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Sample records for unit varies consumption

  1. Visualization of United States Energy Consumption | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Consumption Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Visualization of United States Energy Consumption AgencyCompany Organization: Energy Information...

  2. Visualization of United States Renewable Consumption | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Visualization of United States Renewable Consumption AgencyCompany Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User...

  3. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ...

  4. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  5. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  6. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  7. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  8. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  9. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  10. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  11. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  12. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  13. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  14. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  15. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  16. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  17. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  18. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  19. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  20. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  1. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  2. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  3. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  4. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  5. Fact #839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues to Rise despite Declines from the United States and Europe- Dataset

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #839: World Petroleum Consumption Continues to Rise despite Declines from the United States and Europe

  6. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  7. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    2011-05-09

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and

  8. A High Spatiotemporal Assessment of Consumptive Water Use and Water Scarcity in the Conterminous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Brandon C.; Coleman, André M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Skaggs, Richard L.; Venteris, Erik R.

    2015-08-15

    Increasing demands for energy production and national objectives for securing energy independence from domestic sources of energy, both renewable and non-renewable, are heavily dependent on available water resources. This explicit interdependency between energy production and required water resources is commonly referred to as the “water-energy nexus” The competition for available water resources can, in part, be understood by evaluating the quantity, timing and spatial distribution of water availability and use. The location and timing at which water is available and consumed dominantly affects the extent to which not only energy and water influence one another, but also the greater cross-sector dependencies that for example, influence agriculture, industry, environment, economics, and social well-being. The understanding of water resources and its use, from a spatiotemporal perspective, is critical for shaping future water use policy and management, planning for change-based impacts at the local level, and resolving prevalent issues and priorities now and into the future. To this end, we present a systematic method for both spatial and temporal disaggregation of United States Geological Survey (USGS) annual, county-scale water use data to a consistent 1/8° spatial resolution at a monthly time-step. The utility of this approach and the resulting data are demonstrated by examining water scarcity at varying spatiotemporal resolutions in the context of food and energy security.

  9. A High Spatiotemporal Assessment of Consumptive Water Use and Water Scarcity in the Conterminous United States

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Moore, Brandon C.; Coleman, André M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Skaggs, Richard L.; Venteris, Erik R.

    2015-08-15

    Increasing demands for energy production and national objectives for securing energy independence from domestic sources of energy, both renewable and non-renewable, are heavily dependent on available water resources. This explicit interdependency between energy production and required water resources is commonly referred to as the “water-energy nexus” The competition for available water resources can, in part, be understood by evaluating the quantity, timing and spatial distribution of water availability and use. The location and timing at which water is available and consumed dominantly affects the extent to which not only energy and water influence one another, but also the greater cross-sectormore » dependencies that for example, influence agriculture, industry, environment, economics, and social well-being. The understanding of water resources and its use, from a spatiotemporal perspective, is critical for shaping future water use policy and management, planning for change-based impacts at the local level, and resolving prevalent issues and priorities now and into the future. To this end, we present a systematic method for both spatial and temporal disaggregation of United States Geological Survey (USGS) annual, county-scale water use data to a consistent 1/8° spatial resolution at a monthly time-step. The utility of this approach and the resulting data are demonstrated by examining water scarcity at varying spatiotemporal resolutions in the context of food and energy security.« less

  10. Fact #839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues to Rise despite Declines from the United States and Europe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 1980 to 2013, overall world petroleum consumption has increased from 63 to 90 million barrels per day. Overall consumption is the total of the individual countries/regions shown below....

  11. Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value

  12. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per

  13. " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic

  14. Survey Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  15. Fact #839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Consumption Continues to Rise despite Declines from the United States and Europe - Dataset Fact 839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues to ...

  16. Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption

    Reports and Publications

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census division (1998 through 2009).

  17. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of...

  18. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    This report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990, is based upon data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Focusing on energy end-use consumption and expenditures of households, the 1990 RECS is the eighth in a series conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Over 5,000 households were surveyed, providing information on their housing units, housing characteristics, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information provided represents the characteristics and energy consumption of 94 million households nationwide.

  19. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-10

    Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1987, Part 1: National Data is the second publication in a series from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is prepared by the Energy End Use Division (EEUD) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Information Administration (EIA). The EIA collects and publishes comprehensive data on energy consumption in occupied housing units in the residential sector through the RECS. 15 figs., 50 tabs.

  20. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4...

  1. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  2. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  3. Transportation sector energy consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Chapter 8 Transportation sector energy consumption Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, transportation sector delivered energy consumption ...

  4. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household RECS 2009 - Release date: June 6, 2012 Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units

  5. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

  6. " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2010; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;" " Unit: Physical Units." ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum" "Energy Sources","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)" ,"Total United States" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",745247,727194,770790

  7. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  8. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption and Expenditures Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Consumption Wood and Solar Energy Consumption Fuel Oil and District Heat Consumption Energy Consumption in...

  9. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  10. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  11. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Information Resources » Publications » Market Studies » Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3)

  12. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Truşcă, M. R. C. Albert, Ş. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. Fărcaş, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  13. All Consumption Tables.vp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004...

  14. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  15. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  16. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  17. Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy use intensities in commercial buildings vary widely and depend on activity and climate, as shown in this data table, which was derived from the Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey.

  18. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    This report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990, is based upon data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Focusing on energy end-use consumption and expenditures of households, the 1990 RECS is the eighth in a series conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Over 5,000 households were surveyed, providing information on their housing units, housing characteristics, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information provided represents the characteristics and energy consumption of 94 million households nationwide.

  19. Residential energy consumption across different population groups: Comparative analysis for Latino and non-Latino households in U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Henderson, L.

    1998-05-01

    Residential energy cost, an important part of the household budget, varies significantly across different population groups. In the United States, researchers have conducted many studies of household fuel consumption by fuel type -- electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) -- and by geographic areas. The results of past research have also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest-growing population group in the United States, has not been explained by economic and noneconomic factors in any available statistical model. This paper presents a discussion of energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States. The statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households is based on Stone and Geary`s linear expenditure system model. For comparison, the authors also developed models for energy consumption in non-Latino, black, and nonblack households. These models estimate consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. The study revealed significant variations in the patterns of fuel consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researchers, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups.

  20. Total U.S. Housing Units...................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Space Heating Usage Indicators Million U.S. Housing Units Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing ...

  1. Industrial sector energy consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Chapter 7 Industrial sector energy consumption Overview The industrial sector uses more delivered energy 294 than any other end-use sector, consuming about 54% of the world's total ...

  2. DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  3. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-22

    This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

  4. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage patterns, and household demographics. This information is combined with data from energy suppliers to these homes to estimate

  5. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  6. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond ... Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond ...

  7. Residential energy consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1982-March 1983. Part 1, national data

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from April 1982 through March 1983. Data on the consumption of wood for this period are also presented. The consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills, obtained, with the permission of the household. from the companies supplying energy to the household. Data on wood consumption are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the winter and are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors described in the report. These data come from the 1982 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the fifth in a series of comparable surveys beginning in 1978. The 1982 survey is the first survey to include, as part of its sample, a portion of the same households interviewed in the 1980 survey. A separate report is planned to report these longitudinal data. This summary gives the highlights of a comparison of the findings for the 5 years of RECS data. The data cover all types of housing units in the 50 states and the District of Columbia including single-family units, apartments, and mobile homes. For households with indirect energy costs, such as costs that are included in the rent or paid by third parties, the sonsumption and expenditures data are estimated and included in the figures reported here. The average household consumption of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and LPG dropped in 1982 from the previous year, hitting a 5-year low since the first Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was conducted in 1978. The average consumption was 103 (+-3) million Btu per household in 1982, down from 114 (+-) million Btu in 1981. The weather was the main contributing factor. 8 figures, 46 tables.

  8. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  9. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18

  10. Health Care Buildings: Consumption Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption Tables Sum of Major Fuel Consumption by Size and Type of Health Care Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per...

  11. User-needs study for the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. [Energy Consumption Series

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) that is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the primary source of energy data for commercial buildings in the United States. The survey began in 1979 and has subsequently been conducted in 1983, 1986, and 1989. The next survey will cover energy consumption during the year 1992. The building characteristic data will be collected between August 1992 and early December 1992. Requests for energy consumption data are mailed to the energy suppliers in January 1993, with data due by March 1993. Before each survey is sent into the field, the data users' needs are thoroughly assessed. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of that user-needs assessment for the 1992 survey.

  12. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Technical Documentation | Department of Energy Technical Documentation Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Technical Documentation This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical methods used in the DOE Report to Congress on the impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. Technical Documentation for Report to Congress (3.65 MB) More Documents & Publications Impact of Extended

  13. International Energy Outlook 2016-Transportation sector energy consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    - Energy Information Administration 8. Transportation sector energy consumption print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, transportation sector delivered energy consumption increases at an annual average rate of 1.4%, from 104 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2012 to 155 quadrillion Btu in 2040. Transportation energy demand growth occurs almost entirely in regions outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

  14. Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin; Salapura, Valentina; Sugavanam, Krishnan; Hoenicke, Dirk

    2012-01-24

    Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth dynamically changes the depth of prefetching so that the number of multiple streams as well as the hit rate of a single stream are optimized. The method and apparatus in one aspect monitor a plurality of load requests from a processing unit for data in a prefetch buffer, determine an access pattern associated with the plurality of load requests and adjust a prefetch depth according to the access pattern.

  15. Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Airaksinen, Riikka; Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu; Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune; Mannio, Jaakko; Hallikainen, Anja

    2010-08-15

    Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

  16. Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Patinkin, L.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

  17. DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents comprising a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. * Wood used for heating. Although wood consumption data...

  18. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733

  19. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP

  20. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  1. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    or commercial trucks (See Table 1). Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 5 The 1991 RTECS count includes vehicles that were owned or used...

  2. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the...

  3. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual...

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991...

  5. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

  6. Housing characteristics, 1987: Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-26

    This report is the first of a series of reports based on data from the 1987 RECS. The 1987 RECS is the seventh in the series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers. These surveys provide baseline information on how households in the United States use energy. A cross section of housing types such as single-family detached homes, townhouses, large and small apartment buildings, condominiums, and mobile homes were included in the survey. Data from the RECS and a companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public use tapes. 10 figs., 69 tabs.

