we use a novel mathematical model based on stochastically forced, non-linear delay differential equations to study solar cycle fluctuations in which time delays capture the physics of magnetic flux transport between spatially segregated dynamo source regions in the solar interior. Using this model, we explicitly demonstrate that the Babcock-Leighton poloidal field source based on dispersal of tilted bipolar sunspot flux, alone, cannot recover the sunspot cycle from a grand minimum. We find that an additional poloidal field source effective on weak fields—e.g., the mean-field α effect driven by helical turbulence—is necessary for self-consistent recovery of the sunspot cycle from grand minima episodes.

  12. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  13. INVESTIGATING THE MINIMUM ENERGY PRINCIPLE IN SEARCHES FOR NEW MOLECULAR SPECIESTHE CASE OF H{sub 2}C{sub 3}O ISOMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Ryan A.; McGuire, Brett A.; Remijan, Anthony J.; Shingledecker, Christopher; Johnson, Chelen H.; Blair, Samantha; Robertson, Amy

    2015-01-20

    Recently, Lattelais et al. have interpreted aggregated observations of molecular isomers to suggest that there exists a ''minimum energy principle'', such that molecular formation will favor more stable molecular isomers for thermodynamic reasons. To test the predictive power of this principle, we have fully characterized the spectra of the three isomers of C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O toward the well-known molecular region SgrB2(N). Evidence for the detection of the isomers cyclopropenone (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O) and propynal (HCCCHO) is presented, along with evidence for the non-detection of the lowest zero-point energy isomer, propadienone (CH{sub 2}CCO). We interpret these observations as evidence that chemical formation pathways, which may be under kinetic control, have a more pronounced effect on final isomer abundances than thermodynamic effects such as the minimum energy principle.

  14. The role of beryllium in the band structure of MgZnO: Lifting the valence band maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. S.; Pan, X. H. E-mail: yezz@zju.edu.cn; Chen, W.; Zhang, H. H.; Dai, W.; Ding, P.; Huang, J. Y.; Lu, B.; Ye, Z. Z. E-mail: yezz@zju.edu.cn

    2014-09-22

    We investigate the effect of Be on the valence band maximum (VBM) of MgZnO by measuring the band offsets of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O/Be{sub x}Mg{sub y}Zn{sub 1−x−y}O heterojunctions using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O and Be{sub x}Mg{sub y}Zn{sub 1−x−y}O films have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The valence band offset (ΔE{sub V}) of Mg{sub 0.15}Zn{sub 0.85}O (E{sub g} = 3.62 eV)/Be{sub 0.005}Mg{sub 0.19}Zn{sub 0.805}O (E{sub g} = 3.73 eV) heterojunction is 0.01 eV and Be{sub 0.005}Mg{sub 0.19}Zn{sub 0.805}O has a lower VBM. The increased Mg composition is the main factor for the reduction of VBM. The VBM of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O is lower by 0.03 eV with the enlargement of E{sub g} from 3.62 eV to 3.73 eV by increasing Mg composition. Considering the effect of increased Mg composition, it is concluded that the little amount of Be makes the VBM go up by 0.02 eV when the E{sub g} of the alloy is 3.73 eV. The ΔE{sub V} of Mg{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.89}O (E{sub g} = 3.56 eV)/Be{sub 0.007}Mg{sub 0.12}Zn{sub 0.873}O (E{sub g} = 3.56 eV) heterojunction is calculated to be 0.03 eV and Be{sub 0.007}Mg{sub 0.12}Zn{sub 0.873}O has a higher VBM than Mg{sub 0.11}Zn{sub 0.89}O, which means that a little amount Be lifts the VBM by 0.03 eV when the E{sub g} of the alloy is 3.56 eV. The experimental measurements have offered a strong support for the theoretical research that alloying Be in Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O alloys is hopeful to form a higher VBM and to enhance the p-type dopability of MgZnO.

  15. Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world LANL statistical tools have helped create Reliability Technology (RT), which increases the overall fraction of productive manufacturing time, or "uptime," for its internal manufacturing lines. April 3, 2012 Improving consumer value through enhanced performance around the world Reliability Technology (RT) is a comprehensive reliability engineering

  16. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Markets - EAC 2011 | Department of Energy Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a

  17. CBEI: Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015 Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Review | Department of Energy Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review CBEI: Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Susan Wachter, University of Pennsylvania View the Presentation CBEI: Broker Training - Placing Value on Energy Retrofits - 2015 Peer Review (771.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Market Engagement Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Value-Added Data Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Including Evaluated Data Sets) () | Data Explorer Value-Added Data Products (Including Evaluated Data Sets) Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Value-Added Data Products (Including Evaluated Data Sets) Many of the scientific needs of the ARM Program are met through the analysis and processing of existing data products into "value-added" products or VAPs. Despite extensive instrumentation deployed at the ARM sites, there will always be quantities of interest that are

  19. The Value of Distributed Solar Electric Generation to San Antonio

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Nic; Norris, Ben; Meyer, Lisa

    2013-02-14

    This report presents an analysis of value provided by grid-connected, distributed PV in San Antonio from a utility perspective. The study quantified six value components, summarized in Table ES- 1. These components represent the benefits that accrue to the utility, CPS Energy, in accepting solar onto the grid. This analysis does not treat the compensation of value, policy objectives, or cost-effectiveness from the retail consumer perspective.

  20. Microsoft Word - Web Posting for Earned Value Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CONTRACTOR EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CERTIFICATION STATUS (as of January 14, 2016) DOE Office (Geographic Site) Contract Name Contractor Name Principal Companies Certified ...

  1. Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment...

    Energy Saver

    Reporting System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation This ...

  2. Table 4. Average value of photovoltaic modules, 2005-2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average value of photovoltaic modules, 2005-2015" "(dollars per peak watt)" ... Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic CellModule Shipments Report.' Note: ...

  3. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Greater Investments in Clean Energy Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value ... in efficient and renewable energy and water conservation can create jobs and stimulate ...

