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  1. AWS Truewind | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    con":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: AWS Truewind Web Site1 WindNavigator2 Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL...

  2. AWS Truewind LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Name: AWS Truewind LLC Place: Albany, New York Zip: NY 12203 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: AWS Truewind has mainly been providing general services in the wind-power...

  3. TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    TrueWind Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: TrueWind Solutions Place: Albany, NY Website: www.awstruepower.com References: TrueWind Solutions1 Information About...

  4. AW Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search Name: AW Energy Address: Lars Sonckin kaari 16 Place: Espoo Zip: FI-02600 Region: Finland Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +358 9 7262404...

  5. American Way Solar AWS | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    navigation, search Name: American Way Solar (AWS) Place: Plzen, Czech Republic Sector: Solar Product: Czech subsidiary of US PV panel manufacturer, American Way Solar (AWS)....

  6. Austrian Wirtschaftsservice (AWS) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Vienna, Austria Website: www.awsg.atportal References: AWS1 "The Austrian Economic Service (AWS) is to encourage Austrian bank for the middle class. As a special bank...

  7. Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc AWS | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Waste Solutions Inc AWS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Agricultural Waste Solutions Inc (AWS) Place: Westlake Village, California Zip: CA 91361 Product: Agricultural Waste...

  8. MHK Projects/AW Energy EMEC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    AW Energy successfully demonstrated a 1:3 scale prototype device at EMEC (European Marine Energy Center) in both calm and rough winter conditions. Bottom wave velocity measurements...

  9. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Automatic Weather Station AWS 2700 | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Weather Station AWS 2700 < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help...

  10. G. Bacelli, V.S. Neary, A.W. Murphy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Compressible degree of freedom (CDOF): A potentially disruptive strategy for boosting wave energy converter (WEC) performance G. Bacelli, V.S. Neary, A.W. Murphy Water Power ...

  11. MHK Projects/AWS II | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    20 Main Overseeing Organization AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  12. Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  13. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  14. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Schneider, Thomas W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO.sub.2. In another embodiment, the SiO.sub.2 is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system.

  15. Acoustic wave (AW) based moisture sensor for use with corrosive gases

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Frye, G.C.; Schneider, T.W.

    1996-11-05

    Moisture corrosive gas stream is measured as a function of the difference in resonant frequencies between two acoustic wave (AW) devices, each with a film which accepts at least one of the components of the gas stream. One AW is located in the gas stream while the other is located outside the gas stream but in the same thermal environment. In one embodiment, the film is a hydrophilic material such as SiO{sub 2}. In another embodiment, the SiO{sub 2} is covered with another film which is impermeable to the corrosive gas, such that the AW device in the gas stream measures only the water vapor. In yet another embodiment, the film comprises polyethylene oxide which is hydrophobic and measures only the partial pressure of the corrosive gas. Other embodiments allow for compensation of drift in the system. 8 figs.

  16. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  17. HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TH Ii ' HA' R,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M iANY A December 30, 1955 U. S. Atomic Energy Commission Oak Ridge OperationwOfflce Post Office Box "E" Oak Ridge, Tennessee Attention: Mr. T. ...

  18. Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AW-105

    SciTech Connect

    DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Lambie, R.W.; Stephens, R.H.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-28

    In May 1990, double-shell Tank 241-AW-105 was sampled to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also addresses expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background tank information. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-AW-105, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this waste tank. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are given based on safety issues and further characterization needs.

  19. Criticality safety evaluation of disposing of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank AW-105

    SciTech Connect

    ROGERS, C.A.

    1999-06-04

    A criticality safety evaluation is made of the disposal of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank (DST) AW-105 located in the 200 east area of Hanford Site. The technical basis is provided for limits and controls to be used in the development of a criticality prevention specification (CPS). A model of K Basin sludge is developed to account for fuel burnup. The iron/uranium mass ration required to ensure an acceptable magrin of subcriticality is determined.

  20. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04

    This document reports the results of a boildown study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-106 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27 °C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C.

  1. Final Report for the Erosion-Corrosion Anaysis of Tank 241-AW-02E Feed Pump Pit Jumpers B-2 and 1-4 Removed from Service in 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.

    2014-04-07

    This document is the final report summarizing the results in the examination of two pipe sections (jumpers) from the tank 241-AW-02E feed pump pit in the 241-AW tank farm. These pipe section samples consisted of jumper AW02E-WT-J-[B – 2] and jumper AW02E-WT-J-[1 – 4]. For the remainder of this report, these jumpers will be referred to as B – 2 and 1 – 4.

  2. Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the finalreport

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-02-20

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document.

  3. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Pignata, G.; Bufano, F.; Bayless, A. J.; Pritchard, T. A.; Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S.; Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Haislip, J. B.; Harutyunyan, A.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ∼ 20 M {sub ☉}, progenitor radius R ∼ 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (∼430 R {sub ☉}), explosion energy E ∼ 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ∼0.06 M {sub ☉}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ☉} of the Type IIP events.

  4. THE RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR OF SUPERNOVA 2012aw (PTF12bvh) IN MESSIER 95

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Mailcode 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V., E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: cenko@berkeley.edu, E-mail: afilippenko@berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); and others

    2012-09-10

    We report on the direct detection and characterization of the probable red supergiant (RSG) progenitor of the intermediate-luminosity Type II-Plateau (II-P) supernova (SN) 2012aw in the nearby (10.0 Mpc) spiral galaxy Messier 95 (M95; NGC 3351). We have identified the star in both Hubble Space Telescope images of the host galaxy, obtained 17-18 yr prior to the explosion, and near-infrared ground-based images, obtained 6-12 yr prior to the SN. The luminous supergiant showed evidence for substantial circumstellar dust, manifested as excess line-of-sight extinction. The effective total-to-selective ratio of extinction to the star was R'{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 4.35, which is significantly different from that of diffuse interstellar dust (i.e., R{sub V} = 3.1), and the total extinction to the star was therefore, on average, A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 3.1 mag. We find that the observed spectral energy distribution for the progenitor star is consistent with an effective temperature of 3600 K (spectral type M3), and that the star therefore had a bolometric magnitude of -8.29. Through comparison with recent theoretical massive-star evolutionary tracks we can infer that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass 15 {approx}< M{sub ini}(M{sub Sun }) < 20. Interpolating by eye between the available tracks, we surmise that the star had initial mass {approx}17-18 M{sub Sun }. The circumstellar dust around the progenitor must have been destroyed in the explosion, as the visual extinction to the SN is found to be low (A{sub V} = 0.24 mag with R{sub V} = 3.1).