  7. Fractal analysis of time varying data

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Sadana, Ajit

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of time varying data, such as an electrical signal, are analyzed by converting the data from a temporal domain into a spatial domain pattern. Fractal analysis is performed on the spatial domain pattern, thereby producing a fractal dimension D.sub.F. The fractal dimension indicates the regularity of the time varying data.

  8. United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    page. Country Profile Name United States Population 320,206,000 GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO...

  9. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were

  10. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Canadian Energy Demand

    Reports and Publications

    2015-01-01

    The residential sector is one of the main end-use sectors in Canada accounting for 16.7% of total end-use site energy consumption in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012. pp, 4-5). In this year, the residential sector accounted for 54.5% of buildings total site energy consumption. Between 1990 and 2009, Canadian household energy consumption grew by less than 11%. Nonetheless, households contributed to 14.6% of total energy-related greenhouse gas emissions in Canada in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012). This is the U.S. Energy Information Administrations second study to help provide a better understanding of the factors impacting residential energy consumption and intensity in North America (mainly the United States and Canada) by using similar methodology for analyses in both countries.

  11. US ENC IL Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  12. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  13. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33%

  14. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  15. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than

  16. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2007 | Department of Energy 8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) held 69% of the world's crude oil reserves and produced 41% of world

  17. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    for 1994, will continue the 3-year cycle. The RTECS, a subsample of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), is an integral part of a series of surveys designed by...

  18. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    16.8 17.4 18.6 18.9 1.7 2.2 0.6 1.5 Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 15 Vehicle Miles Traveled per Vehicle (Thousand) . . . . . . . . ....

  19. 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    U S C E N S U S B U R E A U 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Sponsored by the Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Administered and Compiled by ...

  20. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of...

  1. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  2. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  3. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL

  4. Computer usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    SciTech Connect

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Fuchs, Heidi; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah; Young, Scott

    2014-12-01

    The electricity consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads (MELs) in the home has grown in recent years, and is expected to continue rising. Consumer electronics, in particular, are characterized by swift technological innovation, with varying impacts on energy use. Desktop and laptop computers make up a significant share of MELs electricity consumption, but their national energy use is difficult to estimate, given uncertainties around shifting user behavior. This report analyzes usage data from 64 computers (45 desktop, 11 laptop, and 8 unknown) collected in 2012 as part of a larger field monitoring effort of 880 households in the San Francisco Bay Area, and compares our results to recent values from the literature. We find that desktop computers are used for an average of 7.3 hours per day (median = 4.2 h/d), while laptops are used for a mean 4.8 hours per day (median = 2.1 h/d). The results for laptops are likely underestimated since they can be charged in other, unmetered outlets. Average unit annual energy consumption (AEC) for desktops is estimated to be 194 kWh/yr (median = 125 kWh/yr), and for laptops 75 kWh/yr (median = 31 kWh/yr). We estimate national annual energy consumption for desktop computers to be 20 TWh. National annual energy use for laptops is estimated to be 11 TWh, markedly higher than previous estimates, likely reflective of laptops drawing more power in On mode in addition to greater market penetration. This result for laptops, however, carries relatively higher uncertainty compared to desktops. Different study methodologies and definitions, changing usage patterns, and uncertainty about how consumers use computers must be considered when interpreting our results with respect to existing analyses. Finally, as energy consumption in On mode is predominant, we outline several energy savings opportunities: improved power management (defaulting to low-power modes after periods of inactivity as well as power scaling), matching the rated power

  5. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  6. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  7. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  8. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot...

  9. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot (gallons)","per Worker...

  10. ,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  11. ,"Florida Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption ... 10:36:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption ...

  12. ,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption ... 10:36:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption ...

  13. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ... 12:00:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ...

  14. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption ...

  15. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:20 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  16. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption ...

  17. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" ...

  18. 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ...... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by ...

  19. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  1. ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 6:36:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand)...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the...

  6. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

  7. Vehicle Energy Consumption and Performance Analysis | Argonne...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption and Performance Analysis Vehicle Energy Consumption and Performance Analysis Argonne researchers have applied their expertise in modeling, simulation and control to ...

  8. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:14 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

  10. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  1. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ... 7:09:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ...

  2. Inconsistent Investment and Consumption Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kronborg, Morten Tolver; Steffensen, Mogens

    2015-06-15

    In a traditional Black–Scholes market we develop a verification theorem for a general class of investment and consumption problems where the standard dynamic programming principle does not hold. The theorem is an extension of the standard Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equation in the form of a system of non-linear differential equations. We derive the optimal investment and consumption strategy for a mean-variance investor without pre-commitment endowed with labor income. In the case of constant risk aversion it turns out that the optimal amount of money to invest in stocks is independent of wealth. The optimal consumption strategy is given as a deterministic bang-bang strategy. In order to have a more realistic model we allow the risk aversion to be time and state dependent. Of special interest is the case were the risk aversion is inversely proportional to present wealth plus the financial value of future labor income net of consumption. Using the verification theorem we give a detailed analysis of this problem. It turns out that the optimal amount of money to invest in stocks is given by a linear function of wealth plus the financial value of future labor income net of consumption. The optimal consumption strategy is again given as a deterministic bang-bang strategy. We also calculate, for a general time and state dependent risk aversion function, the optimal investment and consumption strategy for a mean-standard deviation investor without pre-commitment. In that case, it turns out that it is optimal to take no risk at all.

  3. International Energy Outlook 2016-Industrial sector energy consumption -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Energy Information Administration 7. Industrial sector energy consumption print version Overview The industrial sector uses more delivered energy [294] than any other end-use sector, consuming about 54% of the world's total delivered energy. The industrial sector can be categorized by three distinct industry types: energy-intensive manufacturing, nonenergy-intensive manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing (Table 7-1). The mix and intensity of fuels consumed in the industrial sector vary across

  4. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    SciTech Connect

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-04

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  5. Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End ...

  6. Florida Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Total ...

  7. Florida Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End ...

  8. West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  9. Virginia Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by ...

  10. West Virginia Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption ...

  11. Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  12. Nevada Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End ...

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  14. Kansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Natural ...

  15. New York Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption New York Natural Gas Consumption by ...

  16. New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by ...

  17. New Jersey Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Jersey Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  18. New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  20. New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by ...

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption ...

  2. North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  3. North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  4. Minnesota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Consumption Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36% Government Owned 105.3 28% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (thousand Btu/SF) 1) Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, June 2006,

  6. "PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008" ,,,"FY","20XX" "Agency:","Department of X",,,"Prepared by:" "Date:",,,,"Phone:" "PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA" "1-1. NECPA/E.O. 13423 Goal Subject Buildings" "Energy Type","Consumption Units","Annual Consumption","Annual Cost (Thou. $)","Unit Cost ($)",,"Site-Delivered Btu

  7. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to

  8. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less

  9. Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

  10. Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

  11. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  12. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"West South Central","Moun- tain","Pacific","West South Central","Moun-...

  13. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 2003","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  14. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West North...

  15. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone 4","Zone 5","Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone...

  16. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 2003","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  17. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  18. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  19. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West North...

  20. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  1. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  2. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  3. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  4. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone 4","Zone 5","Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone...

  5. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 1999","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  6. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"West South Central","Moun- tain","Pacific","West South Central","Moun-...

  7. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 1999","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  8. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (million square feet)",,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  9. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    90,1024,3251,1511,"Q",106.6,97.3,100.6 "Office ...",305,325,329,175,3012,2989,3782,2425,101.2,108.8,87,72.1 "Public Assembly ...",93,103,109,64,1048,...

  10. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9,60,56.7,43.1,31.4,22.1 "1990 to 1999 ...",69,87,51,93,34,1735,1988,1202,3012,1267,40,43.8,42.4,30.9,26.9 "2000 to 2003 ...",23,40,"Q",28,15,693,1086,7...

  11. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Floorspace - Housing Characteristics PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.1.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.1.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.1.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.1.4) PDF XLS Usage Indicators Heated Floorspace

  12. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Where does RECS square footage data come from? RECS 2009 - Release date: July 11, 2012 The size of a home is a fixed characteristic strongly associated with the amount of energy consumed within it, particularly for space heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other appliances. As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow

  13. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  14. Time varying arctic climate change amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, Petr; Dubey, Manvendra K; Lesins, Glen; Wang, Muyin

    2009-01-01

    During the past 130 years the global mean surface air temperature has risen by about 0.75 K. Due to feedbacks -- including the snow/ice albedo feedback -- the warming in the Arctic is expected to proceed at a faster rate than the global average. Climate model simulations suggest that this Arctic amplification produces warming that is two to three times larger than the global mean. Understanding the Arctic amplification is essential for projections of future Arctic climate including sea ice extent and melting of the Greenland ice sheet. We use the temperature records from the Arctic stations to show that (a) the Arctic amplification is larger at latitudes above 700 N compared to those within 64-70oN belt, and that, surprisingly; (b) the ratio of the Arctic to global rate of temperature change is not constant but varies on the decadal timescale. This time dependence will affect future projections of climate changes in the Arctic.

  15. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  16. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2010; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  17. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  18. table6.3_02.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2002; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  19. table6.4_02.xls

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2002; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  20. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  1. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar ...

  2. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  3. Household vehicles energy consumption 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

  4. Household and environmental characteristics related to household energy-consumption change: A human ecological approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study focused on the family household as an organism and on its interaction with the three environments of the human ecosystem (natural, behavioral, and constructed) as these influence energy consumption and energy-consumption change. A secondary statistical analysis of data from the US Department of Energy Residential Energy Consumption Surveys (RECS) was completed. The 1980 and 1983 RECS were used as the data base. Longitudinal data, including household, environmental, and energy-consumption measures, were available for over 800 households. The households were selected from a national sample of owner-occupied housing units surveyed in both years. Results showed a significant( p = <.05) relationship between the dependent-variable energy-consumption change and the predictor variables heating degree days, addition of insulation, addition of a wood-burning stove, year the housing unit was built, and weighted number of appliances. A significant (p = <.05) relationship was found between the criterion variable energy-consumption change and the discriminating variables of age of the head of the household, cooling degree days, heating degree days, year the housing unit was built, and number of stories in the housing unit.