  4. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0A, Earned Value Management System (EVMS) by Rick Blaisdell Functional areas: Capital Assets, Contract Management, Program Management, Project Management This Guide provides...

  5. History, Applications, Numerical Values and Problems with the...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical Values and Problems with the Calculation of EROI (Energy Return on Energy Investment) Professor Charles Hall State University of NY College of Environmental Science and...

  6. Microsoft Word - Web Posting for Earned Value Management.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 CONTRACTOR EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CERTIFICATION STATUS (as of May 11, 2016) DOE Office (Geographic Site) Contract Name Contractor Name Principal Companies Certified Green ...

  7. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  8. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Fourth Quarter: July 1-September 30, 2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ARM Climate Research Facility ...

  10. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; SEDIMENTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL...

  11. Earned Value Management System Gold Card | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Earned Value Management (EVM) is a systematic approach to the integration and measurement of cost, schedule, and technical (scope) accomplishments on a project or task. It provides ...

  12. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  13. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  14. An Initial Value of Information (VOI) Framework for Geophysical...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Exploration of Geothermal Energy Abstract We present a value of information (VOI) methodology for the exploration geothermal problem. VOI quantifies how relevant any particular...

  15. Deriving value from wet and gaseous waste streams.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Deriving value from wet and gaseous waste streams. Assessing the real value of "higher value products" Setting realistic assumption and avoid common pitfalls Luca Zullo VerdeNero LLC luca.zullo@verdenero.com 651-270-6478 My technology works great and my feedstock is a no value waste! Thermodynamics and process economics are not very different Reactants Products G1 G2 $2 $1 G<0 $>0 Ea Project development and capital cost It is never too early to think about economics! Feedstock

  16. Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    At their recent off-site continuous improvement session, the NNSA Livermore Field Office (LFO) in California unveiled their new set of core values: Integrity - Trustworthy, ...

  17. Valuing Green in the Appraisal Process - Building America Top...

    Energy Saver

    Valuing Green in the Appraisal Process - Building America Top Innovation Real estate appraisers have historically faced challenges with green and energy efficient homes, both in ...

  18. Module 1 - Introduction to Earned Value | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and defines the framework necessary for proper Earned Value management implementation. ... Module 7 - Integrated Baseline Review and Change Control Module 8 - Reporting

  19. Quantifying Fl Value of Hydro in Transmission Grid | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quantifying Fl Value of Hydro in Transmission Grid 72hydrogridserviceseprikey.ppt (3.96 MB) More Documents & Publications Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish ...

  20. Double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Suhonen, J.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P. O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd was determined by using the JYFLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The measured mass difference between {sup 150}Nd and {sup 150}Sm is 3371.38(20) keV. This new value deviates by 3.7 keV from the previously adopted value of 3367.7(22) keV and is a factor of 10 more precise. Accurate knowledge of this Q value is important because {sup 150}Nd is a primary candidate to be used in the search for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay modes in several experiments.

  1. Two small businesses selected for work valued at $80 million

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Businesses compete for drilling, monitoring work Two small businesses selected for work valued at 80 million Two small businesses compete for up to 80 million in well drilling ...

  2. Microsoft Word - Web Posting for Earned Value Management.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CONTRACTOR EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CERTIFICATION STATUS (as of April 11, 2016) DOE Office (Geographic Site) Contract Name Contractor Name Principal Companies Certified Green ...

  3. The Purpose and Value of Successful Technology Demonstrations...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose and Value of Successful Technology Demonstrations - The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Demonstrations by Steve Bossart, NETL Senior Management and Technical...

  4. Microsoft Word - Web Posting for Earned Value Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CONTRACTOR EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CERTIFICATION STATUS (as of December 2, 2015) DOE Office (Geographic Site) Contract Name Contractor Name Principal Companies Certified ...

  5. Shared Value in Utility and Efficiency Partnerships | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Energy Efficiency Solutions Conference: Shared Value in Utility and Efficiency Partnerships, July 10, 2012. Presents four case studies highlighting partnerships between local...

  6. Bioenergy Demonstration Project: Value-Added Products from Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bioenergy Demonstration Project: Value-Added Products from Renewable Fuels May 23, 2013 Technology Area Review: Biochemical Conversion Paul Blum University of Nebraska 2 Goal ...

  7. Superior Energy Performance: Getting the Most Value from ISO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Superior Energy Performance cm : Getting the Most Value from ISO 50001- Energy Management Systems US Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office March 13, 2012 Aimee McKane ...

  8. Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    & Reporting System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation This ...

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2014-11-21

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility.

  10. Microsoft Word - Web Posting for Earned Value Management.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 CONTRACTOR EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CERTIFICATION STATUS (as of June 10, 2016) DOE Office (Geographic Site) Contract Name Contractor Name Principal Companies Certified ...

  11. EIS-0158: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the 1979 Petroleum Production at Maximum Efficient Rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1(Elk Hills), Kern County, California (1993)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assess the potential environmental impacts of the continued operation of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 at the Maximum Efficient Rate authorized by Public Law 94-258. This EIS supplements DOE/EIS-0012.

  12. ProteinShop: A Tool for Interactive Protein

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Also, it can be used to define the minimum and maximum per-atom energy values that will be mapped to ProteinShop's green-yellow-red color ramp, and to select any combination of ...