  5. Boildown Study on Supernatant Liquid Retrieved from AW-106 in December 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.

    2013-06-04

    This document reports the results of a boil down study using a composite created from supernatant liquid grab samples retrieved from tank 241-AW-I06 in December of 2012. The composite was made using predetermined volumes of the grab samples which accounted for layering of the supernatant liquid in the tank. The finished composite was a clear, yellow liquid containing no visible solids at hot cell ambient temperatures (24 - 27°C). The density of the test composite was measured in the hot cell immediately before the boildown study and was 1.266 g/mL at 27.1 °C. The boiling temperature of the composite was measured at three different pressures (40, 60, and 80 Torr) throughout the volume reduction, and the results show steadily increasing boiling temperatures with increasing volume reduction and no significant discontinuities. Moderate foaming was observed at the onset of the boildown. The foaming disappeared during the first reduction step, and minimal foaming was observed throughout the rest of the study. The bulk densities at 18.0 °C (D{sub Bulk}{sup 18 °C}) and quantities of settled and centrifuged solids were measured on samples of the boildown concentrates. Estimated values of the bulk densities at the 60-Torr boiling temperatures (D{sub Bulk}{sup 60 Torr}) were also calculated. Solids were first observed at boildown temperatures when the % VWR reached 39.3%. The quantity of solids in the composite quickly increased after this initial formation; the amount of centrifuged solids increased by 22% as the %WVR increased from 39.3 to 44.1 %. A small amount of solids did appear in the samples collected prior to the initial formation during the boildown. These solids precipitated while they sat at hot cell ambient temperature and in the 18. 0 °C water bath. Analysis of boil down test samples indicated that natrophosphate (Na7{sub 3}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{centerdot} 19 H{sub 2}O) and kogarkoite (Na3FS04) accounted for a majority of the initial solids (~80% of the

  6. L AW R E N C E N A T I O N A L LABORATORY LIVERMORE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AW R E N C E N A T I O N A L LABORATORY LIVERMORE Atoms for Peace After 50 Years R.N. Schock, E.S. Vergino, N. Joeck, and R.F. Lehman Issues in Science and Technology Spring 2004 Spring 2004 UCRL-JRNL-203590 This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility

  7. Comparisons of ANS, ASME, AWS, and NFPA standards cited in the NRC standard review plan, NUREG-0800, and related documents

    SciTech Connect

    Ankrum, A.R.; Bohlander, K.L.; Gilbert, E.R.; Spiesman, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    This report provides the results of comparisons of the cited and latest versions of ANS, ASME, AWS and NFPA standards cited in the NRC Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG 0800) and related documents. The comparisons were performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in support of the NRC`s Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Significant changes to the standards, from the cited version to the latest version, are described and discussed in a tabular format for each standard. Recommendations for updating each citation in the Standard Review Plan are presented. Technical considerations and suggested changes are included for related regulatory documents (i.e., Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations) citing the standard. The results and recommendations presented in this document have not been subjected to NRC staff review.

  8. PBi3aws

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    haaYr, JEorpwl that the dust rsu rwt-wlg rcrs lx3 uma2-, QLa wcnlct b8 expsatml. ... &.4mwuae AU mplpmnt mad flae31-8, eawrpt dust cmUwWon aml ventlltrtlng uquipamt, M ...

  9. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the extremely osmotolerant diphenol degrading bacterium Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T, and emended description of the genus Halotalea

    SciTech Connect

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Fasseas, Constantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Zervakis, Georgios I.

    2015-08-13

    Members of the genus Halotalea (family Halomonadaceae) are of high significance since they can tolerate the greatest glucose and maltose concentrations ever reported for known bacteria and are involved in the degradation of industrial effluents. Here, the characteristics and the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation of Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T are described. The microorganism was sequenced as a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, and it is the only strain within the genus Halotalea having its genome sequenced. The genome is 4,467,826 bp long and consists of 40 scaffolds with 64.62 % average GC content. A total of 4,104 genes were predicted, comprising of 4,028 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes. Most protein-coding genes (87.79 %) were assigned to a putative function. Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T encodes the catechol and protocatechuate degradation to β-ketoadipate via the β-ketoadipate and protocatechuate ortho-cleavage degradation pathway, and it possesses the genetic ability to detoxify fluoroacetate, cyanate and acrylonitrile. Lastly, an emended description of the genus Halotalea Ntougias et al. 2007 is also provided in order to describe the delayed fermentation ability of the type strain.

  10. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the extremely osmotolerant diphenol degrading bacterium Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T, and emended description of the genus Halotalea

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Fasseas, Constantinos; et al

    2015-08-13

    Members of the genus Halotalea (family Halomonadaceae) are of high significance since they can tolerate the greatest glucose and maltose concentrations ever reported for known bacteria and are involved in the degradation of industrial effluents. Here, the characteristics and the permanent-draft genome sequence and annotation of Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T are described. The microorganism was sequenced as a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, and it is the only strain within the genus Halotalea having its genome sequenced. The genome is 4,467,826 bp longmore » and consists of 40 scaffolds with 64.62 % average GC content. A total of 4,104 genes were predicted, comprising of 4,028 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes. Most protein-coding genes (87.79 %) were assigned to a putative function. Halotalea alkalilenta AW-7T encodes the catechol and protocatechuate degradation to β-ketoadipate via the β-ketoadipate and protocatechuate ortho-cleavage degradation pathway, and it possesses the genetic ability to detoxify fluoroacetate, cyanate and acrylonitrile. Lastly, an emended description of the genus Halotalea Ntougias et al. 2007 is also provided in order to describe the delayed fermentation ability of the type strain.« less

  11. AWS Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Zip: IV17 1SN Product: Inverness-based company established to commercialise the Archimedes Wave Swing. Coordinates: 48.55324, -110.689764 Show Map Loading map......

  12. Mk12A/W78 ground test project (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Kyle R

    2010-12-01

    The slides present the scope, objectives and status of the Mk12A1W78 Ground Test Project for the purpose of updating the ICBM Project Officers Group. In addition, project constraints and risks are discussed.

