National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for types thirty-four end-use

  1. Table 10.7 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Market Sector, End Use, and Type, 2001-2009 (Thousand Square Feet) Year and Type By Market Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 1 Industrial 2 Electric Power 3 Other 4 Pool Heating Water Heating Space Heating Space Cooling Combined Heating 5 Process Heating Electricity Generation Total Shipments 6<//td> 2001 Total 10,125 1,012 17 1 35 10,797 274 70 0 12 34 2 11,189 Low 7 9,885 987 12 0 34 10,782 42 61 0 0 34 0 10,919 Medium 8 240 24 5 0 1 16

  2. End Use and Fuel Certification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification John Eichberger, Vice President of Government Relations, National Association for Convenience Stores

  3. ,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  4. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:20 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  5. ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 6:36:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  6. Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet outlines alternative strategies for low-pressure end uses as a pathway to reduced compressed air energy costs.

  7. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ... Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  8. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ... Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  9. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ... ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  10. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ... Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  11. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ... Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  12. End-use taxes: Current EIA practices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-17

    There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

  13. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 11:05:14 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  14. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  15. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  16. Preliminary CBECS End-Use Estimates

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    For the past three CBECS (1989, 1992, and 1995), we used a statistically-adjusted engineering (SAE) methodology to estimate end-use consumption. The core of the SAE methodology...

  17. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas ...

  18. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net

  19. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source:...

  20. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural

  1. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural

  2. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for

  3. " Row: End Uses;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for

  4. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    SciTech Connect

    Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

    2012-05-01

    The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

  5. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Pless, S.; Kung, F.

    2014-08-01

    NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers, and engineers in the healthcare sector will be able to use these results to more effectively prioritize and refine the scope of investments in new metering and energy audits.

  6. Realizing Building End-Use Efficiency with Ermerging Technologies

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about the implementation of emerging technologies to maximize end-use efficiency in buildings.

  7. End-Use Working Group Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    End-Use Working Group Report End-Use Working Group Report The Oak Ridge Reservation End Use Working Group, a broadly-based voluntary citizens group, was formed in January 1997 to develop and evaluate guidelines and recommendations for future uses of contaminated areas following the Environmental Management program's remediation of the Oak Ridge Reservation. The purposes of this Final Report of the End Use Working Group are to: Document the history and purpose of the End Use Working Group Outline

  8. Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Facilities » Water Efficiency » Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption Estimating Methods for Determining End-Use Water Consumption The Federal Building Metering Guidance specifies buildings with water using processes and whole building water consumption that exceeds 1,000 gallons per day must have a water meter installed. Below are methods for estimating daily water use for typical end-uses that drive building-level, end-use water consumption. Plumbing

  9. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Information Resources » Publications » Market Studies » Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3)

  10. Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring Healthcare Energy End-Use Monitoring NREL partnered with two hospitals (MGH and SUNY UMU) to collect data on the energy used for multiple thermal and electrical end-use categories, including preheat, heating, and reheat; humidification; service water heating; cooling; fans; pumps; lighting; and select plug and process loads. Additional data from medical office buildings were provided for an analysis focused on plug loads. Facility managers, energy managers,

  11. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimates The end-use estimates had two main sources: the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system....

  12. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    0 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review compressed air end uses and determine the required level of air pressure. * Review the compressed air end ...

  13. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1995 - Index...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    End-Use Analyst Contact: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager URL: http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecscbec-eu1.html separater bar If...

  14. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  15. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1989 Energy End-Use Intensities Overview Full Report Tables National estimates and analysis of energy consumption by fuel (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district...

  16. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire ...

  17. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island ...

  18. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1992 -- Overview...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    in the way that variables such as building age and employment density could interact with the engineering estimates of end-use consumption. The SAE equations were...

  19. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ... from noncombustible renewable resources, minus quantities sold and transferred out. ...

  20. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ... from noncombustible renewable resources, minus quantities sold and transferred out. ...

  1. Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses

  2. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  3. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  4. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  5. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL

  6. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  7. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733

  8. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18

  9. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP

  10. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    as buildings of the 1980's. In this section, intensities are based upon the entire building stock, not just those buildings using a particular fuel for a given end use. This...

  11. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel ...

  12. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 10:31:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  13. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL ...

  14. Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL ...

  15. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL ...

  16. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net

  17. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Alternative Fuels » Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research Vehicle Technologies Office: Biofuels End-Use Research Biofuels offer Americans viable domestic, environmentally sustainable alternatives to gasoline and diesel. Learn about the basics, benefits, and issues to consider related to biodiesel and ethanol on the Alternative Fuels Data Center. The Vehicle Technologies Office supports research to increase our knowledge of the effects of biofuels on engines and

  19. Distribution Infrastructure and End Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Research & Development » Demonstration & Market Transformation » Distribution Infrastructure and End Use Distribution Infrastructure and End Use The expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) created under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 requires 36 billion gallons of biofuels to be blended into transportation fuel by 2022. Meeting the RFS2 target introduces new challenges for U.S. infrastructure, as modifications will be needed to transport and deliver renewable

  20. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  1. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","

  2. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  3. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for

  4. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"

  5. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net

  6. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"

  7. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  8. Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

  9. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

  10. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman; Morrow, William R.; Masanet, Eric

    2012-05-11

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The survey is a sample of approximately 15,000 manufacturing establishments selected from the Economic Census - Manufacturing Sector. MECS provides statistics on the consumption of energy by end uses (e.g., boilers, process, electric drives, etc.) disaggregated by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. The manufacturing sector (NAICS Sector 31-33) consists of all manufacturing establishments in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. According to the NAICS, the manufacturing sector comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. The establishments are physical facilities such as plants, factories, or mills. For many of the sectors in the MECS datasets, information is missing because the reported energy use is less than 0.5 units or BTUs, or is withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments, or is withheld because the standard error is greater than 50%. We infer what the missing information likely are using several approximations techniques. First, much of the missing data can be easily calculated by adding or subtracting other values reported by MECS. If this is not possible (e.g. two data are missing), we look at historic MECS reports to help identify the breakdown of energy use in the past and assume it remained the same for the current MECS. Lastly, if historic data is also missing, we assume that 3 digit NAICS classifications predict energy use in their 4, 5, or 6 digit NAICS sub-classifications, or vice versa. Along with addressing data gaps, end use energy is disaggregated beyond the specified MECS allocations using additional industry specific energy consumption data. The result is a

  11. Detailed End Use Load Modeling for Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.

    2010-04-09

    The field of distribution system analysis has made significant advances in the past ten years. It is now standard practice when performing a power flow simulation to use an algorithm that is capable of unbalanced per-phase analysis. Recent work has also focused on examining the need for time-series simulations instead of examining a single time period, i.e., peak loading. One area that still requires a significant amount of work is the proper modeling of end use loads. Currently it is common practice to use a simple load model consisting of a combination of constant power, constant impedance, and constant current elements. While this simple form of end use load modeling is sufficient for a single point in time, the exact model values are difficult to determine and it is inadequate for some time-series simulations. This paper will examine how to improve simple time invariant load models as well as develop multi-state time variant models.

  12. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  13. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  14. Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions Healthcare Energy: Using End-Use Data to Inform Decisions The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. See below for ideas about how to use end-use data to inform decisions in your facility. The relative magnitude of the energy consumption of different end uses can be a starting point for prioritizing energy investments and action, whether the scope under

  15. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014" "Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1219363,276627,129773,812963,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1134527,513748,563581,57198,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal

  16. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--End-Use Equipment

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Cooling Equipment Packaged air conditioning units were the predominant type of cooling...

  17. Technology data characterizing water heating in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    Commercial-sector conservation analyses have traditionally focused on lighting and space conditioning because of their relatively-large shares of electricity and fuel consumption in commercial buildings. In this report we focus on water heating, which is one of the neglected end uses in the commercial sector. The share of the water-heating end use in commercial-sector electricity consumption is 3%, which corresponds to 0.3 quadrillion Btu (quads) of primary energy consumption. Water heating accounts for 15% of commercial-sector fuel use, which corresponds to 1.6 quads of primary energy consumption. Although smaller in absolute size than the savings associated with lighting and space conditioning, the potential cost-effective energy savings from water heaters are large enough in percentage terms to warrant closer attention. In addition, water heating is much more important in particular building types than in the commercial sector as a whole. Fuel consumption for water heating is highest in lodging establishments, hospitals, and restaurants (0.27, 0.22, and 0.19 quads, respectively); water heating`s share of fuel consumption for these building types is 35%, 18% and 32%, respectively. At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and refined a base-year data set characterizing water heating technologies in commercial buildings as well as a modeling framework. We present the data and modeling framework in this report. The present commercial floorstock is characterized in terms of water heating requirements and technology saturations. Cost-efficiency data for water heating technologies are also developed. These data are intended to support models used for forecasting energy use of water heating in the commercial sector.

  18. Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Three or More NA NA 14 14 15 18 23 28 28 29 36 43 44 30 Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 88 90 7 80 51 NA Digital Video Recorder (DVR) NA NA NA NA NA NA ...

  19. Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity ...

  20. "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for ...

  1. "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for ...

  2. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21

  3. Community energy systems and the law of public utilities. Volume thirty-four. New York

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of New York governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  4. ,"U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

  5. "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," ...rtation",5,0,11,13,4,0 ," Conventional Electricity Generation",0,0,53,5,2,0 ," Other ...

  6. End-use Breakdown: The Building Energy Modeling Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    End-use Breakdown: The Building Energy Modeling Blog End-use Breakdown: The Building Energy Modeling Blog RSS Welcome to the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Modeling blog. October 5, 2016 Autodesk Insight360 allows architects to explore the energy impacts of different design choices as they design. Insight360 uses EnergyPlus to calculate heating and cooling loads and now provides the option of using EnergyPlus to evaluate annual energy impacts. Credit: Autodesk. Autodesk Upgrades

  7. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  8. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  9. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","

  10. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " ","

  11. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  12. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","

  13. GridLAB-D Technical Support Document: Residential End-Use Module Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Zachary T.; Gowri, Krishnan; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2008-07-31

    1.0 Introduction The residential module implements the following end uses and characteristics to simulate the power demand in a single family home: • Water heater • Lights • Dishwasher • Range • Microwave • Refrigerator • Internal gains (plug loads) • House (heating/cooling loads) The house model considers the following four major heat gains/losses that contribute to the building heating/cooling load: 1. Conduction through exterior walls, roof and fenestration (based on envelope UA) 2. Air infiltration (based on specified air change rate) 3. Solar radiation (based on CLTD model and using tmy data) 4. Internal gains from lighting, people, equipment and other end use objects. The Equivalent Thermal Parameter (ETP) approach is used to model the residential loads and energy consumption. The following sections describe the modeling assumptions for each of the above end uses and the details of power demand calculations in the residential module.

  14. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  15. " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG

  16. Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu) End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other 1 Total All Buildings 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 3,559 Principal Building Activity Education 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 371 Food Sales 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 208 Food Service 10 28 24 10 42 13 70 2 2 15 217 Health Care 6 34 42 2 105 1 8 4 10 36 248 Inpatient 3 25 38 2 76 1 4 2 7 21

  17. ,"New Mexico Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","12/22/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of November 2016" ,"Excel

  18. ,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use",13,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","12/22/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of November 2016" ,"Excel File

  19. ,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","12/22/2015" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of November 2016" ,"Excel File

  20. U.S. Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Show Data By: End Use Product Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Residential Distillate Fuel Oil 4,328,840 3,897,937 3,713,883 3,223,851 3,714,150 4,041,766 1984-2014 ...

  1. Electricity end-use efficiency: Experience with technologies, markets, and policies throughout the world

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.D.; Koomey, J.; Price, L.; Geller, H.; Nadel, S.