  13. DOE: Quantifying the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-31

    The report summarizes research to Quantify the Value of Hydropower in the Electric Grid. This 3-year DOE study focused on defining value of hydropower assets in a changing electric grid. Methods are described for valuation and planning of pumped storage and conventional hydropower. The project team conducted plant case studies, electric system modeling, market analysis, cost data gathering, and evaluations of operating strategies and constraints. Five other reports detailing these research results are available a project website, www.epri.com/hydrogrid. With increasing deployment of wind and solar renewable generation, many owners, operators, and developers of hydropower have recognized the opportunity to provide more flexibility and ancillary services to the electric grid. To quantify value of services, this study focused on the Western Electric Coordinating Council region. A security-constrained, unit commitment and economic dispatch model was used to quantify the role of hydropower for several future energy scenarios up to 2020. This hourly production simulation considered transmission requirements to deliver energy, including future expansion plans. Both energy and ancillary service values were considered. Addressing specifically the quantification of pumped storage value, no single value stream dominated predicted plant contributions in various energy futures. Modeling confirmed that service value depends greatly on location and on competition with other available grid support resources. In this summary, ten different value streams related to hydropower are described. These fell into three categories; operational improvements, new technologies, and electricity market opportunities. Of these ten, the study was able to quantify a monetary value in six by applying both present day and future scenarios for operating the electric grid. This study confirmed that hydropower resources across the United States contribute significantly to operation of the grid in terms

  14. Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

  15. Method for selecting minimum width of leaf in multileaf adjustable collimator while inhibiting passage of particle beams of radiation through sawtooth joints between collimator leaves

    DOEpatents

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Bercovitz, John; Nyman, Mark; Chu, William

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for selecting the minimum width of individual leaves of a multileaf adjustable collimator having sawtooth top and bottom surfaces between adjacent leaves of a first stack of leaves and sawtooth end edges which are capable of intermeshing with the corresponding sawtooth end edges of leaves in a second stack of leaves of the collimator. The minimum width of individual leaves in the collimator, each having a sawtooth configuration in the surface facing another leaf in the same stack and a sawtooth end edge, is selected to comprise the sum of the penetration depth or range of the particular type of radiation comprising the beam in the particular material used for forming the leaf; plus the total path length across all the air gaps in the area of the joint at the edges between two leaves defined between lines drawn across the peaks of adjacent sawtooth edges; plus at least one half of the length or period of a single sawtooth. To accomplish this, in accordance with the method of the invention, the penetration depth of the particular type of radiation in the particular material to be used for the collimator leaf is first measured. Then the distance or gap between adjoining or abutting leaves is selected, and the ratio of this distance to the height of the sawteeth is selected. Finally the number of air gaps through which the radiation will pass between sawteeth is determined by selecting the number of sawteeth to be formed in the joint. The measurement and/or selection of these parameters will permit one to determine the minimum width of the leaf which is required to prevent passage of the beam through the sawtooth joint.

  16. SU-E-T-539: Maximum Energy of Helium and Carbon Ions Clinically Needed for Spine, Lung, Prostate and Pancreas Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pompos, A; Choy, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Timmerman, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Maximum available kinetic energy of accelerated heavy ions is a critical parameter to consider during the establishment of a heavy ion therapy center. It dictates the maximum range in tissue and determines the size and cost of ion gantry. We have started planning our heavy ion therapy center and we report on the needed ion range. Methods: We analyzed 50 of random SBRT-spine, SBRT- lung, prostate and pancreatic cancer patients from our photon clinic. In the isocentric axial CT cut we recorded the maximum water equivalent depth (WED4Field) of PTV’s most distal edge in four cardinal directions and also in a beam direction that required the largest penetration, WEDGantry. These depths were then used to calculate the percentage of our patients we would be able to treat as a function of available maximum carbon and helium beam energy. Based on the Anterior-Posterior WED for lung patients and the maximum available ion energy we estimated the largest possible non-coplanar beam entry angle φ (deviation from vertical) in the isocentric vertical sagittal plane. Results: We found that if 430MeV/u C-12, equivalently 220MeV/u He-4, beams are available, more than 96% (98%) of all patients can be treated without any gantry restrictions (in cardinals angles only) respectively. If the energy is reduced to 400MeV/u C-12, equivalently 205MeV/u He-4, the above fractions reduce to 80% (87%) for prostate and 88% (97%) for other sites. This 7% energy decrease translates to almost 5% gantry size and cost decrease for both ions. These energy limits in combination with the WED in the AP direction for lung patients resulted in average non-coplanar angles of φ430MeV/u = 68°±8° and φ400MeV/u = 65°±10° if nozzle clearance permits them. Conclusion: We found that the two worldwide most common maximum carbon beam energies will treat above 80% of all our patients.

  17. Housing standards: change to HUD 4930. 2 Intermediate Minimum Property Standard (IMPS) supplement for solar heating and domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-17

    This rule is made to provide an updating, clarification, and improvement of requirements contained in HUD Handbook 4930.2, Intermediate Minimum Property Standards (IMPS) Supplement concerning solar heating and domestic hot water systems. Changes pertain to fire protection, penetration, roof covering, conditions of use, thermal stability, rain resistance, ultraviolet stability, and compatibility with transfer medium. Additional changes cover applicable standards, labeling, flash point, chemical and physical commpatibility, flame spread classification, lightening protection, and parts of a solar energy system. Altogether, there are over 50 changes, some of which apply to tables and worksheets. Footnotes are included.

  18. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  19. The social values at risk from sea-level rise

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sonia; Barnett, Jon; Fincher, Ruth; Hurlimann, Anna; Mortreux, Colette; Waters, Elissa

    2013-07-15

    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the lived values of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.

  20. Erosion control for the Fundamental values in NEPA

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, M.C.; Hinds, W.T.

    1997-08-01

    A commitment to exploring alternatives to major Federal actions, pursuing and facilitating public involvement, and identifying measures to mitigate the adverse effects of actions selected for implementation are important values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. While other major environmental legislation may commit an agency to different aspects of environmental review and protection, no other Federal statute combines the unique values that NEPA does. Since its enactment over 26 years ago, NEPA has faced numerous challenges to its fundamental intent and values. Recently, processes deemed to be, or assumed to be, functionally equivalent have attempted to subsume important NEPA values while allowing major Federal actions to proceed without NEPA`s environmental review. This paper examines the concept and origin of the term NEPA values, and the effects of judicial review and actions such as DOE`s NEPA/CERCLA integration agreement, have had on maintaining fundamental NEPA values in the Federal decision making process. In addition, based on concerns that are building momentum in the US Congress, a brief discussion will be included exploring what may occur in the future to prevent further erosion of fundamental NEPA values.

