National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for uniform traffic control

  1. Apparatus and method for controlling plating uniformity

    DOEpatents

    Hachman Jr., John T.; Kelly, James J.; West, Alan C.

    2004-10-12

    The use of an insulating shield for improving the current distribution in an electrochemical plating bath is disclosed. Numerical analysis is used to evaluate the influence of shield shape and position on plating uniformity. Simulation results are compared to experimental data for nickel deposition from a nickel--sulfamate bath. The shield is shown to improve the average current density at a plating surface.

  2. Controlled Uniform Coating from the Interplay of Marangoni Flows...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on March 24, 2017 Title: Controlled Uniform ... Free Publicly Accessible Full Text This content will become publicly available on March ...

  3. Traffic improvement and transportation pollution control in Xiamen

    SciTech Connect

    Dongxing Yuan; Zilin, Wu

    1996-12-31

    in this paper, the urban traffic improvement and transportation control in Xiamen are highlighted. Xiamen is a port city and an economical special zone of China. As the economy grows, the transportation is developing dramatically and becoming the key for further economic development. The air quality is threatened by the rapid growth of the vehicles in the city. The most urgent task in improving urban traffic is to establish a sound traffic system. The municipal government takes great effort to improve the traffic condition, as well as to reduce green house gases and protect air environment. Some management and technical measures are carried out. Those management measures are mainly as follows: (1) systematic planning of the city arrangement and city functional division, and integrated planning of the urban roads system, (2) putting great emphasis on tail gas monitoring and management, and (3) establishing optimized utilization of motor vehicles. Those included in the main technical measures are (1) making the roads clear, (2) enlarging traffic capacity, and (3) developing the public transport. The most urgent task in improving urban traffic is to establish a sound traffic system. The city municipal government and Transportation Management Bureau plan to make a series of reforms to improve the urban traffic condition, such as building high quality road around the city, reducing the number of one way roads and replacing gasoline buses with electric buses. An optimized traffic system of Xiamen, taking public transport as the main means, is the key to meet the needs of both traffic improvement and urban transportation pollution control.

  4. Intelligent Control in Automation Based on Wireless Traffic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2007-09-01

    Wireless technology is a central component of many factory automation infrastructures in both the commercial and government sectors, providing connectivity among various components in industrial realms (distributed sensors, machines, mobile process controllers). However wireless technologies provide more threats to computer security than wired environments. The advantageous features of Bluetooth technology resulted in Bluetooth units shipments climbing to five million per week at the end of 2005 [1, 2]. This is why the real-time interpretation and understanding of Bluetooth traffic behavior is critical in both maintaining the integrity of computer systems and increasing the efficient use of this technology in control type applications. Although neuro-fuzzy approaches have been applied to wireless 802.11 behavior analysis in the past, a significantly different Bluetooth protocol framework has not been extensively explored using this technology. This paper presents a new neurofuzzy traffic analysis algorithm of this still new territory of Bluetooth traffic. Further enhancements of this algorithm are presented along with the comparison against the traditional, numerical approach. Through test examples, interesting Bluetooth traffic behavior characteristics were captured, and the comparative elegance of this computationally inexpensive approach was demonstrated. This analysis can be used to provide directions for future development and use of this prevailing technology in various control type applications, as well as making the use of it more secure.

  5. Intelligent Control in Automation Based on Wireless Traffic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2007-08-01

    Wireless technology is a central component of many factory automation infrastructures in both the commercial and government sectors, providing connectivity among various components in industrial realms (distributed sensors, machines, mobile process controllers). However wireless technologies provide more threats to computer security than wired environments. The advantageous features of Bluetooth technology resulted in Bluetooth units shipments climbing to five million per week at the end of 2005 [1, 2]. This is why the real-time interpretation and understanding of Bluetooth traffic behavior is critical in both maintaining the integrity of computer systems and increasing the efficient use of this technology in control type applications. Although neuro-fuzzy approaches have been applied to wireless 802.11 behavior analysis in the past, a significantly different Bluetooth protocol framework has not been extensively explored using this technology. This paper presents a new neurofuzzy traffic analysis algorithm of this still new territory of Bluetooth traffic. Further enhancements of this algorithm are presented along with the comparison against the traditional, numerical approach. Through test examples, interesting Bluetooth traffic behavior characteristics were captured, and the comparative elegance of this computationally inexpensive approach was demonstrated. This analysis can be used to provide directions for future development and use of this prevailing technology in various control type applications, as well as making the use of it more secure.

  6. Boise Air Traffic Control Tower: High Performance and sustainable Building Guiding Principles Technical Assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Goel, Supriya; Henderson, Jordan W.

    2013-09-01

    Overview of energy efficiency opportunities for new FAA tower construction using the Boise Air Traffic Control Tower as an example.

  7. Open-air direct current plasma jet: Scaling up, uniformity, and cellular control

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2012-10-15

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are commonly used in many fields from medicine to nanotechnology, yet the issue of scaling the discharges up to larger areas without compromising the plasma uniformity remains a major challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate a homogenous cold air plasma glow with a large cross-section generated by a direct current power supply. There is no risk of glow-to-arc transitions, and the plasma glow appears uniform regardless of the gap between the nozzle and the surface being processed. Detailed studies show that both the position of the quartz tube and the gas flow rate can be used to control the plasma properties. Further investigation indicates that the residual charges trapped on the inner surface of the quartz tube may be responsible for the generation of the air plasma plume with a large cross-section. The spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy reveals that the air plasma plume is uniform as it propagates out of the nozzle. The remarkable improvement of the plasma uniformity is used to improve the bio-compatibility of a glass coverslip over a reasonably large area. This improvement is demonstrated by a much more uniform and effective attachment and proliferation of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells on the plasma-treated surface.

  8. Federal Automated Information System of Nuclear Material Control and Accounting: Uniform System of Reporting Documents

    SciTech Connect

    Pitel, M V; Kasumova, L; Babcock, R A; Heinberg, C

    2003-06-12

    One of the fundamental regulations of the Russian State System for Nuclear Material Accounting and Control (SSAC), ''Basic Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Rules,'' directed that a uniform report system be developed to support the operation of the SSAC. According to the ''Regulation on State Nuclear Material Control and Accounting,'' adopted by the Russian Federation Government, Minatom of Russia is response for the development and adoption of report forms, as well as the reporting procedure and schedule. The report forms are being developed in tandem with the creation of an automated national nuclear material control and accounting system, the Federal Information System (FIS). The forms are in different stages of development and implementation. The first report forms (the Summarized Inventory Listing (SIL), Summarized Inventory Change Report (SICR) and federal and agency registers of nuclear material) have already been created and implemented. The second set of reports (nuclear material movement reports and the special anomaly report) is currently in development. A third set of reports (reports on import/export operations, and foreign nuclear material temporarily located in the Russian Federation) is still in the conceptual stage. To facilitate the development of a unified document system, the FIS must establish a uniform philosophy for the reporting system and determine the requirements for each reporting level, adhering to the following principles: completeness--the unified report system provides the entire range of information that the FIS requires to perform SSAC tasks; requisite level of detail; hierarchical structure--each report is based on the information provided in a lower-level report and is the source of information for reports at the next highest level; consistency checking--reports can be checked against other reports. A similar philosophy should eliminate redundancy in the different reports, support a uniform approach to the contents of

  9. Optimal Control and Coordination of Connected and Automated Vehicles at Urban Traffic Intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue J.; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Cassandras, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of coordinating online a continuous flow of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) crossing two adjacent intersections in an urban area. We present a decentralized optimal control framework whose solution yields for each vehicle the optimal acceleration/deceleration at any time in the sense of minimizing fuel consumption. The solu- tion, when it exists, allows the vehicles to cross the intersections without the use of traffic lights, without creating congestion on the connecting road, and under the hard safety constraint of collision avoidance. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation considering two intersections located in downtown Boston, and it is shown that coordination of CAVs can reduce significantly both fuel consumption and travel time.

  10. Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik R.

    2002-01-01

    A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

  11. Traffic Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Traffic Safety Traffic Safety Addthis Description Traffic safety promotion video

  12. A junction-tree based learning algorithm to optimize network wide traffic control: A coordinated multi-agent framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Feng; Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Qian, Xinwu; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-01-31

    Our study develops a novel reinforcement learning algorithm for the challenging coordinated signal control problem. Traffic signals are modeled as intelligent agents interacting with the stochastic traffic environment. The model is built on the framework of coordinated reinforcement learning. The Junction Tree Algorithm (JTA) based reinforcement learning is proposed to obtain an exact inference of the best joint actions for all the coordinated intersections. Moreover, the algorithm is implemented and tested with a network containing 18 signalized intersections in VISSIM. Finally, our results show that the JTA based algorithm outperforms independent learning (Q-learning), real-time adaptive learning, and fixed timing plans in terms of average delay, number of stops, and vehicular emissions at the network level.

  13. A junction-tree based learning algorithm to optimize network wide traffic control: A coordinated multi-agent framework

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhu, Feng; Aziz, H. M. Abdul; Qian, Xinwu; Ukkusuri, Satish V.

    2015-01-31

    Our study develops a novel reinforcement learning algorithm for the challenging coordinated signal control problem. Traffic signals are modeled as intelligent agents interacting with the stochastic traffic environment. The model is built on the framework of coordinated reinforcement learning. The Junction Tree Algorithm (JTA) based reinforcement learning is proposed to obtain an exact inference of the best joint actions for all the coordinated intersections. Moreover, the algorithm is implemented and tested with a network containing 18 signalized intersections in VISSIM. Finally, our results show that the JTA based algorithm outperforms independent learning (Q-learning), real-time adaptive learning, and fixed timing plansmore » in terms of average delay, number of stops, and vehicular emissions at the network level.« less

  14. Online Optimal Control of Connected Vehicles for Efficient Traffic Flow at Merging Roads

    SciTech Connect

    Rios-Torres, Jackeline; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Pisu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of coordinating online connected vehicles at merging roads to achieve a smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. We present a framework and a closed-form solution that optimize the acceleration profile of each vehicle in terms of fuel economy while avoiding collision with other vehicles at the merging zone. The proposed solution is validated through simulation and it is shown that coordination of connected vehicles can reduce significantly fuel consumption and travel time at merging roads.

  15. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Yearly Network Traffic HPSS Yearly Network Traffic Yearly Summary of IO Traffic Between Storage and Network Destinations These bar charts show the total transfer traffic for...

  16. Controlled Synthesis of Uniform Cobalt Phosphide Hyperbranched Nanocrystals Using Tri-n-octylphosphine Oxide as a Phosphorus Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Hovden, Robert; Fitting Kourkoutis, Lena; Robinson, Richard D.

    2011-01-12

    A new method to produce hyperbranched Co{sub 2}P nanocrystals that are uniform in size, shape, and symmetry was developed. In this reaction tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) was used as both a solvent and a phosphorus source. The reaction exhibits a novel monomer-saturation-dependent tunability between Co metal nanoparticle (NP) and Co{sub 2}P NP products. The morphology of Co{sub 2}P can be controlled from sheaflike structures to hexagonal symmetric structures by varying the concentration of the surfactant. This unique product differs significantly from other reported hyperbranched nanocrystals in that the highly anisotropic shapes can be stabilized as the majority shape (>84%). This is the first known use of TOPO as a reagent as well as a coordinating background solvent in NP synthesis.

  17. Chapter 3, Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3: Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol Stephen Carlson, DNV KEMA Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 3 - 1 Chapter 3 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol

  18. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Yearly Network Traffic HPSS Yearly Network Traffic Yearly Summary of I/O Traffic Between Storage and Network Destinations These bar charts show the total transfer traffic for each year between storage and network destinations (systems within and outside of NERSC). Traffic for the current year is an estimate derived by scaling the known months traffic up to 12 months. The years shown are calendar years. The first graph shows the overall growth in network traffic to storage over the years.

  19. Chapter 19: HVAC Controls (DDC/EMS/BAS) Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9: HVAC Controls (DDC/EMS/BAS) Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Jeff Romberger SBW Consulting, Inc. Bellevue, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63167 November 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable

  20. Network traffic analysis using dispersion patterns

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2010-03-15

    The Verilog code us used to map a measurement solution on FPGA to analyze network traffic. It realizes a set of Bloom filters and counters, besides associated control logic that can quickly measure statistics like InDegree, OutDegree, Depth, in the context of Traffic Dispersion Graphs. Such patterns are helpful in classification of network activity, like Peer to Peer and Port-Scanning, in the traffic.

  1. NATIONAL TRAFFIC SAFETY SUMMIT

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    TRAFFIC SAFETY SUMMIT OCTOBER 14-17, 2013 - BRINGING LAW ENFORCEMENT CRIME LABS ... Upon arrival of law enforcement both occupants of the victims' vehicle are deceased. The ...

  2. Traffic Modeling and Simulation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Over 40,000 fatalities occur each year in traffic accidents. Vehicle emissions are the leading cause of air pollution. With travel demand expected to increase more than 50% by ...

  3. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2015-03-10

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliable used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular stochastic value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory, we discuss three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  4. Fermilab | Traffic Safety at Fermilab |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Included progressive discipline for parking and moving violations as described in FESHM 10160. Set up an online training course titled Traffic Safety Awareness, which is required ...

  5. Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    By this winter, the 22 traffic signals within Topeka’s three major traffic corridors—21st Street, Wanamaker and Topeka Boulevard—will be resynchronized to help reduce driving time, gas consumption and emissions. These corridors see anywhere from 17,000 to 30,000 cars daily.

  6. A shared data environment for the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D.L.; Wheeler, V.V. ); Truett, L.F. )

    1992-01-01

    In September 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed tasking to assist the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic (MTIT) in the analysis of a potential Shared Data Environment (SDE) for MTIT automated cargo traffic systems. This analysis was a preliminary effort with emphasis on documentation of requirements, examination of design alternatives, and identification of specific MTIT systems' data sharing problems. This report records the results of the ORNL analysis. The SDE envisioned by ORNL at this point in the analysis is not merely a repository of information; it is also a system that allows processing of distributed data. To provide high-level access to and control over international cargo processes, ORNL recommends a loosely coupled, replicated database design with high-speed communications among all sites.

  7. A shared data environment for the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D.L.; Wheeler, V.V.; Truett, L.F.

    1992-01-01

    In September 1991, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed tasking to assist the Military Traffic Management Command Directorate of International Traffic (MTIT) in the analysis of a potential Shared Data Environment (SDE) for MTIT automated cargo traffic systems. This analysis was a preliminary effort with emphasis on documentation of requirements, examination of design alternatives, and identification of specific MTIT systems` data sharing problems. This report records the results of the ORNL analysis. The SDE envisioned by ORNL at this point in the analysis is not merely a repository of information; it is also a system that allows processing of distributed data. To provide high-level access to and control over international cargo processes, ORNL recommends a loosely coupled, replicated database design with high-speed communications among all sites.

  8. Traffic information computing platform for big data

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Zongtao Li, Ying Zheng, Xibin Liu, Yan Dai, Jiting Kang, Jun

    2014-10-06

    Big data environment create data conditions for improving the quality of traffic information service. The target of this article is to construct a traffic information computing platform for big data environment. Through in-depth analysis the connotation and technology characteristics of big data and traffic information service, a distributed traffic atomic information computing platform architecture is proposed. Under the big data environment, this type of traffic atomic information computing architecture helps to guarantee the traffic safety and efficient operation, more intelligent and personalized traffic information service can be used for the traffic information users.

  9. Hanford Safety Traffic Improvements - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Safety Traffic Improvements About Us Traffic Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection are taking steps to improve traffic safety on the Hanford Site. These measures are meant to improve the safety of the workforce and visitors to the Hanford Site. There will also be benefits in improving the flow of traffic and reducing traffic

  10. Hanford Traffic Safety FAQs - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Traffic Safety Frequently Asked Questions Hanford Site Traffic Safety Improvements Hanford Traffic Safety Frequently Asked Questions Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Hanford Traffic Safety Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Hanford Site Traffic Safety Committee (HSTSC) Transportation Solutions Inc. (TSI) What are the Safety Pull Outs and what are they used for? The shoulder of Route 4 South is too narrow for drivers to safely pull over. The safety

  11. Method for uniformly bending conduits

    DOEpatents

    Dekanich, S.J.

    1984-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a method for bending metal tubing through various radii while maintaining uniform cross section of the tubing. The present invention is practical by filling the tubing to a sufficient level with water, freezing the water to ice and bending the ice-filled tubing in a cooled die to the desired radius. The use of the ice as a filler material provides uniform cross-sectional bends of the tubing and upon removal of the ice provides an uncontaminated interior of the tubing which will enable it to be used in its intended application without encountering residual contaminants in the tubing due to the presence of the filler material.

  12. Air Traffic Operations | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    In the Air Traffic Cloud Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on ... In the Air Traffic Cloud Researchers Mike Durling and Liling Ren discuss new technology to ...

  13. Seven Traffic Signals in Two Minutes

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topeka, Kansas has activated the first of three key traffic corridors to receive a "green light tunnel," a real-time adaptive traffic signal system that synchronizes signals to create a series of...

  14. NAC 484 - Traffic Laws | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    RegulationRegulation: NAC 484 - Traffic LawsLegal Abstract These regulations set forth the traffic laws in the State of Nevada. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014...

  15. FAA Air Traffic Organization Safety Management

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Mark DeNicuolo, Manager Performance and Analyses Air Traffic Organization Safety and Technical Training Federal Aviation Administration

  16. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  17. Uniform Methods Project Contacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    » Uniform Methods Project Contacts Uniform Methods Project Contacts The primary contacts for the Uniform Methods Project are below. Send comments, questions, and feedback to ump@ee.doe.gov. U.S. Department of Energy Michael Li National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dan Beckley Chuck Kurnik

  18. EECBG Success Story: Getting Traffic Lights Talking to Improve Topeka's Traffic Tunnel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    To improve traffic and reduce emissions, Topeka, Kansas is implementing an "InSync" traffic system that resynchronizing lights to help reduce driving time, financed by an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). Learn more.

  19. A queuing model for road traffic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrouahane, N.; Aissani, D.; Bouallouche-Medjkoune, L.; Farhi, N.

    2015-03-10

    We present in this article a stochastic queuing model for the raod traffic. The model is based on the M/G/c/c state dependent queuing model, and is inspired from the deterministic Godunov scheme for the road traffic simulation. We first propose a variant of M/G/c/c state dependent model that works with density-flow fundamental diagrams rather than density-speed relationships. We then extend this model in order to consider upstream traffic demand as well as downstream traffic supply. Finally, we show how to model a whole raod by concatenating raod sections as in the deterministic Godunov scheme.

  20. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOEpatents

    Bohn, Mark S.; Anselmo, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  1. Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code includes the statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include log homes, ma...

  2. Chapter 21: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol. Uniform...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lighting Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of ...

  3. Nanoscale Traffic Rules for Metals on Graphene | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Traffic Rules for Metals on Graphene Researchers have shown how the motion of individual atoms on surfaces of graphene-a one atom thick layer of carbon-can be controlled. The adatom diffusion rate and hopping direction can be tuned by lowering the diffusion barrier using an effective electric field. This was shown using in situ scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperatures and the mechanism was elucidated using first-principles calculations. The electric field is locally tuned by

  4. V-201: Cisco Intrusion Prevention System SSP Fragmented Traffic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    201: Cisco Intrusion Prevention System SSP Fragmented Traffic Denial of Service Vulnerability V-201: Cisco Intrusion Prevention System SSP Fragmented Traffic Denial of Service ...

  5. Methods and systems for detecting abnormal digital traffic (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methods and systems for detecting abnormal digital traffic Title: Methods and systems for detecting abnormal digital traffic Aspects of the present invention encompass methods and ...

  6. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, David B.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  7. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM); Cannon, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A system utilizing uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The uniformly redundant array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts such that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. Additionally, the array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors.

  8. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E. (Los Alamos, NM); Cannon, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    A system utilizing uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The uniformly redundant array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts such that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. Additionally, the array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors.

  9. A First Look at Modern Enterprise Traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ruoming; Mark Allman, Mark; Bennett, Mike; Lee, Jason; Paxson, Vern; Tierney, Brian

    2005-06-01

    While wide-area Internet traffic has been heavily studied for many years, the characteristics of traffic inside Internet enterprises remain almost wholly unexplored. Nearly all of the studies of enterprise traffic available in the literature are well over a decade old and focus on individual LANs rather than whole sites. In this paper we present a broad overview of internal enterprise traffic recorded at a medium-sized site. The packet traces span more than 100 hours, over which activity from a total of several thousand internal hosts appears. This wealth of data--which we are publicly releasing in anonymized form--spans a wide range of dimensions. While we cannot form general conclusions using data from a single site, and clearly this sort of data merits additional in-depth study in a number of ways, in this work we endeavor to characterize a number of the most salient aspects of the traffic. Our goal is to provide a first sense of ways in which modern enterprise traffic is similar to wide-area Internet traffic, and ways in which it is quite different.

  10. FAQS Reference Guide - Transportation and Traffic Management | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Transportation and Traffic Management FAQS Reference Guide - Transportation and Traffic Management This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the September 2002 edition of DOE-STD-1155-2002, Transportation and Traffic Functional Area Qualification Standard. Transportation and Traffic Management Qualification Standard Reference Guide, April 2010 (1.42 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-1155-2002 FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic

  11. Method and apparatus for spatially uniform electropolishing and electrolytic etching

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Contolini, R.J.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1992-03-17

    In an electropolishing or electrolytic etching apparatus the anode is separated from the cathode to prevent bubble transport to the anode and to produce a uniform current distribution at the anode by means of a solid nonconducting anode-cathode barrier. The anode extends into the top of the barrier and the cathode is outside the barrier. A virtual cathode hole formed in the bottom of the barrier below the level of the cathode permits current flow while preventing bubble transport. The anode is rotatable and oriented horizontally facing down. An extended anode is formed by mounting the workpiece in a holder which extends the electropolishing or etching area beyond the edge of the workpiece to reduce edge effects at the workpiece. A reference electrode controls cell voltage. Endpoint detection and current shut-off stop polishing. Spatially uniform polishing or etching can be rapidly performed. 6 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for spatially uniform electropolishing and electrolytic etching

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Contolini, Robert J.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1992-01-01

    In an electropolishing or electrolytic etching apparatus the anode is separated from the cathode to prevent bubble transport to the anode and to produce a uniform current distribution at the anode by means of a solid nonconducting anode-cathode barrier. The anode extends into the top of the barrier and the cathode is outside the barrier. A virtual cathode hole formed in the bottom of the barrier below the level of the cathode permits current flow while preventing bubble transport. The anode is rotatable and oriented horizontally facing down. An extended anode is formed by mounting the workpiece in a holder which extends the electropolishing or etching area beyond the edge of the workpiece to reduce edge effects at the workpiece. A reference electrode controls cell voltage. Endpoint detection and current shut-off stop polishing. Spatially uniform polishing or etching can be rapidly performed.

  13. Preventing Space Traffic Jams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Preventing Space Traffic Jams Preventing Space Traffic Jams June 10, 2015 - 2:25pm Addthis With around one thousand active satellites and the tens of thousands of pieces of space junk orbiting Earth, space is getting exceedingly crowded. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab are working on a system that could help prevent collisions in space. | Graphic by <a href="/node/379579">Sarah Gerrity</a>, Energy Department. With around one thousand active satellites and the

  14. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings...

  15. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures (April 2013) The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy...

  16. NNSA Adopts Standardized Protective Force Uniforms Across Enterprise...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The new standardized uniform will permit bulk purchases, which is projected to save ... Nuclear Security (DNS). "In addition to saving money, the standardized uniforms and ...

  17. Method of Obtaining Uniform Coatings on Graphite

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I. E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  18. METHOD OF OBTAINING UNIFORM COATINGS ON GRAPHITE

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, I.E.

    1961-04-01

    A method is given for obtaining uniform carbide coatings on graphite bodies. According to the invention a metallic halide in vapor form is passed over the graphite body under such conditions of temperature and pressure that the halide reacts with the graphite to form a coating of the metal carbide on the surface of the graphite.

  19. MODERATOR ELEMENTS FOR UNIFORM POWER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Balent, R.

    1963-03-12

    This patent describes a method of obtaining a flatter flux and more uniform power generation across the core of a nuclear reactor. The method comprises using moderator elements having differing moderating strength. The elements have an increasing amount of the better moderating material as a function of radial and/or axial distance from the reactor core center. (AEC)

  20. Fact #580: July 20, 2009 Traffic Congestion Grows

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to the Texas Transportation Institute's latest study on traffic congestion, two of every three cars experienced congestion in their morning or evening trip in 2007. As expected, traffic...

  1. LED Traffic Lights Get Buy American Stamp | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Red. Yellow. Green. What LED traffic signals don't say: Made in USA. That is changing. ... Lindsey Gsell is a Staff Writer for Energy Empowers. Addthis Related Articles LED traffic ...

  2. LED Traffic Lights Get Buy American Stamp | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    To date, Dialight has manufactured nearly 4 million LED signals-which include red, green and yellow traffic balls, traffic arrows and pedestrian crosswalk signals. Many major U.S. ...

  3. Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and...

  4. HANFORD SITE VEHICLE TRAFFIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HANFORD SITE VEHICLE TRAFFIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT April 2010 Prepared for: Mission Support Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy - Richland Office Richland, Washington Prepared by: Transportation Solutions, Inc. 8350 165 th Ave Northeast, Suite 100 Redmond, Washington 98052 425-883-4134 tsinw.com Hanford Vehicle Safety Assessment FEBRUARY 2010 ii Table of Contents Executive Summary

  5. Variability in continuous traffic monitoring data

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.; Hu, P.S.; Young, J.

    1996-07-01

    Each state in the United States can be viewed as a universe of road segments. For each road segment in each state, it is desired to know various traffic characteristics based on count data, classification count data, and weigh-in-motion data. These data are absolutely essential for highway design, maintenance, safety, and planning. Given no cost constraints, each road segment would be continuously monitored every day of the year. However, in practice, a few road segments are monitored continuously every day of the year to produce annual characteristics of traffic flow. The remaining road segments are monitored for one or two days each year, and this resulting data are `adjusted` (using factors based on data collected from the continuously monitored road segments) to produce estimates of annual characteristics. With this general approach, each state strives to provide estimates of annual characteristics for each road segment within its jurisdiction. In 1985, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published the Traffic Monitoring Guide to assist states in achieving this end. As with almost any data collection effort, the monitoring data suffers from errors from many sources. In this paper, we report some empirical findings in a research project sponsored by the FHWA. This research project studied the variability in the traffic data from the continuously monitored road segments from state(s) and, the extent to which this variability is transferred to and affects the precision of the data produced from the road segments which are monitored only one or two days each year. The ultimate hope is that states will eventually be able to not only publish an estimate of a characteristic such as Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) for each road segment, but also that each estimate will be accompanied by a statement expressing how good the estimate is in terms of its estimated variability or precision, which will likely be expressed as a coefficient of variation.

  6. Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuation Operations: Phase A Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Zhang, Li; Mahmoud, Anas M.; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Wen, Yi

    2010-05-01

    is also equipped with their own power supply and a GPS (Global Positioning System) device to auto-determine its spatial location on the transportation network under surveillance. The system is capable of assessing traffic parameters by identifying and re-identifying vehicles in the traffic stream as those vehicles pass over the sensors. The system of sensors transmits, through wireless communication, real-time traffic information (travel time and other parameters) to a command and control center via an NTCIP (National Transportation Communication for ITS Protocol) -compatible interface. As an alternative, an existing NTCIP-compatible system accepts the real-time traffic information mentioned and broadcasts the traffic information to emergency managers, the media and the public via the existing channels. A series of tests, both in a controlled environment and on the field, were conducted to study the feasibility of rapidly deploying the system of traffic sensors and to assess its ability to provide real-time traffic information during an emergency evacuation. The results of these tests indicated that the prototype sensors are reliable and accurate for the type of application that is the focus of this project.

  7. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  8. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  9. Electrode with transparent series resistance for uniform switching of optical modulation devices

    DOEpatents

    Tench, D. Morgan; Cunningham, Michael A.; Kobrin, Paul H.

    2008-01-08

    Switching uniformity of an optical modulation device for controlling the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is improved by use of an electrode comprising an electrically resistive layer that is transparent to the radiation. The resistive layer is preferably an innerlayer of a wide-bandgap oxide sandwiched between layers of indium tin oxide or another transparent conductor, and may be of uniform thickness, or may be graded so as to provide further improvement in the switching uniformity. The electrode may be used with electrochromic and reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window devices, as well as display devices based on various technologies.

  10. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, J.S.