  13. 272-AW_Bldg_Renovation_cx00017 (2).pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

  14. AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Commercial Pilot Project This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Archimedes Wave Swing This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved...

  15. 272-AW_Bldg_Renovation_Mod1_CX-00017 r1.pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

  16. AWS Pilot Report M. O'Connor, Y. Hines July 2016 Version 1...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... general Internet, science flows will be exposed to a series of networks designed for a huge numbers of small transfers without a clear chain of support for when things go wrong. ...

  17. Vitrification and Product Testing of AW-101 and AN-107 Pretreated Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Gary L.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary objective for vitrifying the LAW samples is to generate glass products for subsequent product testing. The work presented in this report is divided into 6 work elements: 1) Glass Fabrication, 2) Chemical Composition, 3) Radiochemical Composition, 4) Crystalline and Non-crystalline Phase Determination, and 5) Release Rate (Modified PCT). These work elements will help demonstrate the RPP-WTP projects ability to satisfy the product requirements concerning, chemical and radionuclide reporting, waste loading, identification and quantification of crystalline and non-crystalline phases, and waste form leachability. VOA, SVOA, dioxins, furans, PCBs, and total cyanide analyses will be reported in as separate document (WTP-RPT-005).

  18. Test procedure for use of the shear vane in tanks 103-SY, 103-AN, and 103-AW

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, M.D.; Waters, E.

    1995-01-01

    This is a record copy of a test procedure for application of the full-scale shear vane to underground waste tanks at Hanford. The introduction of the report provides background information on the development and proof-testing of the shear vane, as well as information about its current location. The document was originally prepared in 1988, and the work as shelved temporarily for lack of funds. Activities to utilize the shear vane will be expedited by use of this information.

  19. Ecology Information Request HgC2H6 for 241-AW Tank Farm, 01/13/2015

    SciTech Connect

    Dyekman, Dale L.; Greene, Michael R.

    2015-01-15

    This information was requested by Phil Gent of Ecology on 12/18/2014 and confirmed on 01/13/2015 to Dale Dyekman.

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION REPORT FOR TANKS 241-AW-103 & 241-AZ-102 & 241-AN-106 & 241-AN-107 & 241-AY-101 & 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-08-22

    Corrosion rates using supernatant samples retrieved from near the top of the liquid layer were determined for the tanks. Corrosion rates using settled solids (saltcake) were determined. The supernatant samples were tested as received without argon sparging. The settled solid sample segments were extruded under anaerobic condition and kept under a sweep of humidified argon gas during 'the electrochemical corrosion testing. The class of steel used to construct the tank in question was used, and test coupons were allowed to equilibrate for a minimum of 18 hours before a Tafel scan was initiated. The coupons were scanned from -250 mV to +250 mV from the rest or open circuit potential. The corrosion rate is reported along with the corrosion current measurement, open circuit potential, and a chi-square statistic generated by the instrument controlling and analysis algorithm.

  1. ES&H Manual Welding and Brazing Supplement ISSUING AUTHORITY...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Code-Aluminum AWS D1.6, Structural Welding Code-Stainless Steel AWS B2.1-X-XXX, Standard Welding Procedure Specifications AWS D1.3, Structural Welding Code-Sheet ...

  2. MHK Projects | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    information: Loading... 40MW Lewis project ADM 3 ADM 4 ADM 5 AHERC 5kW deployment AW Energy EMEC AWS II Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Agucadoura Akwanga Nigeria SHP...

  3. Community Wind Handbook/Conduct a Wind Resource Estimate | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    "Windustry. Wind Resource Assessment" "AWS Scientific for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Wind Resource Assessment Handbook" Retrieved from "http:...

  4. Bulk- and layer-heterojunction phototransistors based on poly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of magnitude higher than that of BH-FEpTs (10sup -1AW) under the same conditions. ... (Tianjin University), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300072 (China) Tianjin Key ...

  5. Agenda: Wednesday, May 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... AWS Truepower Quantifying Uncertainty in Solar Energy Estimates Kevin Lang, SAIC Improving Estimation of Plane-of-Array Irradiance Ben Bourne, SunPower Diffuse ...

  6. NREL: Wind Research - New Wind Resource Maps Reach Higher Heights

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    capacity map at a 140-meter hub height. Photo courtesy of WINDExchange August 11, 2015 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and AWS Truepower LLC recently released maps...

  7. Aquatera | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Aquatera Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aquatera Place: United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Sector: Services Product: Environmental services and products provider. References:...

  8. MHK Projects/Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesArchimedes Wave Swing Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  9. Table 3a. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs from...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a","W","-","-","-","-","-" "Uinta Basin","Alabama","W","-","-","-","-","-" "Uinta Basin","California","-","W","-","-","-","-" "Uinta Basin","Colorado","W","W","W","W","-","-"...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reactors (21) specific nuclear reactors and associated ... temperature (14) plasma physics and fusion technology (14) ... Kline, J. L. (4) Langdon, A. B. (4) Longest, A.W. (4) ...

  11. 2015 Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    comprise this report. 2015 ANNUAL REPORT FUEL AND LUBRICANT TECHNOLOGIES ii Nomenclature ... AVFL Advanced VehicleFuelLubricants AW antiwear Bench. benchmark BHT butylated hydroxy ...

  12. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse November 2010

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Aot & lAnsce Division stAFF AwArDeD DeFense ProgrAms AwArDs oF excellence 8 LAnsce-ns ... University of New South Wales). The team received a Defense Programs Award of Excellence. ...

  13. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A chemical sensor (1) includes two or more pairs of interdigital electrodes (10) having different periodicities. Each pair is comprised of a first electrode (10a) and a second electrode (10b). The electrodes are patterned on a surface of a piezoelectric substrate (12). Each pair of electrodes may launch and receive various acoustic waves (AW), including a surface acoustic wave (SAW), and may also launch and receive several acoustic plate modes (APMs). The frequencies associated with each are functions of the transducer periodicity as well as the velocity of the particular AW in the chosen substrate material. An AW interaction region (13) exists between each pair of electrodes. Circuitry (20, 40) is used to launch, receive, and monitor the propagation characteristics of the AWs and may be configured in an intermittent measurement fashion or in a continuous measurement fashion. Perturbations to the AW velocity and attenuation are recorded at several frequencies and provide the sensor response.