  1. ESTIMATED NEPTUNIUM SEDIMENT SORPTION VALUES AS A FUNCTION OF PH AND MEASURED BARIUM AND RADIUM KD VALUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this document is to provide traceability and justification for a select few new geochemical data used in the Special Analysis entitled 'Special Analysis for the Dose Assessment of the Final Inventories in Center Slit Trenches One through Five'. Most values used in the Special Analysis came from the traditional geochemical data package, however, some recent laboratory measurements have made it possible to estimate barium K{sub d} values. Additionally, some recent calculations were made to estimate neptunium K{sub d} values as a function of pH. The assumptions, justifications, and calculations needed to generate these new values are presented in this document, and the values are summarized.

  2. NREL: State and Local Governments - Value-of-Solar Tariffs

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Value-of-Solar Tariffs A value-of-solar (VOS) tariff is a rate design policy that gives customers with solar installations credit for the electricity generated by a photovoltaic (PV) system. Utility customers with distributed PV panels on their homes or businesses can give power to and take power from the grid. A VOS tariff clarifies how much energy is sold in each direction (customer to utility and utility to customer) and at what rate the energy is valued. A VOS tariff should not be confused

  3. The value of post-extracted algae residue

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bryant, Henry; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Anderson, David; Richardson, James; Sawyer, Jason; Wickersham, Tryon; Drewery, Merritt

    2012-07-26

    This paper develops a hedonic pricing model for post-extracted algae residue (PEAR), which can be used for assessing the economic feasibility of an algal production enterprise. Prices and nutritional characteristics of commonly employed livestock feed ingredients are used to estimate the value of PEAR based on its composition. We find that PEAR would have a value lower than that of soybean meal in recent years. The value of PEAR will vary substantially based on its characteristics. PEAR could have generated algal fuel co-product credits that in recent years would have ranged between $0.95 and $2.43 per gallon of fuel produced.

  4. Case Studies Show the Value of Program Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    
 1
 Case Studies Show the Value of Program Evaluation Value of Program Evaluation Case Study Series Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, November 2009 The U.S Department of Energy sponsored several small case studies that clearly demonstrate the benefits that evaluation can provide to energy and environmental programs. The result is a set of five "Value of Program Evaluation" Case Studies (each 2-pages in length) documenting the benefits of implementing recommendations from

  5. The Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity storage can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including the ability to levelize load, provide ancillary services, and provide firm capacity. Historically, it has been difficult to compare the value of electricity storage to alternative generation resources using simplified metrics, such as levelized cost of energy. To properly value energy storage requires detailed time-series simulations using software tools that can co-optimize multiple services provided by different storage technologies. This analysis uses a commercial grid simulation tool to examine the potential value of different general classes of storage devices when providing both energy and ancillary services.

  6. Value of a Smart Grid System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Value of a Smart Grid System Value of a Smart Grid System Implementing a Smart Grid is the effort to move the electric grid from a "static" to a "dynamic" state. Doing so improves the efficiency, reliability and cost-effectiveness of the electrical system's operations, planning and maintenance and creates a system that is interactive with consumers and markets, allowing better energy and dollar savings. Below we summarize the value of the Smart Grid from six perspectives.

  7. A test of the 'one-point method' for estimating maximum carboxylation capacity from field-measured, light-saturated photosynthesis

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Martin G. De Kauwe; Serbin, Shawn P.; Lin, Yan -Shih; Wright, Ian J.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ellsworth, David S.; Maire, Vincent; Prentice, I. Colin; Atkin, Owen K.; et al

    2015-12-31

    Here, simulations of photosynthesis by terrestrial biosphere models typically need a specification of the maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax). Estimating this parameter using A–Ci curves (net photosynthesis, A, vs intercellular CO2 concentration, Ci) is laborious, which limits availability of Vcmax data. However, many multispecies field datasets include net photosynthetic rate at saturating irradiance and at ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration (Asat) measurements, from which Vcmax can be extracted using a ‘one-point method’.

  8. THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PDF icon THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1234 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 More Documents & Publications Economic Dispatch of Electric ...

  9. Object detection with a multistatic array using singular value decomposition

    DOEpatents

    Hallquist, Aaron T.; Chambers, David H.

    2014-07-01

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across a surface and that travels down the surface. The detection system converts the return signals from a time domain to a frequency domain, resulting in frequency return signals. The detection system then performs a singular value decomposition for each frequency to identify singular values for each frequency. The detection system then detects the presence of a subsurface object based on a comparison of the identified singular values to expected singular values when no subsurface object is present.

  10. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications Denholm, P.; Jorgenson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M. 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND...

  11. Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. EarnedValue-EV-AnalysisProjectAssessmentReportingSystem-PARS IIPresentationJanuary2013.pdf More...

  12. ARM Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol ...

  13. How to Estimate the Value of Service Reliability Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Michael J.; Mercurio, Matthew G.; Schellenberg, Josh A.; Eto, Joseph H.

    2010-06-08

    A robust methodology for estimating the value of service reliability improvements is presented. Although econometric models for estimating value of service (interruption costs) have been established and widely accepted, analysts often resort to applying relatively crude interruption cost estimation techniques in assessing the economic impacts of transmission and distribution investments. This paper first shows how the use of these techniques can substantially impact the estimated value of service improvements. A simple yet robust methodology that does not rely heavily on simplifying assumptions is presented. When a smart grid investment is proposed, reliability improvement is one of the most frequently cited benefits. Using the best methodology for estimating the value of this benefit is imperative. By providing directions on how to implement this methodology, this paper sends a practical, usable message to the industry.

  14. Value of Improved Short-Term Wind Power Forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.; Sharp, J.; Margulis, M.; Mcreavy, D.

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes an assessment of improved short-term wind power forecasting in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) market and provides a quantification of its potential value.

  15. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product Citation Details In-Document Search Title: G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) ...