  5. Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Rashmi; Shah, Nihar; Phadke, Amol

    2012-07-01

    Evaporative coolers (ECs) provide significant gains in energy efficiency compared to vapor compression air conditioners, but simultaneously have significant onsite water demand. This can be a major barrier to deployment in areas of the world with hot and arid climates. To address this concern, this study determined where in the world evaporative cooling is suitable, the water consumption of ECs in these cities, and the potential that greywater can be used reduce the consumption of potable water in ECs. ECs covered 69percent of the cities where room air conditioners are may be deployed, based on comfort conditions alone. The average water consumption due to ECs was found to be 400 L/household/day in the United States and Australia, with the potential for greywater to provide 50percent this amount. In the rest of the world, the average water consumption was 250 L/household/day, with the potential for greywater to supply 80percent of this amount. Home size was the main factor that contributed to this difference. In the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Northern India, and the Midwestern and Southwestern United States alkalinity levels are high and water used for bleeding will likely contribute significantly to EC water consumption. Although technically feasible, upfront costs for household GW systems are currently high. In both developed and developing parts of the world, however, a direct EC and GW system is cost competitive with conventional vapor compression air conditioners. Moreover, in regions of the world that face problems of water scarcity the benefits can substantially outweigh the costs.

  6. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  7. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection

  8. ,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    10:36:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SFL2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  10. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam Radius Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the ...

  11. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  12. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... foot at a pressure base of 14.73 pounds standard per square inch absolute and a temperature base of 60 degrees Fahrenheit; Cubic meter is a unit of measure which equals 35.314 ...

  13. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at...

  14. Report to the United States Congress clean coal technology export markets and financing mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report responds to a Congressional Conference Report that requests that $625,000 in funding provided will be used by the Department to identify potential markets for clean coal technologies in developing countries and countries with economies in transition from nonmarket economies and to identify existing, or new, financial mechanisms or financial support to be provided by the Federal government that will enhance the ability of US industry to participate in these markets. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects world coal consumption to increase by 30 percent between 1990 and 2010, from 5.1 to 6.5 billion short tons. Five regions stand out as major foreign markets for the export of US clean coal technologies: China; The Pacific Rim (other than China); South Asia (primarily India); Transitional Economies (Central Europe and the Newly Independent States); and Other Markets (the Americas and Southern Africa). Nearly two-thirds of the expected worldwide growth in coal utilization will occur in China, one quarter in the United States. EIA forecasts nearly a billion tons per year of additional coal consumption in China between 1990 and 2010, a virtual doubling of that country`s coal consumption. A 30-percent increase in coal consumption is projected in other developing countries over that same period. This increase in coal consumption will be accompanied by an increase in demand for technologies for burning coal cost-effectively, efficiently and cleanly. In the Pacific Rim and South Asia, rapid economic growth coupled with substantial indigenous coal supplies combine to create a large potential market for CCTS. In Central Europe and the Newly Independent States, the challenge will be to correct the damage of decades of environmental neglect without adding to already-considerable economic disruption. Though the situation varies, all these countries share the basic need to use indigenous low-quality coal cleanly and efficiently.

  15. Resource demand growth and sustainability due to increased world consumption

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Balatsky, Galina I.; Borysov, Stanislav S.

    2015-03-20

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially neededmore » immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.« less

  16. Resource demand growth and sustainability due to increased world consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Balatsky, Galina I.; Borysov, Stanislav S.

    2015-03-20

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially needed immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.

  17. Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework

    SciTech Connect

    Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

    1991-01-01

    Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

  18. Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework

    SciTech Connect

    Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

    1991-12-31

    Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

  19. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  20. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  1. A structural analysis of natural gas consumption by income class from 1987 to 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This study had two major objectives: (1) assess and compare changes in natural gas consumption between 1987 and 1993 by income group and (2) assess the potential influence of energy policy on observed changes in natural gas consumption over time and across income groups. This analysis used U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data files and involved both the generation of simple descriptive statistics and the use of multivariate regression analysis. The consumption of natural gas by the groups was studied over a six-year period. The results showed that: (1) natural gas use was substantially higher for the highest income group than for the two lower income groups and (2) natural gas consumption declined for the lowest and middle income quintiles and increased for the highest income quintile between 1987 and 1990; between 1990 and 1993, consumption increased for the lowest and middle income quintile, but remained relatively constant for the highest income quintile. The relative importance of the structural and variable factors in explaining consumption changes between survey periods varies by income group. The analysis provides two major energy policy implications: (1) natural gas intensity has been the highest for the lowest income group, indicating that this group is more vulnerable to sudden changes in demand-indicator variables, in particular weather-related variables, than increase natural gas consumption, and (2) the fall in natural gas intensity between 1987 and 1993 may indicate that energy policy has had some impact on reducing natural gas consumption. 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. Florida Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Florida Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 ... Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  3. State Energy Data System 2014 Consumption Technical Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Consumption Technical Notes U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption 3 Purpose All of the estimates contained in the state energy consumption ...

  4. Package DX Units: Performance Optimization & Field Tests

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Package DX Units: Performance Optimization & Field Tests Michael West, PhD, PE Advantek Consulting Engineering, Inc. Mike.West@advantekinc.com EXPERT POWERED :: CLIENT DRIVEN Unitary equipment is ubiquitous.  60% of US commercial space is cooled with RTUs (DOE)  54% of commercial building cooling primary energy consumption (EIA)  Total annual installations over 300,000 units  Estimated 1.6 million legacy units operating at low efficiency levels 100,000 units at DoD facilities /

  5. Promising Technology: High-Efficiency Rooftop Units

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-efficiency rooftop air conditioning units (RTUs) can significantly reduce heating, cooling, and ventilation energy consumption. High efficiency RTUs incorporate variable speed controls to minimize fan and compressor energy while capturing and reusing heat, cold, and humidity from a building’s exhaust air.

  6. Energy consumption in thermomechanical pulping

    SciTech Connect

    Marton, R.; Tsujimoto, N.; Eskelinen, E.

    1981-08-01

    Various components of refining energy were determined experimentally and compared with those calculated on the basis of the dimensions of morphological elements of wood. The experimentally determined fiberization energy of spruce was 6 to 60 times larger than the calculated value and that of birch 3 to 15 times larger. The energy consumed in reducing the Canadian standard freeness of isolated fibers from 500 to 150 ml was found to be approximately 1/3 of the total fiber development energy for both spruce and birch TMP. Chip size affected the refining energy consumption; the total energy dropped by approximately 30% when chip size was reduced from 16 mm to 3 mm in the case of spruce and approximately 40% for birch. 6 refs.

  7. 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person Per capita energy consumption across all sectors of the economy. Click on a state for more information.

  8. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Appendix I Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption For information about how to obtain these publi- cations, see the inside cover of this report. Please note that the...

  10. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on a...

  11. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Energy Information Adminstration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

  12. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    in this report were based on monthly billing records submitted by the buildings' energy suppliers. The section, "Annual Consumption and Expenditures" provide a detailed...

  13. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  14. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1995...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    fuel oil, and district heat consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings by building characteristics. Previous Page Arrow Separater Bar File Last Modified: January 29,...

  15. ,"Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  16. Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    national concerns about dependence on foreign oil and the deleterious effect on the environment of fossil fuel combustion, residential vehicle fleet fuel consumption was...

  17. Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering Emissions By enabling process ...

  18. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC ...

  19. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Canadian...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Canadian Energy Demand June 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 ...

  20. ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GREENHOUSES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses Rafferty, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GREENHOUSES; AUXILIARY HEATING; CAPITALIZED COST; OPERATING...

  1. Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    t 7 Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, Preliminary Estimates, 1991 (See Page 1) This publication and other Energy Information Administration...

  2. Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    > Derived Annual Estimates - Executive Summary Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption, 1974-1988 Figure showing Derived Estimates Executive Summary This...

  3. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on...

  4. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: ...

  5. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projection...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    That increase in supply has in turn lowered the price of natural gas to manufacturers Manufacturing Energy Consumption Data Show Large Reductions in Both Manufacturing Energy Use ...

  6. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    This rise has occurred while Federal energy efficiency standards were enacted on every major appliance, overall household energy consumption actually decreased from 10.58 quads to ...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures per Building (thousand cubic feet) per Square Foot (cubic feet) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (cubic feetsquare foot) 25th...

  8. CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    consumption by major fuel, 1992 Divider Line To View andor Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties,...

  9. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census ...

  10. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 9 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing characteristics tables + EXPAND ALL Fuels used & end uses Preliminary release date: March 28, 2011 Final release date: May 6, 2013 ZIP (all tables) by Type of housing unit (HC1.1) XLS by Owner-renter (HC1.2) XLS by Year of construction (HC1.3) XLS by Number of household members (HC1.4) XLS by Household income

  11. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: August 19, 2011 line chart:air conditioning in U.S. figure dataExcept in the temperate climate regions along the West coast, air conditioners (AC) are now standard equipment in most U.S. homes (Figure 1). As recently as 1993, only 68% of all occupied housing units had AC. The latest results from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that 87 percent of

  12. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e))

  13. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act

  14. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16

  15. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) .

  16. United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CSW Power Marketing OE Docket No. EA-3 1 8 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 18 February 22,2007 CSW Power Marketing Order No. EA-318 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30l(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 1 5 1 (b), 7 1 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16

  17. Minimize oil field power consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B.; Ennis, P.

    1999-08-01

    Though electric power is a major operating cost of oil production, few producers have systematically evaluated their power consumption for ways to be more efficient. There is significant money to be saved by doing so, and now is a good time to make an evaluation because new power options are at hand. They range from small turbo generators that can run on casing head gas and power one or two lift pumps, to rebuilt major turbines and ram-jet powered generators that can be set in a multi-well field and deliver power at bargain prices. Power industry deregulation is also underway. Opportunities for more advantageous power contracts from competitive sources are not far off. This two-part series covers power efficiency and power options. This article reviews steps you can take to evaluate the efficiency of your power use and go about improving it. Part 2 will discuss opportunities for use of distributed power and changes you can expect from decentralized power.