    1981-01-07

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprisng: (1) a movable grinding surface; (2) a specimen holder; (3) a dislacing means for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another; and (4) at least three means for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  11. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOEpatents

    Bryner, Joseph S.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprising (1) a movable grinding surface, (2) a specimen holder, (3) a displacing device for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another, and (4) at least three devices for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  12. Mixing liquid holding tanks for uniform concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving uniform concentration within liquid holding tanks can often times be a difficult task for the nuclear chemical process industry. This is due to the fact that nuclear criticality concerns require these tanks to be designed with high internal aspect ratios such that the free movement of fluid is greatly inhibited. To determine the mixing times required to achieve uniform concentrations within these tanks, an experimental program was conducted utilizing pencil tanks, double-pencil tanks, and annular tanks of varying geometries filled with salt-water solutions (simulant for nitric acid actinide solutions). Mixing was accomplished by air sparging and/or pump recirculation. Detailed fluid mechanic mixing models were developed --from first principles--to analyze and interpret the test results. These nondimensional models show the functionality of the concentration inhomogeneity (defined as the relative standard deviation of the true concentration within the tank) in relationship to the characteristic mixing time--among other variables. The results can be readily used to scale tank geometries to sizes other than those studied here.

  13. Making the Traffic Operations Case for Congestion Pricing: Operational Impacts of Congestion Pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hu, Patricia S; Davidson, Diane

    2011-02-01

    Congestion begins when an excess of vehicles on a segment of roadway at a given time, resulting in speeds that are significantly slower than normal or 'free flow' speeds. Congestion often means stop-and-go traffic. The transition occurs when vehicle density (the number of vehicles per mile in a lane) exceeds a critical level. Once traffic enters a state of congestion, recovery or time to return to a free-flow state is lengthy; and during the recovery process, delay continues to accumulate. The breakdown in speed and flow greatly impedes the efficient operation of the freeway system, resulting in economic, mobility, environmental and safety problems. Freeways are designed to function as access-controlled highways characterized by uninterrupted traffic flow so references to freeway performance relate primarily to the quality of traffic flow or traffic conditions as experienced by users of the freeway. The maximum flow or capacity of a freeway segment is reached while traffic is moving freely. As a result, freeways are most productive when they carry capacity flows at 60 mph, whereas lower speeds impose freeway delay, resulting in bottlenecks. Bottlenecks may be caused by physical disruptions, such as a reduced number of lanes, a change in grade, or an on-ramp with a short merge lane. This type of bottleneck occurs on a predictable or 'recurrent' basis at the same time of day and same day of week. Recurrent congestion totals 45% of congestion and is primarily from bottlenecks (40%) as well as inadequate signal timing (5%). Nonrecurring bottlenecks result from crashes, work zone disruptions, adverse weather conditions, and special events that create surges in demand and that account for over 55% of experienced congestion. Figure 1.1 shows that nonrecurring congestion is composed of traffic incidents (25%), severe weather (15%), work zones, (10%), and special events (5%). Between 1995 and 2005, the average percentage change in increased peak traveler delay, based on

  14. Radiochromic Film Measurement of Spatial Uniformity for a Laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uniformity for a Laser Generated X-ray Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiochromic Film Measurement of Spatial Uniformity for a Laser Generated X-ray ...

  15. ARS 41-1092 Uniform Administrative Hearing Procedures | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    92 Uniform Administrative Hearing Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ARS 41-1092 Uniform Administrative...

  16. About the Uniform Methods Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Initiatives & Projects » Uniform Methods Project » About the Uniform Methods Project About the Uniform Methods Project The Uniform Methods Project is developing measurement and verification protocols for determining energy savings for commonly implemented program measures. This work is being done through collaboration with energy efficiency program administrators, stakeholders, and EM&V consultants-including the firms that perform roughly 70% of the energy efficiency evaluations in

  17. Streamlining Transportation Corridor Planning Processess: Freight and Traffic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar

    2010-08-01

    The traffic investigation is one of the most important parts of an Environmental Impact Statement of projects involving the construction of new roadway facilities and/or the improvement of existing ones. The focus of the traffic analysis is on the determination of anticipated traffic flow characteristics of the proposed project, by the application of analytical methods that can be grouped under the umbrella of capacity analysis methodologies. In general, the main traffic parameter used in EISs to describe the quality of traffic flow is the Level of Service (LOS). The current state of the practice in terms of the traffic investigations for EISs has two main shortcomings. The first one is related to the information that is necessary to conduct the traffic analysis, and specifically to the lack of integration among the different transportation models and the sources of information that, in general, reside in GIS databases. A discussion of the benefits of integrating CRS&SI technologies and the transportation models used in the EIS traffic investigation is included. The second shortcoming is in the presentation of the results, both in terms of the appearance and formatting, as well as content. The presentation of traffic results (current and proposed) is discussed. This chapter also addresses the need of additional data, in terms of content and coverage. Regarding the former, other traffic parameters (e.g., delays) that are more meaningful to non-transportation experts than LOS, as well as additional information (e.g., freight flows) that can impact traffic conditions and safety are discussed. Spatial information technologies can decrease the negative effects of, and even eliminate, these shortcomings by making the relevant information that is input to the models more complete and readily available, and by providing the means to communicate the results in a more clear and efficient manner. The benefits that the application and use of CRS&SI technologies can provide to

  18. Florida County Seeks to Reduce Emissions and Improve Traffic

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    St. Johns County, Florida is tackling its traffic-timing problem with a little help from an Energy Department Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block grant. The county will use the grant to improve traffic flow by re-synchronizing signals at five major road segments. In total, 23 traffic signals will be retimed and synchronized, resulting in lower fuel consumption, shorter travel times, increased travel speed, less stopping and less engine idling.

  19. Microsoft Word - FINAL STM Traffic MAP Completion Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5 4.1.1 Commit One Half a Full Time Equivalent Employee ......conduct informal traffic monitoring as part of standard operations and sustainability ...

  20. Ohio Town Installing ‘Green’ Traffic Signals

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elyria makes the move to efficient lighting. The town has decided to start replacing traffic lights with energy-efficient LEDs.

  1. Uniform Fin Sizes versus Uniform Fin Root Temperatures for Unsymmetrically Obstructed Solar Probe RTGs

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Noravian, Heros

    1991-08-01

    Paper presented at the 26th IECEC, August 4-9, 1991 in Boston, MA. The Solar Probe will approach the sun within four solar radii or 0.02 AU. Because of that proximity, the spacecraft must be protected by a thermal shield. The protected umbra is a cone of 4 m diameter and 7.5 m height, and all temperature-sensitive flight components must fit within that cone. Therefore, the RTGs which power the Solar probe cannot be separated from each other and from other payload components by deploying them on long booms. They must be located near and thermally isolated from the spacecraft's paylod. This paper compares the performance of such variable-fin RTGs with that of uniform-fin RTGs. It derives the fin dimensions required for circumferential isothermicity, identifies a design that maximizes the RTGs specific power, and proves the practicality of that design option. However, detailed thermal and electrical analyses led to the somewhat surprising conclusion that (for a given thermal power) the non-uniform-fin design results in the same power output, at a higher maximum hot-junction temperature, as the standard uniform-fin design, despite the latter's nonuniform cold-junction temperatures. There are three copies in the file.

  2. A SPATIOTEMPORAL APPROACH FOR HIGH RESOLUTION TRAFFIC FLOW IMPUTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lee; Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), traffic data collection technologies have been evolving dramatically. The emergence of innovative data collection technologies such as Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor (RTMS), Bluetooth sensor, GPS-based Floating Car method, automated license plate recognition (ALPR) (1), etc., creates an explosion of traffic data, which brings transportation engineering into the new era of Big Data. However, despite the advance of technologies, the missing data issue is still inevitable and has posed great challenges for research such as traffic forecasting, real-time incident detection and management, dynamic route guidance, and massive evacuation optimization, because the degree of success of these endeavors depends on the timely availability of relatively complete and reasonably accurate traffic data. A thorough literature review suggests most current imputation models, if not all, focus largely on the temporal nature of the traffic data and fail to consider the fact that traffic stream characteristics at a certain location are closely related to those at neighboring locations and utilize these correlations for data imputation. To this end, this paper presents a Kriging based spatiotemporal data imputation approach that is able to fully utilize the spatiotemporal information underlying in traffic data. Imputation performance of the proposed approach was tested using simulated scenarios and achieved stable imputation accuracy. Moreover, the proposed Kriging imputation model is more flexible compared to current models.

  3. OSTIblog Articles in the Web traffic Topic | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    traffic Topic OSTI's Web Traffic by Mark Martin 16 May, 2011 in Technology Recently, I had the opportunity to explore OSTI's web traffic statistics with Walt Warnick and Karen ...

  4. Beating the traffic with commuting alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This pamphlet describes how, by encouraging commuting options, local governments can help reduce air pollution, fuel consumption, and traffic congestion. Minimizing these problems makes the community more appealing to businesses, residents, and visitors and boosts the local economy. Approaches to alternative transportation are as varied as the communities devising and using them. But the critical factor is initiative from local governments, often one of communities largest employers. They can use and promote commuting alternatives among their employees. Local governments can also promote alternative transportation among other employers and the general public. They can provide information on commuting options, improve the infrastructure, and use local authority to require and reward those changes necessary to make alternative transportation a widely accepted part of community life. Best of all, local governments can lead by example and establish a template for other employers to follow.

  5. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Large, uniform hollow spherical shells are produced by forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, evaporating the drops to form dried particles, coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material, and heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble which expands the outer layer. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the hollow shells, spherical shells with uniform walls are produced.

  6. Traffic within the Cytochrome b[subscript 6]f Lipoprotein Complex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Traffic within the Cytochrome bsubscript 6f Lipoprotein Complex: Gating of the Quinone Portal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Traffic within the Cytochrome bsubscript ...

  7. Radiochromic Film Measurement of Spatial Uniformity for a Laser...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiochromic Film Measurement of Spatial Uniformity for a Laser Generated X-ray Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiochromic Film Measurement of Spatial...

  8. Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Andrew Maham, Tom Houston, Carl J. Costantino DOE NPH Meeting, Germantown, MD October 2014

  9. Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation from the May 2015 Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel Meeting. PDF icon Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities More Documents & Publications ...

  10. EGR Spatial Uniformity & Cylinder-Resolved Transients-Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    using an Absorption Spectroscopy Probe EGR Spatial Uniformity & Cylinder-Resolved Transients-Measurements using an Absorption Spectroscopy Probe This poster describes ...

  11. Polymer delineation system. [Patent application: traffic lane lines

    DOEpatents

    Woolman, S.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-24

    A delineation system (traffic lane lines) for highways is described in which polymerizable substances are applied to existing or newly prepared highway pavements. The substances would contain a suitable pigment and may incorporate reflective elements.

  12. Addendum to 2010 NREL Environmental Performance Report … Traffic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Traffic counts for this time period were extracted from the complete data set for the recording period and compared against the allowable maximum. Figure 1 shows the data set of ...

  13. OSTI_WebTraffic_FY12.png | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information OSTI_WebTraffic_FY12.png

  14. High sensitivity charge amplifier for ion beam uniformity monitor

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  15. A rigorous treatment of a follow-the-leader traffic model with traffic lights present

    SciTech Connect

    Argall, Brenna; Cheleshkin, Eugene; Greenberg, J.M.; Hinde, Colin; Lin, Pei-Jen

    2003-07-16

    Traffic flow on a unidirectional roadway in the presence of traffic lights is modeled. Individual car responses to green, yellow, and red lights are postulated and these result in rules governing the acceleration and deceleration of individual cars. The essence of the model is that only specific cars are directly affected by the lights. The other cars behave according to simple follow-the-leader rules which limit their speed by the spacing between it and the car directly ahead. The model has a number of desirable properties; namely cars do not run red lights, cars do not smash into one another, and cars exhibit no velocity reversals. In a situation with multiple lights operating in-phase we get, after an initial startup period, a constant number of cars through each light during any green-yellow period. Moreover, this flux is less by one or two cars per period than the flux obtained in discretized versions of the idealized Lighthill, Whitham, Richards model which allows for infinite accelerations.

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Safety after a Traffic Accident on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas

  17. Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaNsapphire template Authors: Sundaram, S. 1 ; Puybaret, R. 2 ; El ...

  18. Uniform Methods Project Related Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Project Related Links Uniform Methods Project Related Links The websites and publications listed below provide supporting information for the Uniform Methods Project and for evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs. Glossaries of EM&V Terms Federal EM&V Resources International Resources Related Standards Glossaries of EM&V Terms The following glossaries provide definitions of technical language and EM&V terms. Appendix A: Glossary of

  19. Uniform Methods Project for Determining Energy Efficiency Program Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy for Determining Energy Efficiency Program Savings Uniform Methods Project for Determining Energy Efficiency Program Savings Under the Uniform Methods Project, DOE is developing a set of protocols for determining savings from energy efficiency measures and programs. The protocols provide a straightforward method for evaluating gross energy savings for residential, commercial, and industrial measures commonly offered in ratepayer-funded programs in the United Sates. The

  20. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Savings for Specific Measures | Department of Energy The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures In April 2013 the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) published the first set of protocols for determining energy savings from energy efficiency measures and programs. Funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

  1. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and ...

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation

    DOEpatents

    Field, Halden

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

  4. Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    inspection station Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and won't be staffed by a Laboratory protective force officer. September 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

  5. Methods and systems for detecting abnormal digital traffic

    DOEpatents

    Goranson, Craig A [Kennewick, WA; Burnette, John R [Kennewick, WA

    2011-03-22

    Aspects of the present invention encompass methods and systems for detecting abnormal digital traffic by assigning characterizations of network behaviors according to knowledge nodes and calculating a confidence value based on the characterizations from at least one knowledge node and on weighting factors associated with the knowledge nodes. The knowledge nodes include a characterization model based on prior network information. At least one of the knowledge nodes should not be based on fixed thresholds or signatures. The confidence value includes a quantification of the degree of confidence that the network behaviors constitute abnormal network traffic.

  6. Cloud-Based Air Traffic Management Announcement | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Works to Bring Air Traffic Management Into "The Cloud" Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Works to Bring Air Traffic Management Into "The Cloud" A global leader in avionics and software development, the General Electric Company (NYSE: GE) has embarked on an 18-month project with the

  7. New non-linear photovoltaic effect in uniform bipolar semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Volovichev, I.

    2014-11-21

    A linear theory of the new non-linear photovoltaic effect in the closed circuit consisting of a non-uniformly illuminated uniform bipolar semiconductor with neutral impurities is developed. The non-uniform photo-excitation of impurities results in the position-dependant current carrier mobility that breaks the semiconductor homogeneity and induces the photo-electromotive force (emf). As both the electron (or hole) mobility gradient and the current carrier generation rate depend on the light intensity, the photo-emf and the short-circuit current prove to be non-linear functions of the incident light intensity at an arbitrarily low illumination. The influence of the sample size on the photovoltaic effect magnitude is studied. Physical relations and distinctions between the considered effect and the Dember and bulk photovoltaic effects are also discussed.

  8. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1983-09-26

    The invention is a method to produce large uniform hollow spherical shells by (1) forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, (2) evaporating the drops to form dried particles, (3) coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material and (4) heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and to decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble. The expanding gas bubble forms the molten outer layer into a shell of relatively large diameter. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the molten shell, nonuniformities in wall thickness can be reduced. The method of the invention is utilized to produce large uniform spherical shells, in the millimeter to centimeter diameter size range, from a variety of materials and of high quality, including sphericity, concentricity and surface smoothness, for use as laser fusion or other inertial confinement fusion targets as well as other applications.

  9. Achieving uniform-high-tensions in mechanical-anchor bolts. Open file report, 15 January 1980-15 November 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Mahyera, A.; Jones, A.H.

    1982-11-01

    Towards the goal of achieving uniform high tensions in roofbolts to provide superior roof support for extended periods, mechanical anchor bolts were installed in a mine in eight different ways--under torque thrust control with and without hardened washers, belleville washers, and tension equalization; in a conventional manner with and without a hardened washer. The various bolt groups were analyzed in terms of tension uniformity and mean tension levels. Installing the bolts accurately with a hardened washer under the bolthead, and proper torque thrust control resulted in the most uniformly tensioned bolt--with a coefficient variation of only 14%, an improvement of three times over a conventional installation. Also, these bolts maintained a high tension level--80% of the installation tension compared with 50% achieved conventionally.

  10. Maximum voltage gradient, uniformity and brightness of dispenser cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Green, M.C.; Miram, G.V.; Nordquist, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Initial measurements of current uniformity and intrinsic cathode brightness are presented a 5.1 cm diameter osmium alloy coated dispenser cathode. The data are obtained with a planar diode driven with a 35ns Blumlein pulse line. Pepper pot images are observed with a fast phosphor and gated camera. The current density and beamlet divergence angle are uniform within +-10% and a brightness J = 1.6E10A/m/sup 2/rad/sup 2/ is observed at a current density j=44A/cm/sup 2/. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Emergency evacuation/transportation plan update: Traffic model development and evaluation of early closure procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-28

    Prolonged delays in traffic experienced by Laboratory personnel during a recent early dismissal in inclement weather, coupled with reconstruction efforts along NM 502 east of the White Rock Wye for the next 1 to 2 years, has prompted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to re-evaluate and improve the present transportation plan and its integration with contingency plans maintained in other organizations. Facilities planners and emergency operations staff need to evaluate the transportation system`s capability to inefficiently and safely evacuate LANL under different low-level emergency conditions. A variety of potential procedures governing the release of employees from the different technical areas (TAs) requires evaluation, perhaps with regard to multiple emergency-condition scenarios, with one or more optimal procedures ultimately presented for adoption by Lab Management. The work undertaken in this project will hopefully lay a foundation for an on-going, progressive transportation system analysis capability. It utilizes microscale simulation techniques to affirm, reassess and validate the Laboratory`s Early Dismissal/Closure/Delayed Opening Plan. The Laboratory is required by Federal guidelines, and compelled by prudent practice and conscientious regard for the welfare of employees and nearby residents, to maintain plans and operating procedures for evacuation if the need arises. The tools developed during this process can be used outside of contingency planning. It is anticipated that the traffic models developed will allow site planners to evaluate changes to the traffic network which could better serve the normal traffic levels. Changes in roadway configuration, control strategies (signalization and signing), response strategies to traffic accidents, and patterns of demand can be modelled using the analysis tools developed during this project. Such scenarios typically are important considerations in master planning and facilities programming.

  12. U-091: cURL Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    91: cURL Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSLTLS Traffic U-091: cURL Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSLTLS Traffic January 30, 2012 - 6:45am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in ...

  13. U-134: Apache Traffic Server Host Header Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Apache Traffic Server. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions.

  14. Addendum to 2010 NREL Environmental Performance Report … Traffic Mitigation Action Plan Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Addendum to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Environmental Performance Report for 2010 (Annual Site Environmental Report per the U.S. Department of Energy Order 231.1-1A Chg 2) Traffic Mitigation Action Plan Update November 2011 Page 1 of 4 Traffic Mitigation Action Plan 2010 Update Traffic Management A Mitigation Action Plan (MAP), finalized in May 2008, was developed to address potential environmental impacts from changes in traffic at NREL and to support a Finding of No Significant

  15. BACKSCATTER GUAGE DESCRIPTION FOR INSPECTION OF NEUTRON ABSORBER AND UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Gibbs, K.; Couture, A.

    2012-05-23

    This paper describes design, calibration, and testing of a dual He-3 detector neutron backscatter gauge for use in the Savannah River Site Mixed Oxide Fuel project. The gauge is demonstrated to measure boron content and uniformity in concrete slabs used in the facility construction.

  16. Crystallographically uniform arrays of ordered (In)GaN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Gačević, Ž. Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Albert, S.; Calleja, E.

    2015-01-21

    In this work, through a comparative study of self-assembled (SA) and selective area grown (SAG) (In)GaN nanocolumn (NC) ensembles, we first give a detailed insight into improved crystallographic uniformity (homogeneity of crystallographic tilts and twists) of the latter ones. The study, performed making use of: reflective high energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, reveals that unlike their SA counterparts, the ensembles of SAG NCs show single epitaxial relationship to both sapphire(0001) and Si(111) underlying substrates. In the second part of the article, making use of X-ray diffraction, we directly show that the selective area growth leads to improved compositional uniformity of InGaN NC ensembles. This further leads to improved spectral purity of their luminescence, as confirmed by comparative macro-photoluminescence measurements performed on SA and SAG InGaN NC ensembles. An improved crystallographic uniformity of NC ensembles facilitates their integration into optoelectronic devices, whereas their improved compositional uniformity allows for their employment in single-color optoelectronic applications.

  17. Improved plasma uniformity in a discharge system with electron injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vizir, A. V.; Tyunkov, A. V.; Shandrikov, M. V.

    2009-02-15

    We present the results of experiments leading to improvement in bulk plasma uniformity of a constricted-arc discharge system with electron injection. The steady-state discharge was in argon, at a gas pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and operated with a main discharge voltage between 20 and 100 V and current between 3 and 15 A. The radial plasma distribution was measured with a movable Langmuir probe. We find that geometric modification of the intermediate electrode exit aperture and the main discharge cathode add little to the plasma uniformity. Improved bulk plasma uniformity is observed when a special distributing grid electrode is used and the main discharge voltage is less than 20-30 V. The application of a weakly divergent magnetic field in the region of the intermediate electrode exit aperture decreases the plasma nonuniformity from 20% to 14% over a radial distance of 30 cm. The plasma uniformity was further improved by compensating the magnetic self-field of the injected electron beam by a reverse magnetic field produced with a special electrode compensator. It is shown that an increase in discharge current causes a proportional increase in back current in the distributing electrode. The approach allows a decrease in plasma nonuniformity from 20% to 13% over a radial distance of 30 cm.

  18. Laboratory evaluation of dynamic traffic assignment systems: Requirements, framework, and system design

    SciTech Connect

    Miaou, S.-P.; Pillai, R.S.; Summers, M.S.; Rathi, A.K.; Lieu, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    The success of Advanced Traveler Information 5ystems (ATIS) and Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) depends on the availability and dissemination of timely and accurate estimates of current and emerging traffic network conditions. Real-time Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) systems are being developed to provide the required timely information. The DTA systems will provide faithful and coherent real-time, pre-trip, and en-route guidance/information which includes routing, mode, and departure time suggestions for use by travelers, ATIS, and ATMS. To ensure the credibility and deployment potential of such DTA systems, an evaluation system supporting all phases of DTA system development has been designed and presented in this paper. This evaluation system is called the DTA System Laboratory (DSL). A major component of the DSL is a ground- truth simulator, the DTA Evaluation System (DES). The DES is envisioned to be a virtual representation of a transportation system in which ATMS and ATIS technologies are deployed. It simulates the driving and decision-making behavior of travelers in response to ATIS and ATMS guidance, information, and control. This paper presents the major evaluation requirements for a DTA Systems, a modular modeling framework for the DES, and a distributed DES design. The modeling framework for the DES is modular, meets the requirements, can be assembled using both legacy and independently developed modules, and can be implemented as a either a single process or a distributed system. The distributed design is extendible, provides for the optimization of distributed performance, and object-oriented design within each distributed component. A status report on the development of the DES and other research applications is also provided.

  19. Controlling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling chaos in low- and high-dimensional systems with periodic parametric perturbations K. A. Mirus and J. C. Sprott Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 29 June 1998͒ The effect of applying a periodic perturbation to an accessible parameter of various chaotic systems is examined. Numerical results indicate that perturbation frequencies near the natural frequencies of the unstable periodic orbits of the chaotic systems can result in limit

  20. Convergence of Vehicle and Infrastructure Data for Traffic and Demand Management

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Stanley E.

    2015-11-16

    The increasing availability of highly granular, vehicle trajectory data combined with ever increasing stores of roadway sensor data has provided unparalleled observability into the operation of our urban roadway networks. These data sources are quickly moving from research and prototype environments into full-scale commercial deployment and data offerings. The observability gained allows for increased control opportunities to enhance transportation mobility, safety and energy efficiency. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is involved in three initiatives to leverage these data for positive outcomes: 1) In 2015 NREL, in cooperation with industry and university partners, was awarded an ARPA-E research grant to research a control architecture to incentivize individual travelers toward more sustainable travel behavior. Based on real-time data on the traveler's destination and state of the system, the traveler is presented with route and/or mode choices and offered incentives to accept sustainable alternatives over less-sustainable ones. The project tests the extent to which small incentives can influence, or tip the balance toward more sustainable travel behavior. 2) Although commercial sources of travel time and speed have emerged in recent years based on vehicle probe data, volume estimates continue to rely primarily on historical count data factored for the time of day, day of week, and season of year. Real-time volume flows would enable better tools, simulation in the loop, and ultimately more effective control outcomes. NREL in cooperation with the University of Maryland and industry traffic data providers (INRIX, HERE and TomTom), are attempting to accelerate the timeframe to a viable real-time vehicle volume data feed based on probe data. 3) Signal control on urban arterials for years has had to rely on models rather than measured data to assess performance. High-resolution controller data and low-cost re-identification data now allows for direct

  1. OSTIblog Articles in the Web traffic Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information traffic Topic OSTI's Web Traffic by Mark Martin 16 May, 2011 in Technology Recently, I had the opportunity to explore OSTI's web traffic statistics with Walt Warnick and Karen Spence. I am quite happy with what was revealed about our traffic growth and the value of our various collaborations in making scientific and technical information more accessible. So I wanted to share it with you here at the OSTI Blog. Web Traffic, How and What OSTI Tracks OSTI

  2. OPM Briefing on Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Career, Seniority, Pay, and Benefits information

  3. Electrostatic lens to focus an ion beam to uniform density

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Cleland H.

    1977-01-11

    A focusing lens for an ion beam having a gaussian or similar density profile is provided. The lens is constructed to provide an inner zero electrostatic field, and an outer electrostatic field such that ions entering this outer field are deflected by an amount that is a function of their distance from the edge of the inner field. The result is a beam that focuses to a uniform density in a manner analogous to that of an optical ring lens. In one embodiment, a conically-shaped network of fine wires is enclosed within a cylindrical anode. The wire net together with the anode produces a voltage field that re-directs the outer particles of the beam while the axial particles pass undeflected through a zero field inside the wire net. The result is a focused beam having a uniform intensity over a given target area and at a given distance from the lens.

  4. Effect of non-uniform exchange field in ferromagnetic graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2015-04-15

    We have presented here the consequences of the non-uniform exchange field on the spin transport issues in spin chiral configuration of ferromagnetic graphene. Taking resort to the spin–orbit coupling (SOC) term and non-uniform exchange coupling term we are successful to express the expression of Hall conductivity in terms of the exchange field and SOC parameters through the Kubo formula approach. However, for a specific configuration of the exchange parameter we have evaluated the Berry curvature of the system. We also have paid attention to the study of SU(2) gauge theory of ferromagnetic graphene. The generation of anti damping spin–orbit torque in spin chiral magnetic graphene is also briefly discussed.

  5. Uniform Methods Project: Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Measures | Department of Energy Project: Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Uniform Methods Project: Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures The first set of protocols for determining energy savings from energy efficiency measures and programs were published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in April 2013. Funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,

  6. Method for producing solid or hollow spherical particles of chosen chemical composition and of uniform size

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A method is provided for producing commercially large quantities of high melting temperature solid or hollow spherical particles of a predetermined chemical composition and having a uniform and controlled size distribution. An end (18, 50, 90) of a solid or hollow rod (20, 48, 88) of the material is rendered molten by a laser beam (14, 44, 82). Because of this, there is no possibility of the molten rod material becoming contaminated with extraneous material. In various aspects of the invention, an electric field is applied to the molten rod end (18, 90), and/or the molten rod end (50, 90) is vibrated. In a further aspect of the invention, a high-frequency component is added to the electric field applied to the molten end of the rod (90). By controlling the internal pressure of the rod, the rate at which the rod is introduced into the laser beam, the environment of the process, the vibration amplitude and frequency of the molten rod end, the electric field intensity applied to the molten rod end, and the frequency and intensity of the component added to the electric field, the uniformity and size distribution of the solid or hollow spherical particles (122) produced by the inventive method is controlled. The polarity of the electric field applied to the molten rod end can be chosen to eliminate backstreaming electrons, which tend to produce run-away heating in the rod, from the process.

  7. Memorandum of Decision: Withdrawal of LED Traffic Light Nonavailability Waiver

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF ENERGY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY MEMORANDUM OF DECISION SUBJECT: Amended waiver of section 1605 of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 (Recovery Act Buy American provisions) in EERE-funded projects for (1) LED traffic lights, arrows and crosswalk signals, as well as the adjacent wires and electronic parts necessary for the functionality of the lights themselves. This amendment withdraws the nonavailability waiver issued on February 11, 2010

  8. Beam characteristics in two different proton uniform scanning systems: A side-by-side comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Nichiporov, Dmitri; Hsi Wen; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To compare clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of proton therapy fields produced by two uniform scanning systems that have a number of similar hardware components but employ different techniques of beam spreading. Methods: This work compares two technologically distinct systems implementing a method of uniform scanning and layer stacking that has been developed independently at Indiana University (IU) and by Ion Beam Applications, S. A. (IBA). Clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of fields produced by these systems are studied, such as beam range control, peak-to-entrance ratio (PER), lateral penumbra, field flatness, effective source position, precision of dose delivery at different gantry angles, etc. Results: Under comparable conditions, both systems controlled beam range with an accuracy of 0.5 mm and a precision of 0.1 mm. Compared to IBA, the IU system produced pristine peaks with a slightly higher PER (3.23 and 3.45, respectively) and smaller, symmetrical, lateral in-air penumbra of 1 mm compared to about 1.9/2.4 mm in the inplane/crossplane (IP/CP) directions for IBA. Large field flatness results in the IP/CP directions were similar: 3.0/2.4% for IU and 2.9/2.4% for IBA. The IU system featured a longer virtual source-to-isocenter position, which was the same for the IP and CP directions (237 cm), as opposed to 212/192 cm (IP/CP) for IBA. Dose delivery precision at different gantry angles was higher in the IBA system (0.5%) than in the IU system (1%). Conclusions: Each of the two uniform scanning systems considered in this work shows some attractive performance characteristics while having other features that can be further improved. Overall, radiation field characteristics of both systems meet their clinical specifications and show comparable results. Most of the differences observed between the two systems are clinically insignificant.