  16. Department of Energy Earned Value Management Survey Results

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Humphreys & Associates, Inc. (H&A) conducted a survey of Department of Energy (DOE) Earned Value Management (EVM) and Project Management (PM) stakeholders.  Two versions of the survey were...

  17. Sales and Value Recognition for Zero Energy Ready Home Webinar...

    Energy Saver

    ... Now, anyone can go into this database here and plug in an ... The PV Value Tool offers a free Web-based tool that I'm ... So we all play a part in that. As Laura has already talked ...

  18. Gyrotron cavity resonator with an improved value of Q

    DOEpatents

    Stone, David S.; Shively, James F.

    1982-10-26

    A gyrotron cavity resonator is connected smoothly and directly to an output waveguide with a very gradually tapered wall so that values of external Q lower than twice the diffraction limit are obtainable.

  19. ZERH Webinar: Sales and Value Recognition of Zero Energy Ready...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ZERH Webinar: Sales and Value Recognition of Zero Energy Ready Homes December 18, 2014 12:00PM to 1:15PM EST GoToWebinar The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) ...

  20. Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value...

    Energy Saver

    Biomass in Pulverized Coal Plants Biopower Report Presents Methodology for Assessing the Value of Co-Firing Biomass in Pulverized Coal Plants November 20, 2014 - 12:22pm ...

  1. Variance control in weak-value measurement pointers

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, A. D.; Gray, J. E.

    2011-07-15

    The variance of an arbitrary pointer observable is considered for the general case that a complex weak value is measured using a complex valued pointer state. For the typical cases where the pointer observable is either its position or momentum, the associated expressions for the pointer's variance after the measurement contain a term proportional to the product of the weak value's imaginary part with the rate of change of the third central moment of position relative to the initial pointer state just prior to the time of the measurement interaction when position is the observable--or with the initial pointer state's third central moment of momentum when momentum is the observable. These terms provide a means for controlling pointer position and momentum variance and identify control conditions which, when satisfied, can yield variances that are smaller after the measurement than they were before the measurement. Measurement sensitivities which are useful for estimating weak-value measurement accuracies are also briefly discussed.

  2. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Value and Marketed Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural...

  3. Template:LabelValuePair | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    is typically used to display the results of an ask or sparql query in a simple label: value format. It is used by many pages, including the sub pages for country profiles, and is...

  4. Panel on Resource Efficiency and Supply Chain/Value Chain

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Panel on Resource Efficiency and Supply Chain/Value Chain: Session 1- Water / Energy / Materials Nexus Session 2 - Advanced Manufacturing through the Supply Chain / Value Chain AMO Peer Review Meeting June 14, 2016 Joe Cresko, DOE-AMO William Morrow, LBNL Samantha Reese, NREL Diane Graziano, ANL Sachin Nimbalkar, ORNL Water - Energy -Materials Nexus Water - Energy - Materials Nexus: Research Questions What are the foundational, interdependent effects of energy, water, and materials consumption

  5. Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation | Department of Energy Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation Enhancing Earned Value (EV) Analysis Using Project Assessment & Reporting System (PARS II) - Road Show Presentation This presentation was provided by the DOE Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (formerly DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management) in January 2013. It is about the

  6. Toward a New Paradigm for Valuing Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, Robert; Faruqui, Ahmad

    2006-05-15

    There is value in DR, but it needs to be evaluated correctly. The pricing experiment in California showed that well-designed dynamic pricing programs can have a significant impact on critical peak loads, and California's investor-owned utilities are using the experimental results to develop business cases for advanced metering. A key question in developing these business cases is how much value to attach to a kW of load that is curtailed during critical times. (author)

  7. ARM Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | Data Explorer Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product Title: ARM Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration, Nd, will increase and droplet size decrease, for a given liquid water path (Twomey 1977), which will greatly affect cloud albedo

  8. Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interpolated Sounding and Gridded Sounding Value-Added Products Standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sounding files provide atmospheric state data in one dimension of increasing time and height per sonde launch. Many applications require a quick estimate of the atmospheric state at higher time resolution. The

  9. Unlocking Customer Value: The Virtual Power Plant | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Unlocking Customer Value: The Virtual Power Plant Unlocking Customer Value: The Virtual Power Plant The utility world has changed drastically in the last 10 years. New technologies like Smart Meters and fully functional Smart Grid concepts have made large inroads into the utility space and no one should want to be left behind. Utilities also face additional pressures from regulatory bodies who are continuing to encourage carbon reduction and greater customer flexibility. Utilities need to

  10. CALCULATION OF STOPPING POWER VALUES AND RANGES OF FAST IONS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2003-03-18

    STOPOW calculates a set of stopping power values and ranges of fast ions in matter for any materials. Furthermore STOPOW can calculate a set of values for one special auxiliary function (e.g. kinematic factors, track structure parameters, time of flight or correction factors in the stopping function) . The user chooses the physical units for stopping powers and ranges and the energy range for calculations.

  11. Valuing Green in the Appraisal Process - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Valuing Green in the Appraisal Process - Building America Top Innovation Valuing Green in the Appraisal Process - Building America Top Innovation Real estate appraisers have historically faced challenges with green and energy efficient homes, both in identifying comparables and in supporting adjustments for improvements. These difficulties stem BARA Green Addendum Top Innov 2014-2.jpg from many reasons, including data gaps in commonly used information systems and lender

  12. Prototype indicators of value added through public involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, D.; Hixson, P.; Ramonas, L.

    1995-12-01

    As more managers realize that public input in public sector decision making is a given in the current political and social climate, many are turning to public involvement as a way to manage input so that it is beneficial to their decisions and projects. Public involvement is starting to become a familiar way of doing business for many Federal agencies and its contractors. Yet, many, if not most agency and contractor managers are still unclear about the value and costs that public involvement adds to their projects. Proponents claim that public involvement increases the acceptability of project goals by increasing stakeholders` knowledge about and involvement in decisions of importance to them. In spite of these assertions avowing the benefits of public involvement, proponents have not generated methods that demonstrate or provide evidence of such value added through incorporating public involvement into projects. As these questions about the value and costs of public involvement efforts increase, there is a pressing need to document the value and costs of public involvement for the participants in these processes--the stakeholders--and to present this information to decision makers in ways that help them assess the value and costs of managing public input through a public involvement program.