    1992-03-01

    In its August meeting in Geneva, the Energy and Industry Subcommittee (EIS) of the Policy Response Panel of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) identified a series of reports to be produced. One of these reports was to be a synthesis of available information on global electricity end-use efficiency, with emphasis on developing nations. The report will be reviewed by the IPCC and approved prior to the UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), Brazil, June 1992. A draft outline for the report was submitted for review at the November 1991 meeting of the EIS. This outline, which was accepted by the EIS, identified three main topics to be addressed in the report: status of available technologies for increasing electricity end-use efficiency; review of factors currently limiting application of end-use efficiency technologies; and review of policies available to increase electricity end-use efficiency. The United States delegation to the EIS agreed to make arrangements for the writing of the report.

  2. U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use (Thousand Gallons) Area: U.S. East Coast ... Residential Distillate Fuel Oil 4,103,881 3,930,517 3,625,747 3,473,310 3,536,111 ...

  3. Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)",,,,,"All Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manufact-uring",,"Space

  4. End-Use Opportunity Analysis from Progress Indicator Results for ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.; Xie, YuLong

    2015-02-05

    This report and an accompanying spreadsheet (PNNL 2014a) compile the end use building simulation results for prototype buildings throughout the United States. The results represent he energy use of each edition of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (ASHRAE 2004, 2007, 2010, 2013). PNNL examined the simulation results to determine how the remaining energy was used.

  5. Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 – – Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 – – CHP 6 and/or Cogeneration Process – – 10 1 (s) 814 19 – – Direct End Use All Process Uses 657,810

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This volume details the end-use electricity demand and efficiency assumptions. The projection of electricity demand is an important consideration in determining the extent to which a predominantly renewable electricity future is feasible. Any scenario regarding future electricity use must consider many factors, including technological, sociological, demographic, political, and economic changes (e.g., the introduction of new energy-using devices; gains in energy efficiency and process improvements; changes in energy prices, income, and user behavior; population growth; and the potential for carbon mitigation).

  7. "Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000

  8. ,"U.S. Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential",4,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 2","Commercial",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Data

  9. ,"U.S. Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Residential",4,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Data 2","Commercial",10,"Annual",2014,"6/30/1984" ,"Data

  10. The Value of End-Use Energy Efficiency in Mitigation of U.S. Carbon Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2007-11-27

    This report documents a scenario analysis exploring the value of advanced technologies in the U.S. buildings, industrial, and transportation sectors in stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. The analysis was conducted by staff members of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), working at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) in support of the strategic planning process of the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The conceptual framework for the analysis is an integration of detailed buildings, industrial, and transportation modules into MiniCAM, a global integrated assessment model. The analysis is based on three technology scenarios, which differ in their assumed rates of deployment of new or presently available energy-saving technologies in the end-use sectors. These technology scenarios are explored with no carbon policy, and under two CO2 stabilization policies, in which an economic price on carbon is applied such that emissions follow prescribed trajectories leading to long-term stabilization of CO2 at roughly 450 and 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv). The costs of meeting the emissions targets prescribed by these policies are examined, and compared between technology scenarios. Relative to the reference technology scenario, advanced technologies in all three sectors reduce costs by 50% and 85% for the 450 and 550 ppmv policies, respectively. The 450 ppmv policy is more stringent and imposes higher costs than the 550 ppmv policy; as a result, the magnitude of the economic value of energy efficiency is four times greater for the 450 ppmv policy than the 550 ppmv policy. While they substantially reduce the costs of meeting emissions requirements, advanced end-use technologies do not lead to greenhouse gas stabilization without a carbon policy. This is due mostly to the effects of increasing service demands over time, the high consumption of fossil fuels in the

  11. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons)

  12. July 11 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial And Residential Building End-Use Equipment And Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These documents contain the three slide decks presented at the public meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances, held on July 11, 2014 in Washington, DC.

  13. Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

  14. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  15. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.; Lobscheid, A.B.

    2006-06-01

    This study assesses for California how increasing end-use electrical energy efficiency from installing residential insulation impacts exposures and disease burden from power-plant pollutant emissions. Installation of fiberglass attic insulation in the nearly 3 million electricity-heated homes throughout California is used as a case study. The pollutants nitrous oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), fine particulate matter (PM2.5), benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and naphthalene are selected for the assessment. Exposure is characterized separately for rural and urban environments using the CalTOX model, which is a key input to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemicals and other environmental Impacts (TRACI). The output of CalTOX provides for urban and rural populations emissions-to-intake factors, which are expressed as an individual intake fraction (iFi). The typical iFi from power plant emissions are on the order of 10{sup -13} (g intake per g emitted) in urban and rural regions. The cumulative (rural and urban) product of emissions, population, and iFi is combined with toxic effects factors to determine human damage factors (HDFs). HDF are expressed as disability adjusted life years (DALYs) per kilogram pollutant emitted. The HDF approach is applied to the insulation case study. Upgrading existing residential insulation to US Department of Energy (DOE) recommended levels eliminates over the assmned 50-year lifetime of the insulation an estimated 1000 DALYs from power-plant emissions per million tonne (Mt) of insulation installed, mostly from the elimination of PM2.5 emissions. In comparison, the estimated burden from the manufacture of this insulation in DALYs per Mt is roughly four orders of magnitude lower than that avoided.

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Florida" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096...

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Washington" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Puget Sound Energy Inc","Investor-owned",20568948...

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Iowa" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"MidAmerican Energy Co","Investor-owned",20585461,570529...

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Montana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NorthWestern Energy LLC - (MT)","Investor-owned",597...

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Westar Energy Inc","Investor-owned",9973395,3434301,4...

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC","Investor-owned",567506...

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Ohio" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",41994756...

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",...

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Indiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Indiana Inc","Investor-owned",28224148,9...

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-ow...

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-owned...

  8. The use of negotiated agreements to improve efficiency of end-use appliances: First results from the European experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoldi, P.; Bowie, R.; Hagen, L.

    1998-07-01

    The European Union is pursuing measures to improve end-use equipment efficiency through a variety of policy instruments, in particular for domestic appliances. One of the most effective methods to achieve market transformation is through minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS). However, after the difficulties and controversy following the adoption of legislation for MEPS for domestic refrigerators/freezers, a new policy instrument, i.e. negotiated agreements by manufacturers, has been investigated and tested for two type of appliances: domestic washing machines and TVs and VCRs. Based on the positive experience of the above two agreements, other products (e.g. dryers, dishwasher, electric water heaters, etc.) will be the subject of future negotiated agreements. Based on the results of the two negotiated agreements, this paper describes the energy efficiency potential, the procedures, and the advantages and disadvantages of negotiated agreements compared to legislated mandatory for MEPS, as developed in the European context. The paper concludes that negotiated agreements are a viable policy option, which allow flexibility in the implementation of the efficiency targets and therefore the adoption of cost-effective solutions for manufacturers. In addition, negotiated agreements can be implemented more quickly compared to mandatory MEPS and they allow a closer monitoring of the results. The main question asked in the paper is whether the negotiated agreements can deliver the results in the long term compared to what could be achieved through legislation. The European experience indicates that this instrument can deliver the results and that it offer a number of advantages compared to MEPS.

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arizona" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Arizona Public Service Co","Investor-owned",27584533,12837752,12477518,2269263,0 2,"Salt River Project","Public",27548529,12293633,11099759,4155137,0 3,"Tucson Electric Power

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    California" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Southern California Edison Co","Investor-owned",75828585,29972416,37903351,7874457,78361 2,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",75114523,29289082,28107971,17717470,0 3,"Los Angeles Department of Water &

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28671219,9008526,12886370,6712282,64041 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4477715,1425423,1097160,1955132,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Connecticut Light & Power Co","Investor-owned",8945482,6146224,2365991,367962,65305 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",2018823,0,1320397,692814,5612 3,"United Illuminating

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",3556542,40286,3515507,749,0 2,"Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",3015764,1733437,1282327,0,0 3,"WGL Energy Services,

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Georgia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-Owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 2,"Jackson Electric Member Corp - (GA)","Cooperative",5201199,3003210,1476773,721216,0 3,"Cobb Electric Membership

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Hawaiian Electric Co Inc","Investor-owned",6781665,1611149,2270495,2900021,0 2,"Maui Electric Co Ltd","Investor-owned",1132056,381979,373947,376130,0 3,"Hawaii Electric Light Co

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Illinois" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-owned",18061768,9114941,7890441,1056386,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",10686139,5208659,5477480,0,0 3,"Homefield

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Louisiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Louisiana LLC","Investor-owned",32904509,9047299,6757407,17099803,0 2,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC","Investor-owned",20822523,5368421,5529206,9924896,0 3,"Cleco Power

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maine" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NextEra Energy Power Marketing","Investor-owned",1984446,859679,1082377,42390,0 2,"New Brunswick Power Generation Corp.","Investor-owned",2101006,1963787,58020,79199,0 3,"Electricity Maine,

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maryland" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Baltimore Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",12270475,8927905,3147168,195402,0 2,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",7202209,1077458,6124751,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Massachusetts Electric Co","Investor-owned",10602381,7180002,3013034,409068,277 2,"NSTAR Electric Company","Investor-owned",8805023,5064032,3531796,209195,0 3,"Direct Energy

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Michigan" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"DTE Electric Company","Investor-owned",41923906,14932840,16790364,10199382,1320 2,"Consumers Energy Co","Investor-owned",33253922,12593983,11045552,9614387,0 3,"Constellation Energy Services,

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Missouri" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Union Electric Co - (MO)","Investor-owned",37022540,13649267,14751404,8600114,21755 2,"Kansas City Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",8554331,2571510,4454312,1528509,0 3,"KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nevada" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Nevada Power Co","Investor-owned",21109027,8922759,4638229,7539740,8299 2,"Sierra Pacific Power Co","Investor-owned",8097075,2268295,2959866,2868914,0 3,"Shell Energy North America (US),

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NH","Investor-owned",3799020,2390026,1240068,168926,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",1008956,3870,1005086,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy,

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Jersey" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Elec & Gas Co","Investor-owned",19571938,11374261,7430854,766823,0 2,"Jersey Central Power & Lt Co","Investor-owned",9957517,7264641,2445207,247669,0 3,"Direct Energy

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    York" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc","Investor-owned",19756921,9869409,9783465,102499,1548 2,"New York Power Authority","Public",18956177,0,8062381,8156837,2736959 3,"Long Island Power

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",24307160,8652606,9472917,6181637,0 2,"Public Service Co of Oklahoma","Investor-owned",17947669,6320906,6389387,5237376,0 3,"Grand River Dam

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vermont" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",4281682,1551471,1572378,1157833,0 2,"Vermont Electric Cooperative, Inc","Cooperative",446870,222366,122807,101697,0 3,"City of Burlington Electric -

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Virginia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Virginia Electric & Power Co","Investor-owned",75562974,29406355,39038242,6916360,202017 2,"Appalachian Power Co","Investor-owned",15954286,6461192,4013267,5479827,0 3,"Rappahannock Electric

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Wisconsin Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",23909329,7778541,8832104,7298684,0 2,"Wisconsin Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",10646058,3533105,2424249,4688704,0 3,"Wisconsin Public Service

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    United States" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096,55224658,46172611,2942385,91442 2,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 3,"Southern California Edison

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Arkansas Inc","Investor-owned",21049257,8069917,6170936,6808318,86 2,"Southwestern Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",4018839,1121436,1354356,1543047,0 3,"Mississippi County Electric

  13. Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications

    2007-01-01

    Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Delaware" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Delmarva Power","Investor-owned",3604764,2673209,902845,28710,0 2,"Delaware Electric Cooperative","Cooperative",1301698,1060347,241351,0,0 3,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",709072,0,709072,0,0 4,"City of Dover -