  14. 10 Questions for a Scientist: Dr. Adam Weber of Lawrence Berkeley...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... AW: While I have always enjoyed the Einstein quote, "If we knew what we were doing it wouldn't be called research," I would say that the scientist I admire most would have to be ...

  15. DOE-0336

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    by this procedure. "Danger Do Not Operate" tags shall be constructed to include an adhesive laminate to be affixed after tag completion. * 3x5-12 Danger Tag, (AW) 54-6001-955....

  16. IHS Standards Expert

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ACI AMT (now B11) ANS ANSI historical standards (1986- ) ANSI nuclear standards API (selected) ASCE ASHRAE ASME ASME-BPVC ASQ ASSESAFE ASTM AWS DRM (11th ed.) EIA IAPMO 2009 ...

  17. Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Scotrenewables Wind Power and Marine Power Ltd Place: Orkey, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Sector:...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser Jiao, Y. ; SLAC Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. ; Wu, J. ; Cai, Y. ; Chao, A.W. ; Fawley, W.M. ; ...

  19. Microsoft Word - chapter FeNiCrMo_ver4.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... OH, 1990, pp. 140-194. 2. MR Louthan, RG Derrick, JA Donovan, and GR Caskey, "Hydrogen Transport in Iron and Steel", in Effect of Hydrogen on Behavior of Materials, AW Thompson ...

  20. Microsoft Word - TPHP9420.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Metall Trans 8A (1977) 265-272. 7. MR Louthan, RG Derrick, JA Donovan and GR Caskey. Hydrogen Transport in Iron and Steel. in: AW Thompson and IM Bernstein, editor. Effect of ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - Reducing Solar Resource Error Through...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    +1 877-899-3463 2011 AWS Truepower, LLC 1. Sources of Energy Uncertainty 2. Solar Resource & Data Sources 3. Case Study: Impact of On-Site Data on Energy Assessment 4. Results: ...

  2. Klamath Falls: High-Power Acoustic Well Stimulation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Brian

    2006-07-24

    Acoustic well stimulation (AWS) technology uses high-power sonic waves from specific frequency spectra in an attempt to stimulate production in a damaged or low-production wellbore. AWS technology is one of the most promising technologies in the oil and gas industry, but it has proven difficult for the industry to develop an effective downhole prototype. This collaboration between Klamath Falls Inc. and the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) included a series of tests using high-power ultrasonic tools to stimulate oil and gas production. Phase I testing was designed and implemented to verify tool functionality, power requirements, and capacity of high-power AWS tools. The purpose of Phase II testing was to validate the production response of wells with marginal production rates to AWS stimulation and to capture and identify any changes in the downhole environment after tool deployment. This final report presents methodology and results.

  3. Casimir Forces On A Silicon Micromechanical Chip (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Zou, J. 1 ; Marset, zsolt 2 ; Rodriguez, A.W. 3 ; Reid, M. T.H. 4 ; McCauley, A. P. 4 ; Kravchenko, Ivan I 5 ; Bao, Y. 2 ; Johnson, S. G. 4 ; Chan, Ho Bun ...

  4. Offshore Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Offshore Wind Power Place: St Albans, United Kingdom Zip: AL1 3AW Sector: Wind energy Product: Formed to develop offshore wind farms around the coast of Great Britain. References:...

  5. How Saving Energy Might Be Contagious

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    I was wondering the other day if saving energy might be, you know, contagious. And yes, that's an awfully dorky thing to think. But I found myself wondering that because I really was being a bit of...

  6. PURE the Clean Planet Trust | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    PURE the Clean Planet Trust Jump to: navigation, search Name: PURE the Clean Planet Trust Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: EC2N 4AW Product: Pure (the Clean...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM ...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Xiao_NanoLett-2013.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of GaS nanosheet photodetectors made on SiO 2 Si substrates and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates exhibit a photo-responsivity at 254nm up to 4.2 AW...

  9. Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnered with AWS Truepower, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Energy Departments Wind Program released maps in December 2014 that highlight the potential for wind energy...

  10. Trading Emissions PLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Trading Emissions PLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trading Emissions PLC Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC2N 4AW Product: Trading Emissions PLC is an investment fund...

  11. OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... PBI-3.22 OLIN 3 Solid-Phase Aluminum ... PBI1-7.3 OLI N 7 ARRA AW-1 04 Corrosion Probe ... d) Work Control process and Conduct of Operations improvements (e.g., ...

  12. Orkney Marine Energy Test Centre | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Test Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Orkney Marine Energy Test Centre Place: Orkney, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Product: Its aim is to stimulate and accelerate the...

  13. European Marine Energy Centre Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Marine Energy Centre Ltd EMEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: European Marine Energy Centre Ltd (EMEC) Place: Stromness, United Kingdom Zip: KW16 3AW Product: EMEC aims to...

  14. R&D 100 Awards: 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4 2014 R&D 100 Awards Discoveries, developments, advancements and inventions at Los Alamos make America-and the world-a better and safer place and bolster national security. AWS: A ...

  15. Property:Project Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects40MW Lewis project + 0 + MHK ProjectsADM 5 + 1 + MHK ProjectsAWS II + 1 + MHK Projects...

  16. Property:Number of Build Out Units Deployed | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects40MW Lewis project + 50 + MHK ProjectsAHERC 5kW deployment + 1 + MHK ProjectsAWS II + 20 + MHK...

  17. Descriptions and diagrams of the primary and annulus ventilation systems of the double-shell tank farms as of January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, A.E.; Waters, E.D.

    1994-12-28

    This document is a compilation of information describing the ventilation systems of the Double-Shell Tank farms (214-AN, -AP, -AW, -AW, -AY, -AZ, and -SY). A general description of the primary tank and annulus ventilation systems is given along with specific information on the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, condensers, preheaters, exhaust fans, and piping. This information is considered to be current as of January 1988. 38 refs, 20 figs, 30 tabs.