  9. Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S

    2011-01-01

    Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow

  10. Change Control Management Guide - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    20, Change Control Management Guide by Ruben Sanchez Functional areas: Program Management, Project Management The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for...

  11. OFF VUF-2700 FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 OFF VUF-2700 FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE U.S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION FALLON, NEVADA OCTOBER 26, 1963 Project 9.1 U.s. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station James M. Polatty / James E. McDonald Issuance Dates May 1j 1965 IT lAS VEGAS llBiU\Rl LEG A L NOTICE '. ':" This report was prepared as an account or Government eponecred work. Neither the United States, nor the commtseton, nor any

  12. Effect on Non-Uniform Heat Generation on Thermionic Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    The penalty resulting from non-uniform heat generation in a thermionic reactor is examined. Operation at sub-optimum cesium pressure is shown to reduce this penalty, but at the risk of a condition analogous to burnout. For high pressure diodes, a simple empirical correlation between current, voltage and heat flux is developed and used to analyze the performance penalty associated with two different heat flux profiles, for series-and parallel-connected converters. The results demonstrate that series-connected converters require much finer power flattening than parallel converters. For example, a 10% variation in heat generation across a series array can result in a 25 to 50% power penalty.

  13. A sensitive, spatially uniform photodetector for broadband infrared spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, Enrique J.; Smith, Allan W.; Kaplan, Simon G

    2008-05-01

    We describe the design and performance of a liquid helium-cooled As:Si blocked-impurity-band photodetector system intended for spectrophotometry in the thermal infrared (2 to 30 {mu}m) spectral region. The system has been characterized for spectral sensitivity, noise, thermal stability, and spatial uniformity, and optimized for use with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer source for absolute goniometric reflectance measurements. Its performance is evaluated and compared to more common detector systems used in this spectral region, including room-temperature pyroelectric and liquid-N2-cooled photoconductive devices.

  14. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The present invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput. The balance correlation response function for the self-supporting array pattern provides an accurate representation of the source of nonfocusable radiation.

  15. Towards uniformly dispersed battery electrode composite materials: Characteristics and performance

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yo Han Kwon; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Huie, Matthew M.; Choi, Dalsu; Chang, Mincheol; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-01-14

    Battery electrodes are complex mesoscale systems comprised of electroactive components, conductive additives, and binders. In this report, methods for processing electrodes with dispersion of the components are described. To investigate the degree of material dispersion, a spin-coating technique was adopted to provide a thin, uniform layer that enabled observation of the morphology. Distinct differences in the distribution profile of the electrode components arising from individual materials physical affinities were readily identified. Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) analysis revealed pertinent surface interactions associated with materials dispersivity. Further studies demonstrated that HSPs can provide an effective strategy to identify surface modification approaches formore » improved dispersions of battery electrode materials. Specifically, introduction of surfactantlike functionality such as oleic acid (OA) capping and P3HT-conjugated polymer wrapping on the surface of nanomaterials significantly enhanced material dispersity over the composite electrode. The approach to the surface treatment on the basis of HSP study can facilitate design of composite electrodes with uniformly dispersed morphology and may contribute to enhancing their electrical and electrochemical behaviors. The conductivity of the composites and their electrochemical performance was also characterized. In conclusion, the study illustrates the importance of considering electronic conductivity, electron transfer, and ion transport in the design of environments incorporating active nanomaterials.« less

  16. Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Ravi; Vaughn, Worth E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  17. Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Congestion | Department of Energy 6: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion Despite the news that traffic congestion wasted nearly 2.9 billion gallons of fuel in 2011, fuel savings were achieved due to efforts to combat congestion. According to the Texas Transportation Institute, public transportation was responsible for a savings of 450 million gallons of fuel in 2011.

  18. Acquisition and registration of aerial video imagery of urban traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Loveland, Rohan C

    2008-01-01

    The amount of information available about urban traffic from aerial video imagery is extremely high. Here we discuss the collection of such video imagery from a helicopter platform with a low-cost sensor, and the post-processing used to correct radial distortion in the data and register it. The radial distortion correction is accomplished using a Harris model. The registration is implemented in a two-step process, using a globally applied polyprojective correction model followed by a fine scale local displacement field adjustment. The resulting cleaned-up data is sufficiently well-registered to allow subsequent straight-forward vehicle tracking.

  19. Fact #581: July 27, 2009 Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy 1: July 27, 2009 Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion Fact #581: July 27, 2009 Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion The researchers at the Texas Transportation Institute have recently published new estimates of the effects of traffic congestion. Nearly 3 billion gallons of fuel is wasted each year due to traffic congestion. In 2007, the amount of wasted fuel declined slightly due to an overall decline in vehicle miles traveled when fuel prices skyrocketed. The wasted fuel amounts to 1.6% of

  20. DOE-STD-1155-2002; Transportation and Traffic Management Functional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The Sponsor, in coordination with the Federal Technical Capability Panel, is also ... SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES Chemistry 1. Transportation and traffic management personnel shall ...

  1. Uniform Corrosion of model FeCrAl Alloys in LWR Coolants (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Uniform Corrosion of model FeCrAl Alloys in LWR Coolants Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Uniform Corrosion of model FeCrAl Alloys in LWR Coolants Authors: ...

  2. RCRA Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form 8700-22) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form 8700-22) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form...

  3. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q. [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China); Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K. [School of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Energy Technology, The University of Adelaide, S.A. 5005 (Australia)

    2010-07-15

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  4. Dynamic mask for producing uniform or graded-thickness thin films

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-06-13

    A method for producing single layer or multilayer films with high thickness uniformity or thickness gradients. The method utilizes a moving mask which blocks some of the flux from a sputter target or evaporation source before it deposits on a substrate. The velocity and position of the mask is computer controlled to precisely tailor the film thickness distribution. The method is applicable to any type of vapor deposition system, but is particularly useful for ion beam sputter deposition and evaporation deposition; and enables a high degree of uniformity for ion beam deposition, even for near-normal incidence of deposition species, which may be critical for producing low-defect multilayer coatings, such as required for masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The mask can have a variety of shapes, from a simple solid paddle shape to a larger mask with a shaped hole through which the flux passes. The motion of the mask can be linear or rotational, and the mask can be moved to make single or multiple passes in front of the substrate per layer, and can pass completely or partially across the substrate.

  5. Synthesis of Uniformly Distributed Single- and Double-sided Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Nanocombs

    SciTech Connect

    Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Liu, Yuzi; Altintas Yildirim, Ozlem

    2015-11-15

    Uniformly distributed single- and double-sided zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocomb structures have been prepared by a vapor-liquid-solid technique from a mixture of ZnO nanoparticles and graphene nanoplatelets. The ZnO seed nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple precipitation method. The structure of the ZnO nanocombs could easily be controlled by tuning the carrier-gas flow rate during growth. Higher flow rate resulted in the formation of uniformly-distributed single-sided comb structures with nanonail-shaped teeth, as a result of the self-catalysis effect of the catalytically active Zn-terminated polar (0001) surface. Lower gas flow rate was favorable for production of double-sided comb structures with the two sets of teeth at an angle of similar to 110 degrees to each other along the comb ribbon, which was attributed to the formation of a bicrystal nanocomb ribbon. The formation of such a double-sided structure with nanonail-shaped teeth has not previously been reported.

  6. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Mookerjee, S.; Weijun, S.; Yager, B.

    1994-03-08

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet is described having a relatively dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel. 8 figures.

  7. Method and apparatus for making uniform pellets for fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Budrick, Ronald G.; King, Frank T.; Martin, Alfred J.; Nolen, Jr., Robert L.; Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for making uniform pellets for laser driven fusion reactors which comprises selection of a quantity of glass frit which has been accurately classified as to size within a few micrometers and contains an occluded material, such as urea, which gasifies and expands when heated. The sized particles are introduced into an apparatus which includes a heated vertical tube with temperatures ranging from 800.degree. C to 1300.degree. C. The particles are heated during the drop through the tube to molten condition wherein the occluded material gasifies to form hollow microspheres which stabilize in shape and plunge into a collecting liquid at the bottom of the tube. The apparatus includes the vertical heat resistant tube, heaters for the various zones of the tube and means for introducing the frit and collecting the formed microspheres.

  8. Coupled Serial and Parallel Non-uniform SQUIDs

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, Patrick; In, Visarath; Berggren, Susan; Palacios, Antonio; Leese de Escobar, Anna

    2011-04-19

    In this work we numerical model series and parallel non-uniform superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array. Previous work has shown that series SQUID array constructed with a random distribution of loop sizes, (i.e. different areas for each SQUID loop) there exists a unique 'anti-peak' at the zero magnetic field for the voltage versus applied magnetic field (V-B). Similar results extend to a parallel SQUID array where the difference lies in the arrangement of the Josephson junctions. Other system parameter such as bias current, the number of loops, and mutual inductances are varied to demonstrate the change in dynamic range and linearity of the V-B response. Application of the SQUID array as a low noise amplifier (LNA) would increase link margins and affect the entire communication system. For unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), size, weight and power are limited, the SQUID array would allow use of practical 'electrically small' antennas that provide acceptable gain.

  9. Method for forming a uniformly dense polymer foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 to about 0.5 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microballoon material wherein some of the microballoons are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  10. Uniformly wound superconducting coil and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Mookerjee, Sumit; Weijun, Shen; Yager, Billy

    1994-01-01

    A coil of superconducting wire for a superconducting magnet having a relaely dense and uniformly spaced winding to enhance the homogeneity and strength of the magnetic field surrounding the coil and a method of winding the same wherein the mandrel used to wind said coil comprises removable spacers and retainers forming a plurality of outwardly opening slots, each of said slots extending generally about the periphery of the mandrel and being sized to receive and outwardly align and retain successive turns of the superconducting wire within each slot as the wire is wound around and laterally across the mandrel to form a plurality of wire ribbons of a predetermined thickness laterally across the mandrel.

  11. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  12. Discrete Mathematical Approaches to Graph-Based Traffic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Cowley, Wendy E.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Olsen, Bryan K.

    2014-04-01

    Modern cyber defense and anlaytics requires general, formal models of cyber systems. Multi-scale network models are prime candidates for such formalisms, using discrete mathematical methods based in hierarchically-structured directed multigraphs which also include rich sets of labels. An exemplar of an application of such an approach is traffic analysis, that is, observing and analyzing connections between clients, servers, hosts, and actors within IP networks, over time, to identify characteristic or suspicious patterns. Towards that end, NetFlow (or more generically, IPFLOW) data are available from routers and servers which summarize coherent groups of IP packets flowing through the network. In this paper, we consider traffic analysis of Netflow using both basic graph statistics and two new mathematical measures involving labeled degree distributions and time interval overlap measures. We do all of this over the VAST test data set of 96M synthetic Netflow graph edges, against which we can identify characteristic patterns of simulated ground-truth network attacks.

  13. Image intensifier gain uniformity improvements in sealed tubes by selective scrubbing

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Stanley W.

    1995-01-01

    The gain uniformity of sealed microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPIs) is improved by selectively scrubbing the high gain sections with a controlled bright light source. Using the premise that ions returning to the cathode from the microchannel plate (MCP) damage the cathode and reduce its sensitivity, a HeNe laser beam light source is raster scanned across the cathode of a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI) tube. Cathode current is monitored and when it exceeds a preset threshold, the sweep rate is decreased 1000 times, giving 1000 times the exposure to cathode areas with sensitivity greater than the threshold. The threshold is set at the cathode current corresponding to the lowest sensitivity in the active cathode area so that sensitivity of the entire cathode is reduced to this level. This process reduces tube gain by between 10% and 30% in the high gain areas while gain reduction in low gain areas is negligible.

  14. Image intensifier gain uniformity improvements in sealed tubes by selective scrubbing

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, S.W.

    1995-04-18

    The gain uniformity of sealed microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPIs) is improved by selectively scrubbing the high gain sections with a controlled bright light source. Using the premise that ions returning to the cathode from the microchannel plate (MCP) damage the cathode and reduce its sensitivity, a HeNe laser beam light source is raster scanned across the cathode of a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI) tube. Cathode current is monitored and when it exceeds a preset threshold, the sweep rate is decreased 1000 times, giving 1000 times the exposure to cathode areas with sensitivity greater than the threshold. The threshold is set at the cathode current corresponding to the lowest sensitivity in the active cathode area so that sensitivity of the entire cathode is reduced to this level. This process reduces tube gain by between 10% and 30% in the high gain areas while gain reduction in low gain areas is negligible. 4 figs.

  15. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, Edward J.

    1983-01-01

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode (1) and cathode (2) to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source (3). An array of resistors (4) or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit (5) producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO.sub.2 laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  16. Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; January 2012 - March 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, T.; Haeri, H.

    2013-04-01

    Under the Uniform Methods Project, DOE is developing a framework and a set of protocols for determining the energy savings from specific energy efficiency measures and programs. The protocols provide a straightforward method for evaluating gross energy savings for common residential and commercial measures offered in ratepayer-funded initiatives in the United States. They represent a refinement of the body of knowledge supporting energy efficiency evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) activities. This document deals with savings from the following measures: commercial and industrial lighting, commercial and industrial lighting controls, small commercial and residential unitary and split system HVAC cooling equipment, residential furnaces and boilers, residential lighting, refrigerator recycling, whole-building retrofit using billing analysis, metering, peak demand and time-differentiated energy savings, sample design, survey design and implementation, and assessing persistence and other evaluation issues.

  17. Network Traffic Generator for Low-rate Small Network Equipment Software

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzisera, Steven

    2013-05-28

    Application that uses the Python low-level socket interface to pass network traffic between devices on the local side of a NAT router and the WAN side of the NAT router. This application is designed to generate traffic that complies with the Energy Star Small Network Equipment Test Method.

  18. Highly uniform, multi-stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Tatebayashi, J. Ota, Y.; Ishida, S.; Nishioka, M.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate a highly uniform, dense stack of In{sub 0.22}Ga{sub 0.78}As/GaAs quantum dot (QD) structures in a single GaAs nanowire (NW). The size (and hence emission energy) of individual QD is tuned by careful control of the growth conditions based on a diffusion model of morphological evolution of NWs and optical characterization. By carefully tailoring the emission energies of individual QD, dot-to-dot inhomogeneous broadening of QD stacks in a single NW can be as narrow as 9.3?meV. This method provides huge advantages over traditional QD stack using a strain-induced Stranski-Krastanow growth scheme. We show that it is possible to fabricate up to 200 uniform QDs in single GaAs NWs using this growth technique without degradation of the photoluminescence intensity.

  19. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  20. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan; Parilla, Philip A.; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  1. Shape memory polymers based on uniform aliphatic urethane networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Herberg, J L; Marion III, J E; Wright, W J; Evans, C L; Maitland, D J

    2007-01-19

    Aliphatic urethane polymers have been synthesized and characterized, using monomers with high molecular symmetry, in order to form amorphous networks with very uniform supermolecular structures which can be used as photo-thermally actuable shape memory polymers (SMPs). The monomers used include hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), trimethylhexamethylenediamine (TMHDI), N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine (HPED), triethanolamine (TEA), and 1,3-butanediol (BD). The new polymers were characterized by solvent extraction, NMR, XPS, UV/VIS, DSC, DMTA, and tensile testing. The resulting polymers were found to be single phase amorphous networks with very high gel fraction, excellent optical clarity, and extremely sharp single glass transitions in the range of 34 to 153 C. Thermomechanical testing of these materials confirms their excellent shape memory behavior, high recovery force, and low mechanical hysteresis (especially on multiple cycles), effectively behaving as ideal elastomers above T{sub g}. We believe these materials represent a new and potentially important class of SMPs, and should be especially useful in applications such as biomedical microdevices.

  2. Hohenberg-Kohn theorems in electrostatic and uniform magnetostatic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2015-11-07

    The Hohenberg-Kohn (HK) theorems of bijectivity between the external scalar potential and the gauge invariant nondegenerate ground state density, and the consequent Euler variational principle for the density, are proved for arbitrary electrostatic field and the constraint of fixed electron number. The HK theorems are generalized for spinless electrons to the added presence of an external uniform magnetostatic field by introducing the new constraint of fixed canonical orbital angular momentum. Thereby, a bijective relationship between the external scalar and vector potentials, and the gauge invariant nondegenerate ground state density and physical current density, is proved. A corresponding Euler variational principle in terms of these densities is also developed. These theorems are further generalized to electrons with spin by imposing the added constraint of fixed canonical orbital and spin angular momenta. The proofs differ from the original HK proof and explicitly account for the many-to-one relationship between the potentials and the nondegenerate ground state wave function. A Percus-Levy-Lieb constrained-search proof expanding the domain of validity to N-representable functions, and to degenerate states, again for fixed electron number and angular momentum, is also provided.

  3. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  4. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, Ivar H.

    1990-01-01

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  5. Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Hryniw, Natalia; Hansen, Jon A; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank

    2011-01-27

    A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

  6. UNIFORM PATENT POLICY FOR RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE BY GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy UNIFORM PATENT POLICY FOR RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE BY GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES UNIFORM PATENT POLICY FOR RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE BY GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES The purpose of this part is to provide for the administration of a uniform patent policy for the Government with respect to the rights in inventions made by Government employees and to prescribe rules and regulations for implementing and effectuating such policy. (306.26 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE F 280.1

  7. Sealable stagnation flow geometries for the uniform deposition of materials and heat

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Kevin F. (Livermore, CA); Kee, Robert J. (Livermore, CA); Lutz, Andrew E. (Alamo, CA); Meeks, Ellen (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention employs a constrained stagnation flow geometry apparatus to achieve the uniform deposition of materials or heat. The present invention maximizes uniform fluxes of reactant gases to flat surfaces while minimizing the use of reagents and finite dimension edge effects. This results, among other things, in large area continuous films that are uniform in thickness, composition and structure which is important in chemical vapor deposition processes such as would be used for the fabrication of semiconductors.

  8. EGR Spatial Uniformity & Cylinder-Resolved Transients-Measurements using an Absorption Spectroscopy Probe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster describes development and application of an EGR probe for assessing steady-state spatial uniformity and cylinder-resolved EGR dynamics.

  9. Modeling of non-uniform spatial arrangement of fibers in a ceramic matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Tewari, A.; Gokhale, A.M.

    1997-07-01

    In the unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, the spatial agreement of fibers is often non-uniform. These non-uniformities are linked to the processing conditions, and they affect the properties of the composite. In this contribution, a recently developed digital image analysis technique is used to quantify the non-uniform spatial arrangement of Nicalon fibers in a ceramic matrix composite (CMC). These quantitative data are utilized to develop a six parameter computer simulated microstructure model that is statistically equivalent to the non-uniform microstructure of the CMC. The simulated microstructure can be utilized as a RVE for the micro-mechanical modeling studies.

  10. Fact #897: November 2, 2015 Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion - Dataset |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy 7: November 2, 2015 Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion - Dataset Fact #897: November 2, 2015 Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Fuel Wasted in Traffic Congestion fotw#897_web.xlsx (14.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #925: May 16, 2016 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Savings - Dataset Fact #881: July 13, 2015 Powertrain Efficiency Improvements, 2005 to 2013 - Dataset Fact #883: July 27,

  11. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOEpatents

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  12. A critical review of principal traffic noise models: Strategies and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Naveen; Maji, Sagar

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents an exhaustive comparison of principal traffic noise models adopted in recent years in developed nations. The comparison is drawn on the basis of technical attributes including source modelling and sound propagation algorithms. Although the characterization of source in terms of rolling and propulsion noise in conjunction with advanced numerical methods for sound propagation has significantly reduced the uncertainty in traffic noise predictions, the approach followed is quite complex and requires specialized mathematical skills for predictions which is sometimes quite cumbersome for town planners. Also, it is sometimes difficult to follow the best approach when a variety of solutions have been proposed. This paper critically reviews all these aspects pertaining to the recent models developed and adapted in some countries and also discusses the strategies followed and implications of these models. - Highlights: Principal traffic noise models developed are reviewed. Sound propagation algorithms used in traffic noise models are compared. Implications of models are discussed.

  13. Fact #668: March 28, 2011 Time Wasted Due to Traffic Congestion

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to the Texas Transportation Institute's latest study on traffic congestion, all urban areas have experienced increased congestion in the seventeen-year period from 1982 to 2009, but...

  14. U-259: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    59: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSLTLS Traffic and SSL Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-259: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL...

  15. NREL Leads Effort to Get Traffic Moving in Right Direction - News Releases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL NREL Leads Effort to Get Traffic Moving in Right Direction Connected Traveler project will guide travelers in energy-efficient manner August 17, 2015 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will serve as the lead organization in developing a tool travelers and transportation officials can use in helping guide people through a city in the most energy-efficient way possible. "Using real-time traffic and GPS data, along with simulations that take into

  16. NREL: Transportation Research - NREL Leads Effort to Get Traffic Moving in

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    the Right Direction NREL Leads Effort to Get Traffic Moving in the Right Direction Connected Traveler project will guide travelers in energy-efficient manner August 17, 2015 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will serve as the lead organization in developing a tool travelers and transportation officials can use in helping guide people through a city in the most energy-efficient way possible. "Using real-time traffic and GPS data, along with simulations

  17. V-201: Cisco Intrusion Prevention System SSP Fragmented Traffic Denial of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Service Vulnerability | Department of Energy 201: Cisco Intrusion Prevention System SSP Fragmented Traffic Denial of Service Vulnerability V-201: Cisco Intrusion Prevention System SSP Fragmented Traffic Denial of Service Vulnerability July 19, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Cisco Intrusion Prevention System PLATFORM: Cisco ASA 5500-X Series Adaptive Security Appliances Cisco Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) 7.1 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability in the

  18. No evidence of a threshold in traffic volume affecting road-kill mortality at a large spatio-temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grilo, Clara; Ferreira, Flavio Zanchetta; Revilla, Eloy

    2015-11-15

    Previous studies have found that the relationship between wildlife road mortality and traffic volume follows a threshold effect on low traffic volume roads. We aimed at evaluating the response of several species to increasing traffic intensity on highways over a large geographic area and temporal period. We used data of four terrestrial vertebrate species with different biological and ecological features known by their high road-kill rates: the barn owl (Tyto alba), hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Additionally, we checked whether road-kill likelihood varies when traffic patterns depart from the average. We used annual average daily traffic (AADT) and road-kill records observed along 1000 km of highways in Portugal over seven consecutive years (2003–2009). We fitted candidate models using Generalized Linear Models with a binomial distribution through a sample unit of 1 km segments to describe the effect of traffic on the probability of finding at least one victim in each segment during the study. We also assigned for each road-kill record the traffic of that day and the AADT on that year to test for differences using Paired Student's t-test. Mortality risk declined significantly with traffic volume but varied among species: the probability of finding road-killed red foxes and rabbits occurs up to moderate traffic volumes (< 20,000 AADT) whereas barn owls and hedgehogs occurred up to higher traffic volumes (40,000 AADT). Perception of risk may explain differences in responses towards high traffic highway segments. Road-kill rates did not vary significantly when traffic intensity departed from the average. In summary, we did not find evidence of traffic thresholds for the analysed species and traffic intensities. We suggest mitigation measures to reduce mortality be applied in particular on low traffic roads (< 5000 AADT) while additional measures to reduce barrier effects should take into account

  19. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  20. Apparatus and process to enhance the uniform formation of hollow glass microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, Ray F

    2013-10-01

    A process and apparatus is provided for enhancing the formation of a uniform population of hollow glass microspheres. A burner head is used which directs incoming glass particles away from the cooler perimeter of the flame cone of the gas burner and distributes the glass particles in a uniform manner throughout the more evenly heated portions of the flame zone. As a result, as the glass particles are softened and expand by a released nucleating gas so as to form a hollow glass microsphere, the resulting hollow glass microspheres have a more uniform size and property distribution as a result of experiencing a more homogenous heat treatment process.

  1. Microsoft Word - Hanford Site Traffic Safety Improvements FACT SHEET V5 WO One Way Option.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Traffic Safety Improvements In response to increased traffic safety concerns, the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) asked the Mission Support Alliance (MSA) to commission an independent study on the current state of Hanford roadways and to give the DOE specific recommendations for safety on the roadways. The MSA hired a highly reputable safety traffic and engineering consulting firm, Transportation Solutions, Inc. (TSI) of Redmond, Wash., to conduct the study.

  2. 41 A.R.S. 1092 et seq.: Uniform Administrative Hearing Procedures...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    A.R.S. 1092 et seq.: Uniform Administrative Hearing Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: 41 A.R.S. 1092 et...

  3. Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts aged ...

  4. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2015-02-15

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping.

  5. Dielectrophoresis device and method having non-uniform arrays for manipulating particles

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Simmons, Blake

    2008-09-02

    Microfluidic devices according to embodiments of the present invention include an inlet port, an outlet port, and a channel or chamber having a non-uniform array of insulating features on one or more surfaces. Electrodes are provided for generation of a spatially non-uniform electric field across the array. A voltage source, which may be an A.C. and/or a D.C. voltage source may be coupled to the electrodes for the generation of the electric field.

  6. Method of manufacturing hollow members having uniform wall thickness through use of ablation

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Paul R.; Downs, Raymond L.; Henderson, Timothy M.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing a hollow structure of uniform wall thickness comprising the steps of selecting or forming a precursor having one wall surface of desired geometry, treating a portion of the precursor consisting of the one wall surface and a uniform depth of material beneath the wall surface to increase resistance to ablation, and then removing by ablation and discarding the remaining or untreated portion of the precursor.

  7. On-demand production of uniform DT droplets using pulsed electrohydrodynamic spraying. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 1-82

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Gavrilovic, P.

    1982-04-01

    A technique suitable for on-demand production of uniform DT droplets is investigated using pulsed electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spraying. Liquid hydrogen is employed as the working liquid, into which charge is injected using a sharp tungsten needle raised to high voltage. By controlling this high voltage, the amount of charge injection required for disrupting the liquid surface into a smooth liquid jet of desired size is determined. For on-demand production of the liquid jet (which breaks up into uniform droplets), high voltage pulses of appropriate height and duration are applied to the charge injection electrode. Results obtained with liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen are presented. Considering the potential hazard and scarcity of tritium, the present technique may prove to be particularly useful when there is a need for filling ICF targets with a controlled amount of DT micropellets.

  8. Laser energy deposition and its dynamic uniformity for direct-drive capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The total laser energy deposition of multi-laser-beam irradiation is not only associated with the dynamic behavior of capsule but also the time-dependent angular distribution of the energy deposition of each beam around its axis. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition does not linearly respond to the dynamic behavior of laser irradiation. The laser energy deposition uniformity determines the symmetry of implosion. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition non-uniformity in OMEGA for laser with square beam shape intensity profile is investigated. In the case of smaller laser spot, the initial non-uniformity caused by laser beam overlap is very high. The shell asymmetry caused by the high initial laser irradiation non-uniformity is estimated by the extent of distortion of shock front which is not as severe as expected before the shock driven by main pulse arrives. This suggests that the large initial non-uniformity due to smaller laser spot is one of the elements that seed disturbance before the main pulse. The rms of laser energy deposition during the main pulse remains above 2%. Since the intensity of main driving pulse usually is several times higher than that of picket pulses, the non-uniformity in main pulse period may jeopardize the symmetrical implosion. When dynamic behavior of capsule is considered, the influence of beam pointing error, the target positioning error, and beam-to-beam power unbalance is quite different for the case of static capsule.

  9. High-speed and high-fidelity system and method for collecting network traffic

    DOEpatents

    Weigle, Eric H.

    2010-08-24

    A system is provided for the high-speed and high-fidelity collection of network traffic. The system can collect traffic at gigabit-per-second (Gbps) speeds, scale to terabit-per-second (Tbps) speeds, and support additional functions such as real-time network intrusion detection. The present system uses a dedicated operating system for traffic collection to maximize efficiency, scalability, and performance. A scalable infrastructure and apparatus for the present system is provided by splitting the work performed on one host onto multiple hosts. The present system simultaneously addresses the issues of scalability, performance, cost, and adaptability with respect to network monitoring, collection, and other network tasks. In addition to high-speed and high-fidelity network collection, the present system provides a flexible infrastructure to perform virtually any function at high speeds such as real-time network intrusion detection and wide-area network emulation for research purposes.