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Idaho" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Idaho Power Co","Investor-owned",13462077,4784073,3792971,4885033,0 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",3495174,665344,457510,2372320,0 3,"Avista Corp","Investor-owned",3083614,1188464,1029305,865845,0 4,"City of Idaho Falls -

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Kentucky Utilities Co","Investor-owned",18888411,6334638,5483135,7070638,0 2,"Louisville Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",11817164,4157326,4885866,2773972,0 3,"Kenergy Corp","Cooperative",9670080,757715,325857,8586508,0

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mississippi" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Mississippi Inc","Investor-owned",13204945,5672166,5235681,2297098,0 2,"Mississippi Power Co","Investor-owned",9960184,2136509,2905744,4917931,0 3,"Tennessee Valley Authority","Federal",4527039,0,0,4527039,0

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Omaha Public Power District","Public",10659655,3561537,3640059,3458059,0 2,"Nebraska Public Power District","Public",3353118,895508,1211817,1245793,0 3,"Lincoln Electric System","Public",3219685,1193586,1526628,499471,0

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oregon" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Portland General Electric Co","Investor-owned",17603187,7461863,6849512,3283792,8020 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",12958735,5309295,5109334,2524679,15427 3,"City of Eugene - (OR)","Public",2336296,919175,872330,544791,0

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"The Narragansett Electric Co","Investor-owned",5006934,2852069,1901360,253505,0 2,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",589515,0,589515,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",469721,0,296950,149198,23573

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utah" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",24105301,6605139,8564346,8875134,60682 2,"Provo City Corp","Public",784886,236348,410174,138364,0 3,"City of St George","Public",616490,276947,68066,271477,0 4,"Moon Lake Electric Assn

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",9568272,1041412,1503050,7023810,0 2,"Powder River Energy Corp","Cooperative",2640812,221881,891312,1527619,0 3,"Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co","Investor-owned",1175006,259090,533610,382306,0

  3. Refining and end use study of coal liquids I - pilot plant studies

    SciTech Connect

    Erwin, J.; Moulton, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Office of Fossil Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center is examining the ways in which coal liquids may best be integrated into the refinery of the 2000-2015 time frame and what performance and emission properties will prevail among the slate of fuels produced. The study consists of a Basic Program administered by Bechtel Group, Inc. to build a linear programming refinery model and provide processing and fuel properties data through subcontractors Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and M.W. Kellogg Company. The model will be used in an Option 1 to devise a slate of test fuels meeting advanced specifications, which will be produced and tested for physical ASTM-type properties, engine performance, and vehicle emissions. Three coal liquids will be included: a direct liquid from bituminous coal, another from subbituminous, and a Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction product. This paper reports the work to date on fractions of the first direct liquid including naphtha hydrotreating, heavy distillate hydrotreating, FCC of the heavy distillate hydrotreater products. Also reported are the first stages of work on the indirect liquefaction wax including feed preparation and FCC tests of blends with petroleum FCC feed.

  4. Residential sector end-use forecasting with EPRI-Reeps 2.1: Summary input assumptions and results

    SciTech Connect

    Koomey, J.G.; Brown, R.E.; Richey, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes current and projected future energy use by end-use and fuel for the U.S. residential sector, and assesses which end-uses are growing most rapidly over time. The inputs to this forecast are based on a multi-year data compilation effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. We use the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) REEPS model, as reconfigured to reflect the latest end-use technology data. Residential primary energy use is expected to grow 0.3% per year between 1995 and 2010, while electricity demand is projected to grow at about 0.7% per year over this period. The number of households is expected to grow at about 0.8% per year, which implies that the overall primary energy intensity per household of the residential sector is declining, and the electricity intensity per household is remaining roughly constant over the forecast period. These relatively low growth rates are dependent on the assumed growth rate for miscellaneous electricity, which is the single largest contributor to demand growth in many recent forecasts.

  5. Developing an industrial end-use forecast: A case study at the Los Angeles department of water and power

    SciTech Connect

    Mureau, T.H.; Francis, D.M.

    1995-05-01

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) uses INFORM 1.0 to forecast industrial sector energy. INFORM 1.0 provides an end-use framework that can be used to forecast electricity, natural gas or other fuels consumption. Included with INFORM 1.0 is a default date set including the input data and equations necessary to solve each model. LADWP has substituted service area specific data for the default data wherever possible. This paper briefly describes the steps LADWP follows in developing those inputs and application in INFORM 1.0.

  6. Table 2.5 Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End Use, Selected Years, 1978-2005

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Household 1 Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End Use, Selected Years, 1978-2005 Year Space Heating Air Conditioning Water Heating Appliances, 2 Electronics, and Lighting Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Electricity 3 Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 LPG 5 Total Consumption (quadrillion Btu)<//td> 1978 4.26 0.40 2.05 0.23 6.94 0.31 1.04 0.29 0.14 0.06 1.53 0.28 1.46 0.03 1.77 1980 3.41 .27 1.30 .23 5.21 .36 1.15 .30 .22

  7. Table 3.6 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars )

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 5,272 4,186 10,352 20,112 1,844 1,440 7,319 10,678 2,082 2,625 6,069 366 5,624 16,691 35,327 35,379 1971 5,702 4,367 11,589 21,934 2,060 1,574

  8. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  9. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Presentation Slides: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

  10. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

  11. Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and  Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

  12. Hot Water Electric Energy Use in Single-Family Residences in the Pacific Northwest : Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP).

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Megan E., Ritland, Keith G., Pratt, R.G.

    1991-09-01

    The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration carriers out generation and conservation resource planning. The analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption is carried out by the office's End-Use Research Section. The End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side conservation planning, load forecasting, and conservation program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program, commonly known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), was recently renamed the Regional End-Use Metering Project (REMP) to reflect an emphasis on metering rather than analytical activities. REMP is designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings in the residential and commercial sectors and is conducted for Bonneville by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (Battelle). The detailed summary information in this report is on energy used for water heaters in the residential sector and is based on data collected from September 1985 through December 1990 for 336 of the 499 REMP metered homes. Specific information is provided on annual loads averaged over the years and their variation across residences. Descriptions are given of use as associated with demographic and energy-related characteristics. Summaries are also provided for electricity use by each year, month, and daytype, as well as at peak hot water load and peak system times. This is the second residential report. This report focuses on a specific end use and adds detail to the first report. Subsequent reports are planned on other individual end uses or sets of end uses. 15 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. The effect of efficiency standards on water use and water heating energy use in the US: A detailed end-use treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Koomey, J.G.; Dunham, C.; Lutz, J.D.

    1994-05-01

    Water heating is an important end-use, accounting for roughly 16% of total primary energy consumption in the US residential sector. Recently enacted efficiency standards on water heaters and hot water-using equipment (e.g., dishwashers, clothes washers, showerheads, and faucets) will substantially affect the energy use of water heaters in the future. Assessment of current and future utility programs and government policies requires that regulators, resource planners, and forecasters understand the effects of these regulations. In order to quantify these impacts, this paper presents a detailed end-use breakdown of household hot and cold water use developed for the US Department of Energy. This breakdown is based on both previous studies and new data and analysis. It is implemented in a spreadsheet forecasting framework, which allows significant flexibility in specifying end-use demands and linkages between water heaters and hot water-using appliances. We disaggregate total hot and cold water use (gallons per day) into their component parts: showers, baths, faucets (flow dominated and volume dominated), toilets, landscaping/other, dishwashers, and clotheswashers. We then use the end-use breakdown and data on equipment characteristics to assess the impacts of current efficiency standards on hot water use and water heater energy consumption.

  14. Power applications of high-temperature superconductivity: Variable speed motors, current switches, and energy storage for end use

    SciTech Connect

    Hawsey, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Banerjee, B.B.; Grant, P.M. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct joint research and development activities related to certain electric power applications of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS). The new superconductors may allow development of an energy-efficient switch to control current to variable speed motors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, and other power conversion equipment. Motor types that were considered include induction, permanent magnet, and superconducting ac motors. Because it is impractical to experimentally alter certain key design elements in radial-gap motors, experiments were conducted on an axial field superconducting motor prototype using 4 NbTi magnets. Superconducting magnetic energy storage technology with 0.25--5 kWh stored energy was studied as a viable solution to short duration voltage sag problems on the customer side of the electric meter. The technical performance characteristics of the device wee assembled, along with competing technologies such as active power line conditioners with storage, battery-based uninterruptible power supplies, and supercapacitors, and the market potential for SMES was defined. Four reports were prepared summarizing the results of the project.

  15. April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

  16. 1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

  17. Energy balances in the production and end use of alcohols derived from biomass. A fuels-specific comparative analysis of alternate ethanol production cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Considerable public interest and debate have been focused on the so-called energy balance issue involved in the conversion of biomass materials into ethanol for fuel use. This report addresses questions of net gains in premium fuels that can be derived from the production and use of ethanol from biomass, and shows that for the US alcohol fuel program, energy balance need not be a concern. Three categories of fuel gain are discussed in the report: (1) Net petroleum gain; (2) Net premium fuel gain (petroleum and natural gas); and (3) Net energy gain (for all fuels). In this study the investment of energy (in the form of premium fuels) in alcohol production includes all investment from cultivating, harvesting, or gathering the feedstock and raw materials, through conversion of the feedstock to alcohol, to the delivery to the end-user. To determine the fuel gains in ethanol production, six cases, encompassing three feedstocks, five process fuels, and three process variations, have been examined. For each case, two end-uses (automotive fuel use and replacement of petrochemical feedstocks) were scrutinized. The end-uses were further divided into three variations in fuel economy and two different routes for production of ethanol from petrochemicals. Energy requirements calculated for the six process cycles accounted for fuels used directly and indirectly in all stages of alcohol production, from agriculture through distribution of product to the end-user. Energy credits were computed for byproducts according to the most appropriate current use.

  18. The examination of pretreatment and end use technologies for dirty fuels produced from coal gasification, coal pyrolysis, oil shale processing, and heavy oil recovery: Final technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Raden, D.P.; Page, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify pretreatment (upgrading) and end use technologies which: (1) reduce environmental, health and safety impacts, (2) reduce pollution control costs, or (3) reduce upgrading costs of ''dirty fuels'' while producing higher value energy products. A comprehensive list of technologies was developed for upgrading the various dirty fuels to higher value and products. Fifty-two process flow concepts were examined and from these four process flow concepts were chosen for further development. These are: heavy oil recovery and in situ hydrotreating; wet air oxidation in a downhole reactor; total raw gas shift; and high density fuels via vacuum devolatilization. Each of these four process flow concepts described exhibit the potential for reducing environmental, health and safety impacts and/or pollution control costs. In addition these concepts utilize dirty fuels to produce an upgraded or higher value energy product. These concepts should be developed and evaluated in greater detail to assess their technical and economical viability. Therefore, it is recommended that a program plan be formulated and a proof-of-concept research program be performed for each process concept. 3 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. The National Fuel End-Use Efficiency Field Test: Energy Savings and Performance of an Improved Energy Conservation Measure Selection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of an advanced residential energy conservation measure (ECM) selection technique was tested in Buffalo, New York, to verify the energy savings and program improvements achieved from use of the technique in conservation programs and provide input into determining whether utility investments in residential gas end-use conservation are cost effective. The technique analyzes a house to identify all ECMs that are cost effective in the building envelope, space-heating system, and water-heating system. The benefit-to-cost ratio (BCR) for each ECM is determined and cost-effective ECMs (BCR > 1.0) are selected once interactions between ECMs are taken into account. Eighty-nine houses with the following characteristics were monitored for the duration of the field test: occupants were low-income, houses were single-family detached houses but not mobile homes, and primary space- and water-heating systems were gas-fired. Forty-five houses received a mix of ECMs as selected by the measure selection technique (audit houses) and 44 served as a control group. Pre-weatherization data were collected from January to April 1988 and post-weatherization data were collected from December 1988 to April 1989. Space- and waterheating gas consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the two winters. A house energy consumption model and regression analysis were employed to normalize the space-heating energy savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and a 68 F indoor temperature. Space and water-heating energy savings for the audit houses were adjusted by the savings for the control houses. The average savings of 257 therms/year for the audit houses was 17% of the average pre-weatherization house gas consumption and 78% of that predicted. Average space-heating energy savings was 252 therms/year (25% of pre-weatherization space-heating energy consumption and 85% of the predicted value) and average water-heating savings was 5 therms/year (2% of pre

  20. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8817,1663,1627,2865,0,2661 41654,9350,2463,2128,2676,0,2083 41685,8446,2138,1696,2644,0,1968 41713,9361,1858,1502,2871,0,3129 41744,6829,825,740,2340,0,2924 41774,6637,496,615,2477...