  18. Resources for Veteran Recruitment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Resources for Veteran Recruitment Resources for Veteran Recruitment USEFUL WEBSITES FOR VETERAN/MILITARY RECRUITMENT AND HIRING Many of the following websites provide free services for employers looking to hire Veterans and transitioning military service members. WEBSITES - Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2): http://wtc.army.mil/aw2/index.html - official site for the DoD program for the severely wounded interested in employment. - Clearedjobs.net: http://clearedjobs.net/ - Fee for service,

  19. Nonlinear generation of kinetic-scale waves by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvn waves and nonlocal spectral transport in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-04-20

    We study the nonlocal nonlinear coupling and generation of kinetic Alfvn waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvn waves (MHD AWs) in conditions typical for the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. This cross-scale process provides an alternative to the turbulent energy cascade passing through many intermediate scales. The nonlinearities we study are proportional to the scalar products of wave vectors and hence are called 'scalar' ones. Despite the strong Landau damping of kinetic waves, we found fast growing KAWs and KSWs at perpendicular wavelengths close to the ion gyroradius. Using the parametric decay formalism, we investigate two independent decay channels for the pump AW: forward decay (involving co-propagating product waves) and backward decay (involving counter-propagating product waves). The growth rate of the forward decay is typically 0.05 but can exceed 0.1 of the pump wave frequency. The resulting spectral transport is nonlocal and anisotropic, sharply increasing perpendicular wavenumbers but not parallel ones. AWs and KAWs propagating against the pump AW grow with about the same rate and contribute to the sunward wave flux in the solar wind. Our results suggest that the nonlocal decay of MHD AWs into KAWs and KSWs is a robust mechanism for the cross-scale spectral transport of the wave energy from MHD to dissipative kinetic scales in the solar wind and similar media.

  20. PROTON HEATING IN SOLAR WIND COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE WITH COLLISIONS BETWEEN COUNTER-PROPAGATING WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2015-11-10

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. As opposed to the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfvén waves (AWs), anti-sunward AWs are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond, respectively, to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Elsässer variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orthogonality between the possible oscillation direction of one wave and the possible propagation direction of the other. The associated protons are revealed to exhibit bi-directional asymmetric beams in their velocity distributions: sunward beams appear in short, narrow patterns and anti-sunward in broad extended tails. It is suggested that multiple types of wave–particle interactions, i.e., cyclotron and Landau resonances with AWs and SMWs at kinetic scales, are taking place to jointly heat the protons perpendicular and in parallel.

  1. CX-002877: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    272-AW Building Renovation Project, Hanford SiteCX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.22, B2.1, B1.3Date: 06/23/2010Location(s): Richland, WashingtonOffice(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  2. Nick Balthaser! Wayne Hurlbert! LBNL/NERSC Storage Systems Group

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    o f 9 me i n p roduc9on - Drive f eatures i n u se * Data V olume - Carts, T B, fi les * Workload - Exchangesunit 9 me - IO R ates: R aw v s. H PSS * Error R ates * Data L...

  3. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  4. ISO and US Standards for Thermal Cutting and Joint Preparation (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hochanadel, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-02

    The summary of this presentation is: (1) There is a lot of shared space between AWS and ISO documents; (2) Several areas use the same specifications and standards, especially true in process materials; and (3) Equipment is one area with very little overlap.

  5. I\\r'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r' ( g-. ic' fz .; w .fl : L ' ..j : i ?- z -2"" . 2,-3X- Aw23-t 11, 1949 J c. s. ?.%omic ?zaru ccm3ission 7-t i-n,-;ra-& 3&-p.Cz' ;"ica P. ' 3. 30x 3 Eacsrs 17, lIaw York :....

  6. CX-003458: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    272-AW Building Renovation Project Conducted Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment ActCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.15, B1.22, B2.1Date: 08/16/2010Location(s): Richland, WashingtonOffice(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office

  7. Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, D.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-24

    This document details the results of the field Acceptance Testing of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System on the waste tank exhaust stacks in 241-AW and 241-AN tank farm. The monitors will be used to measure hydrogen and ammonia from the exhaust stacks.

  8. DEMO: Action Recommendation for Cyber Resilience

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Luke R.; Curtis, Darren S.; Choudhury, Sutanay; Oler, Kiri J.; Nordquist, Peter L.; Chen, Pin-Yu; Ray, Indrajit

    2015-09-01

    In this demonstration we show the usefulness of our unifying graph-based model for the representation of infrastructure, behavior, and missions of cyber enterprise in both a software simulation and on an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance. We show the effectiveness of our recommendation algorithm for preserving various system health metrics in both cases.

  9. An investigation of the radiolytic stability of a resorcinol- formaldehyde ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Bibler, N.E.; Bibler, J.P.

    1993-12-31

    Radiolytic stability of a resorcinol-formaldehyde polycondensation-type cation exchange resin was investigated for up to lE09 rads total dose. The resorcinol-formaldehyde resin is a resin that has potential cesium decontamination applications at Pacific Northwest and Savannah River. We have determined both radiation and storage effects on performance of the resin using 101-AW Hanford simulant and ASTM Type-I water. Distribution coefficient determinations, total carbon analysis, and physical observations lead us to conclude that radiation up to lE08 rads does not significantly affect the performance of the resin. The resin is more stable to radiation in water than in 101-AW Hanford simulant. Also radiation or storage does not affect the thermal stability of the resin. Gas production rates for several resin slurries increased in the order of resin/101-AW Hanford simulant, resin/ASTM water, and resin/0.5 M HNO{sub 3}. H{sub 2} is produced from radiolysis of resin in 101-AW Hanford simulant with a G value of G(H{sub 2}) of 0.11 {plus_minus} 0.02 molecules/100eV and in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} with a G value of G(H{sub 2}) of 0.27 {plus_minus} 0.02 molecules/lOOeV.

  10. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  11. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, James Edward

    2016-03-01

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  12. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2006-06-06

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  13. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, III, James Edward

    2009-03-17

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  14. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, III, James E.

    2011-02-08

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  15. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, James Edward

    2013-12-10

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity great than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelenths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  16. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Mazur, Eric; Carey, III, James E.

    2010-08-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  17. Silicon-based visible and near-infrared optoelectric devices

    DOEpatents

    Carey, III, James Edward; Mazur, Eric

    2011-12-20

    In one aspect, the present invention provides a silicon photodetector having a surface layer that is doped with sulfur inclusions with an average concentration in a range of about 0.5 atom percent to about 1.5 atom percent. The surface layer forms a diode junction with an underlying portion of the substrate. A plurality of electrical contacts allow application of a reverse bias voltage to the junction in order to facilitate generation of an electrical signal, e.g., a photocurrent, in response to irradiation of the surface layer. The photodetector exhibits a responsivity greater than about 1 A/W for incident wavelengths in a range of about 250 nm to about 1050 nm, and a responsivity greater than about 0.1 A/W for longer wavelengths, e.g., up to about 3.5 microns.