  10. Microsoft Word - Results_of_the_Independent_Hanford_Traffic_Safety_Study_and_Next_Steps_ANNOUNCEMENT.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ANNOUNCEMENT Department of Energy RL No.: 10-0124 Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Issued: 6/11/2010 To: ALL HANFORD EMPLOYEES Subject: RESULTS OF INDEPENDENT HANFORD TRAFFIC SAFETY STUDY AND NEXT STEPS One of the most hazardous situations that most of us face each day is driving to and from work. Therefore, we are taking some immediate steps to improve safety on the site's roads. In response to an increase in traffic safety concerns the Richland Operations

  11. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  12. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  13. Morphologically and size uniform monodisperse particles and their shape-directed self-assembly

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joshua E.; Bell, Howard Y.; Ye, Xingchen; Murray, Christopher Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Monodisperse particles having: a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology are disclosed. Due to their uniform size and shape, the monodisperse particles self assemble into superlattices. The particles may be luminescent particles such as down-converting phosphor particles and up-converting phosphors. The monodisperse particles of the invention have a rare earth-containing lattice which in one embodiment may be an yttrium-containing lattice or in another may be a lanthanide-containing lattice. The monodisperse particles may have different optical properties based on their composition, their size, and/or their morphology (or shape). Also disclosed is a combination of at least two types of monodisperse particles, where each type is a plurality of monodisperse particles having a single pure crystalline phase of a rare earth-containing lattice, a uniform three-dimensional size, and a uniform polyhedral morphology; and where the types of monodisperse particles differ from one another by composition, by size, or by morphology. In a preferred embodiment, the types of monodisperse particles have the same composition but different morphologies. Methods of making and methods of using the monodisperse particles are disclosed.

  14. Traffic circulation study and long-range plan for Del Rio. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, A.J.; Islam, R.

    1996-03-01

    A 1992 report to Congress, pursuant to Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) sections 1089 and 6015, acknowledges that Texas serves a disproportionate share of the U.S.-Mexico international trade, and, accordingly, recommends the development of federal-aid program options to improve transportation infrastructure related to international trade. In order to take advantage of this recommendation, border states must monitor their transborder traffic demand and develop traffic circulation plans for their border cities. This report presents a 25-year traffic circulation plan for the City of Del Rio, Texas. The plan includes recommendations for increasing roadway capacity, adding left-turn lanes, building new routes to relieve congestion, and adding international thoroughfares. It also includes a comprehensive analysis of a transborder traffic in Del Rio, as well as of international thoroughfares between Cuidad Acuna and Del Rio. The recommendations take into account input from TxDOT personnel, City officials, border inspectors, international bridge managers, and several Mexican officials. The recommendations and schedules discussed in this report can assist TxDOT not only in planning land transport infrastructure, but also in alleviating problems associated with additional highway capacity, pavement rehabilitation, signalization, and right-of-way.

  15. ECR apparatus with magnetic coil for plasma refractive index control

    DOEpatents

    Berry, L.A.

    1994-04-26

    The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design. 9 figures.

  16. ECR apparatus with magnetic coil for plasma refractive index control

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Lee A.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design.

  17. One-directional uniformly coated fibers, method of preparation, and uses therefor

    DOEpatents

    Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C. Sr.

    A problem addressed by this invention was how to obtain very long lengths of refractory metal-coated multifilamentary yarns having a uniform coating on the filaments which make up each yarn, the coating being uniform throughout the length of the yarn such that the coated yarns are suitable for being woven and are suitable for a variety of other uses. The solution is a continuous process which employs a chemical vapor deposition reaction at relatively low temperature and pressure and a separation of the gaseous reaction products from the coated yarn prior to allowing the coated yarn to cool.

  18. One-directional uniformly coated fibers, method of preparation, and uses therefor

    DOEpatents

    Newkirk, Lawrence R.; Valencia, Flavio; Riley, Robert E.; Wallace, Sr., Terry C.

    1982-01-01

    A problem addressed by this invention was how to obtain very long lengths of refractory metal-coated multifilamentary yarns having a uniform coating on the filaments which make up each yarn, the coating being uniform throughout the length of the yarn such that the coated yarns are suitable for being woven and are suitable for a variety of other uses. The solution is a continuous process which employs a chemical vapor deposition reaction at relatively low temperature and pressure and a separation of the gaseous reaction products from the coated yarn prior to allowing the coated yarn to cool.

  19. Interaction of high intensity laser with non-uniform clusters and enhanced X-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-10-15

    Laser irradiated clusters with non-uniform density variation are shown to broaden surface plasmon resonance very significantly. As the clusters get heated and expand hydro-dynamically, the Bremsstrahlung X-ray emission yield passes through a maximum in time. The maximum yield decreases with increase in non-uniformity in the electron density inside the clusters. At higher laser intensity, the nonlinearity in laser cluster interaction may arise even prior to electron heating, via the relativistic mass variation and the nonlinear restoration force on electrons. For clusters with radius less than one tenth of the laser wavelength, the restoration force nonlinearity dominates.

  20. Why we need to stick with uniform-price auctions in electricity markets

    SciTech Connect

    Cramton, Peter; Stoft, Steven

    2007-01-15

    Arguments that the uniform-price auction yields electricity prices that are systematically too high are incorrect. Tampering with the spot price would cause inefficiency and raise long-term costs. The proper way to dampen the impact of spot price fluctuations is with long-term hedging. (author)

  1. Method and apparatus for uniformly concentrating solar flux for photovoltaic applications

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Carasso, Meir (Lakewood, CO); Wendelin, Timothy J. (Golden, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A dish reflector and method for concentrating moderate solar flux uniformly on a target plane on a solar cell array, the dish having a stepped reflective surface that is characterized by a plurality of ring-like segments arranged about a common axis, and each segment having a concave spherical configuration.

  2. Method and apparatus for uniformly concentrating solar flux for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.J.; Carasso, M.; Wendelin, T.J.; Lewandowski, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a dish reflector and method for concentrating moderate solar flux uniformly on a target plane on a solar cell array, the dish having a stepped reflective surface that is characterized by a plurality of ring-like segments arranged about a common axis, and each segment having a concave spherical configuration.

  3. Largest-area Photonic Crystal LED Fabricated Demonstrates Uniform Light Emission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lumileds Lighting, the University of New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to demonstrate uniform light emission from the largest-area III-Nitride photonic crystal LED (1 x 1 mm2) ever fabricated. Most previous photonic crystal LED research has relied on small-area patterns written by slow, serial-writing electron-beam lithography.

  4. EFFECT OF GEOMETRY AND OPERATING PARAMETERS ON SIMULATED SOFC STACK TEMPERATURE UNIFORMITY

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Lai, Canhai; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-08-10

    A uniform temperature field is desirable in the solid oxide fuel cell stack to avoid local hot regions that contribute to material degradation, thermal stresses, and differences in electrochemical performance. Various geometric and operational design changes were simulated by numerical modeling of co-flow and counter-flow multi-cell stacks, and the effects on stack maximum temperature, stack temperature difference, and maximum cell temperature difference were characterized. The results showed that 40-60% on-cell steam reforming of methane and a reduced reforming rate of 25-50% of the nominal rate was beneficial for a more uniform temperature field. Fuel exhaust recycling up to 30% was shown to be advantageous for reforming fuels and co-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel, but counter-flow stacks with hydrogen fuel showed higher temperature differences. Cells with large aspect ratios showed a more uniform temperature response due to either the strong influence of the inlet gas temperatures or the greater thermal exchange with the furnace boundary condition. Improved lateral heat spreading with thicker interconnects was demonstrated, but greater improvements towards a uniform thermal field for the same amount of interconnect mass could be achieved using thicker heat spreader plates appropriately distributed along the stack height.

  5. U-259: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic and SSL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code | Department of Energy 59: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic and SSL Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-259: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic and SSL Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code September 13, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic and SSL Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute

  6. Two-lane traffic rules for cellular automata: A systematic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K. |; Wolf, D.E. |; Wagner, P. |; Simon, P.

    1997-11-05

    Microscopic modeling of multi-lane traffic is usually done by applying heuristic lane changing rules, and often with unsatisfying results. Recently, a cellular automation model for two-lane traffic was able to overcome some of these problems and to produce a correct density inversion at densities somewhat below the maximum flow density. In this paper, the authors summarize different approaches to lane changing and their results, and propose a general scheme, according to which realistic lane changing rules can be developed. They test this scheme by applying it to several different lane changing rules, which, in spite of their differences, generate similar and realistic results. The authors thus conclude that, for producing realistic results, the logical structure of the lane changing rules, as proposed here, is at least as important as the microscopic details of the rules.

  7. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment

  8. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, David R.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Ferreira, Summer; Schoenwald, David

    2014-06-01

    The Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems (PNNL-22010) was first issued in November 2012 as a first step toward providing a foundational basis for developing an initial standard for the uniform measurement and expression of energy storage system (ESS) performance. Its subsequent use in the field and review by the protocol working group and most importantly the users’ subgroup and the thermal subgroup has led to the fundamental modifications reflected in this update of the 2012 Protocol. As an update of the 2012 Protocol, this document (the June 2014 Protocol) is intended to supersede its predecessor and be used as the basis for measuring and expressing ESS performance. The foreword provides general and specific details about what additions, revisions, and enhancements have been made to the 2012 Protocol and the rationale for them in arriving at the June 2014 Protocol.

  9. Vector solitons with a uniform polarisation state induced by polarisation filtering in a fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Weicheng; Chen Guojie; Han Dingan; Xie Jianing

    2013-06-30

    A fibre laser with a SESAM as a passive mode-locker is constructed for obtaining a vector soliton with the Kelly sidebands. The analysis of the peculiarities of the sidebands shows that the polarisation states are nonuniform across the entire pulse spectral profile from the leading edge to the trailing edge. Polarisation filtering effect is proposed to obtain a vector soliton with a uniform polarisation state. It is shown that during the polarisation filtering by a polariser incorporated into the laser cavity, the spectral width of the vector solitons gradually broadens and the pulse power decreases. It is found that at a maximum spectral width and a minimum pulse power, vector solitons with a uniform polarisation state are generated. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  10. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-09-26

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput.

  11. Uniform density static fluid sphere in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and its universality

    SciTech Connect

    Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred; Khugaev, Avas

    2010-05-15

    In Newtonian theory, gravity inside a constant density static sphere is independent of spacetime dimension. Interestingly this general result is also carried over to Einsteinian as well as higher order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (Lovelock) gravity notwithstanding their nonlinearity. We prove that the necessary and sufficient condition for universality of the Schwarzschild interior solution describing a uniform density sphere for all n{>=}4 is that its density is constant.

  12. Electron beam method and apparatus for obtaining uniform discharges in electrically pumped gas lasers

    DOEpatents

    Fenstermacher, Charles A.; Boyer, Keith

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining uniform, high-energy, large-volume electrical discharges in the lasing medium of a gas laser whereby a high-energy electron beam is used as an external ionization source to ionize substantially the entire volume of the lasing medium which is then readily pumped by means of an applied potential less than the breakdown voltage of the medium. The method and apparatus are particularly useful in CO.sub.2 laser systems.

  13. Incomplete Laplace integrals - uniform asymptotic expansion with application to the incomplete beta function

    SciTech Connect

    Temme, N.M.

    1987-11-01

    The analytical approach of Temme (1983 and 1985), based on uniform asymptotic expansions, is extended to an additional class of incomplete Laplace integrals. The terminology is introduced; the construction of the formal series is explained; representations for the remainders are derived; the asymptotic nature of the expansions is explored; and error bounds are determined. Numerical results are presented for the case of the incomplete beta function. 14 references.

  14. Chapter 1: Introduction. Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1: Introduction The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Hossein Haeri The Cadmus Group, Inc., Portland, Oregon NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63417 February 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for

  15. Gyrokinetic simulations of collisionless reconnection in turbulent non-uniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Sumire; Rogers, Barrett N.; Numata, Ryusuke

    2014-04-15

    We present nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with non-uniformities in the plasma density, the electron temperature, and the ion temperature. The density gradient can stabilize reconnection due to diamagnetic effects but destabilize driftwave modes that produce turbulence. The electron temperature gradient triggers microtearing modes that drive rapid small-scale reconnection and strong electron heat transport. The ion temperature gradient destabilizes ion temperature gradient modes that, like the driftwaves, may enhance reconnection in some cases.

  16. Uniform surface growth of copper oxide nanowires in radiofrequency plasma discharge and limiting factors

    SciTech Connect

    Filipič, Gregor; Mozetič, Miran; Cvelbar, Uroš; Baranov, Oleg; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-11-15

    The uniform growth of copper oxide nanowires on the top of copper plate has been investigated during the exposure to radiofrequency plasma discharge in respect to plasma properties and its localization. The copper samples of 10 mm radius and 1 mm in thickness were exposed to argon-oxygen plasma created at discharge power of 150 W. After 10 min, almost uniform growth of nanowires was achieved over large surface. There were significant distortions in nanowire length and shape near the edges. Based on the experimental results, we developed a theoretical model, which took into account a balance in heat released at the flow of the current to the nanowire and rejected from the nanowire. This model established a dependence of the maximal length of the nanowire at dependence on the plasma parameters, where the limiting factor for nanowire growth and distortions in distribution are ballistic effects of ions and their local fluxes. In contrast, the plasma heating by potential interactions of species has very little influence on the length and smaller deviations in flux are allowed for uniformity of growth.

  17. Adhesion of voids to bimetal interfaces with non-uniform energies

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zheng, Shijian; Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yongqiang; Demkowicz, Michael J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2015-10-21

    Interface engineering has become an important strategy for designing radiation-resistant materials. Critical to its success is fundamental understanding of the interactions between interfaces and radiation-induced defects, such as voids. Using transmission electron microscopy, here we report an interesting phenomenon in their interaction, wherein voids adhere to only one side of the bimetal interfaces rather than overlapping them. We show that this asymmetrical void-interface interaction is a consequence of differing surface energies of the two metals and non-uniformity in their interface formation energy. Specifically, voids grow within the phase of lower surface energy and wet only the high-interface energy regions. Furthermore,more » because this outcome cannot be accounted for by wetting of interfaces with uniform internal energy, our report provides experimental evidence that bimetal interfaces contain non-uniform internal energy distributions. Ultimately, this work also indicates that to design irradiation-resistant materials, we can avoid void-interface overlap via tuning the configurations of interfaces.« less

  18. Adhesion of voids to bimetal interfaces with non-uniform energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Shijian; Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yongqiang; Demkowicz, Michael J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2015-10-21

    Interface engineering has become an important strategy for designing radiation-resistant materials. Critical to its success is fundamental understanding of the interactions between interfaces and radiation-induced defects, such as voids. Using transmission electron microscopy, here we report an interesting phenomenon in their interaction, wherein voids adhere to only one side of the bimetal interfaces rather than overlapping them. We show that this asymmetrical void-interface interaction is a consequence of differing surface energies of the two metals and non-uniformity in their interface formation energy. Specifically, voids grow within the phase of lower surface energy and wet only the high-interface energy regions. Furthermore, because this outcome cannot be accounted for by wetting of interfaces with uniform internal energy, our report provides experimental evidence that bimetal interfaces contain non-uniform internal energy distributions. Ultimately, this work also indicates that to design irradiation-resistant materials, we can avoid void-interface overlap via tuning the configurations of interfaces.

  19. On uniform plasma generation for the large area plasma processing in intermediate pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jun; Hwang, Hye-Ju; Cho, Jeong Hee; Chae, Hee Sun; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-04-21

    Radial plasma discharge characteristics in the range of 450 mm were studied in a dual inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source, which consisted of a helical ICP and the side type ferrite ICPs. Since the energy relaxation length is shorter than the distance between each of the ferrite ICPs in an intermediate pressure (600 mTorr), local difference in the plasma ignition along the antenna position were observed. In addition, large voltage drop in the discharge of the ferrite ICPs causes an increase in the displacement current to the plasma, and separate discharge mode (E and H mode) according to the antenna position was observed. This results in non-uniform plasma distribution. For the improvement in the discharge of the ferrite ICPs, a capacitor which is placed between the ends of antenna and the ground is adjusted to minimize the displacement current to the plasma. As a result, coincident transitions from E to H mode were observed along the antenna position, and radially concave density profile (edge focused) was measured. For the uniform density distribution, a helical ICP, which located at the center of the discharge chamber, was simultaneously discharged with the ferrite ICPs. Due to the plasma potential variation through the simultaneous discharge of helical ICP and ferrite ICPs, uniform radial distribution in both plasma density and electron temperature are achieved.

  20. Synthesis of uniform CdS nanowires in high yield and its single nanowire electrical property

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Shancheng; Sun Litao; Qu Peng; Huang Ninping; Song Yinchen; Xiao Zhongdang

    2009-10-15

    Large-scale high quality CdS nanowires with uniform diameter were synthesized by using a rapid and simple solvothermal route. Field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the CdS nanowires have diameter of about 26 nm and length up to several micrometres. High resolution TEM (HRTEM) study indicates the single-crystalline nature of CdS nanowires with an oriented growth along the c-axis direction. The optical properties of the products were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectra, photoluminescence spectra and Raman spectra. The resistivity, electron concentration and electron mobility of single NW are calculated by fitting the symmetric I-V curves measured on single NW by the metal-semiconductor-metal model based on thermionic field emission theory. - Graphical abstract: Large-scale high quality CdS nanowires (NWs) with uniform diameter were synthesized by using a rapid and simple solvothermal route. The reaction time is reduced to 2 h, comparing to other synthesis which needed long reaction time up to 12 h. In addition, the as-prepared CdS nanowires have more uniform diameter and high yield. More importantly, the I-V curve of present single CdS nanowire has a good symmetric characteristic as expected by the theory.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  3. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  4. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  5. A spatially resolved retarding field energy analyzer design suitable for uniformity analysis across the surface of a semiconductor wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Gahan, D. Hopkins, M. B.; Kechkar, S.; Daniels, S.

    2014-04-15

    A novel retarding field energy analyzer design capable of measuring the spatial uniformity of the ion energy and ion flux across the surface of a semiconductor wafer is presented. The design consists of 13 individual, compact-sized, analyzers, all of which are multiplexed and controlled by a single acquisition unit. The analyzers were tested to have less than 2% variability from unit to unit due to tight manufacturing tolerances. The main sensor assembly consists of a 300 mm disk to mimic a semiconductor wafer and the plasma sampling orifices of each sensor are flush with disk surface. This device is placed directly on top of the rf biased electrode, at the wafer location, in an industrial capacitively coupled plasma reactor without the need for any modification to the electrode structure. The ion energy distribution, average ion energy, and average ion flux were measured at the 13 locations over the surface of the powered electrode to determine the degree of spatial nonuniformity. The ion energy and ion flux are shown to vary by approximately 20% and 5%, respectively, across the surface of the electrode for the range of conditions investigated in this study.

  6. Method and system for producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Walton, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for producing a thin film with highly uniform (or highly accurate custom graded) thickness on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source with controlled (and generally, time-varying) velocity. In preferred embodiments, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece that is held stationary while exposed to the source), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of sweep velocity modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a sweep velocity modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a practical method of accurately measuring source flux distribution, and a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal sweep velocity modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. Preferably, the computer implements an algorithm in which many sweep velocity function parameters (for example, the speed at which each substrate spins about its center as it sweeps across the source) can be varied or set to zero.

  7. Highly uniform and reproducible visible to near-infrared vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers grown by MOVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Choquette, K.D.; Hammons, B.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present the growth and characterization of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) from visible to near-infrared wavelength grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include the control on growth rate and composition using an in situ normal-incidence reflectometer, optimization of ultra-high material uniformity, and comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire Al composition range. They will also demonstrate the recent achievements of selectively-oxidized VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous-wave demonstration of all-AlGaAs 700-nm red VCSELs, high-performance n-side up 850-nm VCSELs, and low threshold current and low-threshold voltage 1.06 {micro}m VCSELs using InGaAs/GaAsP strain-compensated quantum wells.

  8. Generic vehicle speed models based on traffic simulation: Development and application

    SciTech Connect

    Margiotta, R.; Cohen, H.; Elkins, G.; Rathi, A.; Venigalla, M.

    1994-12-15

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research project to develop new methods of estimating speeds for inclusion in the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) Analytical Process. The paper focuses on the effects of traffic conditions excluding incidents (recurring congestion) on daily average ed and excess fuel consumption. A review of the literature revealed that many techniques have been used to predict speeds as a function of congestion but most fail to address the effects of queuing. However, the method of Dowling and Skabardonis avoids this limitation and was adapted to the research. The methodology used the FRESIM and NETSIM microscopic traffic simulation models to develop uncongested speed functions and as a calibration base for the congested flow functions. The chief contributions of the new speed models are the simplicity of application and their explicit accounting for the effects of queuing. Specific enhancements include: (1) the inclusion of a queue discharge rate for freeways; (2) use of newly defined uncongested flow speed functions; (3) use of generic temporal distributions that account for peak spreading; and (4) a final model form that allows incorporation of other factors that influence speed, such as grades and curves. The main limitation of the new speed models is the fact that they are based on simulation results and not on field observations. They also do not account for the effect of incidents on speed. While appropriate for estimating average national conditions, the use of fixed temporal distributions may not be suitable for analyzing specific facilities, depending on observed traffic patterns. Finally, it is recommended that these and all future speed models be validated against field data where incidents can be adequately identified in the data.

  9. FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    VUF -1009 FINAL REPORT - VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMl SSlON FALLON, NEVADA OCTOBER 26,1963 FINAL REPORT OF OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory September 1, 1964 Issuance Date: November 27, 1964 L E G A L N O T I C E This report war preprred a r an account of Government rponrored work. Neither the Unlted Strtor, nor the Commlerlon, nor m y perron acting on behalf

  10. Exposure reductions encouraged by the determination of the effective dose equivalent for non-uniform exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Matheny, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Dyer, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    DOE Order 5480.11 requires calculation of the effective dose equivalent (EDE) due to non-uniform radiation fields using ICRP-26 weighting factors. To comply with this requirement, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) developed a simple dose calculation scheme based on a draft report by the External Dosimetry Working Group of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The calculations involved are fairly simple and provide a conservative dose estimate. The resulting EDE estimate provides a much better representation of the risk to the monitored individual than the more prevalent practice of assigning the highest measured dose. Details of the dose assessment methodology are included as an attachment.

  11. Soliton dynamics at an interface between a uniform medium and a nonlinear optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, Fatkhulla Kh.; Galimzyanov, Ravil M.; Brtka, Marijana; Tomio, Lauro

    2009-05-15

    We study trapping and propagation of a matter-wave soliton through the interface between uniform medium and a nonlinear optical lattice. Different regimes for transmission of a broad and a narrow solitons are investigated. Reflections and transmissions of solitons are predicted as a function of the lattice phase. The existence of a threshold in the amplitude of the nonlinear optical lattice, separating the transmission and reflection regimes, is verified. The localized nonlinear surface state, corresponding to the soliton trapped by the interface, is found. Variational approach predictions are confirmed by numerical simulations for the original Gross-Pitaevskii equation with nonlinear periodic potentials.

  12. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  13. Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark

    1987-01-01

    A quartz reactor vessel for growth of uniform semiconductor films includes a vertical, cylindrical reaction chamber in which a substrate-supporting pedestal provides a horizontal substrate-supporting surface spaced on its perimeter from the chamber wall. A cylindrical confinement chamber of smaller diameter is disposed coaxially above the reaction chamber and receives reaction gas injected at a tangent to the inside chamber wall, forming a helical gas stream that descends into the reaction chamber. In the reaction chamber, the edge of the substrate-supporting pedestal is a separation point for the helical flow, diverting part of the flow over the horizontal surface of the substrate in an inwardly spiraling vortex.

  14. Reactor design for uniform chemical vapor deposition-grown films without substrate rotation

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.

    1985-02-19

    A quartz reactor vessel for growth of uniform semiconductor films includes a vertical, cylindrical reaction chamber in which a substrate-supporting pedestal provides a horizontal substrate-supporting surface spaced on its perimeter from the chamber wall. A cylindrical confinement chamber of smaller diameter is disposed coaxially above the reaction chamber and receives reaction gas injected at a tangent to the inside chamber wall, forming a helical gas stream that descends into the reaction chamber. In the reaction chamber, the edge of the substrate-supporting pedestal is a separation point for the helical flow, diverting part of the flow over the horizontal surface of the substrate in an inwardly spiraling vortex.

  15. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  16. DOE project could impact local traffic in coming weeks | Y-12 National

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex DOE project could impact ... DOE project could impact local traffic in coming weeks Posted: March 8, 2016 - 8:56am Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Beginning March 10, DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management is conducting a project that requires large, slow-moving equipment on Highway 58 and Highway 95. Motorists transiting the area during this time should be alert for slow-moving vehicles and expect occasional delays. As part of the ongoing cleanup efforts at the East

  17. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area.

  18. Improvements in serial femtosecond crystallography of photosystem II by optimizing crystal uniformity using microseeding procedures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Bommer, Martin; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina

    2015-07-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) is the multi-subunit membrane protein complex that catalyzes photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). To understand the water oxidation reaction, it is important to get structural information about the transient and intermediate states of the OEC in the dimeric PSII core complex (dPSIIcc). In recent times, femtosecond X-ray pulses from the free electron laser (XFEL) are being used to obtain X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of dPSIIcc microcrystals at room temperature that are free of radiation damage. In our experiments at the XFEL, we used an electrospun liquid microjet setup thatmore » requires microcrystals less than 40 μm in size. In this study, we explored various microseeding techniques to get a high yield of monodisperse uniform-sized microcrystals. Monodisperse microcrystals of dPSIIcc of uniform size were a key to improve the stability of the jet and the quality of XRD data obtained at the XFEL. This was evident by an improvement of the quality of the datasets obtained, from 6.5 Å, using crystals grown without the micro seeding approach, to 4.5 Å using crystals generated with the new method.« less

  19. Improvements in serial femtosecond crystallography of photosystem II by optimizing crystal uniformity using microseeding procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Bommer, Martin; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina

    2015-07-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) is the multi-subunit membrane protein complex that catalyzes photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). To understand the water oxidation reaction, it is important to get structural information about the transient and intermediate states of the OEC in the dimeric PSII core complex (dPSIIcc). In recent times, femtosecond X-ray pulses from the free electron laser (XFEL) are being used to obtain X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of dPSIIcc microcrystals at room temperature that are free of radiation damage. In our experiments at the XFEL, we used an electrospun liquid microjet setup that requires microcrystals less than 40 μm in size. In this study, we explored various microseeding techniques to get a high yield of monodisperse uniform-sized microcrystals. Monodisperse microcrystals of dPSIIcc of uniform size were a key to improve the stability of the jet and the quality of XRD data obtained at the XFEL. This was evident by an improvement of the quality of the datasets obtained, from 6.5 Å, using crystals grown without the micro seeding approach, to 4.5 Å using crystals generated with the new method.

  20. System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, T.R.

    1983-07-05

    A method and a cutter are disclosed for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head has a hollow body with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft extends from the hollow body. Cutter teeth are mounted on the upper surface of the body and relatively small holes are formed in the body between the cutter teeth. Relatively large peripheral flutes around the body allow material to drop below the drill head. A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale. 4 figs.

  1. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, Kathryn L.; Conover, David R.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Viswanathan, Vijayganesh; Ferreira, Summer; Rose, David; Schoenwald, David

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), facilitated the development of the protocol provided in this report. The focus of the protocol is to provide a uniform way of measuring, quantifying, and reporting the performance of EESs in various applications; something that does not exist today and, as such, is hampering the consideration and use of this technology in the market. The availability of an application-specific protocol for use in measuring and expressing performance-related metrics of ESSs will allow technology developers, power-grid operators and other end-users to evaluate the performance of energy storage technologies on a uniform and comparable basis. This will help differentiate technologies and products for specific application(s) and provide transparency in how performance is measured. It also will assist utilities and other consumers of ESSs make more informed decisions as they consider the potential application and use of ESSs, as well as form the basis for documentation that might be required to justify utility investment in such technologies.

  2. Protocol for uniformly measuring and expressing the performance of energy storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin; Schoenwald, David Alan; Bray, Kathy; Conover, David; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Viswanathan, Vilayanur

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), facilitated the development of the protocol provided in this report. The focus of the protocol is to provide a uniform way of measuring, quantifying, and reporting the performance of ESSs in various applications; something that does not exist today and, as such, is hampering the consideration and use of this technology in the market. The availability of an application-specific protocol for use in measuring and expressing performance-related metrics of ESSs will allow technology developers, power-grid operators and other end-users to evaluate the performance of energy storage technologies on a uniform and comparable basis. This will help differentiate technologies and products for specific application(s) and provide transparency in how performance is measured. It also will assist utilities and other consumers of ESSs to make more informed decisions as they consider the potential application and use of ESSs, as well as form the basis for documentation that might be required to justify utility investment in such technologies.

  3. Kinetic model of force-free current sheets with non-uniform temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Vasko, I. Y.