  1. Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  2. Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  3. Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  4. Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  5. Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  6. Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  8. Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  9. Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  10. Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  11. Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  12. Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  15. Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  16. Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  17. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 39979,13144,2270,2201,4272,,4401 40009,12199,1930,1901,4243,,4126 40040,12779,1884,1920,4390,,4585 40071,10268,2000,2321,4322,,1626 40101,13672,4317,3170,4983,,1203 ...

  18. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...8,3440,1884,,1201 38883,9251,1972,3084,1899,,2296 38913,11438,1654,2479,1813,,5490 38944,11236,1617,2784,1978,,4856 38975,8042,2121,3434,1374,,1114 39005,11895,4315,4622,1884,,1074 ...

  19. ,"Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...7787,5612,1540,1026,1902,,1145 37817,6174,1358,902,1911,,2002 37848,6166,1355,973,1955,,1884 37879,6229,1856,1243,1950,,1181 37909,7898,2988,1718,2117,,1076 37940,13299,6914,3783,2...

  20. Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Commercial 57,658 55,843 51,795 58,787 58,008 54,004 1967-2015 Industrial 114,295 74,407 ...

  1. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Pipeline & Distribution Use 47,470 51,220 37,176 37,825 42,093 43,059 1997-2015 ...

  2. Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Pipeline & Distribution Use 46,892 51,897 49,235 36,737 50,524 34,141 1997-2015 ...

  3. Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Residential 75,554 85,393 79,892 83,365 78,750 71,952 1967-2015 Commercial 51,335 56,487 ...

  4. Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 39,489 40,819 43,727 45,581 51,127 54,823 ...

  5. Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Volumes Delivered to Consumers 75,821 69,291 67,504 63,247 59,356 51,191 1997-2015 ...

  6. California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 64,931 44,379 51,154 49,846 42,989 42,643 ...

  7. Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total ... Commercial 11,153 11,680 10,482 12,013 12,188 12,937 1967-2015 Industrial 43,059 45,462 51...

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 0 0 0 0 * 1984-2014 Pipeline & Distribution Use 5,820 7,049 4,973 5,626 6,184 1997-2014 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 274,361 265,534 ...

  9. Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    85,549 138,429 294,316 274,451 1997-2014 Volumes Delivered to Consumers 2,947,542 3,185,011 3,305,730 3,377,217 3,350,645 3,415,789 1997-2014 Residential 192,153 226,445 199,958...

  10. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcuskym.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngconssumdcuskym.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  11. End-Use Taxes: Current EIA Practices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    However, many States levy taxes on aviation fuel, as shown in Table B3 in Appendix B, based on information obtained from State TaxationRevenue Offices. The use of the national...

  12. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    67,2429,2389,7792,5,7152 40405,20798,2472,2385,8311,5,7624 40436,16423,2833,2891,8505,5,2189 40466,21523,5597,4616,9601,5,1704 40497,33652,12885,8423,10973,5,1366...

  13. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    32582,,8377,3462 32613,,4724,2362 32643,,2816,1790 32674,,2321,1479 32704,,2189,1399 32735,,2026,1340 32766,,2035,1433 32796,,2513,1568 32827,,4166,2035...

  14. Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  15. Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  16. California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  17. Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    454,456 534,779 598,514 666,712 615,407 634,678 1997-2014 Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 10,460 10,163 10,367 12,389 12,456 10,055 1983-2014 Plant Fuel 6,470 6,441 6,939...

  18. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcuspam.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngconssumdcuspam.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  19. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ... ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  20. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ... and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel ...

  1. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 39736,4922,738,610,3480,,94 39767,5595,1207,908,3394,,86 39797,7419,1929,1386,4005,,100 39828,7385,2040,1589,3639,,117 39859,6193,1754,1416,2927,,96 ...

  2. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    34196,,251,360 34227,,310,381 34257,,481,507 34288,,1159,947 34318,,2057,1543 34349,,1929,1510 34380,,1926,1457 34408,,1432,1121 34439,,1001,771 34469,,568,480 34500,,367,377 ...

  3. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusinm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  4. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusohm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  5. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusmim.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  6. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusmam.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  7. ,"Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusvtm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  8. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusarm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  9. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusiam.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  10. ,"Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusflm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  11. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusmnm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  12. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcusilm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  13. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","1292016" ,"Next Release Date:","2292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconssumdcushim.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavng...

  14. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    32978,,1820,1550 33008,,1476,1268 33039,,1206,1157 33069,,704,821 33100,,560,769 ... 37726,13784,3838,2544,5408,,1994 37756,12066,3058,2088,5382,,1537 ...

  15. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    33649,,1933,2372 33678,,1764,2319 33709,,1346,1935 33739,,1012,1597 33770,,628,1206 33800,,474,1084 33831,,438,1013 33862,,643,1252 33892,,1209,1790 33923,,1442,1928 ...

  16. ,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    33131,,450,347 33161,,1040,782 33192,,1694,1206 33222,,2673,1889 33253,,3533,2425 ...,3279,1081,737,1444,,16 38153,2725,856,647,1206,,16 38183,2154,553,456,1129,,16 ...

  17. ,"Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 38671,4236,102,416,513,,3205 38701,2234,170,664,563,,836 38732,3888,153,605,1206,,1923 38763,4850,166,636,1426,,2622 38791,5239,142,620,2121,,2355 38822,4090,87,355,124...

  18. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 35504,,3058,2114 35535,,1916,1532 35565,,1472,1305 35596,,926,1174 35626,,815,1206 35657,,761,1309 35688,,778,924 35718,,902,1224 35749,,2561,2027 35779,,4355,2937 ...

  19. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 40283,14937,4022,3553,7241,1,119 40313,11682,1468,2245,7020,1,948 40344,12260,1206,2041,6804,1,2209 40374,14350,1036,1878,6882,1,4553 40405,13862,956,1725,7350,1,3829 ...

  20. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 37118,14023,996,1238,910,,10878 37149,12067,1034,1655,858,,8520 37179,12854,1245,1383... 40954,22161,5815,3266,972,47,12062 40983,20389,4325,2888,1019,50,12107 ...

  1. Wisconsin Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  2. Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 2,237 1,453 1,032 1,207 1,173 930 1989-2016 Industrial 10,101 9,093 9,641 9,766 9,833 9,583 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 2 2 2 7 7 8 2010-2016 Electric Power 29,722 26,595 ...

  3. Vermont Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential 541 380 357 196 109 89 1989-2016 Commercial 714 516 NA 286 306 345 1989-2016 Industrial 204 204 192 167 151 140 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric ...

  4. Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 24,800 18,781 14,623 8,703 5,515 5,093 1989-2016 Industrial 18,218 16,587 14,685 12,111 11,431 10,796 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 35 38 37 42 40 46 2010-2016 Electric Power ...

  5. Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 19,038 14,740 13,184 10,611 NA 10,294 1989-2016 Industrial 133,542 139,966 128,883 130,670 130,406 NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 301 333 322 393 380 432 2010-2016 Electric ...

  6. Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 8,887 5,327 3,314 2,735 2,066 2,159 1989-2016 Industrial 7,176 6,041 5,272 5,146 4,574 4,413 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 4 5 4 10 10 11 2010-2016 Electric Power 2,679 2,628 ...

  7. Massachusetts Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 13,214 10,080 8,350 5,404 3,621 3,715 1989-2016 Industrial 5,187 4,478 4,072 3,111 2,790 2,431 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 70 77 75 68 66 75 2010-2016 Electric Power 9,783 ...

  8. Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 1,752 1,664 1,195 825 664 566 1989-2016 Industrial 243 237 183 261 363 307 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010-2016 Electric Power 1,992 1,911 1,710 1,852 1,895 ...

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 2,921 2,364 2,247 2,219 1,909 1,882 1989-2016 Industrial 81,450 87,558 85,108 87,285 84,591 87,948 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 5 5 5 5 5 6 2010-2016 Electric Power 24,771 ...

  10. Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 7,263 6,179 4,598 3,121 1,838 1,647 1989-2016 Industrial 7,760 7,599 6,680 6,193 5,034 5,168 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 27 30 29 31 30 34 2010-2016 Electric Power 6,288 ...

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 3,160 1,825 1,497 1,244 1,250 975 1989-2016 Industrial 16,396 16,568 15,753 16,613 15,147 14,695 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 19 21 20 36 34 39 2010-2016 Electric Power 29,307 ...

  12. Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 3,783 2,546 1,756 1,327 1,020 940 1989-2016 Industrial 6,695 6,718 6,524 6,354 NA 8,194 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 5 5 5 5 5 5 2010-2016 Electric Power 112 W 522 W 1,442 ...

  13. Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 9,234 6,289 5,145 3,556 3,132 2,646 1989-2016 Industrial 7,185 7,482 7,181 NA NA 7,398 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 21 23 22 20 19 21 2010-2016 Electric Power 22,761 20,295 ...

  14. Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 5,807 5,496 3,094 2,828 2,441 2,268 1989-2016 Industrial 6,792 6,605 6,305 5,760 5,732 6,014 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 42 46 45 46 44 50 2010-2016 Electric Power 7,407 ...

  15. Minnesota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 14,790 10,266 7,146 4,040 2,736 2,742 1989-2016 Industrial NA 17,566 NA 11,634 11,627 12,285 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 4 5 4 6 6 6 2010-2016 Electric Power 5,321 5,397 ...

  16. Maine Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential 401 342 258 143 63 52 1989-2016 Commercial 1,199 1,048 789 493 324 294 1989-2016 Industrial NA NA NA NA NA 1,511 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric ...

  17. Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 5,075 3,442 2,215 2,092 1,565 1,495 1989-2016 Industrial 15,430 16,456 16,366 17,335 15,702 15,809 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 35 38 37 44 43 49 2010-2016 Electric Power ...

  18. Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 7,608 4,369 2,983 2,652 2,032 2,035 1989-2016 Industrial 11,145 10,126 9,521 9,340 9,467 9,264 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 9 10 9 21 20 23 2010-2016 Electric Power 6,331 ...

  19. Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 3,194 2,973 1,839 1,438 1,093 1,026 1989-2016 Industrial 4,859 4,996 4,545 4,518 4,216 4,198 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 15 17 17 16 15 17 2010-2016 Electric Power 9,351 ...

  20. Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 5,319 3,970 2,773 2,010 1,075 1,235 1989-2016 Industrial 3,600 3,376 3,569 3,073 3,036 2,822 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 22 25 24 24 23 27 2010-2016 Electric Power 4,079 ...

  1. Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 9,509 6,392 5,411 4,081 3,188 2,823 1989-2016 Industrial 1,428 1,519 1,239 1,179 NA 1,196 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 20 22 22 22 22 24 2010-2016 Electric Power 2,318 4,202 ...