  13. RECOVERY OF THORIUM AND URANIUM VALUES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, G.D.

    1958-02-18

    This patent deals with the separation and recovery of uranium from monazite sand. After initial treatment of the sand with sodium hydroxide, a precipitate is obtuined which contains the uranium, thorium, rare earths and some phosphorus. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid. The bulk of the rare earths are removed from thls soiution by adding aa excess of alkali carbonate, causing precipitation of the rare earths together with part of the thorium present. The solution still contains a considerable amount of thorium, some rare earths, and practically all of the uranium originally present. Thorium and rare earth values are readily precipitated from such solution, and the uranium values thus isolated, by the addition of an excess hydrogen peroxide. The pH value of the solution is preferably adjusted to at least 9 prior to the addition of the peroxide.

  14. Extended space expectation values in quantum dynamical system evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Demiralp, Metin

    2014-10-06

    The time variant power series expansion for the expectation value of a given quantum dynamical operator is well-known and well-investigated issue in quantum dynamics. However, depending on the operator and Hamiltonian singularities this expansion either may not exist or may not converge for all time instances except the beginning of the evolution. This work focuses on this issue and seeks certain cures for the negativities. We work in the extended space obtained by adding all images of the initial wave function under the system Hamiltonians positive integer powers. This requires the introduction of certain appropriately defined weight operators. The resulting better convergence in the temporal power series urges us to call the new defined entities extended space expectation values even though they are constructed over certain weight operators and are somehow pseudo expectation values.

  15. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF THORIUM VALUES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Warf, J.C.

    1959-04-21

    The separation of thorium values from rare earth metals contained ln aqueous solutions by means of extraction with a water immiscible alkyl phosphate diluted with a hydrocarbon such as hexane is described. While the extraction according to this invention may be carried out from any aqueous salt solution, it is preferred to use solutions containing free mineral acid. Hydrochloric acid and in particular nitric acid are sultable in a concentration ranging from 0.1 to 7 normal. The higher acid concentration results in higher extraction values.

  16. Maryland Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31 60 39 20 44 29 34 1990's 22 29 33 28 26 22 0 118 63 18 2000's 34 32 22 48 34 46 NA NA NA NA 2010's NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  17. Missouri Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4 4 4 4 4 4 1990's 7 19 27 14 8 16 25 5 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  18. Arizona Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 26 10 0 0 0 0 1,360 1990's 2,125 1,225 730 548 691 500 405 401 411 439 2000's 332 266 243 426 306 211 588 634 503 695 2010's 165 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  19. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    This report explains the moisture-related concerns for high R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. In this project, hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones. The modeling program assessed the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage; the report presents results of the study.

  20. Analytic Challenges to Valuing Energy Storage Workshop Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has coordinated energy storage efforts from a research and development (R&D) perspective – identifying technology needs, metrics, and goals – but DOE and the research and analytic community have struggled with valuing storage at a systems level. Sixteen stakeholders and experts from across the electric power industry, research universities, national laboratories, and federal agencies were invited to join 8 DOE staff members in a workshop on September 19-20, 2011, in Washington, D.C. to discuss the current state of knowledge for grid-scale energy storage and, in particular, the methodologies to assess its value on the grid.

  1. Visualizing Value: Game-Changing Solar Technologies for Homeowners |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Visualizing Value: Game-Changing Solar Technologies for Homeowners Visualizing Value: Game-Changing Solar Technologies for Homeowners July 29, 2016 - 10:00am Addthis Sistine Solar’s completed SolarSkin installation on a Katahdin log cabin. The company’s SolarSkin panels seamlessly blend in with the cabin’s green roof. | Photo Courtesy of Sistine Solar Sistine Solar's completed SolarSkin installation on a Katahdin log cabin. The company's SolarSkin panels

  2. A test of the 'one-point method' for estimating maximum carboxylation capacity from field-measured, light-saturated photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin G. De Kauwe; Serbin, Shawn P.; Lin, Yan -Shih; Wright, Ian J.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ellsworth, David S.; Maire, Vincent; Prentice, I. Colin; Atkin, Owen K.; Rogers, Alistair; Niinemets, Ulo; Meir, Patrick; Uddling, Johan; Togashi, Henrique F.; Tarvainen, Lasse; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Evans, Bradley J.; Ishida, F. Yoko; Domingues, Tomas F.

    2015-12-31

    Here, simulations of photosynthesis by terrestrial biosphere models typically need a specification of the maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax). Estimating this parameter using A–Ci curves (net photosynthesis, A, vs intercellular CO2 concentration, Ci) is laborious, which limits availability of Vcmax data. However, many multispecies field datasets include net photosynthetic rate at saturating irradiance and at ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration (Asat) measurements, from which Vcmax can be extracted using a ‘one-point method’.

  3. System and method employing a minimum distance and a load feature database to identify electric load types of different electric loads

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yi; Sharma, Santosh K; Zambare, Prachi; Madane, Mayura A

    2014-12-23

    A method identifies electric load types of a plurality of different electric loads. The method includes providing a load feature database of a plurality of different electric load types, each of the different electric load types including a first load feature vector having at least four different load features; sensing a voltage signal and a current signal for each of the different electric loads; determining a second load feature vector comprising at least four different load features from the sensed voltage signal and the sensed current signal for a corresponding one of the different electric loads; and identifying by a processor one of the different electric load types by determining a minimum distance of the second load feature vector to the first load feature vector of the different electric load types of the load feature database.