  18. Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey data Energy intensity Consumption summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All consumption & efficiency data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular All sectors Commercial buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections

  19. Federal Government’s Energy Consumption Lowest in Almost 40 Years

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    While the U.S. federal government continues to be one of the largest energy consumers in the world, its consumption has been steadily declining for nearly four decades, and now stands at less than 1 quadrillion British thermal units, the lowest since 1975, when data collection began. Find out how our Federal Energy Management Program helped agencies achieve this milestone.

  20. Termination unit

    SciTech Connect

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  1. Simulation Based Method for Measuring Spatially Varying Properties...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation Based Method for Measuring Spatially Varying Properties of Neutral Atoms and Molecules in Plasmas This Invention is a method for extending the region of applicability of...

  2. Switching phase separation mode by varying the hydrophobicity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switching phase separation mode by varying the hydrophobicity of polymer additives in solution-processed semiconducting small-moleculepolymer blends Citation Details In-Document ...

  3. Constraining parity and charge-parity violating varying-alpha...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Constraining parity and charge-parity violating varying-alpha theory through laboratory experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Constraining parity and charge-parity ...

  4. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  5. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  6. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $700 $1,400 $2,100 $2,800 $3,500 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Average energy consumption (127 million Btu per year) in New Jersey homes and average household energy expenditures ($3,065 per year) are among the

  7. US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all

  8. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per

  9. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are

  10. Energy Intensity Indicators: Commercial Source Energy Consumption

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure C1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) commercial building floor space, 2) energy use based on source energy consumption, 3) energy intensity, and 4) the...

  11. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy ...

  12. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas ...

  13. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  14. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  15. Time varying voltage combustion control and diagnostics sensor

    DOEpatents

    Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Thornton, Jimmy D.; Huckaby, E. David; Fincham, William

    2011-04-19

    A time-varying voltage is applied to an electrode, or a pair of electrodes, of a sensor installed in a fuel nozzle disposed adjacent the combustion zone of a continuous combustion system, such as of the gas turbine engine type. The time-varying voltage induces a time-varying current in the flame which is measured and used to determine flame capacitance using AC electrical circuit analysis. Flame capacitance is used to accurately determine the position of the flame from the sensor and the fuel/air ratio. The fuel and/or air flow rate (s) is/are then adjusted to provide reduced flame instability problems such as flashback, combustion dynamics and lean blowout, as well as reduced emissions. The time-varying voltage may be an alternating voltage and the time-varying current may be an alternating current.

  16. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  17. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  18. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type | Department of Energy Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are generally defined as all electric loads except those related to main systems for heating,

  19. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  20. table6.2_02.xls

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  1. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  2. New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 ... Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  3. New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 ... Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use ...

  4. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge

    2015-07-15

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  5. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  6. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Part 1. Energy Consumption Data Tables Total Energy Intensity Intensity by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part...

  7. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  8. Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3a. Natural Gas Consumption per Sq Ft Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas...

  9. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ... PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ...

  10. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  11. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and ...

  12. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census Region, ...

  13. Fact #861 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected Gasoline and Diesel Vehicles Fact 861 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected Gasoline and Diesel Vehicles ...

  14. Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  15. Fact #706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Fact 706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards The National Highway Traffic Safety ...

  16. Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combinatio...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    published a final rule setting fuel consumption standards for heavy trucks in September ... Combination Tractor Fuel Consumption Standards, Model Years (MY) 2014-2017 Graph showing ...

  17. Fact #861 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected Gasoline and Diesel Vehicles - Dataset Fact 861 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected Gasoline and Diesel ...

  18. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Fact 840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Excel file with ...

  19. Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus ... Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus Robb Barnitt and ...

  20. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  1. Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and ...

  2. Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant ...

  3. West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant ...

  4. Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant ...

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant ...

  6. Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant ...

  7. 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) As our valued...

  8. Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon September 28, 2011 - 10:57am Addthis The Team...

  9. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  10. 1991 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 Executive Summary

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Summary The Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 report presents statistics about the energy consumption of the manufacturing sector, based on the 1991 Manufacturing Energy...

  11. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  12. Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South...

  13. Table 5a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption...

  14. Fact #749: October 15, 2012 Petroleum and Natural Gas Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Overall consumption tends to follow population density; however, the share of natural gas consumption is usually greater in those states involved in the petroleum, gas, and mining ...

  15. North Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel ... Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by ...

  16. Oil-Consumption-Weighted GDP: Description, Calculation, and Comparison

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oil-Consumption-Weighted GDP: Description, Calculation, and Comparison Vipin Arora, Tyler ... accounts for the relative level of oil consumption within each of the component countries. ...

  17. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption. ...

  18. Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Consumption Division, Form EIA-846, '1998 Manufacturing" "Energy Consumption Survey,' and the Bureau of the Census," "data files for the '1998 Annual Survey of Manufactures.'" ...

  19. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  20. Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; APPROXIMATIONS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRON BEAMS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; ...

  1. Fungi contribute critical but spatially varying roles in nitrogen and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon cycling in acid mine drainage (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Fungi contribute critical but spatially varying roles in nitrogen and carbon cycling in acid mine drainage Title: Fungi contribute critical but spatially varying roles in nitrogen and carbon cycling in acid mine drainage The ecosystem roles of fungi have been extensively studied by targeting one organism and/or biological process at a time, but the full metabolic potential of fungi has rarely been captured in an environmental

  2. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing

    2003-12-18

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps with boiler and cooling tower, and (3) VAV system served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boiler. This analysis estimates the annual energy consumptions and costs of each system option, in order to provide the design team with a reasonable basis for determining which system is most life-cycle cost effective. eQuest (version 3.37), a computer-based energy simulation program that uses the DOE-2 simulation engine, was used to estimate the annual energy costs.

  3. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in

  4. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey - Office Buildings

    Reports and Publications

    2010-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at this building type as reported in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings are the most common type of commercial building and they consumed more than 17% of all energy in the commercial buildings sector in 2003. This special report provides characteristics and energy consumption data by type of office building (e.g. administrative office, government office, medical office) and information on some of the types of equipment found in office buildings: heating and cooling equipment, computers, servers, printers, and photocopiers.

  5. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also

  6. US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in

  7. US SoAtl FL Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    FL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl FL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl FL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US SoAtl FL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Electricity accounts for 90% of the energy consumed by Florida households, and annual electricity expenditures are 40% more than the U.S. average. Florida is second only

  8. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  9. User-needs study for the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) that is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the primary source of energy data for commercial buildings in the United States. The survey began in 1979 and has subsequently been conducted in 1983, 1986, and 1989. The next survey will cover energy consumption during the year 1992. The building characteristic data will be collected between August 1992 and early December 1992. Requests for energy consumption data are mailed to the energy suppliers in January 1993, with data due by March 1993. Before each survey is sent into the field, the data users` needs are thoroughly assessed. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of that user-needs assessment for the 1992 survey.

  10. Consumption trend analysis in the industrial sector: Regional historical trends. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Data on the use of natural gas, electricity, distillate and residual fuel oil, coal, and purchased coke were collected from the United States Bureau of the Census and aggregated nationally and by Census Region. Trend profiles for each fuel and industry were developed and economic, regulatory, and regional factors contributing to these trends were examined. The recession that followed the OPEC embargo in 1973 affected the industrial sector and the heavily industrialized regions of the country most severely. Both industrial production and fuel consumption fell significantly in 1975. As production recovered, spiraling fuel prices promoted conservation efforts, and overall fuel consumption remained at pre-recession levels. From 1975 to 1977 natural gas consumption decreased in almost all the industries examined with curtailments of gas supplies contributing to this trend.

  11. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

    2008-10-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings

  12. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Administration (EIA) ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2010 2006 2002 1998 1994 1991 Archive Analysis & Projections Preliminary estimates show that U.S. manufacturing energy consumption increased between 2010 and 2014 Graph showing manufacturing energy consumption has increased for the first time since 2002 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) 2010

  13. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration (EIA) ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2010 2006 2002 1998 1994 1991 Archive Analysis & Projections Preliminary estimates show that U.S. manufacturing energy consumption increased between 2010 and 2014 Graph showing manufacturing energy consumption has increased for the first time since 2002 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) 2010

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... central air conditioning equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  15. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average

  17. Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

    2004-02-01

    In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

  18. An investigation of cointegration and causality between energy consumption and economic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reexamines the causality between energy consumption and economic growth with both bivariate and multivariate models by applying the recently developed methods of cointegration and Hsiao`s version of the Granger causality to transformed U.S. data for the period 1947-1990. The Phillips-Perron (PP) tests reveal that the original series are not stationary and, therefore, a first differencing is performed to secure stationarity. The study finds no causal linkages between energy consumption and economic growth. Energy and gross national product (GNP) each live a life of its own. The results of this article are consistent with some of the past studies that find no relationship between energy and GNP but are contrary to some other studies that find GNP unidirectionally causes energy consumption. Both the bivariate and trivariate models produce the similar results. We also find that there is no causal relationship between energy consumption and industrial production. The United States is basically a service-oriented economy and changes in energy consumption can cause little or no changes in GNP. In other words, an implementation of energy conservation policy may not impair economic growth. 27 refs., 5 tabs.