  2. Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    257 209 1989-2016 Commercial 1,423 NA 1,054 782 441 NA 1989-2016 Industrial 4,438 NA NA 4,595 4,262 4,064 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 2 2 2 2 2 3 2010-2016 Electric Power W W W W W W

  3. Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 23,559 14,966 12,115 6,674 4,182 4,220 1989-2016 Industrial 27,438 25,038 23,038 21,570 19,851 19,309 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 30 33 32 47 46 52 2010-2016 Electric Power ...

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 3,398 2,770 2,460 2,165 1,910 1,771 1989-2016 Industrial 1,793 1,709 1,577 1,591 1,542 1,335 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 173 192 186 206 199 226 2010-2016 Electric Power ...

  5. Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 5,497 4,174 3,099 2,837 2,529 2,433 1989-2016 Industrial 7,081 6,968 6,512 6,420 6,028 6,029 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 3 3 3 3 3 3 2010-2016 Electric Power 5,839 6,041 ...

  6. Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 3,365 2,766 2,390 2,155 1,760 1,748 1989-2016 Industrial 1,448 1,562 1,518 1,483 1,433 NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 60 66 64 92 89 101 2010-2016 Electric Power 14,466 ...

  7. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 22,320 13,699 11,041 7,146 4,967 4,553 1989-2016 Industrial 23,458 22,615 21,166 19,626 19,397 NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 31 35 33 37 36 41 2010-2016 Electric Power ...

  8. Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1989-2016 Commercial 2,434 2,272 1,488 1,158 778 745 1989-2016 Industrial 1,918 NA NA 1,723 NA NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric Power 732 699 W W 798 1,010

  9. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 38426,11440,5151,3311,2623,,355 38457,8360,3023,1975,2975,,389 38487,6579,1947,1592,2545,,496 38518,5853,990,999,2597,,1268 38548,7874,830,1046,4393,,1606 ...

  10. ,"Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 35869,,8950,5824 35900,,5827,4236 35930,,3221,2738 35961,,2312,2291 35991,,1765,1947 36022,,1574,1818 36053,,1667,1869 36083,,2427,2102 36114,,4731,3442 36144,,7989,5595 ...

  11. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 36326,,2065,1427 36356,,1479,1628 36387,,1617,1905 36418,,1489,1820 36448,,2658,1947 36479,,3997,2395 36509,,9040,4553 36540,,13149,6732 36571,,11829,6091 36600,,8180,4404 ...

  12. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    34043,,6255,4461 34074,,4043,3038 34104,,1947,1583 34135,,1274,1161 34165,,1040,1122 ...836,987,1723,1623,3,10500 40405,13482,1004,1947,1632,3,8895 40436,12628,951,1787,1591,3,82...

  13. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...113,1904,2289,1975,,14944 37057,17703,1272,1947,1872,,12611 37087,18312,1060,1763,1853,,13... 40831,22244,1504,2125,1629,145,16841 40862,19475,2839,2848,2021,141,11627 ...

  14. Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  15. Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  16. Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  17. Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  18. Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  19. Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  20. Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  1. Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  2. Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  3. Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    48 256 243 240 255 264 2001-2016 Residential 49 51 44 45 45 45 1989-2016 Commercial 157 162 151 154 155 163 1989-2016 Industrial 41 42 47 41 54 56 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 1 1 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric Power -- -- -- -- -- --

  4. Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  5. Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,200 4,791 5,641 5,396 6,284 7,183 2001-2016 Residential 2,532 1,290 881 580 518 492 1989-2016 Commercial 1,706 993 851 653 657 701 1989-2016 Industrial 3,186 2,494 2,463 2,137 2,525 2,253 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 15 14 14 14 15 15 2010-2016 Electric Power 1,763 W 1,431 2,013 2,568 3,722

  6. Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6,996 75,916 54,482 NA NA 53,400 2001-2016 Residential 41,109 30,185 15,751 9,472 7,782 7,419 1989-2016 Commercial 21,382 15,803 10,496 7,251 7,882 7,896 1989-2016 Industrial 23,292 20,311 18,796 NA NA 17,648 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 32 31 38 37 42 42 2010-2016 Electric Power 11,181 9,587 9,400 13,205 22,701 20,395

  7. Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  8. Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  9. Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8,876 22,989 21,205 19,444 20,538 21,081 2001-2016 Residential 6,558 4,400 2,098 1,115 1,116 1,042 1989-2016 Commercial 4,891 3,413 2,075 1,575 1,707 1,830 1989-2016 Industrial 15,885 14,227 14,405 14,471 14,379 14,383 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 2 2 2 2 2 2 2010-2016 Electric Power 1,541 948 2,624 2,281 3,333 3,823

  10. Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  11. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  13. Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    86,973 275,184 279,724 262,316 283,177 285,969 1997-2014 Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 15,169 13,461 12,781 17,017 17,110 14,851 1983-2014 Plant Fuel 2,126 2,102 2,246...

  14. ,"Georgia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,5851,3726,10622,93,22727 41228,52299,12989,6200,12742,90,20277 41258,61950,16188,6843,13500,93,25326 41289,62324,18331,7191,13879,85,22838 41320,63455,19031,7667,12703,77,23978 ...

  15. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    34288,,8984,6080 34318,,14527,9396 34349,,16252,10134 34380,,15391,9633 34408,,13500,8295 34439,,9732,6300 34469,,6819,4573 34500,,3474,2745 34530,,2546,2268 ...

  16. Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. More computers, dedicated servers, printers, and photocopiers were used in office buildings than in...

  17. Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research & Development » Biomass Feedstocks Biomass Feedstocks An alternate text version of this video is available online. A feedstock is defined as any renewable, biological material that can be used directly as a fuel, or converted to another form of fuel or energy product. Biomass feedstocks are the plant and algal materials used to derive fuels like ethanol, butanol, biodiesel, and other hydrocarbon fuels. Examples of biomass feedstocks include corn starch, sugarcane juice, crop

  18. Award Types

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards Team (505) 667-7824 Email Types of Awards The Awards Office, sponsored by the Technology Transfer Division and the Science and Technology Base Program Office, coordinates...

  19. "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)&

  20. "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  1. Texas Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,329,790 5,693,270 6,373,078 6,688,629 6,914,481 7,837,118 1984-2014 Residential 67 28 127 102 16 59 1984-2014 Commercial 136,419 100,886 184,312 173,303 142,268 132,601 1984-2014 Industrial 189,981 197,024 233,292 241,601 240,179 270,760 1984-2014 Oil Company 210,865 316,523 541,640 736,186 679,737 886,957 1984-2014 Farm 201,769 207,183 243,170 216,915 190,572 222,849 1984-2014 Electric Power 19,495 15,646 23,156 20,022 20,706 24,700 1984-2014 Railroad 429,026 467,128 498,006 483,096 504,823

  2. U.S. Adjusted Sales of Kerosene by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Florida Georgia North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Alabama

  3. U.S. Sales of Kerosene by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Florida Georgia North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Alabama

  4. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Intensities The purpose of this section is to provide information on how energy was used for space conditioning--heating, cooling, and ventilation--in commercial...

  5. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Active Solar: As an energy source, energy from the sun collected and stored using mechanical pumps or fans to circulate heat-laden fluids or air between solar collectors and the...

  6. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Energy Use in Commercial Buildings The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of how energy was used in commercial buildings. Focusing on 1989 buildings, the section...

  7. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1995 -- Overview...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    by the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. The...

  8. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings1995 -- Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    model using survey data from the 1995 commercial buildings energy consumption survey and building energy simulations provided by the Facility Energy Decision Screening system....

  9. South Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  10. New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  11. Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  12. West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  13. North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  14. North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  15. New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New...

  16. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 35139,,3741,2190 35170,,2996,1884 35200,,954,1154 35231,,547,997 ... 35626,,517,989 35657,,449,1004 35688,,471,1884 35718,,637,1167 35749,,2424,1757 ...

  17. Alternative Strategies for Low-Pressure End Uses; Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review the compressed air applications to determine which ones are valid high-pressure and which ones can ...

  18. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992 - Index...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Author Contact: Joelle.Michaels@eia.doe.gov Joelle Michaels CBECS Survey Manager URL: http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecscbecs1d.html separater bar...

  19. Florida Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    840,100 2,027,012 1,914,621 1,918,039 2,023,650 2,038,923 1984-2014 Residential 1,551 1,820 1,085 572 451 728 1984-2014 Commercial 126,292 113,313 100,791 104,860 113,873 110,082 ...

  20. West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6,180 6,835 NA 12,049 10,209 8,676 2001-2016 Residential 1,242 2,132 2,485 5,340 4,215 2,679 1989-2016 Commercial 1,547 1,923 2,034 3,648 3,015 2,308 1989-2016 Industrial 1,849 ...

  1. Driving Biofuels End Use: BETO/VTO Collaborations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Conventional Engine + Realistic Fuels GEFORCE - Near term technology exploration 6 6 | Vehicle Technologies Program Efficiency Through Biofuels Biofuel blends enhance ...

  2. Louisiana Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    514,474 1,744,771 1,873,769 1,488,986 1,405,392 1,375,580 1984-2014 Residential 1,036 140 34 53 84 89 1984-2014 Commercial 59,689 38,695 39,659 36,840 17,590 21,197 1984-2014 Industrial 21,826 26,063 20,770 33,052 31,744 33,670 1984-2014 Oil Company 243,789 319,394 364,261 245,303 183,801 178,810 1984-2014 Farm 42,624 44,027 49,985 48,462 40,785 46,134 1984-2014 Electric Power 4,321 4,775 5,464 2,733 4,610 4,826 1984-2014 Railroad 18,345 25,425 32,515 28,110 39,578 45,790 1984-2014 Vessel

  3. Mississippi Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    835,855 800,065 771,577 830,756 806,396 819,763 1984-2014 Residential 5 5 4 7 7 8 1984-2014 Commercial 26,641 23,713 26,383 26,386 24,019 28,803 1984-2014 Industrial 21,853 18,362 15,450 20,153 21,186 19,595 1984-2014 Oil Company 3,955 4,262 4,058 6,226 7,450 6,419 1984-2014 Farm 41,080 57,087 52,559 81,878 84,753 79,443 1984-2014 Electric Power 3,796 3,393 2,019 1,674 2,223 1,921 1984-2014 Railroad 24,727 17,936 37,741 29,848 32,550 35,578 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 141,302 93,384 58,285 58,505

  4. New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  5. End-Use Sector Flowcharts, Energy Intensity Indicators

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Controls for Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Enabling More Widespread Use of CHP in Light Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Applications This project developed and demonstrated novel algorithms and dynamic control technology for optimal economic use of CHP systems under 15 MW. Combined cooling, heating and power (CHP) technologies have successfully entered the market for larger (over 20 MW) applications. Smaller

  6. Distribution Category UC-98 Consumption End-Use A Comparison...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    buildings) as well as a list of large buildings in each metropolitan area. MECS is based upon a comprehensive list of manufactures that is maintained by the Census Bureau for...

  7. End-use Breakdown: The Building Energy Modeling Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Modeling Blog en EnergyPlus Logo Debuts on Revit Toolbar http:energy.goveerebuildingsarticlesenergyplus-logo-debuts-revit-toolbar

  8. Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View ...

  9. CBECS 1989 - Energy End-use Intensities in Commercial Buildings...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    the sampling error is nonzero and unknown for the particular sample chosen, the sample design permits sampling errors to be estimated. Due to the complexity of the sample design,...

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... logically be expected to have an impact on the way in which energy is generated, delivered, and used, whether by specific controls or through pricing incentives or disincentives. ...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry...