  4. Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

    2012-10-31

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

  5. Maryland Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NA 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) NA 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) NA 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 43 34 44 32 20 27

  6. Michigan Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    151,886 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 496,371 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 3.79 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 131,118 138,162 129,333 123,622 115,065 107,634

  7. Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    73,721 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 307,738 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.17 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 73,721 81,487 63,843 59,272 54,446 58,207

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 1984-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 0 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 1967-1997 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) NA NA NA 9 3 1

  9. Montana Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7,539 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 318,286 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 3.64 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 87,539 74,624 66,954 63,242 59,160 57,421

  10. Nebraska Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,231 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 8,888 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 3.98 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 2,231 1,959 1,328 1,032 417 477

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NA 2006-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) NA 0 0 0 0 2006-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) NA 2006-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 4 3 4 3 3 3 1991

  12. Alabama Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    212,769 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 994,688 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.46 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 222,932 195,581 215,710 196,326 181,060 168,249

  13. Alaska Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    316,546 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 1,185,249 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 3.17 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 374,226 356,225 351,259 338,182 345,310 343,534

  14. Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    165 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 753 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.11 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 183 168 117 72 106 95

  15. California Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    251,559 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 1,396,916 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.87 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 286,841 250,177 246,822 252,310 238,988 231,060

  16. New York Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    35,241 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 166,532 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.65 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201 17,829

  17. North Dakota Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,837 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 320,783 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 3.92 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 81,837 97,102 172,242 235,711 326,491 471,504

  18. Ohio Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    78,122 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 362,000 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.63 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 78,122 78,858 84,482 166,017 512,371 1,014,848

  19. Oregon Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    376 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 6,919 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.92 1979-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 1,407 1,344 770 770 1,142 848 1979

  20. Value of Underground Storage in Today's Natural Gas Industry, The

    Reports and Publications

    1995-01-01

    This report explores the significant and changing role of storage in the industry by examining the value of natural gas storage; short-term relationships between prices, storage levels, and weather; and some longer term impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) Order 636.

  1. Tennessee Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5,144 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 22,384 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.35 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276

  2. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-06-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  3. Utah Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    385,917 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 1,825,566 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.23 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 432,045 457,525 490,393 470,863 454,545 423,300

  4. Indiana Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6,802 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 28,058 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.13 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 7,25

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    325,591 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 1,372,159 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.23 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 324,720 309,124 296,299 292,467 286,480 285,236

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    135,355 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 604,675 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.47 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775

  7. The Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Hummon, Marissa; Jenkin, Thomas; Palchak, David; Kirby, Brendan; Ma, Ookie; O'Malley, Mark

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  8. Commercial Demonstration of Wood Recovery, Recycling, and Value Adding Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Auburn Machinery, Inc.

    2004-07-15

    This commercial demonstration project demonstrated the technical feasibility of converting low-value, underutilized and waste stream solid wood fiber material into higher valued products. With a growing need to increase product/production yield and reduce waste in most sawmills, few recovery operations and practically no data existed to support the viability of recovery operations. Prior to our efforts, most all in the forest products industry believed that recovery was difficult, extremely labor intensive, not cost effective, and that recovered products had low value and were difficult to sell. This project provided an opportunity for many within the industry to see through demonstration that converting waste stream material into higher valued products does in fact offer a solution. Our work, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, throughout the project aimed to demonstrate a reasonable approach to reducing the millions of recoverable solid wood fiber tons that are annually treated as and converted into low value chips, mulch and fuel. Consequently sawmills continue to suffer from reduced availability of forest resources, higher raw material costs, growing waste disposal problems, increased global competition, and more pressure to operate in an Environmentally Friendly manner. It is our belief (based upon the experience of this project) that the successful mainstreaming of the recovery concept would assist in alleviating this burden as well as provide for a realistically achievable economic benefit to those who would seriously pursue the concept and tap into the rapidly growing ''GREEN'' building marketplace. Ultimately, with participation and aggressive pursuit of the recovery concept, the public would benefit in that: (1) Landfill/disposal waste volume could be reduced adding greater life to existing municipal landfill sites thereby minimizing the need to prematurely license and open added facilities. Also, there would be a cost avoidance benefit associated

  9. Tennessee Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,950 5,022 4,686 3,464 2,707 2,100 1,900 1990's 2,067 1,856 1,770 1,660 1,990 1,820 1,690 1,510 1,420 1,230 2000's 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 2,663 3,942 4,700 5,478 2010's 5,144 - = No Data Reported; --

  10. Texas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,227,995 6,630,246 6,367,936 6,465,964 6,414,021 6,386,544 6,276,968 1990's 6,476,032 6,066,256 5,893,069 5,769,437 5,834,671 5,592,323 4,684,140 4,716,304 4,777,945 5,719,128 2000's 5,869,901 5,159,233 5,166,315

  11. Pennsylvania Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 118,372 166,342 150,234 159,889 163,318 167,089 191,774 1990's 177,609 152,500 138,675 189,443 187,113 177,139 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  12. Louisiana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,149,192 3,650,412 3,179,306 2,986,468 3,243,795 3,158,903 3,066,789 1990's 3,780,551 3,355,867 3,404,963 3,454,646 3,562,360 3,709,015 3,976,305 5,398,216 5,410,523 5,265,670 2000's 3,587,815 1,529,733 1,365,925

  13. Michigan Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 138,910 144,537 131,855 127,287 146,996 146,145 155,988 1990's 106,193 189,497 190,637 199,746 216,268 238,203 245,740 305,950 278,076 277,364 2000's 296,556 275,036 274,476 236,987 259,681 261,112 NA NA 153,130

  14. Mississippi Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 211,116 206,871 178,426 197,217 195,299 196,912 148,167 1990's 149,012 126,637 129,340 131,450 105,646 95,349 88,805 98,075 88,723 83,232 2000's 70,965 76,986 112,979 133,901 145,692 52,923 60,531 73,460 96,641

  15. Montana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 47,751 47,534 46,113 42,203 42,814 47,748 52,044 1990's 45,998 48,075 50,359 58,810 51,953 46,739 46,868 50,409 51,967 55,780 2000's 67,294 78,493 86,075 86,027 90,771 101,666 106,843 110,942 802,619 293,941 2010's