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic model of a one-dimensional force-free current sheet (CS) developed recently by Harrison and Neukirch [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102(13), 135003 (2009)] predicts uniform distributions of the plasma temperature and density across the CS. However, in realistic physical systems, inhomogeneities of these plasma parameters may arise quite naturally due to the boundary conditions or local plasma heating. Moreover, as the CS spatial scale becomes larger than the characteristic kinetic scales (the regime often referred to as the MHD limit), it should be possible to set arbitrary density and temperature profiles. Thus, an advanced model has to allow for inhomogeneities of the macroscopic plasma parameters across the CS, to be consistent with the MHD limit. In this paper, we generalise the kinetic model of a force-free current sheet, taking into account the inhomogeneity of the density and temperature across the CS. In the developed model, the density may either be enhanced or depleted in the CS central region. The temperature profile is prescribed by the density profile, keeping the plasma pressure uniform across the CS. All macroscopic parameters, as well as the distribution functions for the protons and electrons, are determined analytically. Applications of the developed model to current sheets observed in space plasmas are discussed.

  4. DOE uniform reporting system for Federal assistance (grants and cooperative agreements): guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    These guidelines establish a uniform reporting system (URS) for grants and cooperative agreements. The purpose is to simplify reporting requirements, standardize reporting, and ensure that no assistance recipient submits more reports than needed to achieve accountability for public funds. This system replaces the many reporting procedures previously imposed by DOE component organizations. Uniform terminology and data elements will minimize ambiguity of meaning and intent. A glossary of terms is provided. A checklist is used to identify all reporting requirements at the time of award. The recipient is encouraged to discuss the requirements before the time of award in order to ensure that they are appropriate. The Guidelines describe planning forms which can be included in the Federal assistance application or proposal to present the planned approach and desired results. Flexibility has been built into the system to ensure that the information requested is relative to the activity performed. A recipient of Federal assistance submits information only once in each reporting period. The reporting system provides recipients with a formal method for identifying problems, including those originated by the Federal government. For purposes of illustration, a hypothetical project - partially funded by DOE under a cooperative agreement - using all the Program Management forms is presented in Part II, Program Management. Part III, Technical Information uses a research grant to illustrate Technical Reporting. Appendix B provides a complete example of the reporting requirements on a research grant.

  5. Beam halo formation from space-charge dominated beams in uniform focusing channels

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.S. ); Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S. ); Crandall, K.R. )

    1993-01-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and an outer halo. The halo is very prominent in mismatched beams, and the potential for accelerator activation is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied for intense neutron generators to process nuclear materials. We present new results about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams from multiparticle simulation of initial laminar beams in a uniform linear focusing channel, and from a model consisting of single particle interactions with a uniform-density beam core. We study the energy gain from particle interactions with the space-charge field of the core, and we identify the resonant characteristic of this interaction as the basic cause of the separation of the beam into the two components. We identify three different particle-trajectory types, and we suggest that one of these types may lead to continuous halo growth, even after the halo is removed by collimators.

  6. Beam halo formation from space-charge dominated beams in uniform focusing channels

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, J.S.; Wangler, T.P.; Mills, R.S.; Crandall, K.R.

    1993-06-01

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and an outer halo. The halo is very prominent in mismatched beams, and the potential for accelerator activation is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied for intense neutron generators to process nuclear materials. We present new results about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams from multiparticle simulation of initial laminar beams in a uniform linear focusing channel, and from a model consisting of single particle interactions with a uniform-density beam core. We study the energy gain from particle interactions with the space-charge field of the core, and we identify the resonant characteristic of this interaction as the basic cause of the separation of the beam into the two components. We identify three different particle-trajectory types, and we suggest that one of these types may lead to continuous halo growth, even after the halo is removed by collimators.

  7. Lack of uniform trends but increasing spatial variability in observed Indian rainfall extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subimal [ORNL; Das, Debasish [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies disagree on how rainfall extremes over India have changed in space and time over the past half century, as well as on whether the changes observed are due to global warming or regional urbanization. Although a uniform and consistent decrease in moderate rainfall has been reported, a lack of agreement about trends in heavy rainfall may be due in part to differences in the characterization and spatial averaging of extremes. Here we use extreme value theory to examine trends in Indian rainfall over the past half century in the context of long-term, low-frequency variability.We show that when generalized extreme value theory is applied to annual maximum rainfall over India, no statistically significant spatially uniform trends are observed, in agreement with previous studies using different approaches. Furthermore, our space time regression analysis of the return levels points to increasing spatial variability of rainfall extremes over India. Our findings highlight the need for systematic examination of global versus regional drivers of trends in Indian rainfall extremes, and may help to inform flood hazard preparedness and water resource management in the region.

  8. A Review on Biomass Densification Systems to Develop Uniform Feedstock Commodities for Bioenergy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney

    2011-11-01

    Developing uniformly formatted, densified feedstock from lignocellulosic biomass is of interest to achieve consistent physical properties like size and shape, bulk and unit density, and durability, which significantly influence storage, transportation and handling characteristics, and, by extension, feedstock cost and quality. A variety of densification systems are considered for producing a uniform format feedstock commodity for bioenergy applications, including (a) baler, (b) pellet mill, (c) cuber, (d) screw extruder, (e) briquette press, (f) roller press, (g) tablet press, and (g) agglomerator. Each of these systems has varying impacts on feedstock chemical and physical properties, and energy consumption. This review discusses the suitability of these densification systems for biomass feedstocks and the impact these systems have on specific energy consumption and end product quality. For example, a briquette press is more flexible in terms of feedstock variables where higher moisture content and larger particles are acceptable for making good quality briquettes; or among different densification systems, a screw press consumes the most energy because it not only compresses but also shears and mixes the material. Pretreatment options like preheating, grinding, steam explosion, torrefaction, and ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) can also help to reduce specific energy consumption during densification and improve binding characteristics. Binding behavior can also be improved by adding natural binders, such as proteins, or commercial binders, such as lignosulphonates. The quality of the densified biomass for both domestic and international markets is evaluated using PFI (United States Standard) or CEN (European Standard).

  9. Multipole and field uniformity tailoring of a 750 MHz rf dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean R.; Castillo, Alejandro

    2014-12-01

    In recent years great interest has been shown in developing rf structures for beam separation, correction of geometrical degradation on luminosity, and diagnostic applications in both lepton and hadron machines. The rf dipole being a very promising one among all of them. The rf dipole has been tested and proven to have attractive properties that include high shunt impedance, low and balance surface fields, absence of lower order modes and far-spaced higher order modes that simplify their damping scheme. As well as to be a compact and versatile design in a considerable range of frequencies, its fairly simple geometry dependency is suitable both for fabrication and surface treatment. The rf dipole geometry can also be optimized for lowering multipacting risk and multipole tailoring to meet machine specific field uniformity tolerances. In the present work a survey of field uniformities, and multipole contents for a set of 750 MHz rf dipole designs is presented as both a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the inherent flexibility of the structure and its limitations.

  10. System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes

    DOEpatents

    Galloway, Terry R.

    1983-01-01

    A method and a cutter for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head (72) has a hollow body (76) with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft (74) extends from the hollow body (76). Cutter teeth (78) are mounted on the upper surface of the body (76) and relatively small holes (77) are formed in the body (76) between the cutter teeth (78). Relatively large peripheral flutes (80) around the body (76) allow material to drop below the drill head (72). A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale.

  11. Response of a uniformly accelerated detector to massless Rarita–Schwinger fields in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qinglin; Yu, Hongwei; Zhou, Wenting

    2014-09-15

    We study the response of a uniformly accelerated detector modeled by a two-level atom nonlinearly coupled to vacuum massless Rarita–Schwinger fields. We first generalize the formalism developed by Dalibard, Dupont-Roc, and Cohen-Tannoudji in the linear coupling case, and we then calculate the mean rate of change of the atomic energy of the accelerated atom. Our result shows that a uniformly accelerated atom in its ground state interacting with vacuum Rarita–Schwinger field fluctuations would spontaneously transition to an excited state and the unique feature in contrast to the case of the atom coupled to the scalar, electromagnetic and Dirac fields is the appearance of terms in the excitation rate which are proportional to the sixth and eighth powers of acceleration. - Highlights: • We study the response of an accelerated detector to Rarita–Schwinger fields. • Detector spontaneously transitions to an excited state in vacuum. • Excitation rate contains terms of the sixth and eighth powers of acceleration.

  12. Effects of magnetic field on the interaction between terahertz wave and non-uniform plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuan; Han, YiPing; Guo, LiXin; Ai, Xia

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the interaction between terahertz electromagnetic wave and a non-uniform magnetized plasma slab is investigated. Different from most of the published literatures, the plasma employed in this work is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Profiles are introduced to describe the non-uniformity of the plasma slab. At the same time, magnetic field is applied to the background of the plasma slab. It came out with an interesting phenomenon that there would be a valley in the absorption band as the plasma's electromagnetic characteristic is affected by the magnetic field. In addition, the valley located just near the middle of the absorption peak. The cause of the valley's appearance is inferred in this paper. And the influences of the variables, such as magnetic field strength, electron density, and collision frequency, are discussed in detail. The objective of this work is also pointed out, such as the applications in flight communication, stealth, emissivity, plasma diagnose, and other areas of plasma.

  13. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  14. Traffic signal design and simulation for vulnerable road users safety and bus preemption

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Huang, Hsieh-Chu

    2015-01-22

    Mostly, pedestrian car accidents occurred at a signalized interaction is because pedestrians cannot across the intersection safely within the green light. From the viewpoint of pedestrian, there might have two reasons. The first one is pedestrians cannot speed up to across the intersection, such as the elders. The other reason is pedestrians do not sense that the signal phase is going to change and their right-of-way is going to be lost. Developing signal logic to protect pedestrian, who is crossing an intersection is the first purpose of this study. In addition, to improve the reliability and reduce delay of public transportation service is the second purpose. Therefore, bus preemption is also considered in the designed signal logic. In this study, the traffic data of the intersection of Chong-Qing North Road and Min-Zu West Road, Taipei, Taiwan, is employed to calibrate and validate the signal logic by simulation. VISSIM 5.20, which is a microscopic traffic simulation software, is employed to simulate the signal logic. From the simulated results, the signal logic presented in this study can protect pedestrians crossing the intersection successfully. The design of bus preemption can reduce the average delay. However, the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal will influence the average delay of cars largely. Thus, whether applying the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal logic to an intersection or not should be evaluated carefully.

  15. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flowmore » perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.« less

  16. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the

  17. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shuhuai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bakajin, Olgica [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  18. CAGE100: Real-Time Multi-Port Packet Capture System for 100 Gigabit Ethernet Traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Namazi; Babak Azimi-Sadjadi; Chujen Lin

    2012-06-14

    Future large scale sciences are anticipated to use massive amount of data in their experiments. DOE?¢????s ESnet (Energy Science Network) is developing a 100 Gbps backbone based on this state-of-the-art 100 Gigabit Ethernet standard. ESnet will serve thousands of DOE and non-DOE scientists with its high bandwidth backbone, and connect several national laboratories. Current Ethernet test and debug solutions, such as network traffic capturer/analyzer tools, support up to 10 Gbps speed, and the very few capable of handling 100 Gbps are extremely costly. Such tools are essential in the development of high speed devices and routers, and ultimately the success of 100 Gigabit Ethernet.

  19. Transport growth in Bangkok: Energy, environment, and traffic congestion. Workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Philpott, J.

    1995-07-01

    Bangkok, the capital of Thailand, is a physically and economically complexcity with a complicated transport system. With daily traffic congestion averaging 16 hours, the air quality is such that to breathe street level pollution for 8 eight hours is roughly equivalent to smoking nine cigarettes per day. Estimates suggest idling traffic costs up to $1.6 billion annually. Energy use within the transport sector is on a steady rise with an estimated increase in 11 years of two and one half times. Severe health impacts have begun to effect many residents - young children and the elderly being particularly vulnerable. Bangkok`s air quality and congestion problems are far from hopeless. Great potential exists for Bangkok to remedy its transport-related problems. The city has many necessary characteristics that allow an efficient, economical system of transport. For example, its high density level makes the city a prime candidate for an efficient system of mass transit and the multitude and close proximity of shops, street vendors, restaurants, and residential areas is highly conducive to walking and cycling. Technical knowledge and capacity to devise and implement innovative policies and projects to address air quality and congestion problems is plentiful. There is also consensus among Bangkokians that something needs to be done immediately to clear the air and the roads. However, little has been done. This report proposes a new approach to transport planning for Bangkok that integrates consideration of ecological, social, and financial viability in the process of making decisions regarding managing existing infrastructure and investments in new infrastructure. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi

    2013-11-15

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  1. Suitability of Synthetic Driving Profiles from Traffic Micro-Simulation for Real-World Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yunfei; Wood, Eric; Burton, Evan; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-14

    A shift towards increased levels of driving automation is generally expected to result in improved safety and traffic congestion outcomes. However, little empirical data exists to estimate the impact that automated driving could have on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In the absence of empirical data on differences between drive cycles from present day vehicles (primarily operated by humans) and future vehicles (partially or fully operated by computers) one approach is to model both situations over identical traffic conditions. Such an exercise requires traffic micro-simulation to not only accurately model vehicle operation under high levels of automation, but also (and potentially more challenging) vehicle operation under present day human drivers. This work seeks to quantify the ability of a commercial traffic micro-simulation program to accurately model real-world drive cycles in vehicles operated primarily by humans in terms of driving speed, acceleration, and simulated fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from models of freeway and arterial facilities near Atlanta, Georgia, are compared to empirical data collected from real-world drivers on the same facilities. Empirical and synthetic drive cycles are then simulated in a powertrain efficiency model to enable comparison on the basis of fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from traffic micro-simulation were found to exhibit low levels of transient behavior relative to the empirical data. Even with these differences, the synthetic and empirical data in this study agree well in terms of driving speed and simulated fuel economy. The differences in transient behavior between simulated and empirical data suggest that larger stochastic contributions in traffic micro-simulation (relative to those present in the traffic micro-simulation tool used in this study) are required to fully capture the arbitrary elements of human driving. Interestingly, the lack of stochastic contributions from models of human drivers

  2. Three-electrode low pressure discharge apparatus and method for uniform ionization of gaseous media. [CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse smoother

    DOEpatents

    McLellan, E.J.

    1980-10-17

    Uniform, transverse electrical discharges are produced in gaseous media without the necessity of switching the main discharge voltage with an external device which carries the entire discharge current. A three-electrode low pressure discharge tube is charged across its anode and cathode to below breakdown voltage using a dc voltage source. An array of resistors or capacitors can be made to discharge to the wire screen anode by means of a low energy high voltage pulse circuit producing sufficient preionization in the region between the anode and cathode to initiate and control the main discharge. The invention has been demonstrated to be useful as a CO/sub 2/ laser oscillator and pulse-smoother. It can be reliably operated in the sealed-off mode.

  3. Unique battery with an active membrane separator having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels and a method making the same

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Ruscic, Katarina J.; Sears, Devin N.; Smith, Luis J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2012-02-21

    The invention relates to a unique battery having an active, porous membrane and method of making the same. More specifically the invention relates to a sealed battery system having a porous, metal oxide membrane with uniform, physicochemically functionalized ion channels capable of adjustable ionic interaction. The physicochemically-active porous membrane purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  4. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heatingmore » uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.« less

  5. Uniform heating of materials into the warm dense matter regime with laser-driven quasimonoenergetic ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Vold, E. L.; Boettger, J. C.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    In a recent experiment at the Trident laser facility, a laser-driven beam of quasimonoenergetic aluminum ions was used to heat solid gold and diamond foils isochorically to 5.5 and 1.7 eV, respectively. Here theoretical calculations are presented that suggest the gold and diamond were heated uniformly by these laser-driven ion beams. According to calculations and SESAME equation-of-state tables, laser-driven aluminum ion beams achievable at Trident, with a finite energy spread of ΔE/E~20%, are expected to heat the targets more uniformly than a beam of 140-MeV aluminum ions with zero energy spread. As a result, the robustness of the expected heating uniformity relative to the changes in the incident ion energy spectra is evaluated, and expected plasma temperatures of various target materials achievable with the current experimental platform are presented.

  6. Uniform hierarchical SnS microspheres: Solvothermal synthesis and lithium ion storage performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen Wang, Qin; Wang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Fan; Wang, Chenyan; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Uniform hierarchical SnS microspheres via solvothermal reaction. The formation process was investigated in detail. The obtained hierarchical SnS microspheres exhibit superior capacity (1650 mAh g{sup ?1}) when used as lithium battery for the hierarchical microsphere structure. - Abstract: Hierarchical SnS microspheres have been successfully synthesized by a mild solvothermal process using poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as surfactant in this work. The morphology and composition of the microspheres were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of reaction parameters, such as sulfur sources, reaction temperature and the concentration of PVP, on the final morphology of the products are investigated. On the basis of time-dependent experiments, the growth mechanism has also been proposed. The specific surface area of the 3D hierarchitectured SnS microspheres were investigated by using nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. Lithium ion storage performances of the synthesized materials as anodes for Lithium-ion battery were investigated in detail and it exhibits excellent electrochemical properties.

  7. Numerical wave propagation on non-uniform one-dimensional staggered grids

    SciTech Connect

    Long, D.; Thuburn, J.

    2011-04-01

    The wave propagation behaviour of centered difference schemes on one-dimensional non-uniform staggered grids is investigated. Previous results for the linear advection equation are extended to the case of the shallow water equations on staggered grids. For waves of a given frequency, the wave field is decomposed into right- and left-propagating components, and a wave energy conservation law is derived in terms of these components. For slowly varying grids, separate evolution equations for the right- and left-propagating components are derived, leading to the result that there is asymptotically no reflection in the limit of a slowly varying grid, provided that waves of that frequency are resolvable. However, there will be reflection from any location at which the wave group velocity goes to zero. The possibility for wave energy to tunnel through a narrow region of the grid too coarse for propagation is noted. Grids with an abrupt jump in resolution are also investigated. It is possible to tailor the scheme at the jump to minimize spurious wave reflection over a range of frequencies provided the waves are resolvable on both sides of the jump. However, it does not appear possible to avoid complete reflection, except by introducing extra dissipation terms, if the waves are not resolvable on one side of the jump. An example is presented of a second-order accurate scheme that spontaneously radiates waves from the resolution jump.

  8. DEFLECTION OF A HETEROGENEOUS WIDE-BEAM UNDER UNIFORM PRESSURE LOAD

    SciTech Connect

    T. V. Holschuh; T. K. Howard; W. R. Marcum

    2014-07-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or generic test plate assembly (GTPA), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates onset by hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Fuels Development Program. This study’s focus supports the ongoing collaborative effort by detailing the derivation of an analytic solution for deflection of a heterogeneous plate under a uniform, distributed load in order to predict the deflection of test plates in the GTPA. The resulting analytical solutions for three specific boundary condition sets are then presented against several test cases of a homogeneous plate. In all test cases considered, the results for both homogeneous and heterogeneous plates are numerically identical to one another, demonstrating correct derivation of the heterogeneous solution. Two additional problems are presents herein that provide a representative deflection profile for the plates under consideration within the GTPA. Furthermore, qualitative observations are made about the influence of a more-rigid internal fuel-meat region and its influence on the overall deflection profile of a plate. Present work is being directed to experimentally confirm the analytical solution’s results using select materials.

  9. Lateral migration of a microdroplet under optical forces in a uniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyunjun; Chang, Cheong Bong; Jung, Jin Ho; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2014-12-15

    The behavior of a microdroplet in a uniform flow and subjected to a vertical optical force applied by a loosely focused Gaussian laser beam was studied numerically. The lattice Boltzmann method was applied to obtain the two-phase flow field, and the dynamic ray tracing method was adopted to calculate the optical force. The optical forces acting on the spherical droplets agreed well with the analytical values. The numerically predicted droplet migration distances agreed well with the experimentally obtained values. Simulations of the various flow and optical parameters showed that the droplet migration distance nondimensionalized by the droplet radius is proportional to the S number (z{sub d}/r{sub p} = 0.377S), which is the ratio of the optical force to the viscous drag. The effect of the surface tension was also examined. These results indicated that the surface tension influenced the droplet migration distance to a lesser degree than the flow and optical parameters. The results of the present work hold for the refractive indices of the mean fluid and the droplet being 1.33 and 1.59, respectively.

  10. Generation of excited coherent states for a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mojaveri, B.; Dehghani, A. E-mail: alireza.dehghani@gmail.com

    2015-04-15

    We introduce excited coherent states, |β,α;nгЂ‰≔a{sup †n}|β,αгЂ‰, where n is an integer and states |β,αгЂ‰ denote the coherent states of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. States |β,αгЂ‰ minimize the Schrödinger-Robertson uncertainty relation while having the nonclassical properties. It has been shown that the resolution of identity condition is realized with respect to an appropriate measure on the complex plane. Some of the nonclassical features such as sub-Poissonian statistics and quadrature squeezing of these states are investigated. Our results are compared with similar Agarwal’s type photon added coherent states (PACSs) and it is shown that, while photon-counting statistics of |β,α,nгЂ‰ are the same as PACSs, their squeezing properties are different. It is also shown that for large values of |β|, while they are squeezed, they minimize the uncertainty condition. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that by changing the magnitude of the external magnetic field, B{sub ext}, the squeezing effect is transferred from one component to another. Finally, a new scheme is proposed to generate states |β,α;nгЂ‰ in cavities. .

  11. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions

    DOEpatents

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  12. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOEpatents

    Yost, Frederick G.; Frear, Darrel R.; Schmale, David T.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users.

  13. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Frear, D.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-05

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users. 7 figs.

  14. Generalized crossing states in the interacting case: The uniform gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva, Anthony D.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2010-11-15

    We reconsider Baute et al.'s free crossing states [Phys. Rev. A 61, 022118 (2000)] and show that if we require a generalization in the interacting case that goes in complete parallel with the free-particle case, then this generalized crossing state cannot be arbitrary but is determined by the null space of the particle's quantum time-of-arrival operator. Nonetheless, the free crossing states appear as the leading term in the asymptotic expansion of our generalized crossing state in the limit of large momentum. We then examine the quantum time-of-arrival problem of a spinless particle in a uniform gravitational field. Mass-dependent time-of-arrival probability distributions emerge, signifying quantum departures from the weak equivalence principle. However, in the classical limit of large mass and vanishing uncertainty in position, the mass dependence of the quantum time-of-arrival distribution becomes exponentially small and the mean quantum time of arrival reduces to the classical time of arrival.

  15. Uniform Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings and Increasing Electric Utility Confidence in Reported Savings Now Available

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published protocols for estimating energy savings for residential and commercial energy efficiency programs and measures through the recently released “The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures.”

  16. White Noise Path Integral Treatment of a Two-dimensional Dirac Oscillator in a Uniform Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bastatas, Lyndon D.; Bornales, Jinky B.

    2008-06-18

    White noise path integral prescription is applied to solve the Dirac equation for a two-dimensional Dirac oscillator in a uniform magnetic field. The energy spectrum obtained agrees with the result obtained by Villalba and Maggiolo using the differential approach.

  17. Chapter 7, Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    7: Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs and Josh Keeling, The Cadmus Group, Inc. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 7 - 1 Chapter 7 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol

  18. Chapter 9, Metering Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9: Metering Cross- Cutting Protocols Dan Mort, ADM Associates, Inc. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 9 - 1 Chapter 9 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 3 2 Metering Application and Considerations

  19. The Role of Cohesive Particle Interactions on Solids Uniformity and Mobilization During Jet Mixing: Testing Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Chun, Jaehun; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2010-04-01

    Radioactive waste that is currently stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site will be staged in selected double-shell tanks (DSTs) and then transferred to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Before being transferred, the waste will be mixed, sampled, and characterized to determine if the waste composition and meets the waste feed specifications. Washington River Protection Solutions is conducting a Tank Mixing and Sampling Demonstration Program to determine the mixing effectiveness of the current baseline mixing system that uses two jet mixer pumps and the adequacy of the planned sampling method. The overall purpose of the demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risk associated with the mixing and sampling systems meeting the feed certification requirements for transferring waste to the WTP.The purpose of this report is to analyze existing data and evaluate whether scaled mixing tests with cohesive simulants are needed to meet the overall objectives of the small-scale mixing demonstration program. This evaluation will focus on estimating the role of cohesive particle interactions on various physical phenomena that occur in parts of the mixing process. A specific focus of the evaluation will be on the uniformity of suspended solids in the mixed region. Based on the evaluation presented in this report and the absence of definitive studies, the recommendation is to conduct scaled mixing tests with cohesive particles and augment the initial testing with non-cohesive particles. In addition, planning for the quantitative tests would benefit from having test results from some scoping experiments that would provide results on the general behavior when cohesive inter-particle forces are important.

  20. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Zheng, Y; Benton, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  1. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  2. CONTROL ROD FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR AND METHOD OF PREPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Hausner, H.H.

    1958-12-30

    BS>An improved control rod is presented for a nuclear reactor. This control rod is comprised of a rare earth metal oxide or rare earth metal carbide such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium carbide, uniformly distributed in a metal matrix having a low cross sectional area of absorption for thermal neutrons, such as aluminum, beryllium, and zirconium.

  3. Evaluating and tuning system response in the MFTF-B control and diagnostics computers

    SciTech Connect

    Palasek, R.L.; Butner, D.N.; Minor, E.G.

    1983-11-30

    The software system running on the Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) of MFTF-B is, for the major part, an event driven one. Regular, periodic polling of sensors' outputs takes place only at the local level, in the sensors' corresponding local control microcomputers (LCC's). An LCC reports a sensor's value to the supervisory computer only if there was a significant change. This report is passed as a message, routed among and acted upon by a network of applications and systems tasks within the supervisory computer (SCDS). Commands from the operator's console are similarly routed through a network of tasks, but in the oppostie direction to the experiment's hardware. In a network such as this, response time is partialy determined by system traffic. Because the hardware of MFTF-B will not be connected to the computer system for another two years, we are using the local control computers to simulate the event driven traffic that we expect to see during MFTF-B operation. In this paper we show how we are using the simulator to measure and evaluate response, loading, throughput, and utilization of components within the computer system. Measurement of the system under simulation allows us to identify bottlenecks and verify their unloosening. We also use the traffic simulators to evaluate prototypes of different algorithms for selected tasks, comparing their responses under the spectrum of traffic intensities.

  4. Common Control System Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Nelson

    2005-12-01

    The Control Systems Security Program and other programs within the Idaho National Laboratory have discovered a vulnerability common to control systems in all sectors that allows an attacker to penetrate most control systems, spoof the operator, and gain full control of targeted system elements. This vulnerability has been identified on several systems that have been evaluated at INL, and in each case a 100% success rate of completing the attack paths that lead to full system compromise was observed. Since these systems are employed in multiple critical infrastructure sectors, this vulnerability is deemed common to control systems in all sectors. Modern control systems architectures can be considered analogous to today's information networks, and as such are usually approached by attackers using a common attack methodology to penetrate deeper and deeper into the network. This approach often is composed of several phases, including gaining access to the control network, reconnaissance, profiling of vulnerabilities, launching attacks, escalating privilege, maintaining access, and obscuring or removing information that indicates that an intruder was on the system. With irrefutable proof that an external attack can lead to a compromise of a computing resource on the organization's business local area network (LAN), access to the control network is usually considered the first phase in the attack plan. Once the attacker gains access to the control network through direct connections and/or the business LAN, the second phase of reconnaissance begins with traffic analysis within the control domain. Thus, the communications between the workstations and the field device controllers can be monitored and evaluated, allowing an attacker to capture, analyze, and evaluate the commands sent among the control equipment. Through manipulation of the communication protocols of control systems (a process generally referred to as ''reverse engineering''), an attacker can then map out the

  5. Cost estimates for near-term depolyment of advanced traffic management systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.S.; Chin, S.M.

    1993-02-15

    The objective of this study is to provide cost est engineering, design, installation, operation and maintenance of Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) in the largest 75 metropolitan areas in the United States. This report gives estimates for deployment costs for ATMS in the next five years, subject to the qualifications and caveats set out in following paragraphs. The report considers infrastructure components required to realize fully a functional ATMS over each of two highway networks (as discussed in the Section describing our general assumptions) under each of the four architectures identified in the MITRE Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems (IVHS) Architecture studies. The architectures are summarized in this report in Table 2. Estimates are given for eight combinations of highway networks and architectures. We estimate that it will cost between $8.5 Billion (minimal network) and $26 Billion (augmented network) to proceed immediately with deployment of ATMS in the largest 75 metropolitan areas. Costs are given in 1992 dollars, and are not adjusted for future inflation. Our estimates are based partially on completed project costs, which have been adjusted to 1992 dollars. We assume that a particular architecture will be chosen; projected costs are broken by architecture.