  12. New Mexico Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vessel Bunkering 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984-2014 On-Highway 432,794 472,924 495,600 495,026 484,394 504,615 1984-2014 Military 582 306 859 572 405 682 1984-2014 Off-Highway 5,729 24,907 ...

  13. Alabama Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vessel Bunkering 61,852 65,017 41,339 25,542 24,650 20,222 1984-2014 On-Highway 657,070 711,371 717,466 705,904 754,337 768,994 1984-2014 Military 2,014 2,203 2,135 1,649 1,326 ...

  14. End-Use Intensity in Commercial Buildings 1992 (TABLES)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 9 21 5 64 1 9 Food Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 43 53 9 37 28 116 17 1 5 Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 88 32 11 128 52 30 6 15 41 Lodging . . . . . ....

  15. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    lighting intensities per lighted square foot-hour (Figure 23). * Food service and health care buildings had the highest water-heating intensities per square foot--more than...

  16. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    and stored using mechanical pumps or fans to circulate heat-laden fluids or air between solar collectors and the building. Examples include the use of solar collectors for water...

  17. Biogas end-use in the European community

    SciTech Connect

    Constant, M.; Naveau, H.; Nyns, E.J. ); Ferrero, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    In Europe over the past few years the generation of biogas for energy and environmental purposes has been gaining in importance. Industrial wastewaters, cattle manure, sewage sludges, urban wastes, crop residues, algae and aquatic biomass are all typical of the materials being utilized. In contrast to the extensive inventory of biomethanation processes which has been carried out within the EEC, until recently a detailed, up-to-date investigation of the end-sues of biogas had not been undertaken. To supply the necessary information, the Commission of the European Communities and the Belgian Science Policy Office jointly entrusted a study to the Unit of Bioengineering at the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. This book is record of the study and has the following key features: it gives a broad overview of the ongoing use of biogas in Europe; it summarizes available data on storage, purification and engines using biogas; it draws several conclusions concerning the technical and economic viability of the processes; it discusses the problems of using biogas; and it outlines recommendations and future R and D and demonstration projects in the field.

  18. End-Use Sector Flowchart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Industrial Energy Efficiency - Study (Appendix A), June 2015 LARGE INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES BY STATE Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining

  19. Refining and end use study of coal liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.

    1998-05-01

    A conceptual design and ASPEN Plus process flowsheet simulation model was developed for a Battelle biomass-based gasification, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquefaction and combined-cycle power plant. This model was developed in a similar manner to those coal liquefaction models that were developed under DOE contract DE-AC22-91PC90027. As such, this process flowsheet simulation model was designed to be a research guidance tool and not a detailed process design tool. However, it does contain some process design features, such as sizing the F-T synthesis reactors. This model was designed only to predict the effects of various process and operating changes on the overall plant heat and material balances, utilities, capital and operating costs.

  20. South Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  1. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ... from noncombustible renewable resources, minus quantities sold and transferred out. ...

  2. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ... from noncombustible renewable resources, minus quantities sold and transferred out. ...

  3. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 data...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View andor Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties,...

  4. Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1992

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption Survey. divider line To View andor Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties,...

  5. New York Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 40,326 29,003 23,655 17,114 15,142 16,016 1989-2016 Industrial 8,316 7,886 7,536 NA NA NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 332 367 356 347 336 382 2010-2016 Electric Power 30,569 ...

  6. New Hampshire Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential 1,136 831 626 307 173 134 1989-2016 Commercial 1,320 991 738 398 255 206 1989-2016 Industrial NA NA NA NA NA 558 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 6 7 7 7 6 7 2010-2016 Electric ...

  7. North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 1,659 1,211 1,044 430 302 308 1989-2016 Industrial 2,278 2,668 2,094 2,800 2,773 2,197 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric Power 407 W W W 605 817

  8. South Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 3,039 1,881 2,004 1,422 1,279 1,157 1989-2016 Industrial 7,198 7,449 7,168 7,360 6,927 6,691 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 2 2 2 4 4 4 2010-2016 Electric Power 7,772 9,878 ...

  9. North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 8,013 4,335 3,791 2,915 2,615 2,617 1989-2016 Industrial 10,069 9,211 8,646 8,450 7,678 7,751 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 7 8 8 11 11 13 2010-2016 Electric Power 24,806 ...

  10. South Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 1,405 1,061 826 485 304 301 1989-2016 Industrial 3,932 3,785 3,644 3,479 3,385 3,400 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Electric Power 625 605 779 714 847 ...

  11. New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 20,511 15,436 11,773 9,176 8,184 8,016 1989-2016 Industrial 4,867 4,286 4,618 4,195 4,420 4,647 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 20 22 21 20 20 22 2010-2016 Electric Power 21,592 ...

  12. New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 2,913 2,300 1,654 1,340 1,091 NA 1989-2016 Industrial 1,441 1,409 NA NA NA NA 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 16 17 17 15 14 16 2010-2016 Electric Power 5,881 6,156 6,424 6,452 ...

  13. Rhode Island Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial 1,767 1,261 988 555 237 176 1989-2016 Industrial 799 760 728 691 652 605 2001-2016 Vehicle Fuel 7 8 8 8 8 9 2010-2016 Electric Power 2,533 4,496 2,943 5,008 4,767 5,976

  14. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 37271,4603,2030,1519,1045,,9 37302,4036,1730,1309,851,,145 37330,4766,1947,1414,1343,,61 37361,3060,1235,968,795,,62 37391,2078,759,555,706,,58 ...

  15. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 10:31:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Carolina Natural Gas Consumption by End ...

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland ... Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio ...

  17. District of Columbia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  18. District of Columbia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  19. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,20576,14730,6914,,10275 38122,39871,8867,9693,5860,,15451 38153,33708,6026,8360,5823,,13500 38183,33345,5433,7004,5549,,15358 38214,34799,5428,7656,5364,,16351 ...

  20. New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    41,194 241,137 246,418 243,961 245,502 246,178 1997-2014 Lease and Plant Fuel 1967-1998 Lease Fuel 49,655 49,070 47,556 47,696 47,018 49,406 1983-2014 Plant Fuel 36,827 35,289...

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  3. ARM - Measurement - Cloud type

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Cloud type Cloud type such as cirrus, stratus, cumulus etc Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  4. Types of Reuse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  5. Types of Radiation Exposure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation ...

  6. Postdoc Appointment Types

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Appointment Types Postdoc Appointment Types Most postdocs will be offered a postdoctoral research associate appointment. Each year, approximately 30 Postdoctoral Fellow appointments, including the Distinguished Fellows, are awarded. Postdoc appointment types offer world of possibilities Meet the current LANL Distinguished Postdocs Research Associates Research Associates pursue research as part of ongoing LANL science and engineering programs. Sponsored postdoctoral candidate packages are

  7. Agreement Type Union

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Type Union Local #/Name Number of Employees Project Labor Agreement International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers 135 2 International Brothehood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmith Forgers and Helpers 92 0 International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen 13 0 Regional Council of Carpenters 1780 & 1977 13 Operative Plasterers and Cement Mason International Association Operative Plasterers and Cement Mason International Association 1

  8. Energy.gov Page Types

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the standard page types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system. For information about other available page types, or to request a new kind of page type, contact...

  9. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  10. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Window Types Window Types A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto Windows come in a number of different frame and glazing types. By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with a glazing type tailored to your climate and application, you can customize each of your home's windows. Types of Window Frames Improving the thermal resistance

  11. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    is termed fluorescence). A ballast is required to regulate and control the current and voltage. Two types of ballasts are used, magnetic and electronic. Electronic ballasts have...

  12. DIORAMA Location Type User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2015-01-29

    The purpose of this report is to present the current design and implementation of the DIORAMA location type object (LocationType) and to provide examples and use cases. The LocationType object is included in the diorama-app package in the diorama::types namespace. Abstractly, the object is intended to capture the full time history of the location of an object or reference point. For example, a location may be speci ed as a near-Earth orbit in terms of a two-line element set, in which case the location type is capable of propagating the orbit both forward and backward in time to provide a location for any given time. Alternatively, the location may be speci ed as a xed set of geodetic coordinates (latitude, longitude, and altitude), in which case the geodetic location of the object is expected to remain constant for all time. From an implementation perspective, the location type is de ned as a union of multiple independent objects defi ned in the DIORAMA tle library. Types presently included in the union are listed and described in subsections below, and all conversions or transformation between these location types are handled by utilities provided by the tle library with the exception of the \\special-values" location type.

  13. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    its U-factor. There are advantages and disadvantages to all types of frame materials, but vinyl, wood, fiberglass, and some composite frame materials provide greater...

  14. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Archived Reference Building Type: Supermarket

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Archived Reference Building Type: Hospital

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. Archived Reference Building Type: Hospital

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  18. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  19. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  20. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  1. ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud Type

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsCloud Type ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Cloud Type [ ARM research - evaluation data product ] This data product determines a cloud type using cloud boundaries derived from vertically pointing lidar and radar clouds. It uses Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Locations (ARSCL) data as

  2. Variation in Biomass Composition Components among Forage, Biomass, Sorghum-Sudangrass, and Sweet Sorghum Types

    SciTech Connect

    Stefaniak, T. R.; Dahlberg, J. A.; Bean, B. W.; Dighe, N.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Rooney, W. L.

    2012-07-01

    Alternative biomass sources must be developed if the United States is to meet the goal in the U.S. Energy Security Act of 2007 to derive 30% of its petroleum from renewable sources, and several different biomass crops are currently in development. Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is one such crop that will be an important feedstock source for biofuel production. As composition influences productivity, there exists a need to understand the range in composition observed within the crop. The goal of this research was to assess the range in dietary fiber composition observed within different types of biomass sorghums. A total of 152 sorghum samples were divided into the four end-use types of sorghum: biomass, forage, sorghum-sudangrass, and sweet. These samples were analyzed chemically using dietary fiber analysis performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using published protocols. Significant variation among the groups was detected for glucan and ash. Positive and highly significant correlations were detected between structural carbohydrates in the biomass and sweet sorghums while many of these correlations were negative or not significant in the forage and sorghum-sudangrass types. In addition, a wide range of variation was present within each group indicating that there is potential to manipulate the composition of the crop.

  3. Property:Water Type | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Type Property Type String Pages using the property "Water Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1...

  4. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... includes cleaning and maintaining refrigerant levels, replacing filters, checking water distribution lines for leaks, cleaning, sanitizing, and descaling the bin and water system. ...

  5. U.S. Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Florida Georgia North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Alabama

  6. U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Florida Georgia North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Alabama

  7. U.S. Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Florida Georgia North Carolina South Carolina Virginia West Virginia Midwest (PADD 2) Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Alabama

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Tennessee E M C","Cooperative",5743330,3134733,1993358,615239,0 5,"Knoxville Utilities Board","Public",5536187,2506771,2279472,749944,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  9. ,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    to Oil Company Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Electric Utility Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to...

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  11. End Uses Mechanical Properties Settled By The Modified Sintering Conditions Of The Metal Injection Molding Process

    SciTech Connect

    Marray, Tarek [Laboratoire Materiaux, ECAM, 40 montee Saint Barthelemy, 69321, Lyon, Cedex 05 (France); Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory (EA 4496), 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix en Provence (France); Jaccquet, Philippe; Moinard-Checot, Delphine [Laboratoire Materiaux, ECAM, 40 montee Saint Barthelemy, 69321, Lyon, Cedex 05 (France); Arts et Metiers ParisTech, LaBoMaP, Rue Porte de Paris, 71250 CLUNY (France); Fabre, Agnes; Barrallier, Laurent [Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory (EA 4496), 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix en Provence (France)

    2011-01-17

    Most common mechanical applications require parts with specific properties as hard faced features. It is well known that treating parts under suitable atmospheres may improve hardness and strength yield of steels. Heat treatment process and more particularly thermo-chemical diffusion processes (such as carburizing or its variation: carbonitriding) can be performed to reach the industrial hardness profile requirements. In this work, a low-alloyed steel feedstock based on water soluble binder system is submitted to the MIM process steps (including injection molding, debinding and sintering). As-sintered parts are then treated under a low pressure carbonitriding treatment. This contribution focuses on preliminary results such as microstructural analyses and mechanical properties which are established at each stage of the process to determine and monitor changes.