  16. Nebraska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,091 2,300 1,944 1,403 1,261 910 878 1990's 793 785 1,177 1,375 2,098 1,538 1,332 1,194 1,285 1,049 2000's 879 883 892 1,168 1,172 1,172 NA 1,555 3,082 2,908 2010's 2,231 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  17. Ohio Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 149,096 184,651 180,458 180,287 164,960 166,690 159,730 1990's 154,619 146,189 143,381 135,939 130,855 125,085 119,251 116,246 108,542 102,505 2000's 98,551 97,272 103,158 120,081 119,847 83,523 86,315 88,095 84,858

  18. Oklahoma Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,730,061 1,985,869 1,936,341 1,917,493 2,004,797 2,106,632 2,185,204 1990's 2,186,153 2,119,161 1,937,224 2,005,971 1,879,257 1,765,788 1,751,487 1,452,233 1,644,531 1,577,961 2000's 1,612,890 1,477,058 1,456,375

  19. Oregon Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 3,221 1,923 1,439 1,173 1,067 1,291 2000's 1,214 1,069 837 688 467 433 NA 390 751 751 2010's 1,376 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  20. Recommended values of clean metal surface work functions

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, Gregory N. Kern, Megan E.; Worth, Eli H.

    2015-11-15

    A critical review of the experimental literature for measurements of the work functions of clean metal surfaces of single-crystals is presented. The tables presented include all results found for low-index crystal faces except cases that were known to be contaminated surfaces. These results are used to construct a recommended value of the work function for each surface examined, along with an uncertainty estimate for that value. The uncertainties are based in part on the error distribution for all measured work functions in the literature, which is included here. The metals included in this review are silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iridium (Ir), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W)

  1. Graphics processing units accelerated semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tamascelli, Dario; Dambrosio, Francesco Saverio; Conte, Riccardo; Ceotto, Michele

    2014-05-07

    This paper presents a Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) implementation of the Semiclassical Initial Value Representation (SC-IVR) propagator for vibrational molecular spectroscopy calculations. The time-averaging formulation of the SC-IVR for power spectrum calculations is employed. Details about the GPU implementation of the semiclassical code are provided. Four molecules with an increasing number of atoms are considered and the GPU-calculated vibrational frequencies perfectly match the benchmark values. The computational time scaling of two GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C2075 and Kepler K20), respectively, versus two CPUs (Intel Core i5 and Intel Xeon E5-2687W) and the critical issues related to the GPU implementation are discussed. The resulting reduction in computational time and power consumption is significant and semiclassical GPU calculations are shown to be environment friendly.

  2. Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 211,569 211,579 222,637 304,841 271,120 228,284 192,760 1990's 191,798 200,557 206,259 224,786 201,891 227,797 193,278 191,017 192,982 186,727 2000's 189,896 197,735 200,871 199,616 413,667 502,887 494,323

  3. Arkansas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 78,097 75,575 86,552 68,206 42,688 102,046 42,226 1990's 99,456 83,864 85,177 122,596 24,326 180,117 76,671 71,449 61,012 54,382 2000's 55,057 16,901 161,871 166,329 183,299 190,533 193,491 269,886 446,551 680,613

  4. California Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) California Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 282,639 343,079 361,739 329,366 346,720 327,399 283,509 1990's 275,738 211,841 195,515 76,381 199,649 263 37,823 219,216 264,810 382,715 2000's 323,864 328,778 309,399 293,691 276,520 274,817 278,933 268,016

  5. Station-based Surface Data Value-Added Product

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    51 Station-based Surface Data Value-Added Product Q Tang S Xie July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

  6. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; Tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23

    Significantly improved returns in their aerosol chemistry data can be achieved via the development of a value-added product (VAP) of deriving OA components, called Organic Aerosol Components (OACOMP). OACOMP is primarily based on multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix. The key outputs of OACOMP are the concentration time series and the mass spectra of OA factors that are associated with distinct sources, formation and evolution processes, and physicochemical properties.

  7. Louisiana Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,140,525 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 9,345,006 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.23 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 2,210,099 3,029,206 2,955,437 2,360,202 1,960,813 1,776,800

  8. Arkansas Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    936,600 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 3,556,609 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 3.84 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 926,639 1,072,212 1,146,168 1,139,654 1,122,733 1,010,274

  9. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  10. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, Chitra

    2013-07-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise status update for value-added products (VAP) implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new VAPs for which development has begun, (2) progress on existing VAPs, (3) future VAPs that have been recently approved, (4) other work that leads to a VAP, and (5) top requested VAPs from the archive.

  12. Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,318,486 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 9,913,756 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.30 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 2,305,525 2,159,422 2,022,275 1,858,207 1,794,413 1,793,716

  13. New Mexico Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,287,399 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 6,878,560 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 5.32 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 1,292,185 1,237,303 1,215,773 1,171,640 1,229,519 1,244,811

  14. Oklahoma Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,408,061 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 8,606,898 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.71 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 1,827,328 1,888,870 2,023,461 1,993,754 2,331,086 2,499,599

  15. Microsoft Word - Web Posting for Earned Value Management.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7,470,752 1983-2010 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 31,535,019 0 0 0 0 1989-2014 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.70 1967-2010 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 6,715,294 7,112,863 7,475,495 7,633,618 7,985,019 7,880,530

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    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1980-2006 Imputed Wellhead Value of Marketed Production (Thousand Dollars) 1989-2006 Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.) 4.48 3.95 2.66 NA NA NA 1922-2015 Marketed Production (Million Cubic Ft.) 22,381,873 24,036,352 25,283,278 25,562,232 27,497,754 28,752,935 1900

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Grid-Interactive Renewable Water Heating Economic and Environmental Value Grid-interactive renewable water heaters have smart controls that quickly change their charge rate and charge level, factoring in renewable generation and other critical needs of the grid; thereby significantly reducing carbon emissions and bringing a new dimension of conservation and efficiency to the electric grid. The Steffes grid-interactive renewable water heater controller provides utilities with an affordable and