  6. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  7. Inviscid evolution of large amplitude filaments in a uniform gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-11-15

    The inviscid evolution of localized density stratifications under the influence of a uniform gravity field in a homogeneous, ambient background is studied. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible, and the stratification, or filament, is assumed to be initially isotropic and at rest. It is shown that the center of mass energy can be related to the center of mass position in a form analogous to that of a solid object in a gravity field g by introducing an effective gravity field g{sub eff}, which is less than g due to energy that goes into the background and into non-center of mass motion of the filament. During the early stages of the evolution, g{sub eff} is constant in time and can be determined from the solution of a 1D differential equation that depends on the initial, radially varying density profile of the filament. For small amplitude filaments such that ?{sub 0} ? 1, where ?{sub 0} is the relative amplitude of the filament to the background, the early stage g{sub eff} scales linearly with ?{sub 0}, but as ?{sub 0}??,?g{sub eff}?g and is thus independent of ?{sub 0}. Fully nonlinear simulations are performed for the evolution of Gaussian filaments, and it is found that the time t{sub max}, which is defined as the time for the center of mass velocity to reach its maximum value U{sub max}, occurs very soon after the constant acceleration phase and so U{sub max}?g{sub eff}(t=0)t{sub max}. The simulation results show that U{sub max}?1/t{sub max}??(?{sub 0}) for ?{sub 0} ? 1, in agreement with theory and results from previous authors, but that U{sub max} and t{sub max} both scale approximately with ?(?{sub 0}) for ?{sub 0} ? 1. The fact that U{sub max} and t{sub max} have the same scaling with ?{sub 0} for large amplitude filaments is in agreement with the theory presented in this paper.

  8. Effect of non-uniform electron energy distribution function on plasma production in large arc driven negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, T.; Koga, S.; Terasaki, R.; Hatayama, A.; Inoue, T.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Tobari, H.; Tsuchida, K.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.

    2012-02-15

    Spatially non-uniform electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an arc driven negative ion source (JAEA 10A negative ion source: 10 A NIS) is calculated numerically by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo kinetic model for electrons to understand spatial distribution of plasma production (such as atomic and ionic hydrogen (H{sup 0}/H{sup +}) production) in source chamber. The local EEDFs were directly calculated from electron orbits including electromagnetic effects and elastic/inelastic collision forces. From the EEDF, spatial distributions of H{sup 0}/H{sup +} production rate were obtained. The results suggest that spatial non-uniformity of H{sup 0}/H{sup +} productions is enhanced by high energy component of EEDF.

  9. Chapter 21: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol. Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 This supersedes the version originally published in April 2013. Scott Dimetrosky, Katie Parkinson, and Noah Lieb Apex Analytics, LLC Boulder, Colorado NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63205 February 2015 NREL is a national

  10. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: January 2012 - March 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures January 2012 - March 2013 Tina Jayaweera Hossein Haeri The Cadmus Group Portland, Oregon NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable

  11. Dream controller

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  12. International Committee on Traffic Conflict Techniques (ICTCT) calibration study at Malmo: a quantitative analysis of video recordings

    SciTech Connect

    van der Horst, A.R.A.

    1984-12-01

    To investigate a number of Traffic Conflict Techniques, three intersections at Malmo (Sweden) were studied by observer teams of eight countries while simultaneous video recordings were made. This set was analyzed quantitatively from video in order to get an objective description in terms of speed, deceleration, minimum distance, time-to-collision (TTC), and post-encroachment time (PET). The minimum TTC appeared to be the most important variable in explaining a common severity scale, but not the only one. Conflict type contributes substantially to the prediction of severity. Comparisons were made between calculated and estimated measures, like TTC for Sweden and Finland and PET for Canada.

  13. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  14. Effect of scandia doping method on the emission uniformity of scandate cathode with Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}W matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinshu Lai, Chen; Liu, Wei; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xizhu; Cui, Yuntao; Zhou, Meiling

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Emission uniformity of the cathodes prepared by mechanical mixing (a) and spray drying method (b). - Highlights: The emission uniformity of scandate cathodes has been quantitively obtained. The nanoparticles on the cathode surface lead to the electric field enhancement. The cathode prepared by spray drying method exhibits good emission uniformity. - Abstract: Scandia doped tungsten matrix dispenser cathodes were manufactured using scandia doped tungsten powder prepared by mechanical mixing, liquidsolid doping and a spray drying method. It is found the macrostructure of the cathode depended on the powder preparation method. The cathode prepared using the powder prepared by spray drying method had a homogenous and porous matrix characterized with grains with a diameter of less than 1 ?m and with many nanoparticles distributing uniformly around these grains. The cathode with submicron structure and uniform distribution of scandia exhibited good emission uniformity. The emission uniformity ?J/J of the cathode prepared by spray drying method was 0.17, about 6 times lower than that of the cathode prepared by mechanical mixing method. The calculation results showed that the nanoparticles led to electric field enhancement. A BaScO multilayer on the cathode surface and nanoparticles distributing mainly on W grains contributed to the emission property of the cathode.

  15. Control of Classified Documents and Information

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-02-12

    To provide uniform standards and operating procedures for safeguarding and controlling classified documents and information, to ensure that classified documents are furnished only to authorized personnel on a "need-to-know" basis and to prevent loss or compromise of classified information. Cancels DOE O 5635.1 dated 11-24-80 and DOE HQ O 5635.1 dated 9-24-84. Canceled by DOE O 5632.1C dated 7-15-94.

  16. Non-uniform solute segregation at semi-coherent metal/oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Samrat; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Fluss, Michael J.; Hsiung, Luke L.; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-08-26

    The properties and performance of metal/oxide nanocomposites are governed by the structure and chemistry of the metal/oxide interfaces. Here we report an integrated theoretical and experimental study examining the role of interfacial structure, particularly misfit dislocations, on solute segregation at a metal/oxide interface. We find that the local oxygen environment, which varies significantly between the misfit dislocations and the coherent terraces, dictates the segregation tendency of solutes to the interface. Depending on the nature of the solute and local oxygen content, segregation to misfit dislocations can change from attraction to repulsion, revealing the complex interplay between chemistry and structure at metal/oxide interfaces. These findings indicate that the solute chemistry at misfit dislocations is controlled by the dislocation density and oxygen content. As a result, fundamental thermodynamic concepts – the Hume-Rothery rules and the Ellingham diagram – qualitatively predict the segregation behavior of solutes to such interfaces, providing design rules for novel interfacial chemistries.

  17. A model to non-uniform Ni Schottky contact on SiC annealed at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Pristavu, G.; Brezeanu, G.; Badila, M.; Pascu, R.; Danila, M.; Godignon, P.

    2015-06-29

    Ni Schottky contacts on SiC have a nonideal behavior, with strong temperature dependence of the electrical parameters, caused by a mixed barrier on the contact area and interface states. A simple analytical model that establishes a quantitative correlation between Schottky contact parameter variation with temperature and barrier height non-uniformity is proposed. A Schottky contact surface with double Schottky barrier is considered. The main model parameters are the lower barrier (Φ{sub Bn,l}) and a p factor which quantitatively evaluates the barrier non-uniformity on the Schottky contact area. The model is validated on Ni/4H-SiC Schottky contacts, post metallization sintered at high temperatures. The measured I{sub F}–V{sub F}–T characteristics, selected so as not to be affected by interface states, were used for model correlation. An inhomogeneous double Schottky barrier (with both nickel silicide and Ni droplets at the interface) is formed by a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 750 °C. High values of the p parameter are obtained from samples annealed at this temperature, using the proposed model. A significant improvement in the electrical properties occurs following RTA at 800 °C. The expansion of the Ni{sub 2}Si phase on the whole contact area is evinced by an X-Ray diffraction investigation. In this case, the p factor is much lower, attesting the uniformity of the contact. The model makes it possible to evaluate the real Schottky barrier, for a homogenous Schottky contact. Using data measured on samples annealed at 800 °C, a true barrier height of around 1.73 V has been obtained for Ni{sub 2}Si/4H-SiC Schottky contacts.

  18. Change Control Management Guide

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29

    The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for managing project and contract changes through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3B. No cancellation.

  19. A method for preparation and cleaning of uniformly sized arsenopyrite particles

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Hariprasad; Baltrus, John P; Dzombak, David A; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2014-10-11

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals, such as arsenopyrite (FeAsS), is of critical importance in many geochemical systems. A comprehensive understanding of their dissolution rates entails careful preparation of the mineral surface. Measurements of dissolution rates of arsenic from arsenopyrite are dependent on the size and degree of oxidation of its particles, among other factors. In this work, a method was developed for preparation and cleaning of arsenopyrite particles with size range of 150–250 μm. Four different cleaning methods were evaluated for effectiveness based on the removal of oxidized species of iron (Fe), arsenic (As) and sulfur (S) from themore » surface. The percentage oxidation of the surface was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and surface stoichiometry was measured using scanning electron microscopy – energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Results indicate that sonicating the arsenopyrite particles and then cleaning them with 12N HCl followed by 50% ethanol, and drying in nitrogen was the most effective method. This method was successful in greatly reducing the oxide species of Fe while completely removing oxides of As and S from the arsenopyrite surface. Although sonication and acid cleaning have been widely used for mineral preparation, the method described in this study can significantly reduce grain size heterogeneity as well as surface oxidation, which enables greater control in surface and dissolution experiments.« less

  20. "Self-assembly of uniform polyhedral silver nanocrystals into densest packings and exotic superlattices"

    SciTech Connect

    Henzie, Joel; Grunwald, Michael; Widmer-Cooper, Asaph; Geissler, Phillip L.; Yang, Peidong

    2011-03-01

    Understanding how polyhedra pack into extended arrangements is integral to the design and discovery of crystalline materials at all length scales. Much progress has been made in enumerating and characterizing the packing of polyhedral shapes, and the self-assembly of polyhedral nanocrystals into ordered superstructures. However, directing the self-assembly of polyhedral nanocrystals into densest packings requires precise control of particle shape, polydispersity,interactions and driving forces. Here we show with experiment and computer simulation that a range of nanoscale Ag polyhedra can self-assemble into their conjectured densest packings. When passivated with adsorbing polymer, the polyhedra behave as quasi-hard particles and assemble into millimetre-sized three-dimensional supercrystals by sedimentation.We also show, by inducing depletion attraction through excess polymer in solution, that octahedra form an exotic superstructure with complex helical motifs rather than the densest Minkowski lattice. Such large-scale Ag supercrystals may facilitate the design of scalable three-dimensional plasmonic metamaterials for sensing, nanophotonics, and photocatalysis.

  1. Non-uniform solute segregation at semi-coherent metal/oxide interfaces

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Choudhury, Samrat; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Fluss, Michael J.; Hsiung, Luke L.; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-08-26

    The properties and performance of metal/oxide nanocomposites are governed by the structure and chemistry of the metal/oxide interfaces. Here we report an integrated theoretical and experimental study examining the role of interfacial structure, particularly misfit dislocations, on solute segregation at a metal/oxide interface. We find that the local oxygen environment, which varies significantly between the misfit dislocations and the coherent terraces, dictates the segregation tendency of solutes to the interface. Depending on the nature of the solute and local oxygen content, segregation to misfit dislocations can change from attraction to repulsion, revealing the complex interplay between chemistry and structure atmore » metal/oxide interfaces. These findings indicate that the solute chemistry at misfit dislocations is controlled by the dislocation density and oxygen content. As a result, fundamental thermodynamic concepts – the Hume-Rothery rules and the Ellingham diagram – qualitatively predict the segregation behavior of solutes to such interfaces, providing design rules for novel interfacial chemistries.« less

  2. A method for preparation and cleaning of uniformly sized arsenopyrite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Hariprasad; Baltrus, John P; Dzombak, David A; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2014-10-11

    The oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals, such as arsenopyrite (FeAsS), is of critical importance in many geochemical systems. A comprehensive understanding of their dissolution rates entails careful preparation of the mineral surface. Measurements of dissolution rates of arsenic from arsenopyrite are dependent on the size and degree of oxidation of its particles, among other factors. In this work, a method was developed for preparation and cleaning of arsenopyrite particles with size range of 150250 ?m. Four different cleaning methods were evaluated for effectiveness based on the removal of oxidized species of iron (Fe), arsenic (As) and sulfur (S) from the surface. The percentage oxidation of the surface was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and surface stoichiometry was measured using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Results indicate that sonicating the arsenopyrite particles and then cleaning them with 12N HCl followed by 50% ethanol, and drying in nitrogen was the most effective method. This method was successful in greatly reducing the oxide species of Fe while completely removing oxides of As and S from the arsenopyrite surface. Although sonication and acid cleaning have been widely used for mineral preparation, the method described in this study can significantly reduce grain size heterogeneity as well as surface oxidation, which enables greater control in surface and dissolution experiments.

  3. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  4. COLLAPSE AND FRAGMENTATION OF MAGNETIC MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES WITH THE ENZO AMR MHD CODE. I. UNIFORM DENSITY SPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic fields are important contributors to the dynamics of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and can have a major effect on whether collapse results in a single protostar or fragmentation into a binary or multiple protostar system. New models are presented of the collapse of magnetic cloud cores using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo2.0. The code was used to calculate the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of initially spherical, uniform density, and rotation clouds with density perturbations, i.e., the Boss and Bodenheimer standard isothermal test case for three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics codes. After first verifying that Enzo reproduces the binary fragmentation expected for the non-magnetic test case, a large set of models was computed with varied initial magnetic field strengths and directions with respect to the cloud core axis of rotation (parallel or perpendicular), density perturbation amplitudes, and equations of state. Three significantly different outcomes resulted: (1) contraction without sustained collapse, forming a denser cloud core; (2) collapse to form a single protostar with significant spiral arms; and (3) collapse and fragmentation into binary or multiple protostar systems, with multiple spiral arms. Comparisons are also made with previous MHD calculations of similar clouds with a barotropic equations of state. These results for the collapse of initially uniform density spheres illustrate the central importance of both magnetic field direction and field strength for determining the outcome of dynamic protostellar collapse.

  5. Stormwater Controls

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Controls Stormwater Controls Originally built to provide drinking water, the Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir now serves to keep flow at safe levels and slow down flood ...

  6. FIPA agent based network distributed control system

    SciTech Connect

    D. Abbott; V. Gyurjyan; G. Heyes; E. Jastrzembski; C. Timmer; E. Wolin

    2003-03-01

    A control system with the capabilities to combine heterogeneous control systems or processes into a uniform homogeneous environment is discussed. This dynamically extensible system is an example of the software system at the agent level of abstraction. This level of abstraction considers agents as atomic entities that communicate to implement the functionality of the control system. Agents' engineering aspects are addressed by adopting the domain independent software standard, formulated by FIPA. Jade core Java classes are used as a FIPA specification implementation. A special, lightweight, XML RDFS based, control oriented, ontology markup language is developed to standardize the description of the arbitrary control system data processor. Control processes, described in this language, are integrated into the global system at runtime, without actual programming. Fault tolerance and recovery issues are also addressed.

  7. Reliable solution processed planar perovskite hybrid solar cells with large-area uniformity by chloroform soaking and spin rinsing induced surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Yann-Cherng; Wu, Hung-Ruei; Chen, Yen-Chu; Horng, Sheng-Fu; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2015-08-15

    A solvent soaking and rinsing method, in which the solvent was allowed to soak all over the surface followed by a spinning for solvent draining, was found to produce perovskite layers with high uniformity on a centimeter scale and with much improved reliability. Besides the enhanced crystallinity and surface morphology due to the rinsing induced surface precipitation that constrains the grain growth underneath in the precursor films, large-area uniformity with film thickness determined exclusively by the rotational speed of rinsing spinning for solvent draining was observed. With chloroform as rinsing solvent, highly uniform and mirror-like perovskite layers of area as large as 8 cm × 8 cm were produced and highly uniform planar perovskite solar cells with power conversion efficiency of 10.6 ± 0.2% as well as much prolonged lifetime were obtained. The high uniformity and reliability observed with this solvent soaking and rinsing method were ascribed to the low viscosity of chloroform as well as its feasibility of mixing with the solvent used in the precursor solution. Moreover, since the surface precipitation forms before the solvent draining, this solvent soaking and rinsing method may be adapted to spinless process and be compatible with large-area and continuous production. With the large-area uniformity and reliability for the resultant perovskite layers, this chloroform soaking and rinsing approach may thus be promising for the mass production and commercialization of large-area perovskite solar cells.

  8. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  9. Comminution process to produce engineered wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from veneer

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Comminution process of wood veneer to produce wood particles, by feeding wood veneer in a direction of travel substantially normal to grain through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of veneer travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (Td), to produce wood particles characterized by a length dimension (L) substantially equal to the Td and aligned substantially parallel to grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) substantially equal to the veneer thickness (Tv) and aligned normal to W and L, wherein the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces with end checking between crosscut fibers.

  10. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  11. Development of multi-hierarchy simulation model with non-uniform space grids for collisionless driven reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Usami, Shunsuke [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Horiuchi, Ritoku; Ohtani, Hiroaki [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan) [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Soken-dai), Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Den, Mitsue [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Koganei 184-8795 (Japan)] [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Koganei 184-8795 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    A multi-hierarchy simulation model aimed at magnetic reconnection studies has been developed, in which macroscopic and microscopic physics are solved self-consistently and simultaneously. In this work, the previous multi-hierarchy model by these authors is extended to a more realistic one with non-uniform space grids. Based on the domain decomposition method, the multi-hierarchy model consists of three parts: a magnetohydrodynamics algorithm to express the macroscopic global dynamics, a particle-in-cell algorithm to describe the microscopic kinetic physics, and an interface algorithm to interlock macro and micro hierarchies. For its verification, plasma flow injection is simulated in this multi-hierarchy model and it is confirmed that the interlocking method can describe the correct physics. Furthermore, this model is applied to collisionless driven reconnection in an open system. Magnetic reconnection is found to occur in a micro hierarchy by injecting plasma from a macro hierarchy.

  12. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  13. Stormwater Controls

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Controls Stormwater Controls Originally built to provide drinking water, the Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir now serves to keep flow at safe levels and slow down flood impacts. August 1, 2013 Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir Los Alamos Canyon Reservoir

  14. Project Controls

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  15. Fine uniform filament superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Li, Qi; Roberts, Peter R.; Antaya, Peter D.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.; Hancock, Steven; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Garrant, Jennifer H.; Craven, Christopher A.

    2002-01-01

    A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

  16. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  17. Modulations of the plasma uniformity by low frequency sources in a large-area dual frequency inductively coupled plasma based on fluid simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-05-15

    As the wafer size increases, dual frequency (DF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources have been proposed as an effective method to achieve large-area uniform plasma processing. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent fluid model, combined with an electromagnetic module, has been employed to investigate the influence of the low frequency (LF) source on the plasma radial uniformity in an argon DF discharge. When the DF antenna current is fixed at 10 A, the bulk plasma density decreases significantly with the LF due to the less efficient heating, and the best radial uniformity is obtained at 3.39 MHz. As the LF decreases to 2.26 MHz, the plasma density is characterized by an edge-high profile, and meanwhile the maximum of the electron temperature appears below the outer two-turn coil. Moreover, the axial ion flux at 3.39 MHz is rather uniform in the center region except at the radial edge of the substrate, where a higher ion flux is observed. When the inner five-turn coil frequency is fixed at 2.26 MHz, the plasma density profiles shift from edge-high over uniform to center-high as the LF coil current increases from 6 A to 18 A, and the best plasma uniformity is obtained at 14 A. In addition, the maximum of the electron temperature becomes lower with a second peak appears at the radial position of r = 9 cm at 18 A.

  18. Enhanced retained dose uniformity in NiTi spinal correction rod treated by three-dimensional mesh-assisted nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Q. Y.; Hu, T.; Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Chu, Paul K.

    2010-05-15

    Owing to the nonconformal plasma sheath in plasma immersion ion implantation of a rod sample, the retained dose can vary significantly. The authors propose to improve the implant uniformity by introducing a metal mesh. The depth profiles obtained with and without the mesh are compared and the implantation temperature at various locations is evaluated indirectly by differential scanning calorimeter. Our results reveal that by using the metal mesh, the retained dose uniformity along the length is greatly improved and the effects of the implantation temperature on the localized mechanical properties of the implanted NiTi shape memory alloy rod are nearly negligible.

  19. Extremely high-rate, uniform dissolution of alloy C-22 in anhydrous organic solutions at room temperature

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Schindelholz, Eric J.; Christie, Michael A.; Allwein, Shawn P.; Kelly, Robert G.

    2016-06-21

    During routine pharmaceutical development and scale-up work, severe corrosion of a Hastelloy Alloy C-22 filter dryer was observed after single, short (several hours) contact with the product slurry at room temperature. Initial investigations showed that the presence of both 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) and HCl was sufficient in an acetonitrile solution to cause rapid corrosion of C-22. More detailed mass loss studies showed initial corrosion rates exceeding25 mm/year that then decreased over several hours to steady state rates of 3-5 mm/year. The corrosion was highly uniform. Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that although C-22 is spontaneously passive in acetonitrile solution, the presence of HClmore » leads to the development of a transpassive region. Furthermore, DDQ is a sufficiently strong oxidizer, particularly in acidic solutions, to polarize the C-22 well into the transpassive region, leading to the observed high corrosion rates.« less

  20. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Cedeño-Mattei, Y.; Perales-Perez, O.

    2014-01-15

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ∼10{sup −8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  1. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Mrazek, F.C.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-01-19

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell is described wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  2. Method for depositing a uniform layer of particulate material on the surface of an article having interconnected porosity

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    1982-09-29

    The invention is a method for depositing liquid-suspended particles on an immersed porous article characterized by interconnected porosity. In one form of the invention, coating is conducted in a vessel containing an organic liquid supporting a colloidal dispersion of graphite sized to lodge in surface pores of the article. The liquid comprises a first volatile component (e.g., acetone) and a second less-volatile component (e.g., toluene) containing a dissolved organic graphite-bonding agent. The liquid also contains an organic agent (e.g., cellulose gum) for maintaining the particles in suspension. A porous carbon article to be coated is immersed in the liquid so that it is permeated therewith. While the liquid is stirred to maintain a uniform blend, the vessel headspace is evacuated to effect flashing-off of the first component from the interior of the article. This causes particle-laden liquid exterior of the article to flow inwardly through its surface pores, lodging particles in these pores and forming a continuous graphite coating. The coated article is retrieved and heated to resin-bond the graphite. The method can be used to form a smooth, adherent, continuous coating of various materials on various porous articles. The method is rapid and reproducible.

  3. Method for depositing a uniform layer of particulate material on the surface of an article having interconnected porosity

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E.; Lewis, Jr., John

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a method for depositing liquid-suspended particles on an immersed porous article characterized by interconnected porosity. In one form of the invention, coating is conducted in a vessel containing an organic liquid supporting a colloidal dispersion of graphite sized to lodge in surface pores of the article. The liquid comprises a first volatile component (e.g., acetone) and a second less-volatile component (e.g., toluene) containing a dissolved organic graphite-bonding agent. The liquid also contains an organic agent (e.g., cellulose gum) for maintaining the particles in suspension. A porous carbon article to be coated is immersed in the liquid so that it is permeated therewith. While the liquid is stirred to maintain a uniform blend, the vessel headspace is evacuated to effect flashing-off of the first component from the interior of the article. This causes particle-laden liquid exterior of the article to flow inwardly through its surface pores, lodging particles in these pores and forming a continuous graphite coating. The coated article is retrieved and heated to resin-bond the graphite. The method can be used to form a smooth, adherent, continuous coating of various materials on various porous articles. The method is rapid and reproducible.

  4. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2015-06-23

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, wherein W.sub.C>L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is less than T.sub.D.

  5. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-08-13

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is greater than T.sub.D.

  6. Radiological Control

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-06-16

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs.

  7. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  8. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  9. Change Control Management Guide

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29

    The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for managing project and contract changes through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3B. Admin Chg 1 dated 10-22-2015.

  10. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Walker, D.E.; Matras, S.

    1963-04-30

    This patent shows a method of making a fuel or control rod for a nuclear reactor. Fuel or control material is placed within a tube and plugs of porous metal wool are inserted at both ends. The metal wool is then compacted and the tube compressed around it as by swaging, thereby making the plugs liquid- impervious but gas-pervious. (AEC)

  11. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5 of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  12. Chapter 10, Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    0: Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings Cross-Cutting Protocols Frank Stern, Navigant Consulting Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 10 - 1 Chapter 10 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................2 2 Purpose of Peak Demand and Time-differentiated Energy

  13. Chapter 13, Assessing Persistence and Other Evaluation Issues Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3: Assessing Persistence and Other Evaluation Issues Cross- Cutting Protocols Daniel M. Violette, Navigant Consulting Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 13 - 1 Chapter 13 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................2 2 Persistence of Energy Savings

  14. Chapter 2, Commercial and Industrial Lighting Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2: Commercial and Industrial Lighting Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Dakers Gowans, Left Fork Energy Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 Chapter 2 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of the Protocol

  15. Chapter 5, Residential Furnaces and Boilers Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Evaluation Protocol David Jacobson, Jacobson Energy Research Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 5 - 1 Chapter 5 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol

  16. Chapter 8, Whole-Building Retrofit with Billing Analysis Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8: Whole-Building Retrofit with Consumption Data Analysis Evaluation Protocol Ken Agnew and Mimi Goldberg, DNV KEMA Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 8 - 1 Chapter 8 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description ...............................................................................................................2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol

  17. The feasibility assessment of a U.S. natural gas production reporting system uniform production reporting model. Final report, July 1993--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    The Uniform Production Reporting Model (UPRM) project was charged with identifying the best practices and procedures of the natural gas producing states related to the gathering, management, and dissemination of production data. It is recommended that the producing states begin the process of upgrading state systems using the concepts embodied in the UPRM model.

  18. The non-uniform early structural response of globular proteins to cold denaturing conditions: A case study with Yfh1

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Prathit; Bagchi, Sayan E-mail: s.bagchi@ncl.res.in; Sengupta, Neelanjana E-mail: s.bagchi@ncl.res.in

    2014-11-28

    The mechanism of cold denaturation in proteins is often incompletely understood due to limitations in accessing the denatured states at extremely low temperatures. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we have compared early (nanosecond timescale) structural and solvation properties of yeast frataxin (Yfh1) at its temperature of maximum stability, 292 K (T{sub s}), and the experimentally observed temperature of complete unfolding, 268 K (T{sub c}). Within the simulated timescales, discernible global level structural loss at T{sub c} is correlated with a distinct increase in surface hydration. However, the hydration and the unfolding events do not occur uniformly over the entire protein surface, but are sensitive to local structural propensity and hydrophobicity. Calculated infrared absorption spectra in the amide-I region of the whole protein show a distinct red shift at T{sub c} in comparison to T{sub s}. Domain specific calculations of IR spectra indicate that the red shift primarily arises from the beta strands. This is commensurate with a marked increase in solvent accessible surface area per residue for the beta-sheets at T{sub c}. Detailed analyses of structure and dynamics of hydration water around the hydrophobic residues of the beta-sheets show a more bulk water like behavior at T{sub c} due to preferential disruption of the hydrophobic effects around these domains. Our results indicate that in this protein, the surface exposed beta-sheet domains are more susceptible to cold denaturing conditions, in qualitative agreement with solution NMR experimental results.

  19. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; Jia, Chun -Jia; Schueth, Ferdi

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.

  20. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; et al

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  1. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  2. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  3. Radiological Control

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION ... DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical ...

  4. Version Control

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Control at NERSC Jack Deslippe Options at NERSC SVN Great for small projects with few developers working on a single branch. GIT Great for big projects with many developers...

  5. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  6. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  7. Chapter 14: Chiller Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 … May 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4: Chiller Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Alex Tiessen, Posterity Group Ottawa, Ontario NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-62431 September 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance

  8. Chapter 15: Commercial New Construction Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 … May 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5: Commercial New Construction Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Steven Keates, ADM Associates, Inc. Sacramento, California NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-62432 September 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

  9. Chapter 16: Retrocommissioning Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 … May 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6: Retrocommissioning Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Alex Tiessen, Posterity Group Ottawa, Ontario NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-62430 September 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the

  10. Chapter 17: Residential Behavior Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; Period of Performance September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    17: Residential Behavior Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 James Stewart The Cadmus Group Waltham, Massachusetts Annika Todd Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-62497 January 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of

  11. Chapter 18: Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8: Variable Frequency Drive Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Jeff Romberger SBW Consulting, Inc. Bellevue, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63166 November 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

  12. Chapter 20: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; Period of Performance: September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    0: Data Center IT Efficiency Measures The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Robert Huang The Cadmus Group, Inc. Waltham, Massachusetts Eric Masanet Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63181 January 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy

  13. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures: September 2011 … December 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures Created as part of subcontract with period of performance September 2011 - December 2014 Nathanael Benton Nexant, Inc. San Francisco, California NREL Technical Monitor: Charles Kurnik Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A40-63210 November 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by

  14. On the increase of the non-uniform scaling of the magnetic field variations before the M{sub w}9.0 earthquake in Japan in 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Skordas, E. S.