  19. Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy

  20. Table A22. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Ener

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1994 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)","

  1. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Information Administration (EIA) What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample." Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates

  2. Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption March 2012 8.1.2 Average Energy Intensity of Public Water Supplies by Location (kWh per Million Gallons) Location United States (2) 627 437 1,363 United States (3) 65 (6) 1,649 Northern California Indoor 111 1,272 1,911 Northern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Southern California Indoor (5) 111 1,272 1,911 Southern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Iowa (6) 380 1,570 Massachusetts (6) (6) 1,750 Wisconsin Class AB (4) - - Wisconsin Class C (4) - - Wisconsin Class

  4. Energy-efficient appliance labeling in China: Lessons for successful labeling programs in varied markets

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiang; Townend, Jeanne; Fridley, David; McNeil, Gary; Silva, Tony; Clark, Robin

    2002-08-20

    Appliance ownership and production has increased dramatically in China in the past two decades. From extremely low levels in 1980, China's appliance industry has become one of the largest in the world, with sales topping U.S. $14.4 billion in 2000. In 1981, less than 1 percent of urban Chinese households owned a refrigerator; by 1998, that number had increased to over 75 percent. This dramatic increase in sales and ownership leads to an excellent opportunity to impact energy consumption in China by affecting the energy efficiency of appliances being bought and sold. In general, Chinese consumers value energy efficiency and are knowledgeable about the operating costs of major appliances. However, the Chinese marketplace does not provide information that consumers trust about the energy consumption of specific products. Thus, several interdependent organizations have emerged in China to provide information and market supports for energy efficiency. This paper describes the appliance market in China and the evolution of its standards and labeling programs and the agencies that implement them. It discusses the authors' work with these organizations in developing energy efficiency criteria and supporting an energy efficiency endorsement labeling program in China. It describes how the authors have used their experience with ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} and other programs in the U.S. to work with China to develop a successful program specific to Chinese conditions, with a particular emphasis on refrigerators. It then gives the author's market assessment of the Chinese refrigerator market and recommendations for a successful labeling program and transferable lessons for developing energy efficiency labeling programs in varied markets. This paper is based on the authors' market research, their support in setting energy efficiency criteria in China, interviews with Chinese manufacturers, retailers, and sales staff, and the development and implementation of labeling strategies and

  5. Conversion of a regenerative oxidizer into catalytic unit

    SciTech Connect

    Matros, Y.S.; Bunimovich, G.A.; Strots, V.O.

    1997-12-31

    Use of a VOC oxidation catalyst in the existing regenerative thermal oxidizers may greatly reduce fuel consumption and improve the oxidizer performance. This was demonstrated in a commercial 25,000 SCFM unit installed at a printing facility. The paper discusses the principles of the oxidizer retrofit design and test results obtained at various conditions of operation.

  6. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  7. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  8. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  9. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Administration U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption &

  10. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Survey (MECS) Steel Analysis Brief Chemical Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities | Fuel Switching Capacity Introduction The chemical industries are a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, converting raw materials such as oil, natural gas, air, water, metals, and minerals into thousands of various products. Chemicals are key materials

  11. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Survey (MECS) Steel Analysis Brief Steel Industry Analysis Brief Change Topic: Steel | Chemical JUMP TO: Introduction | Energy Consumption | Energy Expenditures | Producer Prices and Production | Energy Intensity | Energy Management Activities Introduction The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of construction, transportation, manufacturing, and a variety of consumer products. It is the backbone of bridges, skyscrapers,

  12. Varied morphology carbon nanotubes and method for their manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Li, Wenzhi; Wen, Jian Guo; Ren, Zhi Feng

    2007-01-02

    The present invention describes the preparation of carbon nanotubes of varied morphology, catalyst materials for their synthesis. The present invention also describes reactor apparatus and methods of optimizing and controlling process parameters for the manufacture carbon nanotubes with pre-determined morphologies in relatively high purity and in high yields. In particular, the present invention provides methods for the preparation of non-aligned carbon nanotubes with controllable morphologies, catalyst materials and methods for their manufacture.

  13. Means for ultrasonic testing when material properties vary

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for maintaining constant sensitivity in an ultrasonic testing device, despite varying attenuation due to the properties of the material being tested. The device includes a sensor transducer for transmitting and receiving a test signal and a monitor transducer positioned so as to receive ultrasonic energy transmitted through the material to be tested. The received signal of the monitor transducer is utilized in analyzing data obtained from the sensor transducer.

  14. Development of a Life Cycle Inventory of Water Consumption Associated with the Production of Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, David J.; Cai, Hao; Wang, Zhichao; Keisman, Jennifer; Wu, May; Han, Jeongwoo; Dunn, Jennifer; Sullivan, John L.; Elgowainy, Amgad; Wang, Michael; Keisman, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    The production of all forms of energy consumes water. To meet increased energy demands, it is essential to quantify the amount of water consumed in the production of different forms of energy. By analyzing the water consumed in different technologies, it is possible to identify areas for improvement in water conservation and reduce water stress in energy-producing regions. The transportation sector is a major consumer of energy in the United States. Because of the relationships between water and energy, the sustainability of transportation is tied to management of water resources. Assessment of water consumption throughout the life cycle of a fuel is necessary to understand its water resource implications. To perform a comparative life cycle assessment of transportation fuels, it is necessary first to develop an inventory of the water consumed in each process in each production supply chain. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is an analytical tool that can used to estimate the full life-cycle environmental impacts of various transportation fuel pathways from wells to wheels. GREET is currently being expanded to include water consumption as a sustainability metric. The purpose of this report was to document data sources and methodologies to estimate water consumption factors (WCF) for the various transportation fuel pathways in GREET. WCFs reflect the quantity of freshwater directly consumed per unit production for various production processes in GREET. These factors do not include consumption of precipitation or low-quality water (e.g., seawater) and reflect only water that is consumed (i.e., not returned to the source from which it was withdrawn). The data in the report can be combined with GREET to compare the life cycle water consumption for different transportation fuels.

  15. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact from an Automated Mobility District

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Qi, Xuewei; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-19

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  16. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact on an Automated Mobility District: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Gonder, Jeff; Qi, Xuewei

    2015-12-11

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  17. Maine Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

  18. Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  19. Fact #704: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New Heavy Pickups and Vans Fact 704: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New Heavy Pickups and Vans In September ...

  20. Washington Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  1. Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  2. Delaware Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  4. West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  7. Washington Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  8. Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  9. Indiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  10. Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  11. Fact #839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    declined since 2007, this is offset by increasing consumption from the rest of the world. ... Not including the U.S., Europe, China, and India, petroleum consumption by the rest of the ...

  12. SEP Request for Approval Form 7 - Other Situations for Consumption...

    Energy Saver

    7 - Other Situations for Consumption Adjustment SEP Request for Approval Form 7 - Other Situations for Consumption Adjustment SEP-Request-for-Approval-Form-7Other-Situations-for-C...

  13. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 10:31:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  14. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 10:31:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End ...

  15. Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  16. Arizona Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  17. Arizona Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  18. New Hampshire Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Hampshire Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  19. Summary Max Total Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  20. Appliance Energy Consumption in Australia | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ?viewPublicatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentappliance-energy-consumption-australi DeploymentPrograms: Industry Codes & Standards Regulations:...

  1. Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentcanadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website...

  2. Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Facilities » Water Efficiency » Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption The Federal Building Metering Guidance specifies buildings with water using processes and whole building water consumption that exceeds 1,000 gallons per day must have a water meter installed. Below are methods for estimating daily water use for typical end-uses that drive building-level, end-use water consumption. Plumbing

  3. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... For more statistics on fuel usage patterns see the Fuels Used and End-Uses data tables. Entertainment and communication equipment has grown rapidly Nearly every home in the United ...

  4. Bending of solitons in weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Abhik Janaki, M. S. Kundu, Anjan

    2015-12-15

    The bending of solitons in two dimensional plane is presented in the presence of weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous ion density for the propagation of ion acoustic soliton in unmagnetized cold plasma with isothermal electrons. Using reductive perturbation technique, a modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation is obtained with a chosen unperturbed ion density profile. The exact solution of the equation shows that the phase of the solitary wave gets modified by a function related to the unperturbed inhomogeneous ion density causing the soliton to bend in the two dimensional plane, while the amplitude of the soliton remains constant.

  5. Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline gadolinium with varying grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we report a study of evolution of low field magnetoresistance (MR) of Gadolinium as the grain size in the sample is changed from few microns (∼4 μm) to the nanoscopic regime (∼35 nm). The low field MR has a clear effect on varying grain size. In large grain sample (few μm), the magnetic domains are controlled by local anisotropy field determined mainly by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The low field MR clearly reflects the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. For decreasing gain size, the contribution of spin disorder at the grain boundary increases and enhances the local anisotropy field.

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... for Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  8. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  9. Varying fine structure 'constant' and charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2009-12-15

    Speculation that the fine-structure constant {alpha} varies in spacetime has a long history. We derive, in 4-D general relativity and in isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical {alpha} J. D. Bekenstein, Phys. Rev. D 25, 1527 (1982).. This solution coincides with a previously known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying-{alpha} charged black holes are adherence to a 'no hair' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in an analytic extension of the relevant metric. The exteriors of almost extremal electrically (magnetically) charged black holes have simple structures which makes their influence on applied magnetic (electric) fields transparent. We rederive the thermodynamic functions of the modified black holes; the otherwise difficult calculation of the electric potential is done by a shortcut. We confirm that variability of {alpha} in the wake of expansion of the universe does not threaten the generalized second law.

  10. PIA - Form EIA-475 A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA ...

  11. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  12. Simulations of stretching a flexible polyelectrolyte with varying charge separation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Stevens, Mark J.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-07-22

    We calculated the force-extension curves for a flexible polyelectrolyte chain with varying charge separations by performing Monte Carlo simulations of a 5000 bead chain using a screened Coulomb interaction. At all charge separations, the force-extension curves exhibit a Pincus-like scaling regime at intermediate forces and a logarithmic regime at large forces. As the charge separation increases, the Pincus regime shifts to a larger range of forces and the logarithmic regime starts are larger forces. We also found that force-extension curve for the corresponding neutral chain has a logarithmic regime. Decreasing the diameter of bead in the neutral chain simulations removedmore » the logarithmic regime, and the force-extension curve tends to the freely jointed chain limit. In conclusion, this result shows that only excluded volume is required for the high force logarithmic regime to occur.« less

  13. Systems and methods of varying charged particle beam spot size

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    2014-09-02

    Methods and devices enable shaping of a charged particle beam. A modified dielectric wall accelerator includes a high gradient lens section and a main section. The high gradient lens section can be dynamically adjusted to establish the desired electric fields to minimize undesirable transverse defocusing fields at the entrance to the dielectric wall accelerator. Once a baseline setting with desirable output beam characteristic is established, the output beam can be dynamically modified to vary the output beam characteristics. The output beam can be modified by slightly adjusting the electric fields established across different sections of the modified dielectric wall accelerator. Additional control over the shape of the output beam can be excreted by introducing intentional timing de-synchronization offsets and producing an injected beam that is not fully matched to the entrance of the modified dielectric accelerator.