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utilities Co","Investor-owned",2068166,811250,1081889,175027,0 3,"Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop","Cooperative",2025153,263270,182264,1579619,0 4,"Otter Tail Power ...

  13. Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy Markets 1999: Energy Transformation and End Use

    Reports and Publications

    2008-01-01

    his is the second report prepared in response to a two-part request from the Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Energy, to provide an estimate of U.S. Federal energy subsidies. In its request, the Office of Policy asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to update a 1992 EIA report on Federal energy subsidies, including any additions or deletions of Federal subsidies based on Administration and Congressional action since the 1992 report was written, and to provide an estimate of the size of each current subsidy.

  14. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

  15. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Refining and end use study of coal liquids II - linear programming analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, C.; Tam, S.

    1995-12-31

    A DOE-funded study is underway to determine the optimum refinery processing schemes for producing transportation fuels that will meet CAAA regulations from direct and indirect coal liquids. The study consists of three major parts: pilot plant testing of critical upgrading processes, linear programming analysis of different processing schemes, and engine emission testing of final products. Currently, fractions of a direct coal liquid produced form bituminous coal are being tested in sequence of pilot plant upgrading processes. This work is discussed in a separate paper. The linear programming model, which is the subject of this paper, has been completed for the petroleum refinery and is being modified to handle coal liquids based on the pilot plant test results. Preliminary coal liquid evaluation studies indicate that, if a refinery expansion scenario is adopted, then the marginal value of the coal liquid (over the base petroleum crude) is $3-4/bbl.

  17. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellog Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993 for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. The work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to characterize the coal liquids, develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids, and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PIMS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program, produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks, conduct engine emission tests, and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts during the reporting period, October through December 1996, were in the areas of Option 1 blending and Option 1 FCC production run.

  18. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

  19. Energy balances in the production and end-use of methanol derived from coal

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-10

    Analysis is performed for three combinations of fuels, specifically: net petroleum gain (petroleum only); net premium fuel gain (natural gas and petroleum); and net energy gain (includes all fuels; does not include free energy from sun). The base case selected for evaluation was that of an energy-efficient coal-to-methanol plant located in Montana/Wyoming and using the Lurgi conversion process. The following variations of the base coal-methanol case are also analyzed: gasoline from coal with methanol as an intermediate step (Mobil-M); and methanol from coal (Texaco gasification process). For each process, computations are made for the product methanol as a replacement for unleaded gasoline in a conventional spark ignition engine and as a chemical feedstock. For the purpose of the energy analysis, computations are made for three situations regarding mileage of methanol/ gasoline compared to that of regular unleaded gasoline: mileage of the two fuels equal, mileage 4 percent better with gasohol, and mileage 4 percent worse with gasohol. The standard methodology described for the base case applies to all of the variations.

  20. Industrial end-use forecasting that incorporates DSM and air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Tutt, T.; Flory, J.

    1995-05-01

    The California Energy Commission (CEC) and major enregy utilities in California have generally depended on simple aggregate intensity or economic models to forecast energy use in the process industry sector (which covers large industries employing basic processes to transform raw materials, such as paper mills, glass plants, and cement plants). Two recent trends suggests that the time has come to develop a more disaggregate process industry forecasting model. First, recent efforts to improve air quality, especially by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), could significantly affect energy use by the process industry by altering the technologies and processes employed in order to reduce emissions. Second, there is a renewed interest in Demand-Side Management (DSM), not only for utility least-cost planning, but also for improving the economic competitiveness and environmental compliance of the pro{minus}cess industries. A disaggregate forecasting model is critical to help the CEC and utilities evaluate both the air quality and DSM impacts on energy use. A crucial obstacle to the development and use of these detailed process industry forecasting models is the lack of good data about disaggregate energy use in the sector. The CEC is nearing completion of a project to begin to overcome this lack of data. The project is testing methds of developing detailed energy use data, collecting an initial database for a large portion of southern California, and providing recommendations and direction for further data collection efforts.

  1. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and ...

  2. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    11,"Annual",2015,"6/30/1930" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_cons_sum_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_cons_sum_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10/28/2016

  3. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9,"Monthly","8/2016","1/15/1973" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_cons_sum_dcu_nus_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_cons_sum_dcu_nus_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202)

  4. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 APPENDIX B FINAL EIA - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case Presented to: U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by Navigant Consulting, Inc. 1200 19 St. NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 With SAIC 8301 Greensboro Drive McLean, VA 22102 March 2014 Final DISCLAIMER This presentation was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency

  5. Understanding Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology, applications, and economics, for end-use workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, R.J.; McConnell, B.W.

    1993-06-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the state-of-the-art and to what extent existing SMES is a viable option in meeting the needs of utilities and their customers for improving electric service power quality. By defining and analyzing SMES electrical/mechanical performance characteristics, and comparing SMES application benefits with competitive stored energy systems, industry will be able to determine SMES unique applications and potential market penetration. Building on this information base, it would also be possible to evaluate the impact of high temperature superconductors (77 K and 20-35 K) on SMES technology applications. The authors of this report constructed a network of industry contacts and research consultants that were used to collect, update, and analyze ongoing SMES R&D and marketing activities in industries, utilities, and equipment manufacturers. These key resources were utilized to assemble performance characteristics on existing SMES, battery, capacitor, flywheel, and high temperature superconductor (HTS) stored energy technologies. From this information, preliminary stored energy system comparisons were accomplished. In this way, the electric load needs would be readily comparable to the potential solutions and applications offered by each aforementioned energy storage technology.

  6. Refining and end use of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An intregral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop, an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PICS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1994 were in the areas of: subcontract preparation and negotiation; and linear programming modeling.

  7. End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

  8. Control Limits for Building Energy End Use Based on Engineering Judgment, Frequency Analysis, and Quantile Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, G. P.; Pless, S.; Petersen, A.; Long, N.; Scambos, A. T.

    2014-02-01

    Approaches are needed to continuously characterize the energy performance of commercial buildings to allow for (1) timely response to excess energy use by building operators; and (2) building occupants to develop energy awareness and to actively engage in reducing energy use. Energy information systems, often involving graphical dashboards, are gaining popularity in presenting energy performance metrics to occupants and operators in a (near) real-time fashion. Such an energy information system, called Building Agent, has been developed at NREL and incorporates a dashboard for public display. Each building is, by virtue of its purpose, location, and construction, unique. Thus, assessing building energy performance is possible only in a relative sense, as comparison of absolute energy use out of context is not meaningful. In some cases, performance can be judged relative to average performance of comparable buildings. However, in cases of high-performance building designs, such as NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) discussed in this report, relative performance is meaningful only when compared to historical performance of the facility or to a theoretical maximum performance of the facility as estimated through detailed building energy modeling.

  9. Assessment of U.S. Electric End-Use Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Gellings, Clark W.; Wikler, Greg; Ghosh, Debyani

    2006-11-15

    Demand-side management holds significant potential to reduce growth in U.S. energy consumption and peak demand, and in a cost-effective manner. But significant policy interventions will be required to achieve these benefits. (author)

  10. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... energy conservation standard advanced notice of proposed rulemaking (lamps ANOPR). ... published a determination that energy conservation standards for HID lamps would be ...

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4,"Duke Energy Progress - (NC)","Investor-owned",6559067,2292609,1804594,2461864,0 5,"Berkeley Electric Coop Inc","Cooperative",2095651,1269704,244465,581482,0 " ","Total ...

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4,"Wheeling Power Co","Investor-owned",3269892,425005,447849,2397038,0 5,"Black Diamond Power Co","Investor-owned",56232,39152,17080,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wheeler Elec Member Corp","Cooperative",1662817,621444,300425,740948,0 5,"Baldwin County El Member Corp","Cooperative",1361550,911009,450541,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,"Southwestern Public Service Co","Investor-owned",5014741,1127323,1655334,2232084,0 3,"El Paso Electric Co","Investor-owned",1640996,651515,910681,78800,0 4,"City of Farmington - ...

  15. Microsoft Word - Major end uses front page v2 2015-03-31.docx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Market Transformation 7 Historical Shipment Data 8 Residential Gas-Fired Water Heaters 9 Residential Oil-Fired Water Heaters 12 Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters 14 ...

  16. U.S. Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Vermont Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Delaware District of Columbia ...

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3. End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, Donna; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  18. Born-Infeld-type gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, Denis

    2005-09-15

    Generalizations of gravitational Born-Infeld type Lagrangians are investigated. Phenomenological constraints (reduction to Einstein-Hilbert action for small curvature, spin-two ghost freedom, and absence of Coulomb-like Schwarschild singularity) select one effective Lagrangian whose dynamics is dictated by the tensors g{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} and R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}{sub {rho}}{sub {sigma}} (not R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} or the scalar R)

  19. IMPROVED TYPE OF FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.O.

    1961-01-24

    A radiator-type fuel block assembly is described. It has a hexagonal body of neutron fissionable material having a plurality of longitudinal equal- spaced coolant channels therein aligned in rows parallel to each face of the hexagonal body. Each of these coolant channels is hexagonally shaped with the corners rounded and enlarged and the assembly has a maximum temperature isothermal line around each channel which is approximately straight and equidistant between adjacent channels.

  20. Property:DeviceType | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    DeviceType Property Type String Description Used for MHK ISDB Allows Values Instrument;Sensor Pages using the property "DeviceType" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous...

  1. Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Also provided is a ...

  2. Principal Types of Volcanoes | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Types of Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Principal Types of Volcanoes Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author John Watson...

  3. Type C: Caldera Resource | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    C: Caldera Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type C: Caldera Resource Dictionary.png Type C: Caldera Resource: No definition has been...

  4. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1983-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  5. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-10-11

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load. 7 figs.

  6. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1982-01-20

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  7. Property:Geothermal/Type | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "GeothermalType" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest...

  8. Type:Epoch | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Type:Epoch Jump to: navigation, search An Epoch is a measurement for a given length of time. The use of type pages has been deprecated. Please set properties to Quantity and use...

  9. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  10. Crystal of GTP Cyclohydrolase Type IB

    DOEpatents

    Swairjo, Manal A.; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; de Crecy-Lagard, Valerie

    2012-12-11

    This invention relates to a novel, bacterial GTP Cyclohydrolase Type IB enzyme, and the crystal structure thereof.

  11. Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective Equipment Ignition Incident on ... Type B Accident Investigation, Subcontractor Employee Personal Protective Equipment ...

  12. Types of Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Homes Types of Homes Manufactured homes are one type of home that may require special considerations for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. | Photo courtesy of Florida Solar Energy Center. Manufactured homes are one type of home that may require special considerations for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. | Photo courtesy of Florida Solar Energy Center. Some types of homes may require different considerations when it comes to energy efficiency. You may be

  13. Filter type rotor for multistation photometer

    DOEpatents

    Shumate, II, Starling E.

    1977-07-12

    A filter type rotor for a multistation photometer is provided. The rotor design combines the principle of cross-flow filtration with centrifugal sedimentation so that these occur simultaneously as a first stage of processing for suspension type fluids in an analytical type instrument. The rotor is particularly useful in whole-blood analysis.