    2014-06-01

    By applying Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to the time series of the geomagnetic data recorded at three measuring stations in Japan, Rong et al. in 2012 recently reported that anomalous magnetic field variations were identified well before the occurrence of the disastrous Tohoku M{sub w}9.0 earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 in Japan exhibiting increased non-uniform scaling behavior. Here, we provide an explanation for the appearance of this increase of non-uniform scaling on the following grounds: These magnetic field variations are the ones that accompany the electric field variations termed Seismic Electric Signals (SES) activity which have been repeatedly reported that precede major earthquakes. DFA as well as multifractal DFA reveal that the latter electric field variations exhibit scaling behavior as shown by analyzing SES activities observed before major earthquakes in Greece. Hence, when these variations are superimposed on a background of pseudosinusoidal trend, their long range correlation propertiesquantified by DFAare affected resulting in an increase of the non-uniform scaling behavior. The same is expected to hold for the former magnetic field variations. This explanation is strengthened by recent findings showing that the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity exhibited an unprecedented minimum almost two months before the Tohoku earthquake occurrence which is characteristic for an almost simultaneous emission of Seismic Electric Signals activity.

  15. Important role of the non-uniform Fe distribution for the ferromagnetism in group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor GeFe

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Yuki K.; Ohya, Shinobu; Ban, Yoshisuke; Tanaka, Masaaki [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    We investigate the growth-temperature dependence of the properties of the group-IV-based ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x} films (x?=?6.5% and 10.5%), and reveal the correlation of the magnetic properties with the lattice constant, Curie temperature (T{sub C}), non-uniformity of Fe atoms, stacking-fault defects, and Fe-atom locations. While T{sub C} strongly depends on the growth temperature, we find a universal relationship between T{sub C} and the lattice constant, which does not depend on the Fe content x. By using the spatially resolved transmission-electron diffractions combined with the energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, we find that the density of the stacking-fault defects and the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration are correlated with T{sub C}. Meanwhile, by using the channeling Rutherford backscattering and particle-induced X-ray emission measurements, we clarify that about 15% of the Fe atoms exist on the tetrahedral interstitial sites in the Ge{sub 0.935}Fe{sub 0.065} lattice and that the substitutional Fe concentration is not correlated with T{sub C}. Considering these results, we conclude that the non-uniformity of the Fe concentration plays an important role in determining the ferromagnetic properties of GeFe.

  16. WeaselBoard : zero-day exploit detection for programmable logic controllers.

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, John C.; Schwartz, Moses Daniel; Berg, Michael J.; Van Houten, Jonathan Roger; Urrea, Jorge Mario; King, Michael Aaron; Clements, Abraham Anthony; Jacob, Joshua A.

    2013-10-01

    Critical infrastructures, such as electrical power plants and oil refineries, rely on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to control essential processes. State of the art security cannot detect attacks on PLCs at the hardware or firmware level. This renders critical infrastructure control systems vulnerable to costly and dangerous attacks. WeaselBoard is a PLC backplane analysis system that connects directly to the PLC backplane to capture backplane communications between modules. WeaselBoard forwards inter-module traffic to an external analysis system that detects changes to process control settings, sensor values, module configuration information, firmware updates, and process control program (logic) updates. WeaselBoard provides zero-day exploit detection for PLCs by detecting changes in the PLC and the process. This approach to PLC monitoring is protected under U.S. Patent Application 13/947,887.

  17. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  18. Paleomagnetic isochrons, unsteadiness, and uniformity of sedimentation in Miocene intermontane basin sediments at Salla, eastern Andean cordillera, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, L.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Fine-scaled stratigraphic data are combined with chronologic information provided by paleomagnetic stratigraphy to document and analyze chronostratigraphic variability of the Salla Beds, a sequence of distal floodplain and lacustrine intermontane basin sediments within the eastern Andean cordillera of Bolivia. Unsteadiness in sediment accumulation is identified using a conceptual model of episodic accumulation in which simulated accumulation histories are constructed using estimated rates for various fluvial facies and taking into account gaps in deposition and possible effects of erosion. Variability in the Salla Beds is compared to that in sequence of Miocene fluvial sediments in northern Pakistan to evaluate controls on spatial and temporal stratigraphic variability. Sedimentation in the Salla sequence was generally steady over short time scales, but over longer intervals infrequent carbonates, associated with unusually long hiatuses, served to reduce the net sediment accumulation rate. In the Chinji sequence of Pakistan, unsteady accumulation evolved into a pattern of steadier sediment accumulation as recurring cycles of unsteadiness were superimposed on the overall sequence. The controls on sediment accumulation over time in these two sequences may be similarly related to the presence and extent of atypical and infrequent events of deposition, non-deposition, or erosion that exert a significant effect on net sediment accumulation. The discrepancy of short-term episodic and long-term net stratigraphic accumulation rates in both these sequences suggests that the decrease in net sediment accumulation rate with increasing time reflects the superimposed effects of different levels of local geomorphic and extrabasinal controls.

  19. Method for control of subsurface coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    Komar, Charles A.

    1976-12-14

    The burn front in an in situ underground coal gasification operation is controlled by utilizing at least two parallel groups of vertical bore holes disposed in the coalbed at spaced-apart locations in planes orthogonal to the plane of maximum permeability in the coalbed. The combustion of the coal is initiated in the coalbed adjacent to one group of the bore holes to establish a combustion zone extending across the group while the pressure of the combustion supporting gas mixture and/or the combustion products is regulated at each well head by valving to control the burn rate and maintain a uniform propagation of the burn front between the spaced-apart hole groups to gasify virtually all the coal lying therebetween.

  20. Traffic Safety Facts 2004

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... which can be accessed by Internet users at web site www.nhtsa.dot.govpeoplencsa, ... O FARS data can also be accessed on the Web at www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov. This Web site ...

  1. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  2. Heliostat control

    DOEpatents

    Kaehler, James A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in a system and method of controlling heliostat in which the heliostat is operable in azimuth and elevation by respective stepper motors and including the respective steps or means for calculating the position for the heliostat to be at a commanded position, determining the number of steps in azimuth and elevation for each respective motor to get to the commanded position and energizing both the azimuth and elevation stepper motors to run in parallel until predetermined number of steps away from the closest commanded position in azimuth and elevation so that the closest position has been achieved, and thereafter energizing only the remaining motor to bring it to its commanded position. In this way, the heliostat can be started from a stowed position in the morning and operated by a computer means to its commanded position and kept correctly oriented throughout the day using only the time of the day without requiring the usual sensors and feedback apparatus. A computer, or microprocessor, can then control a plurality of many heliostats easily and efficiently throughout the day.

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Intrusion Detection System (SCADA IDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Jared Verba; Michael Milvich

    2008-05-01

    Current Intrusion Detection System (IDS) technology is not suited to be widely deployed inside a Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) environment. Anomaly- and signature-based IDS technologies have developed methods to cover information technology-based networks activity and protocols effectively. However, these IDS technologies do not include the fine protocol granularity required to ensure network security inside an environment with weak protocols lacking authentication and encryption. By implementing a more specific and more intelligent packet inspection mechanism, tailored traffic flow analysis, and unique packet tampering detection, IDS technology developed specifically for SCADA environments can be deployed with confidence in detecting malicious activity.

  5. Power Control System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1995-02-24

    Power Control System (PCS) is used as a real time control software package for Supervisory Control and Data Acquistion (SCADA) in an electric utility control center environment.

  6. Stormwater Control Structures

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. ...

  7. Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the Michigan Uniform Energy Code

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Michigan homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the Michigan Uniform Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Michigan homeowners will save $10,081 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $604 for the 2012 IECC.

  8. SMAC: A soft MAC to reduce control overhead and latency in CDMA-based AMI networks

    SciTech Connect

    Garlapati, Shravan; Kuruganti, Teja; Buehrer, Michael R.; Reed, Jeffrey H.

    2015-10-26

    The utilization of state-of-the-art 3G cellular CDMA technologies in a utility owned AMI network results in a large amount of control traffic relative to data traffic, increases the average packet delay and hence are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications. Like the CDG, we consider a utility owned cellular like CDMA network for smart grid distribution applications and classify the distribution smart grid data as scheduled data and random data. Also, we propose SMAC protocol, which changes its mode of operation based on the type of the data being collected to reduce the data collection latency and control overhead when compared to 3G cellular CDMA2000 MAC. The reduction in the data collection latency and control overhead aids in increasing the number of smart meters served by a base station within the periodic data collection interval, which further reduces the number of base stations needed by a utility or reduces the bandwidth needed to collect data from all the smart meters. The reduction in the number of base stations and/or the reduction in the data transmission bandwidth reduces the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) and OPerational EXpenditure (OPEX) of the AMI network. Finally, the proposed SMAC protocol is analyzed using markov chain, analytical expressions for average throughput and average packet delay are derived, and simulation results are also provided to verify the analysis.

  9. SMAC: A soft MAC to reduce control overhead and latency in CDMA-based AMI networks

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Garlapati, Shravan; Kuruganti, Teja; Buehrer, Michael R.; Reed, Jeffrey H.

    2015-10-26

    The utilization of state-of-the-art 3G cellular CDMA technologies in a utility owned AMI network results in a large amount of control traffic relative to data traffic, increases the average packet delay and hence are not an appropriate choice for smart grid distribution applications. Like the CDG, we consider a utility owned cellular like CDMA network for smart grid distribution applications and classify the distribution smart grid data as scheduled data and random data. Also, we propose SMAC protocol, which changes its mode of operation based on the type of the data being collected to reduce the data collection latency andmore » control overhead when compared to 3G cellular CDMA2000 MAC. The reduction in the data collection latency and control overhead aids in increasing the number of smart meters served by a base station within the periodic data collection interval, which further reduces the number of base stations needed by a utility or reduces the bandwidth needed to collect data from all the smart meters. The reduction in the number of base stations and/or the reduction in the data transmission bandwidth reduces the CAPital EXpenditure (CAPEX) and OPerational EXpenditure (OPEX) of the AMI network. Finally, the proposed SMAC protocol is analyzed using markov chain, analytical expressions for average throughput and average packet delay are derived, and simulation results are also provided to verify the analysis.« less

  10. USEA/Johnson Controls Energy Efficiency Forum | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Closing the Circle Award for its "green transportation" initiative, which includes a pedestrian-friendly campus; shared transportation options; fuel-efficient traffic flow...

  11. Cyber Incidents Involving Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Turk

    2005-10-01

    The Analysis Function of the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has prepared this report to document cyber security incidents for use by the CSSC. The description and analysis of incidents reported herein support three CSSC tasks: establishing a business case; increasing security awareness and private and corporate participation related to enhanced cyber security of control systems; and providing informational material to support model development and prioritize activities for CSSC. The stated mission of CSSC is to reduce vulnerability of critical infrastructure to cyber attack on control systems. As stated in the Incident Management Tool Requirements (August 2005) ''Vulnerability reduction is promoted by risk analysis that tracks actual risk, emphasizes high risk, determines risk reduction as a function of countermeasures, tracks increase of risk due to external influence, and measures success of the vulnerability reduction program''. Process control and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, with their reliance on proprietary networks and hardware, have long been considered immune to the network attacks that have wreaked so much havoc on corporate information systems. New research indicates this confidence is misplaced--the move to open standards such as Ethernet, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and Web technologies is allowing hackers to take advantage of the control industry's unawareness. Much of the available information about cyber incidents represents a characterization as opposed to an analysis of events. The lack of good analyses reflects an overall weakness in reporting requirements as well as the fact that to date there have been very few serious cyber attacks on control systems. Most companies prefer not to share cyber attack incident data because of potential financial repercussions. Uniform reporting requirements will do much to make this information available to

  12. Automated plasma control with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.P.

    1995-08-01

    Plasma etching and desmear processes for printed wiring board (PWB) manufacture are difficult to predict and control. Non-uniformity of most plasma processes and sensitivity to environmental changes make it difficult to maintain process stability from day to day. To assure plasma process performance, weight loss coupons or post-plasma destructive testing must be used. These techniques are not real-time methods however, and do not allow for immediate diagnosis and process correction. These tests often require scrapping some fraction of a batch to insure the integrity of the rest. Since these tests verify a successful cycle with post-plasma diagnostics, poor test results often determine that a batch is substandard and the resulting parts unusable. These tests are a costly part of the overall fabrication cost. A more efficient method of testing would allow for constant monitoring of plasma conditions and process control. Process anomalies should be detected and corrected before the parts being treated are damaged. Real time monitoring would allow for instantaneous corrections. Multiple site monitoring would allow for process mapping within one system or simultaneous monitoring of multiple systems. Optical emission spectroscopy conducted external to the plasma apparatus would allow for this sort of multifunctional analysis without perturbing the glow discharge. In this paper, optical emission spectroscopy for non-intrusive, in situ process control will be explored along with applications of this technique to for process control, failure analysis and endpoint determination in PWB manufacture.

  13. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to

  14. Correlations between In Situ Conductivity and Uniform-Height Epitaxial Morphology in Pb/Si(111)₋(7×7)

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jałochowski, M.; Zdyb, R.; Tringides, M. C.

    2016-02-23

    The growth of Pb on Si(111)-7x7 at temperatures from 72 K to 201 K has been investigated using in situ electrical resistivity measurements and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). For temperatures T>140 K the specific resistivity ρ(θ) vs coverage θ shows an unusual "hump", instead of the expected monotonic decrease with θ. This novel result correlates well with the formation of uniform height 8-layer Pb islands and the superdiffusive motion of the wetting layer, despite the low temperatures. A model of the film resistivity as two resistors in series, the amorphous wetting layer and the crystalline islands, explains quantitatively the resistivitymore » dependence on θ.« less

  15. Effects of pulsed sputtering frequency on the uniformity of Al:ZnO's transparent conductive oxide properties for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wonkyun; Joo, Junghoon

    2009-11-15

    Bipolar pulsed magnetron sputtering is used to deposit Al doped ZnO (AZO) on a glass substrate for a transparent conducting oxide in a solar cell structure. A 5x25 in.{sup 2} AZO target was sputtered by 50-250 kHz bipolar pulsed dc power supply to deposit a 400x400 mm{sup 2} area by swinging back and forth. Sheet resistance, surface morphology, and optical transmittance were measured at different positions on 16 witness samples (small glass slides) to evaluate uniformity. In the thickness of 800 nm, the average value of sheet resistance was 30 {Omega}/{open_square} and the average resistivity was 2.1x10{sup -3} {Omega} cm. Transmittance was 50%-80% over the visible range. The nonuniformities of thickness, transmittance, and resistivity in the 400x400 mm{sup 2} area were 5.8%, 0.8%, and within 9.5%, respectively.

  16. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  17. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: II. Influence of Ink Formulation, Catalyst Layer Uniformity and Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-09-17

    Platinum electrocatalysts supported on high surface area and Vulcan carbon blacks (Pt/HSC, Pt/V) were characterized in rotating disk electrode (RDE) setups for electrochemical area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) area specific activity (SA) and mass specific activity (MA) at 0.9 V. Films fabricated using several ink formulations and film-drying techniques were characterized for a statistically significant number of independent samples. The highest quality Pt/HSC films exhibited MA 870 ± 91 mA/mgPt and SA 864 ± 56 μA/cm2 Pt while Pt/V had MA 706 ± 42 mA/mgPt and SA 1120 ± 70 μA/cm2 Pt when measured in 0.1 M HClO4, 20 mV/s, 100 kPa O2 and 23±2°C. An enhancement factor of 2.8 in themeasured SA was observable on eliminating Nafion ionomer and employing extremely thin, uniform films (~4.5 μg/cm2 Pt) of Pt/HSC. The ECA for Pt/HSC (99 ± 7 m2/gPt) and Pt/V (65 ± 5 m2/gPt) were statistically invariant and insensitive to film uniformity/thickness/fabrication technique; accordingly, enhancements in MA are wholly attributable to increases in SA. Impedance measurements coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to de-convolute the losses within the catalyst layer and ascribed to the catalyst layer resistance, oxygen diffusion, and sulfonate anion adsorption/blocking. The ramifications of these results for proton exchange membrane fuel cells have also been examined.

  18. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: II. Influence of Ink Formulation, Catalyst Layer Uniformity and Thickness

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-09-17

    Platinum electrocatalysts supported on high surface area and Vulcan carbon blacks (Pt/HSC, Pt/V) were characterized in rotating disk electrode (RDE) setups for electrochemical area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) area specific activity (SA) and mass specific activity (MA) at 0.9 V. Films fabricated using several ink formulations and film-drying techniques were characterized for a statistically significant number of independent samples. The highest quality Pt/HSC films exhibited MA 870 ± 91 mA/mgPt and SA 864 ± 56 μA/cm2 Pt while Pt/V had MA 706 ± 42 mA/mgPt and SA 1120 ± 70 μA/cm2 Pt when measured in 0.1 M HClO4,more » 20 mV/s, 100 kPa O2 and 23±2°C. An enhancement factor of 2.8 in themeasured SA was observable on eliminating Nafion ionomer and employing extremely thin, uniform films (~4.5 μg/cm2 Pt) of Pt/HSC. The ECA for Pt/HSC (99 ± 7 m2/gPt) and Pt/V (65 ± 5 m2/gPt) were statistically invariant and insensitive to film uniformity/thickness/fabrication technique; accordingly, enhancements in MA are wholly attributable to increases in SA. Impedance measurements coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to de-convolute the losses within the catalyst layer and ascribed to the catalyst layer resistance, oxygen diffusion, and sulfonate anion adsorption/blocking. The ramifications of these results for proton exchange membrane fuel cells have also been examined.« less

  19. SU-E-T-586: Field Size Dependence of Output Factor for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams: A Comparison of TPS Calculation, Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Islam, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Output dependence on field size for uniform scanning beams, and the accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are not well studied. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dependence of output on field size for uniform scanning beams and compare it among TPS calculation, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Field size dependence was studied using various field sizes between 2.5 cm diameter to 10 cm diameter. The field size factor was studied for a number of proton range and modulation combinations based on output at the center of spread out Bragg peak normalized to a 10 cm diameter field. Three methods were used and compared in this study: 1) TPS calculation, 2) ionization chamber measurement, and 3) Monte Carlos simulation. The XiO TPS (Electa, St. Louis) was used to calculate the output factor using a pencil beam algorithm; a pinpoint ionization chamber was used for measurements; and the Fluka code was used for Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The field size factor varied with proton beam parameters, such as range, modulation, and calibration depth, and could decrease over 10% from a 10 cm to 3 cm diameter field for a large range proton beam. The XiO TPS predicted the field size factor relatively well at large field size, but could differ from measurements by 5% or more for small field and large range beams. Monte Carlo simulations predicted the field size factor within 1.5% of measurements. Conclusion: Output factor can vary largely with field size, and needs to be accounted for accurate proton beam delivery. This is especially important for small field beams such as in stereotactic proton therapy, where the field size dependence is large and TPS calculation is inaccurate. Measurements or Monte Carlo simulations are recommended for output determination for such cases.

  20. SU-C-9A-02: Structured Noise Index as An Automated Quality Control for Nuclear Medicine: A Two Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J; Christianson, O; Samei, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Flood-field uniformity evaluation is an essential element in the assessment of nuclear medicine (NM) gamma cameras. It serves as the central element of the quality control (QC) program, acquired and analyzed on a daily basis prior to clinical imaging. Uniformity images are traditionally analyzed using pixel value-based metrics which often fail to capture subtle structure and patterns caused by changes in gamma camera performance requiring additional visual inspection which is subjective and time demanding. The goal of this project was to develop and implement a robust QC metrology for NM that is effective in identifying non-uniformity issues, reporting issues in a timely manner for efficient correction prior to clinical involvement, all incorporated into an automated effortless workflow, and to characterize the program over a two year period. Methods: A new quantitative uniformity analysis metric was developed based on 2D noise power spectrum metrology and confirmed based on expert observer visual analysis. The metric, termed Structured Noise Index (SNI) was then integrated into an automated program to analyze, archive, and report on daily NM QC uniformity images. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated over a period of 2 years. Results: The SNI metric successfully identified visually apparent non-uniformities overlooked by the pixel valuebased analysis methods. Implementation of the program has resulted in nonuniformity identification in about 12% of daily flood images. In addition, due to the vigilance of staff response, the percentage of days exceeding trigger value shows a decline over time. Conclusion: The SNI provides a robust quantification of the NM performance of gamma camera uniformity. It operates seamlessly across a fleet of multiple camera models. The automated process provides effective workflow within the NM spectra between physicist, technologist, and clinical engineer. The reliability of this process has made it the preferred

  1. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOEpatents

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  2. Remote controlled vacuum joint closure mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA); Hager, E. Randolph (La Jolla, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A remotely operable and maintainable vacuum joint closure mechanism for a noncircular aperture is disclosed. The closure mechanism includes an extendible bellows coupled at one end to a noncircular duct and at its other end to a flange assembly having sealed grooves for establishing a high vacuum seal with the abutting surface of a facing flange which includes an aperture forming part of the system to be evacuated. A plurality of generally linear arrangements of pivotally coupled linkages and piston combinations are mounted around the outer surface of the duct and aligned along the length thereof. Each of the piston/linkage assemblies is adapted to engage the flange assembly by means of a respective piston and is further coupled to a remote controlled piston drive shaft to permit each of the linkages positioned on a respective flat outer surface of the duct to simultaneously and uniformly displace a corresponding piston and the flange assembly with which it is in contact along the length of the duct in extending the bellows to provide a high vacuum seal between the movable flange and the facing flange. A plurality of latch mechanisms are also pivotally mounted on the outside of the duct. A first end of each of the latch mechanisms is coupled to a remotely controlled latch control shaft for displacing the latch mechanism about its pivot point. In response to the pivoting displacement of the latch mechanism, a second end thereof is displaced so as to securely engage the facing flange.

  3. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, D.A.; Renzi, R.F.; Tung, D.M.; Schroder, K.

    2000-07-04

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration are disclosed. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100 x 100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  4. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Craxton, R. Stephen (Rochester, NY); Soures, John (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temoral oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation.

  5. Systems for controlling the intensity variations in a laser beam and for frequency conversion thereof

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Craxton, R.S.; Soures, J.

    1990-10-02

    In order to control the intensity of a laser beam so that its intensity varies uniformly and provides uniform illumination of a target, such as a laser fusion target, a broad bandwidth laser pulse is spectrally dispersed spatially so that the frequency components thereof are spread apart. A disperser (grating) provides an output beam which varies spatially in wavelength in at least one direction transverse to the direction of propagation of the beam. Temporal spread (time delay) across the beam is corrected by using a phase delay device (a time delay compensation echelon). The dispersed beam may be amplified with laser amplifiers and frequency converted (doubled, tripled or quadrupled in frequency) with nonlinear optical elements (birefringent crystals). The spectral variation across the beam is compensated by varying the angle of incidence on one of the crystals with respect to the crystal optical axis utilizing a lens which diverges the beam. Another lens after the frequency converter may be used to recollimate the beam. The frequency converted beam is recombined so that portions of different frequency interfere and, unlike interference between waves of the same wavelength, there results an intensity pattern with rapid temporal oscillations which average out rapidly in time thereby producing uniform illumination on target. A distributed phase plate (also known as a random phase mask), through which the spectrally dispersed beam is passed and then focused on a target, is used to provide the interference pattern which becomes nearly modulation free and uniform in intensity in the direction of the spectral variation. 16 figs.

  6. Improved Growth of High-Temperature Superconductors with HF Pressure Control

    Energy Innovation Portal

    2014-01-09

    A new method of growing high-temperature superconductors controls hydrogen fluoride gas pressure and creates larger, more uniform crystal structures in these versatile materials. Superconductors offer extreme efficiency by transmitting electric current without any dc resistive loss, and high-temperature versions further reduce cost by requiring less extreme cooling. This process of growing the crystalline structures in cuprate superconductors promises higher quality fabrication for a broad...

  7. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  8. Fractional corresponding operator in quantum mechanics and applications: A uniform fractional Schrödinger equation in form and fractional quantization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao; Wei, Chaozhen; Liu, Yingming; Luo, Maokang

    2014-11-15

    In this paper we use Dirac function to construct a fractional operator called fractional corresponding operator, which is the general form of momentum corresponding operator. Then we give a judging theorem for this operator and with this judging theorem we prove that R–L, G–L, Caputo, Riesz fractional derivative operator and fractional derivative operator based on generalized functions, which are the most popular ones, coincide with the fractional corresponding operator. As a typical application, we use the fractional corresponding operator to construct a new fractional quantization scheme and then derive a uniform fractional Schrödinger equation in form. Additionally, we find that the five forms of fractional Schrödinger equation belong to the particular cases. As another main result of this paper, we use fractional corresponding operator to generalize fractional quantization scheme by using Lévy path integral and use it to derive the corresponding general form of fractional Schrödinger equation, which consequently proves that these two quantization schemes are equivalent. Meanwhile, relations between the theory in fractional quantum mechanics and that in classic quantum mechanics are also discussed. As a physical example, we consider a particle in an infinite potential well. We give its wave functions and energy spectrums in two ways and find that both results are the same.

  9. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying uniform 10–30 T fields to centimeter-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, D. C. Lamppa, D. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Owen, A. C.; McKenney, J.; Johnson, D. W.; Radovich, S.; Kaye, R. J.; McBride, R. D.; Alexander, C. S.; Awe, T. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Haill, T. A.; Jones, P. A.; Argo, J. W.; Dalton, D. G.; Robertson, G. K.; Waisman, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Sandia has successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  10. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOEpatents

    Montcalm, Claude; Folta, James Allen; Walton, Christopher Charles

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  11. A uniform contribution of core-collapse and type Ia supernovae to the chemical enrichment pattern in the outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Ichinohe, Y.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2015-09-24

    We present the first measurements of the abundances of α-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intracluster medium is consistent with being constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 r200). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core-collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured metalmore » abundance ratios are generally consistent with the solar value. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and SNe Ia contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2–3. Furthermore, we estimate the ratio between the number of SNe Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 12% and 37%, broadly consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy or with the SN Ia contribution estimated for the cluster cores.« less

  12. Electromagnetic radiation from positive-energy bound electrons in the Coulomb field of a nucleus at rest in a strong uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenyev, S. A.; Koryagin, S. A.

    2012-06-15

    A classical analysis is presented of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by positive-energy electrons performing bound motion in the Coulomb field of a nucleus at rest in a strong uniform magnetic field. Bounded trajectories exist and span a wide range of velocity directions near the nucleus (compared to free trajectories with similar energies) when the electron Larmor radius is smaller than the distance at which the electron-nucleus Coulomb interaction energy is equal to the mechanical energy of an electron. The required conditions occur in magnetic white dwarf photospheres and have been achieved in experiments on production of antihydrogen. Under these conditions, the radiant power per unit volume emitted by positive-energy bound electrons is much higher than the analogous characteristic of bremsstrahlung (in particular, in thermal equilibrium) at frequencies that are below the electron cyclotron frequency but higher than the inverse transit time through the interaction region in a close collision in the absence of a magnetic field. The quantum energy discreteness of positive-energy bound states restricts the radiation from an ensemble of bound electrons (e.g., in thermal equilibrium) to nonoverlapping spectral lines, while continuum radiative transfer is dominated by linearly polarized bremsstrahlung.

  13. A uniform contribution of core-collapse and type Ia supernovae to the chemical enrichment pattern in the outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Ichinohe, Y.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2015-09-24

    We present the first measurements of the abundances of α-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intracluster medium is consistent with being constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 r200). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core-collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured metal abundance ratios are generally consistent with the solar value. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and SNe Ia contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2–3. Furthermore, we estimate the ratio between the number of SNe Ia and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 12% and 37%, broadly consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy or with the SN Ia contribution estimated for the cluster cores.

  14. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... of candidates for Radiological Control Technician (RCT) and for RCT Supervisor. ... OEBs as indicated in DOE's Radiological Control Standard (RCS) and the RCT Training ...

  15. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  16. Superconducting VAR control

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, Heinrich J.; Hassenzahl, William V.

    1982-01-01

    Static VAR control means employing an asymmetrically controlled Graetz bridge and a superconducting direct current coil having low losses and low cost characteristics.

  17. Sediment Control: Willows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment Control: Willows Sediment Control: Willows LANL recently planted 10,000 willows and constructed wing ditches to increase sediment retention in Pueblo and Los Alamos...

  18. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  19. Chapter 4, Small Commercial and Residential Unitary and Split System HVAC Cooling Equipment-Efficiency Upgrade Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4: Small Commercial and Residential Unitary and Split System HVAC Cooling Equipment-Efficiency Upgrade Evaluation Protocol David Jacobson, Jacobson Energy Research Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 4 - 1 Chapter 4 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application

  20. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  1. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  2. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-04-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields.

  3. Methods and apparatus for controlling dispersions of nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Golovin, Andrii B

    2014-10-21

    Electrically reconfigurable metamaterial with spatially varied refractive index is proposed for applications such as optical devices and lenses. The apparatus and method comprises a metamaterial in which the refractive indices are modified in space and time by applying one or more electric fields. The metamaterials are electrically controllable and reconfigurable, and consist of metal (gold, silver, etc.) particles of different shapes, such as rods, with dimension much smaller than the wavelength of light, dispersed in a dielectric medium. The metamaterial is controlled by applying a non-uniform electric field that causes two effects: (1) It aligns the metallic anisometric particles with respect to the direction of the applied electric field and (2) It redistributes particles in space, making their local concentration position dependent.

  4. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-11-12

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems.