  18. Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G J; Swanson, J L

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).

  19. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  20. Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

  1. Technical basis for installation of the double shell tank exhaust flow monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, W.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11

    This document presents the technical bases for installation of flow meters on the ventilation exhaust ducts of the flammable gas watch list double shell tanks (241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AN-107, 241-AW-101 and 241-SY-103), the saltwell receiver tanks (241-AN-101 and 241-SY-102) and the cross-site receiver tank (241-AP-104).

  2. DOE Tech. Memo. ARM VAP-002.1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Taking Wind Forecasting to New Heights DOE Taking Wind Forecasting to New Heights May 18, 2015 - 3:24pm Addthis A 2013 study conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), AWS Truepower, and WindLogics in the Great Plains and Western Texas, demonstrated that wind power forecasts can be improved substantially using data collected from tall towers, remote sensors, and other devices, and incorporated into improved forecasting

  3. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 e 20030 Century Blvd., Germantown, Maryland 20767, Telephone: (301) 428-2700 7963-02.81.aw.05 20 January 1981 Dr. William E. Mott, Director Environmental & Safety Engineering Division U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20767 Dear Dr. Mott: INVESTIGATIONS OF RECORDS ON THE FORMER VULCAN CRUCIBLE SITE, ALIQUIPPA, PA. AND THE NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY, CHICAGO, IL In your comments of 12 January 1981, regarding the Argonne survey report for Vulcan Crucible Steel Co., Argonne was

  4. EERE Success Story-Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Frontier of New Wind Power Potential EERE Success Story-Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential February 18, 2015 - 11:40am Addthis This map shows wind potential capacity for turbine hub heights at 140 meters. This map shows wind potential capacity for turbine hub heights at 140 meters. Partnered with AWS Truepower, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Energy Department's Wind Program released maps in December 2014 that highlight the potential for

  5. ovtchinnikov-99.PDF

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Water Retrieval Using Radar Measurements in Stratocumulus Clouds M. Ovtchinnikov and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Norman, Oklahoma Introduction A universal relation between radar reflectivity factor, Z, and liquid water content (LWC), W, would be a useful tool in retrieving W from readily available reflectivity measurements. Several studies attempted to find the functional relation in the form: Z = aW b (1) One of the fundamental difficulties in

  6. Computer systems and software description for gas characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, C.V.

    1997-04-01

    The Gas Characterization System Project was commissioned by TWRS management with funding from TWRS Safety, on December 1, 1994. The project objective is to establish an instrumentation system to measure flammable gas concentrations in the vapor space of selected watch list tanks, starting with tank AN-105 and AW-101. Data collected by this system is meant to support first tank characterization, then tank safety. System design is premised upon Characterization rather than mitigation, therefore redundancy is not required.

  7. 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    February 26, 2008 Non-Disclosure Agreement Regarding Frequency Assignment Spectrum Data / Information Items To Support Coordination With Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) Licensees For Use of New Licenses in the 1710-1755 MHz Band * Wireless Service Licensees should print out the attached Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA), complete the agreement with the required signatures, and submit the signed agreement to the Department of Energy Spectrum Relocation Office. The signed NDA may be mailed to the

  8. 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 August 18, 2010 Non-Disclosure Agreement Regarding Frequency Assignment Spectrum Data / Information Items To Support Coordination with Advanced Wireless Services (AWS) Licensees For Use of New Licenses in the 1710-1755 MHz Band  Request the Advanced Wireless Service Licensee(s) print out the attached Non- Disclosure Agreement (NDA), fill in the blanks on the agreement, and obtain the required signatures. Once the document is signed, it may be mailed to the below address, faxed to

  9. Comprehensive Solutions for Integration of Solar Resources into Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Operations | Department of Energy Comprehensive Solutions for Integration of Solar Resources into Grid Operations Comprehensive Solutions for Integration of Solar Resources into Grid Operations AWS truepower logo.png -- This project is inactive -- This project primarily looks at the benefits from more cost-effective unit commitment and dispatch, and reduction in balancing reserves due to reducing uncertainty in solar forecasting. This project will improve the Pacific Northwest National

  10. NREL: Energy Analysis - Partnerships

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnerships NREL seeks to establish partnerships with universities, research institutions and think tanks, and industry leaders that leverage complementary capabilities and resources in advancing the understanding of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. We also co-produce publications with many of these groups. Current partnerships and links to their Web sites include: American Gas Foundation Antares Group, Inc. Arthur D. Little AWS Truepower Center for Clean Air Policy Center

  11. Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Piotr Zelenay of Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices (MPA-11) received the honorary title of Professor in Chemistry from Poland's President Bronisław Komorowski during a June 23 ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Warsaw. October 8, 2015 Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Piotr Zelenay, right, shakes hands with

  12. Berkeley Lab Contributes Expertise to New Amazon Web Services Offering

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Contributes Expertise to New Amazon Web Services Offering Berkeley Lab Contributes Expertise to New Amazon Web Services Offering July 13, 2011 Today Amazon Web Services (AWS) launched Cluster Compute Instances for Amazon EC2, which makes high-bandwidth, low-latency high performance computing (HPC) resources available in a cloud-computing environment. To ensure that the new Amazon EC2 service will be able to handle a gamut of demanding HPC applications ranging from electronic design

  13. PROJECT PROFILE: Hawaiian Electric Company (SHINES) | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Hawaiian Electric Company (SHINES) PROJECT PROFILE: Hawaiian Electric Company (SHINES) Title: Integrating System to Edge-of-Network Architecture and Management for SHINES (SEAMS) Technologies on High Penetration Grids Funding Opportunity: Sustainable and Holistic Integration of Energy Storage and Solar PV SunShot Subprogram: Systems Integration Location: Honolulu, Hawaii Partners: Siemens, Alstom, DNV GL , AWS Truepower, Referentia Systems, Apparent, and Stem Amount Awarded: $2,437,500 Awardee

  14. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland October 8, 2015 Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Piotr Zelenay of Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices (MPA-11) received the honorary title of Professor in Chemistry from Poland's President Bronis#aw Komorowski during a June 23 ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Warsaw. The highly respected title of "Professor," conferred by the president upon a motion of the Central Commission