  14. Epidemic spreading in time-varying community networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Guangming E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com; Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Wang, Xingyuan E-mail: ren-guang-ming@163.com

    2014-06-15

    The spreading processes of many infectious diseases have comparable time scale as the network evolution. Here, we present a simple networks model with time-varying community structure, and investigate susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic spreading processes in this model. By both theoretic analysis and numerical simulations, we show that the efficiency of epidemic spreading in this model depends intensively on the mobility rate q of the individuals among communities. We also find that there exists a mobility rate threshold q{sub c}. The epidemic will survive when q?>?q{sub c} and die when q?

  15. Fenestration systems as luminaries of varying candlepower distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papamichael, K.

    1990-10-01

    Simulation of the performance of electric lighting systems has been successfully handled using computers, since electric lighting systems have a constant luminous output with respect to intensity and spatial distribution, usually referred to as candlepower distribution, which can be measured and used conveniently. This paper describes an approach of treating fenestration systems as luminaries of varying candlepower distribution, so that the determination of their luminous performance becomes consistent with that of electric lighting systems. The transmitted distribution through fenestration systems due to radiation from the sun, sky and ground is determined from their bidirectional transmittance and the luminance distribution of the sources of radiation. The approach is demonstrated using the experimentally determined bidirectional transmittance of a diffusive sample under the uniform, overcast and clear sky luminance distributions. 6 refs., 14 figs.

  16. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  17. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yehia, Ashraf

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  18. Slowly Varying Dilaton Cosmologies and Their Field Theory Duals

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Adel; Das, Sumit R.; Ghosh, Archisman; Oh, Jae-Hyuk; Trivedi, Sandip P.; /Tata Inst. /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-06-28

    We consider a deformation of the AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} solution of IIB supergravity obtained by taking the boundary value of the dilaton to be time dependent. The time dependence is taken to be slowly varying on the AdS scale thereby introducing a small parameter {epsilon}. The boundary dilaton has a profile which asymptotes to a constant in the far past and future and attains a minimum value at intermediate times. We construct the sugra solution to first non-trivial order in {epsilon}, and find that it is smooth, horizon free, and asymptotically AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} in the far future. When the intermediate values of the dilaton becomes small enough the curvature becomes of order the string scale and the sugra approximation breaks down. The resulting dynamics is analysed in the dual SU(N) gauge theory on S{sup 3} with a time dependent coupling constant which varies slowly. When N{epsilon} << 1, we find that a quantum adiabatic approximation is applicable, and use it to argue that at late times the geometry becomes smooth AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} again. When N{epsilon} >> 1, we formulate a classical adiabatic perturbation theory based on coherent states which arises in the large N limit. For large values of the tHooft coupling this reproduces the supergravity results. For small 'tHooft coupling the coherent state calculations become involved and we cannot reach a definite conclusion. We argue that the final state should have a dual description which is mostly smooth AdS5 space with the possible presence of a small black hole.

  19. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  20. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  1. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  2. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced-Rooftop-Unit-Control Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

  3. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AEC ..J. Ccnmigl.io - Chief of Middlesex Operaticns A. PIhot -Hadiation Section, ... (loose in case of large contaminated units) loaded on truck&and lsonltored at' MIddlesex. ...

  4. Observational constraints on holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jianbo; Xu, Lixin; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Setare, M.R. E-mail: msaridak@phys.uoa.gr E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn

    2010-03-01

    We use observational data from Type Ia Supernovae (SN), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and observational Hubble data (OHD), and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, to constrain the cosmological scenario of holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant. We consider both flat and non-flat background geometry, and we present the corresponding constraints and contour-plots of the model parameters. We conclude that the scenario is compatible with observations. In 1? we find ?{sub ?0} = 0.72{sup +0.03}{sub ?0.03}, ?{sub k0} = ?0.0013{sup +0.0130}{sub ?0.0040}, c = 0.80{sup +0.19}{sub ?0.14} and ?{sub G}?G'/G = ?0.0025{sup +0.0080}{sub ?0.0050}, while for the present value of the dark energy equation-of-state parameter we obtain w{sub 0} = ?1.04{sup +0.15}{sub ?0.20}.

  5. Modeling of Time Varying Slag Flow in Coal Gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pilli, Siva Prasad; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Williford, Ralph E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Korolev, Vladimir N.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2008-08-30

    There is considerable interest within government agencies and the energy industries across the globe to further advance the clean and economical conversion of coal into liquid fuels to reduce our dependency on imported oil. To date, advances in these areas have been largely based on experimental work. Although there are some detailed systems level performance models, little work has been done on numerical modeling of the component level processes. If accurate models are developed, then significant R&D time might be saved, new insights into the process might be gained, and some good predictions of process or performance can be made. One such area is the characterization of slag deposition and flow on the gasifier walls. Understanding slag rheology and slag-refractory interactions is critical to design and operation of gasifiers with extended refractory lifetimes and also to better control of operating parameters so that the overall gasifier performance with extended service life can be optimized. In the present work, the literature on slag flow modeling was reviewed and a model similar to Seggiani’s was developed to simulate the time varying slag accumulation and flow on the walls of a Prenflo coal gasifier. This model was further extended and modified to simulate a refractory wall gasifier including heat transfer through the refractory wall with flowing slag in contact with the refractory. The model was used to simulate temperature dependent slag flow using rheology data from our experimental slag testing program. These modeling results as well as experimental validation are presented.

  6. Device for producing a fluid stream of varying composition

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Clark, Mark L.; Rossignol, E. John

    1982-01-01

    A device for producing a fluid stream of varying composition comprises a chamber having an inlet at one end and outlet at the other. Between the inlet and outlet there are substantially planar pans or baffles positioned normal to the bulk flow of fluid between the inlet and the outlet. These pans are arranged in pairs. Each pan, except those of the pair most remote from the inlet, is spaced from the walls of the chamber to permit air to flow past it. The pans of each pair are also spaced from each other, in a direction parallel to their planes, leaving an empty space along the mid-plane of the chamber. This produces a circulation and mixing of fluid between the pairs of pans or baffles. A secondary stream of fluid is introduced between two pairs of baffles in the intermediate portion of the chamber, so that the composition of the fluid is different in the portion adjacent to the outlet and the portion adjacent to the inlet. In a specific embodiment, the device is an exposure chamber for experimental animals, and the pans or baffles are catch pans for excrement.

  7. A Comparison of Two Gasoline and Two Diesel Cars with Varying...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    A Comparison of Two Gasoline and Two Diesel Cars with Varying Emission Control Technologies A Comparison of Two Gasoline and Two Diesel Cars with Varying Emission Control ...

  8. Effect Of Platooning on Fuel Consumption of Class 8 Vehicles Over a Range of Speeds, Following Distances, and Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M. P.; Duran, A.; Diez, J.; Burton, K.; Nicholson, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project evaluates fuel consumption results of two Class 8 tractor-trailer combinations platooned together compared to their standalone fuel consumption. A series of ten modified SAE Type II J1321 fuel consumption track tests were performed to document fuel consumption of two platooned vehicles and a control vehicle at varying steady-state speeds, following distances, and gross vehicle weights (GVWs). The steady-state speeds ranged from 55 mph to 70 mph, the following distances ranged from a 20-ft following distance to a 75-ft following distance, and the GVWs were 65K lbs and 80K lbs. All tractors involved had U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SmartWay-compliant aerodynamics packages installed, and the trailers were equipped with side skirts. Effects of vehicle speed, following distance, and GVW on fuel consumption were observed and analyzed. The platooning demonstration system used in this study consisted of radar systems, Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications, vehicle braking and torque control interface, cameras and driver displays. The lead tractor consistently demonstrated an improvement in average fuel consumption reduction as following distance decreased, with results showing 2.7% to 5.3% fuel savings at a GVW of 65k. The trailing vehicle achieved fuel consumption savings ranging from 2.8% to 9.7%; tests during which the engine cooling fan did not operate achieved savings of 8.4% to 9.7%. 'Team' fuel savings, considering the platooned vehicles as one, ranged from 3.7% to 6.4%, with the best combined result being for 55 mph, 30-ft following distance, and 65k GVW.

  9. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Growing - Dataset | Department of Energy 40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Fact #840: World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing fotw#840_web.xlsx (19.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Quarterly Analysis Review February 2015 Fact #892: September 28, 2015 Over One-Million in Plug-in Vehicle Sales Worldwide -

  10. SEP Request for Approval Form 7 - Other Situations for Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Adjustment | Department of Energy 7 - Other Situations for Consumption Adjustment SEP Request for Approval Form 7 - Other Situations for Consumption Adjustment SEP-Request-for-Approval-Form-7_Other-Situations-for-Consumption-Adjustment.docx (36.48 KB) More Documents & Publications SEP Request for Approval Form 6 - Non-Routine Adjustments SEP Request for Approval Form 5 - Model Does Not Satisfy 3.4.1-3.4.10 Requirements SEP Request for Approval Form 4 - Alternative Adjustment Model

  11. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report to Congress | Department of Energy Report to Congress Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Report to Congress This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical methods used in the DOE Report to Congress on the impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the U.S. national energy consumption. Report to Congress (285 KB) More Documents & Publications Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Technical

  12. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Energy Sources Consumption Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ** estimates adjusted to match the 1995 CBECS definition of target population Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Table 2....

  13. South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    South Dakota Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption South Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  14. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Methodology & Forms 2006 Data Tables Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Revision notice (November 2009): ...

  15. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Mass Correlation of Engine Emissions with Spectral Instruments Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Chemical and Physical Characteristics ...

  16. Fact #706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently published final fuel consumption standards for heavy vehicles called "vocational" vehicles. A vocational vehicle is generally a single...