  5. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  6. Furnace Pressure Controllers

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet highlights the benefits of precise furnace pressure control in process heating systems.

  7. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  8. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  9. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23

    In this report, we present an analytical evaluation of the potential of occupant-regulated distributed environmental control systems (DECS) to enhance individual occupant thermal comfort in an office building with no increase, and possibly even a decrease in annual energy consumption. To this end we developed and applied several analytical models that allowed us to optimize comfort and energy consumption in partitioned office buildings equipped with either conventional central HVAC systems or occupant-regulated DECS. Our approach involved the following interrelated components: 1. Development of a simplified lumped-parameter thermal circuit model to compute the annual energy consumption. This was necessitated by the need to perform tens of thousands of optimization calculations involving different US climatic regions, and different occupant thermal preferences of a population of ~50 office occupants. Yearly transient simulations using TRNSYS, a time-dependent building energy modeling program, were run to determine the robustness of the simplified approach against time-dependent simulations. The simplified model predicts yearly energy consumption within approximately 0.6% of an equivalent transient simulation. Simulations of building energy usage were run for a wide variety of climatic regions and control scenarios, including traditional “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected “have-it-your-way” (HIYW) control with a thermostat at each workstation. The thermal model shows that, un-optimized, DECS would lead to an increase in building energy consumption between 3-16% compared to the conventional approach depending on the climate regional and personal preferences of building occupants. Variations in building shape had little impact in the relative energy usage. 2. Development of a gradient-based optimization method to minimize energy consumption of DECS while keeping each occupant

  10. Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl Retrofit Diesel Emissions Control System Providing 50% NOxControl 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference ...

  11. Limits of optimal control yields achievable with quantum controllers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Limits of optimal control yields achievable with quantum controllers Prev Next Title: Limits of optimal control yields achievable with quantum controllers Authors: Wu, ...

  12. Control rod drive

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  13. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.; Rogers, I.

    1961-06-27

    Accurate and controlled drive for the control rod is from an electric motor. A hydraulic arrangement is provided to balance a piston against which a control rod is urged by the application of fluid pressure. The electric motor drive of the control rod for normal operation is made through the aforementioned piston. In the event scramming is required, the fluid pressure urging the control rod against the piston is relieved and an opposite fluid pressure is applied. The lack of mechanical connection between the electric motor and control rod facilitates the scramming operation.

  14. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  15. Remote controlled vacuum joint closure mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Doll, D.W.; Hager, E.R.

    1984-02-22

    A remotely operable and maintainable vacuum joint closure mechanism for a noncircular aperture is disclosed. The closure mechanism includes an extendible bellows coupled at one end to a noncircular duct and at its other end to a flange assembly having sealed grooves for establishing a high vacuum seal with the abutting surface of a facing flange which includes an aperture forming part of the system to be evacuated. A plurality of generally linear arrangements of pivotally coupled linkages and piston combinations are mounted around the outer surface of the duct and aligned along the length thereof. Each of the piston/linkage assemblies is adapted to engage the flange assembly by means of a respective piston and is further coupled to a remote controlled piston drive shaft to permit each of the linkages positioned on a respective flat outer surface of the duct to simultaneously and uniformly displace a corresponding piston and the flange assembly with which it is in contact along the length of the duct in extending the bellows to provide a high vacuum seal between the movable flange and the facing flange. A plurality of latch mechanisms are also pivotally mounted on the outside of the duct. A first end of each of the latch mechanisms is coupled to a remotely controlled latch control shaft for displacing the latch mechanism about its pivot point. In response to the pivoting displacement of the latch mechanism, a second end thereof is displaced so as to securely engage the facing flange and maintain the high vacuum seal established by the displacement of the flange assembly and extension of the bellows without displacing the entire duct.

  16. Sediment Control: Willows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment Control: Willows Sediment Control: Willows LANL recently planted 10,000 willows and constructed wing ditches to increase sediment retention in Pueblo and Los Alamos canyons. August 1, 2013 Willows: Fall 2010 Willows: Fall 2010

  17. Stormwater Control Structures

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater Control Structures Stormwater control structures are engineered to control run-on and runoff water from suspected contaminated sites. Structures trap sediment, keep water on-site, slow water flow and redirect water around problem areas. Rock check dams Rock check dams Silt tence Silt fence Sediment trap Sediment trap Wood mulch and native seed Wood mulch and native seed Gabion Gabion Concrete lined swales Concrete lined swales Hydroseeding Hydroseeding

  18. Control of Test Conduct

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Control of Test Conduct Prepared by Electric ......... 4 6.1 Test Activities ......

  19. Tutorial on computer control

    SciTech Connect

    Juras, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses computer architecture modfications and development used to control particle accelerators. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy Saver

    Part 8 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Oral Examination Boards Phase III ... Training of Oral Board Members ......

  1. Fuel control system

    SciTech Connect

    Detweiler, C.A.

    1980-12-30

    A fuel control system for a turbocharged engine having fuel delivered to the carburetor under the control of a vacuum operated device which is under the further control of a device sensing pressures upstream and downstream of the turbo charger compressor and delivering a vacuum signal to the fuel control device in proportion to the manifold pressure even though the latter pressure may be a positive pressure.

  2. System for controlling apnea

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  3. Floating Point Control Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  4. The National Traffic Safety Summit Traffic Incident Management...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Mapping ) Deputy Sean Alexander, Houston County Sheriff's Office, (Metro Atlanta, GA) 1030 to 1200 Criminalistics: Using Crime Labs in your Investigations (Evidence ...

  5. Water heater control module

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  6. CONTROL FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lichtenberger, H.V.; Cameron, R.A.

    1959-03-31

    S>A control rod operating device in a nuclear reactor of the type in which the control rod is gradually withdrawn from the reactor to a position desired during stable operation is described. The apparatus is comprised essentially of a stop member movable in the direction of withdrawal of the control rod, a follower on the control rod engageable with the stop and means urging the follower against the stop in the direction of withdrawal. A means responsive to disengagement of the follower from the stop is provided for actuating the control rod to return to the reactor shut-down position.

  7. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  8. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2002-09-01

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects; and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (apriori) or in response to existing contamination spread (aposteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and apriori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, aposteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  9. Integrated Biological Control

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.R.

    2003-10-09

    Biological control is any activity taken to prevent, limit, clean up, or remediate potential environmental, health and safety, or workplace quality impacts from plants, animals, or microorganisms. At Hanford the principal emphasis of biological control is to prevent the transport of radioactive contamination by biological vectors (plants, animals, or microorganisms), and where necessary, control and clean up resulting contamination. Other aspects of biological control at Hanford include industrial weed control (e.g.; tumbleweeds), noxious weed control (invasive, non-native plant species), and pest control (undesirable animals such as rodents and stinging insects, and microorganisms such as molds that adversely affect the quality of the workplace environment). Biological control activities may be either preventive (a priori) or in response to existing contamination spread (a posteriori). Surveillance activities, including ground, vegetation, flying insect, and other surveys, and a priori control actions, such as herbicide spraying and placing biological barriers, are important in preventing radioactive contamination spread. If surveillance discovers that biological vectors have spread radioactive contamination, a posteriori control measures, such as fixing contamination, followed by cleanup and removal of the contamination to an approved disposal location are typical response functions. In some cases remediation following the contamination cleanup and removal is necessary. Biological control activities for industrial weeds, noxious weeds and pests have similar modes of prevention and response.

  10. CRUCIFORM CONTROL ROD JOINT

    DOEpatents

    Thorp, A.G. II

    1962-08-01

    An invention is described which relates to nuclear reactor control rod components and more particularly to a joint between cruciform control rod members and cruciform control rod follower members. In one embodiment this invention provides interfitting crossed arms at adjacent ends of a control rod and its follower in abutting relation. This holds the members against relative opposite longitudinal movement while a compression member keys the arms against relative opposite rotation around a common axis. Means are also provided for centering the control rod and its follower on a common axis and for selectively releasing the control rod from its follower for the insertion of a replacement of the control rod and reuse of the follower. (AEC)

  11. CFD Modeling for Mercury Control Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, J.I.

    2006-12-01

    Compliance with the Clean Air Mercury Rule will require implementation of dedicated mercury control solutions at a significant portion of the U.S. coal-fired utility fleet. Activated Carbon Injection (ACI) upstream of a particulate control device (ESP or baghouse) remains one of the most promising near-term mercury control technologies. The DOE/NETL field testing program has advanced the understanding of mercury control by ACI, but a persistent need remains to develop predictive models that may improve the understanding and practical implementation of this technology. This presentation describes the development of an advanced model of in-flight mercury capture based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The model makes detailed predictions of the induct spatial distribution and residence time of sorbent, as well as predictions of mercury capture efficiency for particular sorbent flow rates and injection grid configurations. Hence, CFD enables cost efficient optimization of sorbent injection systems for mercury control to a degree that would otherwise be impractical both for new and existing plants. In this way, modeling tools may directly address the main cost component of operating an ACI system the sorbent expense. A typical 300 MW system is expected to require between $1 and $2 million of sorbent per year, and so even modest reductions (say 10-20%) in necessary sorbent feed injection rates will quickly make any optimization effort very worthwhile. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, zero velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which is based on first principles and includes mass transfer processes occurring at multiple scales, ranging from the large-scale transport in the duct to transport within the porous structure of a sorbent particle. In principle any single one of these processes

  12. Temperature control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-08-05

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  13. Nuclear reactor control

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.; Warnick, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

  14. Fuzzy logic controller optimization

    DOEpatents

    Sepe, Jr., Raymond B; Miller, John Michael

    2004-03-23

    A method is provided for optimizing a rotating induction machine system fuzzy logic controller. The fuzzy logic controller has at least one input and at least one output. Each input accepts a machine system operating parameter. Each output produces at least one machine system control parameter. The fuzzy logic controller generates each output based on at least one input and on fuzzy logic decision parameters. Optimization begins by obtaining a set of data relating each control parameter to at least one operating parameter for each machine operating region. A model is constructed for each machine operating region based on the machine operating region data obtained. The fuzzy logic controller is simulated with at least one created model in a feedback loop from a fuzzy logic output to a fuzzy logic input. Fuzzy logic decision parameters are optimized based on the simulation.

  15. Control of electrolyte fill to fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Pollack, William

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell stack which can be operated with cells in a horizontal position so that the fuel cell stack does not have to be taken out of operation when adding an electrolyte such as an acid. Acid is supplied to each matrix in a stack of fuel cells at a uniform, low pressure so that the matrix can either be filled initially or replenished with acid lost in operation of the cell, without exceeding the bubble pressure of the matrix or the flooding pressure of the electrodes on either side of the matrix. Acid control to each cell is achieved by restricting and offsetting the opening of electrolyte fill holes in the matrix relative to openings in the plates which sandwich the matrix and electrodes therebetween.

  16. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The researchers demonstrated that through selective control of the carrier concentration ... from the relative size of the Fermi surface, is indicated at the top of each panel. ...

  17. Detonation command and control

    DOEpatents

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2016-05-31

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link there between. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  18. Sun tracking controller

    SciTech Connect

    Menser, H.K.; Newcomb, R.D.

    1981-11-24

    An apparatus is described which controls the electric tracking motors of solar energy collectors and other solar devices which are adapted to be aimed at the sun.

  19. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy (ARPES) at ALS Beamline 7.0.1, a team of scientists from the ALS and Germany characterized the electronic band structure and successfully controlled the gap...

  20. Detonation command and control

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Jonathan L.; Seitz, Gerald J.; Echave, John A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-11-10

    The detonation of one or more explosive charges and propellant charges by a detonator in response to a fire control signal from a command and control system comprised of a command center and instrumentation center with a communications link therebetween. The fire control signal is selectively provided to the detonator from the instrumentation center if plural detonation control switches at the command center are in a fire authorization status, and instruments, and one or more interlocks, if included, are in a ready for firing status. The instrumentation and command centers are desirably mobile, such as being respective vehicles.

  1. Hydraulic control rod

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, Michael

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus for shifting a control rod into and out of a nuclear reactor utilizing as pressure fluid the fluid employed as coolant moderator in the reactor.

  2. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in...

  3. Voltage Control Technical Conference

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1-08-Voltage-Control-Technical-Conference Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

  4. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... point in momentum space (the Dirac crossing energy). The researchers demonstrated that through selective control of the carrier concentration in the graphene layers, the band ...

  5. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced-Rooftop-Unit-Control Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

  6. Nuclear Controls Checklist

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Controls Yes No 1) Is your Facility involved in the research on or development, design, manufacture, construction, testing or maintenance of any nuclear explosive ...

  7. Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25

    To prevent unauthorized dissemination of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information (UCNI). Cancels DOE 5635.4 and DOE 5650.3A

  8. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... addresses the training requirements of 10 CFR 835.103 for Radiological Control Technicians, it must be supplemented with facility specific information to achieve full compliance. ...

  9. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy ...

  10. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG ... an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14 to ...

  11. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of ...

  12. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  13. Management Control Program

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-04-18

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

  14. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-09

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  15. Cable tensioned membrane solar collector module with variable tension control

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar collector comprising a membrane for concentrating sunlight, a plurality of elongated structural members for suspending the membrane member thereon, and a plurality of control members for adjustably tensioning the membrane member, as well as for controlling a focus produced by the membrane members. Each control member is disposed at a different corresponding one of the plurality of structural members. The collector also comprises an elongated flexible tensioning member, which serves to stretch the membrane member and to thereafter hold it in tension, and a plurality of sleeve members, which serve to provide the membrane member with a desired surface contour during tensioning of the membrane member. The tensioning member is coupled to the structural members such that the tensioning member is adjustably tensioned through the structural members. The tensioning member is also coupled to the membrane member through the sleeve members such that the sleeve members uniformly and symmetrically stretch the membrane member upon applying tension to the tensioning member with the control members.

  16. Plating Tank Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  17. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  18. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  19. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  20. Fluid delivery control system

    DOEpatents

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  1. Use of Institutional Controls

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11. Supersedes DOE P 454.1, dated 4-9-03.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  3. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  4. Control the Present

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Control the Present Image of water sampling trip embarking downstream from Otowi Bridge onto the Rio Grande with text overlay of 'How does LANL minimize the impacts from ongoing activities?' Control the Present Home Integrating Environmental Stewardship Something in the air? Protections: Sediment Protections: Sampling

  5. Use of Institutional Controls

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-09

    The Policy ensures that the Department of Energy will use institutional controls in the management of resources, facilities and properties under its control, and in implementing its programmatic responsibilities. Certified 1-28-11. Superseded by Chg 1 (Admin Chg), dated 12-7-15.

  6. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING NEUTRON DENSITY

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1961-06-27

    A neutronic reactor comprising a moderator containing uniformly sized and spaced channels and uniformly dimensioned fuel elements is patented. The fuel elements have a fissionable core and an aluminum jacket. The cores and the jackets of the fuel elements in the central channels of the reactor are respectively thinner and thicker than the cores and jackets of the fuel elements in the remainder of the reactor, producing a flattened flux.

  7. Johnson Controls | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Controls Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Johnson Controls Name: Johnson Controls Address: 5757 N. Green Bay Avenue Place: Milwaukee, Wisconsin Zip: 53201 Sector: Efficiency...

  8. Protections: Sediment Control = Contaminant Retention

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment Control Protections: Sediment Control Contaminant Retention LANL maintains hundreds of wells, stream sampling stations and stormwater control structures to protect...

  9. Cyclic control stick

    DOEpatents

    Whitaker, Charles N.; Zimmermann, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclic control stick of the type used in helicopters for reducing the safety hazards associated with such a mechanism in the event of a crewman being thrown violently into contact with the cyclic control stick resulting from a crash or the like. The cyclic control stick is configured to break away upon the exertion of an impact force which exceeds a predetermined value and/or is exerted for more than a momentary time duration. The cyclic control stick is also configured to be adjustable so as to locate the grip thereof as far away from the crewman as possible for safety reasons without comprising the comfort of the crewman or the use of the control stick, and a crushable pad is provided on the top of the grip for impact energy absorbing purposes.

  10. Gemini Scout Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2010-11-23

    The Gemini Scout Control Software consists of two Windows applications that allow the Gemini Scout vehicle to be controlled by an operator. The Embedded application runs on the vehicle's Gemini Scout Control Software onboard computer and controls the vehicle's various motors and sensors. This application reports the vehicle's status and receives vehicle commands overthe local-area-network. The Embedded applicationalso allows the user to control the vehicle using a USB game-pad connected directly to the vehicle. Themore » Operator Control Unit (OCU) application runs on an external PC and communicates with the vehicle via an Ethernet connection. The OCU application sends commands to and receives data from the Embedded application running on the vehicle. The OCU application also communicates directly with the digital video encoders and radios in order to display video from the vehicle's cameras and the status of the radio link. The OCU application has a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the vehicle's status and allows the user to change various vehicle settings. Finally, the OCU application receives input from a USB game-pad connected to the PC in order to control the vehicle's functions.« less

  11. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  12. Adaptive Process Controls and Ultrasonics for High Temperature PEM MEA Manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Walczyk, Daniel F.

    2015-08-26

    The purpose of this 5-year DOE-sponsored project was to address major process bottlenecks associated with fuel cell manufacturing. New technologies were developed to significantly reduce pressing cycle time for high temperature PEM membrane electrode assembly (MEA) through the use of novel, robust ultrasonic (U/S) bonding processes along with low temperature (<100°C) PEM MEAs. In addition, greater manufacturing uniformity and performance was achieved through (a) an investigation into the causes of excessive variation in ultrasonically and thermally bonded MEAs using more diagnostics applied during the entire fabrication and cell build process, and (b) development of rapid, yet simple quality control measurement techniques for use by industry.

  13. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  14. Calorimeter Control Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-11-03

    The Calorimeter Control Software provides PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) Control for up to twelve Mound Calorimeters and five Calorimeter Waterbaths. The software accepts a Voltage input, compares it to a user defined setpoint, calculates a new voltage output designed to bring the input closer to the setpoint using a PID control algorithm, then sets the analog voltage output to the calculated value. The software is designed to interface with HP 3852A Data Acquisition Unitmore » via an HP-1B PC board. All field inputs are wired into Digital Input cards and field outputs are wired from Analog Output cards.« less

  15. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1960-09-13

    A novel composite neutronic reactor control element is offered. The element comprises a multiplicity of sections arranged in end-to-end relationship, each of the sections having a markedly different neutron-reactive characteristic. For example, a three-section control element could contain absorber, moderator, and fuel sections. By moving such an element longitudinally through a reactor core, reactivity is decreased by the absorber, increased slightly by the moderator, or increased substantially by the fuel. Thus, control over a wide reactivity range is provided.

  17. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  18. Surface controlled blade stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1983-01-01

    Drill string stabilizer apparatus, controllable to expand and retract entirely from the surface by control of drill string pressure, wherein increase of drill string pressure from the surface closes a valve to create a piston means which is moved down by drill string pressure to expand the stabilizer blades, said valve being opened and the piston moving upward upon reduction of drill string pressure to retract the stabilizer blades. Upward and downward movements of the piston and an actuator sleeve therebelow are controlled by a barrel cam acting between the housing and the actuator sleeve.

  19. Introduction to Control Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander

    2015-07-13

    Presentation that offers an introduction to Control Theory, sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Low Level RF Control Group.

  20. Internal Controls Evaluations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4, 2016 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Internal Control Evaluations Fiscal Year 2016 Guidance Page | 2 Table of Contents I. Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 4 A. Background ......................................................................................................................................... 4 B. New for FY

  1. ELECTRONIC PHASE CONTROL CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, J.D.; Klein, W.W.; Hansen, C.F.

    1959-04-21

    An electronic circuit is described for controlling the phase of radio frequency energy applied to a multicavity linear accelerator. In one application of the circuit two cavities are excited from a single radio frequency source, with one cavity directly coupled to the source and the other cavity coupled through a delay line of special construction. A phase detector provides a bipolar d-c output signal proportional to the difference in phase between the voltage in the two cavities. This d-c signal controls a bias supply which provides a d-c output for varying the capacitnce of voltage sensitive capacitors in the delay line. The over-all operation of the circuit is completely electronic, overcoming the time response limitations of the electromechanical control systems, and the relative phase relationship of the radio frequency voltages in the two caviiies is continuously controlled to effect particle acceleration.

  2. Item Management Control System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1993-08-06

    The Item Management Control System (IMCS) has been developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in organizing collections of documents using an IBM-PC or similar DOS system platform.

  3. Quality Procedure- Document Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This procedure establishes the responsibilities and process for preparing, managing, and revising EM Headquarters Office of Standards and Quality Assurance controlled documents in accordance with EM-QA-001, Environmental Management Quality Assurance Program.

  4. Radiological Control Technician Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    quality control (QC) charts. 2.03.10. State the ... depend upon the type and energy of the radiation and the ... in the efficiency or conversion factor of the instrument. ...

  5. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  6. Engineering of metabolic control

    DOEpatents

    Liao, James C.

    2006-10-17

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  7. Control the Present

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Control the Present Image of water sampling trip embarking downstream from Otowi Bridge onto the Rio Grande with text overlay of 'How does LANL minimize the impacts from ongoing...

  8. Overflow control valve

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv; Kessinger, Boyd A.; Parlak, Edward A.

    1984-07-24

    An overflow control valve for use in a liquid sodium coolant pump tank which valve can be extended to create a seal with the pump tank wall or retracted to break the seal thereby accommodating valve removal. An actuating shaft which controls valve disc position also has cams which bear on roller surfaces to force retraction of a sliding cylinder against spring tension to retract the cylinder from sealing contact with the pump tank.

  9. LIGA Scanner Control Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1999-02-01

    The LIGA Scanner Software is a graphical user interface package that facilitates controlling the scanning operation of x-rays from a synchrotron and sample manipulation for making LIGA parts. The process requires scanning of the LIGA mask and the PMMA resist through a stationary x-ray beam to provide an evenly distributed x-ray exposure over the wafer. This software package has been written specifically to interface with Aerotech motor controllers.

  10. PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Esselman, W.H.; Kaplan, G.M.

    1961-06-20

    The control of pressure in pressurized liquid systems, especially a pressurized liquid reactor system, may be achieved by providing a bias circuit or loop across a closed loop having a flow restriction means in the form of an orifice, a storage tank, and a pump connected in series. The subject invention is advantageously utilized where control of a reactor can be achieved by response to the temperature and pressure of the primary cooling system.

  11. Hardware Controller DNA Synthesizer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1995-07-27

    The program controls the operation of various hardware components of an automatic 12-channel parrallel oligosynthesizer. This involves accepting information regarding the DNA sequence to be generated and converting this into a series of instructions to I/O ports to actuate the appropriate hardware components. The design and function of the software is specific to a particular hardware platform and has no utility for controlling other configurations.

  12. Valve for fluid control

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Paul, Phillip H.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2001-01-01

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  13. Version Control Tools

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tools Version Control Tools Subversion Subversion repositories may be created in the NERSC Global File system. Read More » CVS CVS repositories may be created in the NERSC Global File system. Read More » Git Git is distributed version control system focused on speed, effectivity and real-world usability on large projects. These pages describe how Git is used at NERSC. Read More » Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:28

  14. Single photon emission from site-controlled InGaN/GaN quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Hill, Tyler A.; Deng, Hui; Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Lee, Leung-Kway; Ku, Pei-Cheng

    2013-11-04

    Single photon emission was observed from site-controlled InGaN/GaN quantum dots. The single-photon nature of the emission was verified by the second-order correlation function up to 90 K, the highest temperature to date for site-controlled quantum dots. Micro-photoluminescence study on individual quantum dots showed linearly polarized single exciton emission with a lifetime of a few nanoseconds. The dimensions of these quantum dots were well controlled to the precision of state-of-the-art fabrication technologies, as reflected in the uniformity of their optical properties. The yield of optically active quantum dots was greater than 90%, among which 13%–25% exhibited single photon emission at 10 K.

  15. Supervisory Control Strategy Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Storrick; Bojan Petrovic

    2007-02-28

    Task 4 of this collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focused on the design of the hierarchical supervisory control for multiple-module units. The state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – made developing a detailed hierarchical control difficult at this time. However, other simultaneous and ongoing efforts have contributed to providing the needed information. This report summarizes the results achieved under Task 4 of this Financial Assistance Award. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 discusses the IRIS control functions. Next, it briefly reviews the current control concepts, and then reviews the maneuvering requirements for the IRIS plant. It closes by noting the benefits that automated sequences have in reducing operator workload. Section 3 examines reactor loading in the frequency domain to establish some guidelines for module operation, paying particular attention to strategies for using process steam for desalination and/or district heating. The final subsection discusses the implications for reactor control, and argues that using the envisioned percentage (up to 10%) of the NSSS thermal output for these purposes should not significantly affect the NSSS control strategies. Section 4 uses some very general economic assumptions to suggest how one should approach multi-module operation. It concludes that the well-known algorithms used for economic dispatching could be used to help manage a multi-unit IRIS site. Section 5 addresses the human performance factors of multi-module operation. Section 6 summarizes our conclusions.

  16. Cyber-Physical System Security With Deceptive Virtual Hosts for Industrial Control Networks

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Todd; Manic, Milos

    2014-05-01

    A challenge facing industrial control network administrators is protecting the typically large number of connected assets for which they are responsible. These cyber devices may be tightly coupled with the physical processes they control and human induced failures risk dire real-world consequences. Dynamic virtual honeypots are effective tools for observing and attracting network intruder activity. This paper presents a design and implementation for self-configuring honeypots that passively examine control system network traffic and actively adapt to the observed environment. In contrast to prior work in the field, six tools were analyzed for suitability of network entity information gathering. Ettercap, anmore » established network security tool not commonly used in this capacity, outperformed the other tools and was chosen for implementation. Utilizing Ettercap XML output, a novel four-step algorithm was developed for autonomous creation and update of a Honeyd configuration. This algorithm was tested on an existing small campus grid and sensor network by execution of a collaborative usage scenario. Automatically created virtual hosts were deployed in concert with an anomaly behavior (AB) system in an attack scenario. Virtual hosts were automatically configured with unique emulated network stack behaviors for 92% of the targeted devices. The AB system alerted on 100% of the monitored emulated devices.« less

  17. Cyber-Physical System Security With Deceptive Virtual Hosts for Industrial Control Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, Todd; Manic, Milos

    2014-05-01

    A challenge facing industrial control network administrators is protecting the typically large number of connected assets for which they are responsible. These cyber devices may be tightly coupled with the physical processes they control and human induced failures risk dire real-world consequences. Dynamic virtual honeypots are effective tools for observing and attracting network intruder activity. This paper presents a design and implementation for self-configuring honeypots that passively examine control system network traffic and actively adapt to the observed environment. In contrast to prior work in the field, six tools were analyzed for suitability of network entity information gathering. Ettercap, an established network security tool not commonly used in this capacity, outperformed the other tools and was chosen for implementation. Utilizing Ettercap XML output, a novel four-step algorithm was developed for autonomous creation and update of a Honeyd configuration. This algorithm was tested on an existing small campus grid and sensor network by execution of a collaborative usage scenario. Automatically created virtual hosts were deployed in concert with an anomaly behavior (AB) system in an attack scenario. Virtual hosts were automatically configured with unique emulated network stack behaviors for 92% of the targeted devices. The AB system alerted on 100% of the monitored emulated devices.

  18. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  19. Solvothermal synthesis and tunable luminescence of Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} codoped YF{sub 3} nano- and micro-crystals with uniform morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yue [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China) [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)] [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu; Tian, Bining; Sun, Jiashi; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang; Zhong, Hua [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)] [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Hua, Ruinian, E-mail: rnhua@dlnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)] [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} codoped YF{sub 3} nano- and micro-crystals with the morphologies of ellipsoid-like nanoplate, spindle, sandwich-structural rhombus and nanoaggregate were synthesized through a solvothermal method. The morphologies of the prepared products can be tailored by controlling the volume ratio of ethylene glycol (EG) to H{sub 2}O, solvent type or the reaction time. A possible formation mechanism of the sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3} phosphor was proposed. The emitting colors of YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} phosphors can be easily tuned from yellowish green, yellow to orange by increasing Eu{sup 3+} concentration. The energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in YF{sub 3} phosphors was studied. It was found that the interaction type between Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} is electric dipole-dipole interaction. - Graphical abstract: Sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized through a solvothermal process. The formation mechanism of the sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} phosphors was studied. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YF{sub 3} nano- and micro-crystals were synthesized through solvothermal route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A formation mechanism of the sandwich-structural rhombus like YF{sub 3} was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emitting colors of YF{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} phosphors can be tuned. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} is confirmed as electric dipole-dipole interaction.

  20. VHDL Control Routing Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1995-07-10

    The control router simulates a backplane consisting of up to 16 slot. Slot 0, reserved for a control module (cr-ctrl), generates the system clocks and provides the serial interface to the Gating Logic. The remaining 15 slots (1-15) contain routing modules (cr mod), each having up to 64 serial inputs and outputs with FIFOs. Messages to be transmitted to the Control Router are taken from text files. There are currently 17 such source files. Inmore » the model, the serial output of each source is connected to multiple receivers, so that there are 8 identical messages transmitted to the router for each message file entry.« less