  14. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), H?{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (?0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Biomass: Types/Characteristics BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass: Types/Characteristics This infographic was created by students from Albany Academies and Academy of the Holy Names in Albany, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their foundational understanding of bioenergy,

  16. Role of amyloids in type II diabetes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    July » Role of amyloids in type II diabetes Role of amyloids in type II diabetes A collaboration between Los Alamos, Yale University, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute published research that sheds light on pathological properties of amyloids identified in type II diabetes. July 6, 2016 Schematic of human amyloid (blue) partially removing a lipid bilayer (model membrane) on a solid support. Schematic of human amyloid (blue) partially removing a lipid bilayer (model membrane) on a solid

  17. Types of Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cells » Types of Fuel Cells Types of Fuel Cells Fuel cells are classified primarily by the kind of electrolyte they employ. This classification determines the kind of electro-chemical reactions that take place in the cell, the kind of catalysts required, the temperature range in which the cell operates, the fuel required, and other factors. These characteristics, in turn, affect the applications for which these cells are most suitable. There are several types of fuel cells currently under

  18. Types of Hydropower Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Plants Types of Hydropower Plants There are three types of hydropower facilities: impoundment, diversion, and pumped storage. Some hydropower plants use dams and some do not. The images below show both types of hydropower plants. Many dams were built for other purposes and hydropower was added later. In the United States, there are about 80,000 dams of which only 2,400 produce power. The other dams are for recreation, stock/farm ponds, flood control, water supply, and irrigation. Hydropower

  19. Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type (Million Cubic Feet) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes ...

  20. Types of Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    selection. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Incandescent Outdoor solar Light-emitting diode (LED) Also learn how energy-efficient lightbulbs compare to traditional...

  1. Archived Reference Building Type: Large Hotel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  2. Archived Reference Building Type: Quick service restaurant

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  3. Archived Reference Building Type: Quick service restaurant

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  4. Archived Reference Building Type: Full service restaurant

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  5. Archived Reference Building Type: Full service restaurant

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  6. Archived Reference Building Type: Primary school

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  7. Archived Reference Building Type: Primary school

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  8. Archived Reference Building Type: Outpatient health care

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  9. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  10. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  11. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  12. Archived Reference Building Type: Small Hotel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. Archived Reference Building Type: Large Hotel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. Archived Reference Building Type: Small Hotel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Archived Reference Building Type: Secondary school

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Archived Reference Building Type: Secondary school

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  17. Archived Reference Building Type: Outpatient health care

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  18. Archived Reference Building Type: Strip mall

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

  19. Archived Reference Building Type: Strip mall

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  20. Archived Reference Building Type: Midrise Apartment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

  1. Archived Reference Building Type: Midrise Apartment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  2. Membrane-Associated Methane Monooygenase from Type X and Type I Methanotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Antholine, William E.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2009-11-30

    Membrane-Associated Methane Monooxygenases from Type X and Type I Methanotrophs A.A. DiSirito and W.E. Antholine Project Number: DE-FG02-00ER15446 Final project report.

  3. Types of Hydropower Turbines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Turbines Types of Hydropower Turbines There are two main types of hydro turbines: impulse and reaction. The type of hydropower turbine selected for a project is based on the height of standing water-referred to as "head"-and the flow, or volume of water, at the site. Other deciding factors include how deep the turbine must be set, efficiency, and cost. Terms used on this page are defined in the glossary. Impulse Turbine The impulse turbine generally uses the velocity of the water to

  4. Property:CompanyType | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    profit Pages using the property "CompanyType" Showing 4 pages using this property. E Eco Wave Power Ltd. + For Profit + N Nvision.Energy + For Profit + R Rentechno + For Profit...

  5. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Anderson, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  6. Renewable Energy Opportunities by Renovation Type

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable energy opportunities should be considered and identified in the earliest stages of Federal project planning and the team should assess the renewable energy options based on the type of...

  7. Development of Osaka gas type planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Iha, M.; Shiratori, A.; Chikagawa, O.

    1996-12-31

    Osaka Gas Co. has been developing a planar type SOFC (OG type SOFC) which has a suitable structure for stacking. Murata Mfg. Co. has begun to develop the OG type SOFC stack through joint program since 1993. Figure 1 shows OG type cell structure. Because each cell is sustained by cell holders acting air manifold, the load of upper cell is not put on the lower cells. Single cell is composed of 3-layered membrane and LaCrO{sub 3} separator. 5 single cells are mounted on the cell holder, connected with Ni felt electrically, and bonded by glassy material sealant. We call the 5-cell stack a unit. Stacking 13 units, we succeeded 870 W generation in 1993. But the power density was low, 0.11 Wcm{sup -2} because of crack in the electrolyte and gas leakage at some cells.

  8. Types of Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Weatherize » Insulation » Types of Insulation Types of Insulation In existing homes, cellulose (here) or other loose-fill materials can be installed in building cavities through holes drilled (usually) on the exterior of the house. After the installation, the holes are plugged and finish materials replaced. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. In existing homes, cellulose (here) or other loose-fill materials can be installed in building cavities through holes

  9. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Topical report: Petroleum Refinery; Linear Programming Model; and Design Basis

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    A model was developed for use in the Bechtel PIMS (Process Industry Modeling System) linear programming software to simulate a generic Midwest (PADD II) petroleum refinery of the future. This ``petroleum-only`` version of the model establishes the size and complexity of the refinery after the year 2000 and prior to the introduction of coal liquids. It should be noted that no assumption has been made on when a plant can be built to produce coal liquids except that it will be after the year 2000. The year 2000 was chosen because it is the latest year where fuel property and emission standards have been set by the Environmental Protection Agency. It assumes the refinery has been modified to accept crudes that are heavier in gravity and higher in sulfur than today`s average crude mix. In addition, the refinery has also been modified to produce a product slate of transportation fuels of the future (i.e. 40% reformulated gasolines). This model will be used as a basis for determining the optimum scheme for processing coal liquids in a petroleum refinery. This report summarizes the design basis for this ``petroleum only`` LP refinery model. A report detailing the refinery configuration when coal liquids are processed will be provided at a later date.

  10. Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, David B.

    2004-09-04

    This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

  11. Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial And Residential Building End-Use Equipment And Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    BTO held a public meeting to solicit comments from the public on a draft framework. View the agenda, presentations, and summary notes.

  12. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.H.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes.

  13. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.

    1985-12-23

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  14. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  15. Fate of thermal log type Q balls

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Kasuya, Shinta; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-11-15

    We study time evolution of the Q ball in thermal logarithmic potential using lattice simulations. As the temperature decreases due to the cosmic expansion, the thermal logarithmic term in the potential is eventually overcome by a mass term, and we confirm that the Q ball transforms from the thick-wall type to the thin-wall type for a positive coefficient of radiative corrections to the mass term, as recently suggested. Moreover, we find that the Q ball finally ''melts down'' when the Q-ball solution disappears. We also discuss the effects of this phenomenon on the detectability of gravitational waves from the Q-ball formation.

  16. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Midrise Apartment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  17. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  18. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Primary school

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  19. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Medium office

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  20. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Hospital

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  1. Wind turbine of cross-flow type

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungstrom, O.

    1982-04-20

    Wind turbine of cross-flow type with curved or in sections straight vanes (1,2,9). Two vanes or sets of blades are formed in planes parallel to the rotor axis (3) and with the blade planes disposed approximately perpendicularly to one another.

  2. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Large Hotel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  3. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small Hotel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  4. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  5. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small office

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  6. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  7. Ideal bandpasses for type Ia supernova cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tamara M.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Kim, Alex G.

    2005-10-24

    To use type Ia supernovae as standard candles for cosmologywe need accurate broadband magnitudes. In practice the observed magnitudemay differ from the ideal magnitude-redshift relationship either throughintrinsic inhomogeneities in the type Ia supernova population or throughobservational error. Here we investigate how we can choose filterbandpasses to reduce the error caused by both these effects. We find thatbandpasses with large integral fluxes and sloping wings are best able tominimise several sources of observational error, and are also leastsensitive to intrinsic differences in type Ia supernovae. The mostimportant feature of a complete filter set for type Ia supernovacosmology is that each bandpass be a redshifted copy of the first. Wedesign practical sets of redshifted bandpasses that are matched totypical high resistivity CCD and HgCdTe infra-red detector sensitivities.These are designed to minimise systematic error in well observedsupernovae, final designs for specific missions should also considersignal-to-noise requirements and observing strategy. In addition wecalculate how accurately filters need to be calibrated in order toachieve the required photometric accuracy of future supernova cosmologyexperiments such as the SuperNova-Acceleration-Probe (SNAP), which is onepossible realisation of the Joint Dark-Energy mission (JDEM). We considerthe effect of possible periodic miscalibrations that may arise from theconstruction of an interference filter.

  8. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Strip mall

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  9. Compact fast analyzer of rotary cuvette type

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1976-01-01

    A compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type is provided for simultaneously determining concentrations in a multiplicity of discrete samples using either absorbance or fluorescence measurement techniques. A rigid, generally rectangular frame defines optical passageways for the absorbance and fluorescence measurement systems. The frame also serves as a mounting structure for various optical components as well as for the cuvette rotor mount and drive system. A single light source and photodetector are used in making both absorbance and fluorescence measurements. Rotor removal and insertion are facilitated by a swing-out drive motor and rotor mount. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates generally to concentration measuring instruments and more specifically to a compact fast analyzer of the rotary cuvette type which is suitable for making either absorbance or fluorescence measurements. It was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  10. Type IV COPV Cold Gas Operation Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Type IV COPV Cold Gas Operation Challenges DAVID W. GOTTHOLD November 30, 2015 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Cold Gas Motivation and Challenges November 30, 2015 2 200 K H 2 Lower pressure Higher density H 2 CGO ~25% CF savings Cost Savings from reduced CF use Cold gas operation allows for reduced pressures for the same volume for significant CF and cost reductions. Materials properties change significantly at cold gas temperatures and must be studied. Example: HDPE DBT ~ 200 K Higher

  11. Filter:Incentives By Type | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    By Type Jump to: navigation, search This filter covers the property IncentiveType. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFilter:IncentivesByType&oldid258666...

  12. Property:NEPA Application Type | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Application Type Property Type String Allows Values NOI;GPD;POO;POU;POD;ROW;Sundry Notice Pages using the property "NEPA...

  13. Waste minimization and recycling of listed hazardous wastes in petroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Koopersmith, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    Refiners have many options available to optimize hazardous waste programs. The Scalfuel{trademark} process is one such program for effectively transforming various types of refinery oily sludges into a high solids content, high Btu, low water content waste-derived fuel. This waste-derived fuel is widely accepted by permitted cement kilns. Five hundred thirty four truckloads from eight refineries have been successfully recycled at seven different cement kilns.

  14. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Subcontractor Radioactive...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Upon arrival, an incoming radiological survey was performed. PDF icon Type B Accident ... Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC - EA-2005-04 Type B Accident ...

  15. Thermal Analysis of Ball Type Fuel Element for PBR. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Thermal Analysis of Ball Type Fuel Element for PBR. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Analysis of Ball Type Fuel Element for PBR. Authors: ...

  16. CV-1: Magmatic Geothermal Play Type | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    CV-1: Magmatic Geothermal Play Type (Redirected from Magmatic Geothermal Play Type) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF CV-1: Magmatic Geothermal...

  17. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Processing Facility on October 6, 2009 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the ... This report documents the results of the Type B Accident Investigation Board (Board) ...

  18. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15, 2001, Grout Injection ... Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15, 2001, Grout Injection ...

  19. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 8,...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Type B Accident Investigation on the February 17, 2004, Personal Injury Accident, Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven ...

  20. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Access the recording and download ...