  15. Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor:

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2-AW Feb 10,2012 WRPS C M Smith; E A Hill PAST OPERATIONS Beryllium brought in facility: YES Form of beryllium: SOLID Period of beryllium operations (dates): Start: Early 1980s End: Present Location(s) in facility that contained beryllium materials: Tool Crib and adjacent Supply Room, and Mechanical Maintenance Area. Description of beryllium activities: Beryllium tools (beryllium-copper alloy containing about 2% beryllium) are stored in the Tool Crib and given to employees for use in Tank Farms,

  16. Using stochastic activity networks to study the energy feasibility of automatic weather stations

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, Luca; Cesarini, Daniel; Avvenuti, Marco

    2015-03-10

    Automatic Weather Stations (AWSs) are systems equipped with a number of environmental sensors and communication interfaces used to monitor harsh environments, such as glaciers and deserts. Designing such systems is challenging, since designers have to maximize the amount of sampled and transmitted data while considering the energy needs of the system that, in most cases, is powered by rechargeable batteries and exploits energy harvesting, e.g., solar cells and wind turbines. To support designers of AWSs in the definition of the software tasks and of the hardware configuration of the AWS we designed and implemented an energy-aware simulator of such systems. The simulator relies on the Stochastic Activity Networks (SANs) formalism and has been developed using the Mbius tool. In this paper we first show how we used the SAN formalism to model the various components of an AWS, we then report results from an experiment carried out to validate the simulator against a real-world AWS and we finally show some examples of usage of the proposed simulator.

  17. Cloud services for the Fermilab scientific stakeholders

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Timm, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Mhashilkar, P.; Boyd, J.; Bernabeu, G.; Sharma, N.; Peregonow, N.; Kim, H.; Noh, S.; Palur, S.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic raymore » simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. As a result, we present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality.« less

  18. Cloud services for the Fermilab scientific stakeholders

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, S.; Garzoglio, G.; Mhashilkar, P.; Boyd, J.; Bernabeu, G.; Sharma, N.; Peregonow, N.; Kim, H.; Noh, S.; Palur, S.; Raicu, I.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Fermilab/KISTI cooperative research project, Fermilab has successfully run an experimental simulation workflow at scale on a federation of Amazon Web Services (AWS), FermiCloud, and local FermiGrid resources. We used the CernVM-FS (CVMFS) file system to deliver the application software. We established Squid caching servers in AWS as well, using the Shoal system to let each individual virtual machine find the closest squid server. We also developed an automatic virtual machine conversion system so that we could transition virtual machines made on FermiCloud to Amazon Web Services. We used this system to successfully run a cosmic ray simulation of the NOvA detector at Fermilab, making use of both AWS spot pricing and network bandwidth discounts to minimize the cost. On FermiCloud we also were able to run the workflow at the scale of 1000 virtual machines, using a private network routable inside of Fermilab. As a result, we present in detail the technological improvements that were used to make this work a reality.

  19. Respiratory effects of two-hour exposure with intermittent exercise to ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide alone and in combination in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Kagawa, J.

    1983-01-01

    Seven adult male healthy volunteer subjects were exposed to 0.15 ppm each of O/sub 3/, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination, with intermittent light exercise for two hours. Three of the 7 subjects developed cough during deep inspiration and one subject had chest pain during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone. Among the various indices of pulmonary function tests, specific airway conductane (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was the most sensitive index to examine the changes produced by the exposure to O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. Significant decrease of G/sub aw//V/sub tg/ in comparison with control measurements was observed in 6 of 7 subjects during exposure to O/sub 3/ alone, and in all subjects during exposures to the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants. However, no significant enhancement of effect was observed in the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants, although a slightly greater decrease of airway resistance/volume of thoracic gas (G/sub aw//V/sub tg/) was observed for the mixture of O/sub 3/ and other pollutants than for O/sub 3/ alone.

  20. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  1. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    T.J. Venetz Tank and Pipeline Integrity April 2014 Double-Shell Tank Construction: Extent of Condition Tank Operations Contract 2 Page 2 Double-Shell Tanks at Hanford Tank Farm Number of Tanks Construction Period Construction Project Initial Operation Service Life Current Age 241-AY 2 1968 - 1970 IAP-614 1971 40 43 241-AZ 2 1970 - 1974 HAP-647 1976 20 38 241-SY 3 1974 - 1976 B-101 1977 50 37 241-AW 6 1976 - 1979 B-120 1980 50 34 241-AN 7 1977 - 1980 B-130, B-170 1981 50 33 241-AP 8 1982 - 1986

  2. NREL: Technology Deployment - Resource Maps for Taller Towers Reveal New

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Areas for Wind Project Development Resource Maps for Taller Towers Reveal New Areas for Wind Project Development News Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential Publications Southeastern Wind Coalition fact sheets Southeast Wind Energy Fact Sheet Enabling Wind Power Nationwide Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States Sponsors AWS Truepower Southeastern Wind Coalition Key Partners U.S. Department of Energy Contact Ian Baring-Gould, 303-384-7021 A picture of a tall wind

  3. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  4. Windpower

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chilocco Wind Park Cherokee Nation (other nations as well) Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC And PNE Wind Cherokee Chilocco Wind North Central Oklahoma Location KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01

  5. EFFECTS OF CHEMISTRY AND OTHER VARIABLES ON CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN MH

    2008-11-13

    Laboratory testing was performed to develop a comprehensive understanding of the corrosivity of the tank wastes stored in Double-Shell Tanks using simulants primarily from Tanks 241-AP-105, 241-SY-103 and 241-AW-105. Additional tests were conducted using simulants of the waste stored in 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-AN-107, and 241-AY-101. This test program placed particular emphasis on defining the range of tank waste chemistries that do not induce the onset of localized forms of corrosion, particularly pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This document summarizes the key findings of the research program.

  6. Tank farms essential drawing plan

    SciTech Connect

    Domnoske-Rauch, L.A.

    1998-08-04

    The purpose of this document is to define criteria for selecting Essential Drawings, Support Drawings, and Controlled Print File (CPF) drawings and documents for facilities that are part of East and West Tank Farms. Also, the drawings and documents that meet the criteria are compiled separate listings. The Essential Drawing list and the Support Drawing list establish a priority for updating technical baseline drawings. The CPF drawings, denoted by an asterisk (*), defined the drawings and documents that Operations is required to maintain per the TWRS Administration Manual. The Routing Boards in Buildings 272-WA and 272-AW are not part of the CPF.