  17. Manufacturing-Industrial Energy Consumption Survey(MECS) Historical...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    reports, data tables and questionnaires Released: May 2008 The Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) is a periodic national sample survey devoted to measuring...

  18. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Grades: All Topics: Biomass, Wind Energy, Hydropower, Solar, Geothermal Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

  19. Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and...

  20. Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total...

  1. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report to Congress Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Report to Congress This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical ...

  2. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables

    Reports and Publications

    2008-01-01

    The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

  3. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also ...

  4. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    It first identifies and prioritizes the appliances to be evaluated. Then, the study determines whether real world energy consumption differed substantially from predictions and ...

  5. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Buildings Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy ...

  6. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document ...

  7. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Documentation Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Technical Documentation This report presents the detailed results, data, and ...

  8. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire ...

  9. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island ...

  10. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects ...

  11. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity - Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Overview Data Summary Biomass Geothermal Hydropower Solar Wind Alternative transportation ... Wind was the source of 11 percent of total renewable energy consumption, and solar and ...

  12. ,"Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  13. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  14. Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology may reduce fuel consumption and tailpipe emissions in many medium- and heavy- duty vehicle vocations, including school buses. ...

  15. North Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Vehicle Fuel ...

  16. "Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Form EIA-846, '1991" "Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey,' and the Bureau of the Census, Industry" "Division, data files for the '1991 Annual Survey of Manufactures.'

  17. Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Combined Potential of Hybrid Technology and Behavioral Adaptation Title Reducing Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Consumption and Greenhouse Gas...

  18. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOEpatents

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  19. Associative list processing unit

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  20. Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel

  1. United States: moving to realize a golden opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    Samples, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The shift from scarce, highpriced oil to coal and other energy resources has begun to have real effects around the world. For the United States, this basic transition from oil to coal - long discussed and debated - is underway and is accelerating. Domestically, coal use increased by only about three percent per year following the 1973 oil embargo until 1978. However, since that time, growth has accelerated to five percent each year - a rate substantially ahead of growth in total energy consumption in the United States. In 1980, coal provided 20.5 percent of all United States energy needs, up from 17.7 percent in 1974. Oil use dropped from 46.0 percent to 44.9 percent. Total energy consumption rose by 4.7 percent. Electric utilities consume about 80 percent of the coal used in the United States and generate about 51 percent of the nation's electricity from coal, compared to 44.5 percent in 1974. Total coal consumption in this sector has grown from 390,000,000 tons in 1974 to 568,000,000 tons in 1980. World demand for United States steam coal greatly increased. Overseas shipments of steam coal soared from almost none in 1978, to 2,500,000 tons in 1979, to 16,000,000 tons in 1980, and are expected to reach 30,000,000 tons this year. In issuing the Reagan administration's coal export policy last July, Secretary of Commerce Malcolm Baldridge said, Continued private development of the coal market will be strenghtened by the overall administration tax, budgetary, and regulatory reforms. The United States intends to maintain a solid international reputation as a reliable supplier of coal. To insure that the federal government will expedite and not inadvertently constrain coal exports to the world, President Reagan established a coal export task force made up of officials from various government agencies involved in all areas of coal policy.

  2. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Corrie E.; Harto, Christopher B.; Schroeder, Jenna N.; Martino, Louis E.; Horner, Robert M.

    2013-11-05

    describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration

  3. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996–2013: Method development and detailed accounting by battery type

    SciTech Connect

    Patrício, João; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E.O.; Rosado, Leonardo; Åberg, Helena

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Developed MFA method was validated by the national statistics. • Exponential increase of EEE sales leads to increase in integrated battery consumption. • Digital convergence is likely to be a cause for primary batteries consumption decline. • Factors for estimation of integrated batteries in EE are provided. • Sweden reached the collection rates defined by European Union. - Abstract: In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production and export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows – due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996–2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline manganese

  4. Future U.S. water consumption : The role of energy production.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-06-01

    This study investigates how meeting domestic energy production targets for both fossil and renewable fuels may affect future water demand. It combines projections of energy production developed by the U.S. Department of Energy with estimates of water consumption on a per-unit basis (water-consumption coefficients) for coal, oil, gas, and biofuels production, to estimate and compare the domestic freshwater consumed. Although total domestic freshwater consumption is expected to increase by nearly 7% between 2005 and 2030, water consumed for energy production is expected to increase by nearly 70%, and water consumed for biofuels (biodiesel and ethanol) production is expected to increase by almost 250%. By 2030, water consumed in the production of biofuels is projected to account for nearly half of the total amount of water consumed in the production of all energy fuels. Most of this is for irrigation, and the West North Central Region is projected to consume most of this water in 2030. These findings identify an important potential future conflict between renewable energy production and water availability that warrants further investigation and action to ensure that future domestic energy demand can be met in an economically efficient and environmentally sustainable manner.

  5. Voltage verification unit

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Edward J.

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  6. Associative list processing unit

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  7. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical...

  8. Robust Unit Commitment Considering Uncertain Demand Response

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-09-28

    Although price responsive demand response has been widely accepted as playing an important role in the reliable and economic operation of power system, the real response from demand side can be highly uncertain due to limited understanding of consumers' response to pricing signals. To model the behavior of consumers, the price elasticity of demand has been explored and utilized in both research and real practice. However, the price elasticity of demand is not precisely known and may vary greatly with operating conditions and types of customers. To accommodate the uncertainty of demand response, alternative unit commitment methods robust to themore » uncertainty of the demand response require investigation. In this paper, a robust unit commitment model to minimize the generalized social cost is proposed for the optimal unit commitment decision taking into account uncertainty of the price elasticity of demand. By optimizing the worst case under proper robust level, the unit commitment solution of the proposed model is robust against all possible realizations of the modeled uncertain demand response. Numerical simulations on the IEEE Reliability Test System show the e ectiveness of the method. Finally, compared to unit commitment with deterministic price elasticity of demand, the proposed robust model can reduce the average Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) as well as the price volatility.« less

  9. Robust Unit Commitment Considering Uncertain Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-09-28

    Although price responsive demand response has been widely accepted as playing an important role in the reliable and economic operation of power system, the real response from demand side can be highly uncertain due to limited understanding of consumers' response to pricing signals. To model the behavior of consumers, the price elasticity of demand has been explored and utilized in both research and real practice. However, the price elasticity of demand is not precisely known and may vary greatly with operating conditions and types of customers. To accommodate the uncertainty of demand response, alternative unit commitment methods robust to the uncertainty of the demand response require investigation. In this paper, a robust unit commitment model to minimize the generalized social cost is proposed for the optimal unit commitment decision taking into account uncertainty of the price elasticity of demand. By optimizing the worst case under proper robust level, the unit commitment solution of the proposed model is robust against all possible realizations of the modeled uncertain demand response. Numerical simulations on the IEEE Reliability Test System show the e ectiveness of the method. Finally, compared to unit commitment with deterministic price elasticity of demand, the proposed robust model can reduce the average Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) as well as the price volatility.

  10. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Total square footage includes all basements, finished or conditioned (heated ...

  11. U.S. gasoline consumption highest in 8 years

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. gasoline consumption highest in 8 years U.S. gasoline consumption this year is expected to be at the highest level since the record fuel demand seen back in 2007 as lower gasoline prices and more people finding jobs means more sales at the gasoline pump. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said gasoline consumption increased by 2.7% during the first eight months of 2015 and should rise by an average of 190,000 barrels per day this year to 9.1 million

  12. Missouri Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption

  13. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-01

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide-range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  14. Greenhouse gas emission impacts of electric vehicles under varying driving cycles in various counties and US cities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.Q.; Marr, W.W.

    1994-02-10

    Electric vehicles (EVs) can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, relative to emissions from gasoline-fueled vehicles. However, those studies have not considered all aspects that determine greenhouse gas emissions from both gasoline vehicles (GVs) and EVs. Aspects often overlooked include variations in vehicle trip characteristics, inclusion of all greenhouse gases, and vehicle total fuel cycle. In this paper, we estimate greenhouse gas emission reductions for EVs, including these important aspects. We select four US cities (Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.) and six countries (Australia, France, Japan, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and analyze greenhouse emission impacts of EVs in each city or country. We also select six driving cycles developed around the world (i.e., the US federal urban driving cycle, the Economic Community of Europe cycle 15, the Japanese 10-mode cycle, the Los Angeles 92 cycle, the New York City cycle, and the Sydney cycle). Note that we have not analyzed EVs in high-speed driving (e.g., highway driving), where the results would be less favorable to EVs; here, EVs are regarded as urban vehicles only. We choose one specific driving cycle for a given city or country and estimate the energy consumption of four-passenger compact electric and gasoline cars in the given city or country. Finally, we estimate total fuel cycle greenhouse gas emissions of both GVs and EVs by accounting for emissions from primary energy recovery, transportation, and processing; energy product transportation; and powerplant and vehicle operations.

  15. United States Environmental Monitoring

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud,

  16. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  17. Next Generation Rooftop Unit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient

  18. United Nations | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute (UNICRI) United Nations International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (UN-INSTRAW)...

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Average Consumption per Industrial Consumer...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Industrial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Average Consumption per Industrial Consumer (Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  20. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    in this table do not include enclosed malls and strip malls. In the 1999 CBECS, total fuel oil consumption in malls was not statistically significant. (*)Value rounds to zero...

  1. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on national energy consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Chin, Shih -Miao

    2008-10-01

    This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical methods used in the DOE Report to Congress on the impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the U.S. national energy consumption.

  2. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on national energy consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Chin, Shih -Miao

    2008-10-01

    This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical methods used in the DOE Report to Congress on the impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption.

  3. Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Impact of Real Field Diesel Quality Variability on Engine Emissions and Fuel Consumption Solutions for Onboard Optimisation On Board Fuel Quality Sensor BioDiesel Content On-board ...

  4. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values SIC RSE Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and ...

  5. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Methodology & Forms all tables + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes ... Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed for All Purpose XLSPDF Table 1.5 ...

  6. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) ... XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed for All Purpose XLS PDF ...

  7. Estimates of U.S. Biomass Energy Consumption 1992

    Reports and Publications

    1994-01-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass derived primary energy used by the U.S. economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption.

  8. ENERGY USE AND DOMESTIC HOT WATER CONSUMPTION Final Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    USE AND DOMESTIC HOT WATER CONSUMPTION Final Report Phase 1 Prepared for THE N E W YORK ... operating data on combined domestic hot water @HW) and heating systems to be used in ...

  9. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual 11,255 in pumping costs. With a capital investment of ...

  10. Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clouds, rain, thunderstorms… at Solar Decathlon Village? Oh my, you may say. But less-than-ideal weather conditions are no match for this year's teams, thanks to smart grid technology that is helping them monitor their energy consumption.

  11. South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 513 451 449 370 329 253 260 259 287 329 343 367 2002 ...

  12. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This case study outlines how General Motors (GM) developed a highly efficient pumping ... As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 ...

  13. Energy consumption series: Development of the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-18

    The implementation and results of the proceedings concerning the Energy Information Administration assessment of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) are documented in this report. The text and Appendices C, D, and E summarize the background of the MECS data system, the events that led to the MECS redesign, the major issues address during the review process, and the eventual 1991 MECS design that resulted. For many readers, the most useful part of the report may be Appendices A and B, which contain overall summaries of the users' groups and the industrial roundtables. These appendices capture the rationale for additional data needs as provided by the users. Also, they are a rich source of information on how manufacturers deal with energy use day-to-day, how they have addressed the need for energy efficiency improvement in the past, and the opportunities and problems associated with future efforts to improve efficiency. (VC)

  14. Energy consumption series: Development of the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-18

    The implementation and results of the proceedings concerning the Energy Information Administration assessment of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) are documented in this report. The text and Appendices C, D, and E summarize the background of the MECS data system, the events that led to the MECS redesign, the major issues address during the review process, and the eventual 1991 MECS design that resulted. For many readers, the most useful part of the report may be Appendices A and B, which contain overall summaries of the users` groups and the industrial roundtables. These appendices capture the rationale for additional data needs as provided by the users. Also, they are a rich source of information on how manufacturers deal with energy use day-to-day, how they have addressed the need for energy efficiency improvement in the past, and the opportunities and problems associated with future efforts to improve efficiency. (VC)

  15. Assessment of Vehicle Sizing, Energy Consumption and Cost through Large

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Scale Simulation of Advanced Vehicle Technologies | Argonne National Laboratory Assessment of Vehicle Sizing, Energy Consumption and Cost through Large Scale Simulation of Advanced Vehicle Technologies Title Assessment of Vehicle Sizing, Energy Consumption and Cost through Large Scale Simulation of Advanced Vehicle Technologies Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2016 Authors Moawad, A, Kim, N, Shidore, N, Rousseau, A Institution Argonne National Laboratory City Argonne, IL USA

  16. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and

  17. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) 2012 CBECS Preliminary Results What is a commercial building? The CBECS includes buildings greater than 1,000 square feet that devote more than half of their floorspace to activity that is neither residential, manufacturing, industrial, nor agricultural. When will energy consumption estimates be available? Energy consumption and expenditures data will be available beginning in spring 2015. CBECS data collection is currently in its

  18. Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential Hydraulic HEV Fuel Consumption Potential 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting vss071_rousseau_2012_o.pdf (1.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Evaluation of Powertrain Options and Component Sizing for MD and HD Applications on Real World Drive Cycles Roadmap and Technical White Papers for 21st Century Truck Partnership Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG,

  19. Smart Meter Driven Segmentation: What Your Consumption Says About You

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, A; Rajagopal, R

    2013-11-01

    With the rollout of smart metering infrastructure at scale, demand-response (DR) programs may now be tailored based on users' consumption patterns as mined from sensed data. For issuing DR events it is key to understand the inter-temporal consumption dynamics as to appropriately segment the user population. We propose to infer occupancy states from consumption time series data using a hidden Markov model framework. Occupancy is characterized in this model by 1) magnitude, 2) duration, and 3) variability. We show that users may be grouped according to their consumption patterns into groups that exhibit qualitatively different dynamics that may be exploited for program enrollment purposes. We investigate empirically the information that residential energy consumers' temporal energy demand patterns characterized by these three dimensions may convey about their demographic, household, and appliance stock characteristics. Our analysis shows that temporal patterns in the user's consumption data can predict with good accuracy certain user characteristics. We use this framework to argue that there is a large degree of individual predictability in user consumption at a population level.

  20. Estimates of Refrigerator Loads in Public Housing Based on Metered Consumption Data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, JD; Pratt, RG

    1998-09-11

    The New York Power Authority (NYPA), the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), and the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Energy (DOE) have joined in a project to replace refrigerators in New York City public housing with new, highly energy-efficient models. This project laid the ground work for the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) and DOE to enable housing authorities throughout the United States to bulk-purchase energy-efficient appliances. DOE helped develop and plan the program through the ENERGY STAR@ Partnerships program conducted by its Pacific Nofiwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL was subsequently asked to conduct the savings evahations for 1996 and 1997. PNNL designed the metering protocol and occupant survey, supplied and calibrated the metering equipment, and managed and analyzed the data. The 1996 metering study of refrigerator energy usage in New York City public housing (Pratt and Miller 1997) established the need and justification for a regression-model-based approach to an energy savings estimate. The need originated in logistical difficulties associated with sampling the population and pen?orming a stratified analysis. Commonly, refrigerators[a) with high representation in the population were missed in the sampling schedule, leaving significant holes in the sample and difficulties for the stratified anrdysis. The just{jfcation was found in the fact that strata (distinct groups of identical refrigerators) were not statistically distinct in terms of their label ratio (ratio of metered consumption to label rating). This finding suggested a general regression model could be used to represent the consumption of all refrigerators in the population. In 1996 a simple two-coefficient regression model, a function of only the refrigerator label rating, was developed and used to represent the existing population of refrigerators. A key concept used in the 1997 study grew from findings in a small number of apartments

  1. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program:Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun; Yun, Jiang

    2008-06-02

    In 2005, the Chinese government announced an ambitious goal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20% between 2005 and 2010. One of the key initiatives for realizing this goal is the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises program. The energy consumption of these 1000 enterprises accounted for 33% of national and 47% of industrial energy usage in 2004. Under the Top-1000 program, 2010 energy consumption targets were determined for each enterprise. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the program design and initial results, given limited information and data, in order to understand the possible implications of its success in terms of energy and carbon dioxide emissions reductions and to recommend future program modifications based on international experience with similar target-setting agreement programs. Even though the Top-1000 Program was designed and implemented rapidly, it appears that--depending upon the GDP growth rate--it could contribute to somewhere between approximately 10% and 25% of the savings required to support China's efforts to meet a 20% reduction in energy use per unit of GDP by 2010.

  2. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Brandon J; Starke, Michael R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Jackson, Roderick K; Tolbert, Leon M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  3. Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration ...

  5. Fact #894: October 12, 2015 U.S. Petroleum Production and Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Production and Consumption for All Sectors, 1973 through 2040 - Dataset Fact 894: October 12, 2015 U.S. Petroleum Production and Consumption for All Sectors, 1973 ...

  6. Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification ... Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry ...

  7. Fact #895: October 19, 2015 U.S. Petroleum Production and Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    U.S. Petroleum Production and Consumption: The Changing Landscape - Dataset Fact 895: October 19, 2015 U.S. Petroleum Production and Consumption: The Changing Landscape - ...

  8. Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  9. Table 4a. Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Table 4a. Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion...

  10. Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind. ... Notes: * See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. * See Table E1 for estimated energy consumption ...

  11. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  12. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  13. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Hugh R.; Meltzer, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  14. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  15. Laser system preset unit

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, William L.

    1977-01-01

    An electronic circuit is provided which may be used to preset a digital display unit of a Zeeman-effect layer interferometer system which derives distance measurements by comparing a reference signal to a Doppler signal generated at the output of the interferometer laser head. The circuit presets dimensional offsets in the interferometer digital display by electronically inducing a variation in either the Doppler signal or the reference signal, depending upon the direction of the offset, to achieve the desired display preset.

  16. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    United states government department of energy ____________________________________________________________________________ ___ CONFERENCE CALL DOE FEDERAL LABOR FORUM PRELIMINARY MEETING AENDA August 9, 2013 @ 11:00 A.M. EDT Agenda: Confirm interest in DOE-wide labor forum Scope of Forum: This federal labor forum will be charged with jointly identifying and crafting recommended solutions to the problems facing us as a Department. The forum will accomplish this by using a constructive and

  17. United States Senate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    from The Department of Energy for Committee on Energy and Natural Resources United States Senate S. 3312 - The Responsible Disposal Reauthorization Act of 2016 September 22, 2016 The Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) has no issues with the intent of the Responsible Disposal Reauthorization Act of 2016 to extend the operating life of the Grand Junction Disposal Site from the year 2023 to 2048. The disposal site is located about 18 miles southeast of the City of Grand

  18. United States Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    * (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: November 9, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A05TG036) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-01 SUBJECT: Report on Audit of "The Department of Energy's Radio Communications Systems" TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) complex-wide radio systems infrastructure supports and facilitates activities such as site emergency response,

  19. Good Energies (United Kingdom) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energies (United Kingdom) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Good Energies (United Kingdom) Name: Good Energies (United Kingdom) Address: 2-5 Old Bond Street Place: London, United...

  20. Comparison of energy consumption between displacement and mixing ventilation systems for different U.S. buildings and climates

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.; Chen, Q.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1999-07-01

    A detailed computer simulation method was used to compare the energy consumption of a displacement ventilation system with that of a mixing ventilation system for three types of US buildings: a small office, a classroom, and an industrial workshop. The study examined five typical climatic regions as well as different building zones. It was found that a displacement ventilation system may use more fan energy and less chiller and boiler energy than a mixing ventilation system. The total energy consumption is slightly less using a displacement ventilation system. Both systems can use a similarly sized boiler. However, a displacement ventilation system requires a larger air-handling unit and a smaller chiller than the mixing ventilation system. The overall first costs are lower for the displacement ventilation if the system is applied for the core region of a building.