  7. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sirnivas, S.; Musial, W.; Bailey, B.; Filippelli, M.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a deliverable for a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entitled National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign -- Analysis and Collaboration (contract number DE-EE0005372; prime contractor -- AWS Truepower). The project objective is to supplement, facilitate, and enhance ongoing multiagency efforts to develop an integrated national offshore wind energy data network. The results of this initiative are intended to 1) produce a comprehensive definition of relevant met-ocean resource assets and needs and design standards, and 2) provide a basis for recommendations for meeting offshore wind energy industry data and design certification requirements.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Overview of 200 Areas.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford's 200 Areas Ken Niles, Assistant Director Oregon Department of Energy Central Plateau Hanford Central Plateau 200 West & East Areas 200 West 200 East 200 West & East Areas 200 West 200 East WTP ERDF US Ecology 200 BC Cribs "Adjacent" Areas Tank Farms 200 West T-TX-TY S-SX-SY U B-BX-BY A-AX-AY-AZ AN-AP-AW C 200 East 18 Tank Farms in 5 Waste Management Areas Tanks Canyons T-Plant B-Plant PUREX U-Plant REDOX Canyons Other Facilities/Waste Streams PFP PUREX Tunnels WESF

  9. Tank Operations Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification 382

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    382 J.3-1 ATTACHMENT J.3 HANFORD SITE SERVICES AND INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS MATRIX Services listed in the Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix (Matrix) shall be performed in accordance with the Section H Clause entitled, Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix. All services are provided during the Hanford alternate work schedule (AWS) defined as 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on standard Site Fridays unless otherwise

  10. I'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :!. i - _ -. .: -. _. _ : _. -._ -- I' . .- Rooker Case Pile Em. Prot. Bureau N.Y.S. Department of Law New York, New York I FOIA MATERIALS FP.09 DOE Ru /a- --- L -- - -- - ~~~~~~,,.~~;' ~~i~T~~~~ ' ~-~~&~' Mt??7WZ~d$O77 ED STATES GOVERNME:: TO : 8. J. smith, Jr., Chief. Operations Branch DATE: October 21, 1952 Produc tlai Divlsio FROM : H. J. Hsnhmn. Ch da sub-Dm.cs SKEPDRT FOROCTCEJZ SIXBX.: TA::HJH:M *:scpet;r\ P.$@$ Rp3 OIlU b ~~aw*~~ WHENsEPARATa FRo~mcLOSuRES - 6ss&y%fs

  11. Richard Gerber!

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Senior Science Advisor to the Director! NERSC Data-Driven Science at NERSC --- 1 --- August 8 , 2 013 New Community Focus on Data --- 2 --- DOE has extreme data needs --- 3 --- Light Sources * Many d etectors o n M oore's L aw c urve * Data v olumes r endering p revious o pera=onal m odels o bsolete High Energy Physics * LHC E xperiments p roduce a nd d istribute p etabytes o f d ata/year * Astro: p eak d ata r ates i ncrease 3 ---5x o ver 5 y ears, T B o f d ata p er n ight Genomics * Sequencer

  12. NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released new estimates of the U.S. potential for wind-generated electricity, using advanced wind mapping and validation techniques to triple previous estimates of the size of the nation's wind resources. The new study, conducted by NREL and AWS TruePower, finds that the contiguous 48 states have the potential to generate up to 37 million gigawatt-hours annually. In comparison, the total U.S. electricity generation from all sources was roughly 4 million gigawatt-hours in 2009.

  13. Functional design criteria, Project W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval Systems. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, C.A.

    1995-02-07

    This document provides the technical baseline for retrieval of waste from ten double-shell tanks in the SY, AN, AP, AW, AY, and AZ tank farms. In order to retrieve waste from these tanks, systems are needed to mix the sludge with the supernate and pump the waste mixture from the tank. For 101-SY, the existing mitigation pump will be used to mix the waste and Project W-211 will provide for waste removal. The retrieval scope for the other nine tanks includes both the waste mixing and removal functions.

  14. Energy Department Releases New Land-Based/Offshore Wind Resource Map |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Releases New Land-Based/Offshore Wind Resource Map Energy Department Releases New Land-Based/Offshore Wind Resource Map May 1, 2012 - 2:23pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Second Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The Energy Department recently released a new wind resource map compiled by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and AWS Truepower that combines land-based with offshore resources. The new combined map, posted on the

  15. Employee Spotlight: Jim Stein

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jim Stein September 20, 2016 Photo finish As a child, Jim Stein of the Voluntary Protection Program Office loved poring over the awe-inspiring photos of National Geographic magazine. With a small camera his parents bought for him, Jim's passion for photography was ignited. "I started playing around with the camera like I was a Nat Geo photographer," he says. "And although I really was pretty awful, I've been hooked ever since." A photographer's paradise After spending 10

  16. Microsoft Word - RL14788-Section_J-03 Service Providers Mod 337.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    337 ATTACHMENT J.3 HANFORD SITE SERVICES AND INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS MATRIX Services listed in the Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix (Matrix) shall be performed in accordance with the Section H Clause entitled, Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix. All services are provided during the Hanford alternate work schedule (AWS) defined as 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on standard Site Fridays unless otherwise noted.

  17. United States Wind Resource Map: Annual Average Wind Speed at 80 Meters

    WindExchange

    80 m 01-APR-2011 2.1.1 Wind Speed m/s >10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.5 8.0 7.5 7.0 6.5 6.0 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.0 < 4.0 Source: Wind resource estimates developed by AWS Truepower, LLC for windNavigator . Web: http://www.windnavigator.com | http://www.awstruepower.com. Spatial resolution of wind resource data: 2.5 km. Projection: Albers Equal Area WGS84. ¶

  18. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards Senu Sirnivas and Walt Musial National Renewable Energy Laboratory Bruce Bailey and Matthew Filippelli AWS Truepower LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-60573 January 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National

  19. How Did You Do? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Did You Do? How Did You Do? February 3, 2009 - 3:00am Addthis Drew Bittner Writer/Editor, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Over the past several months, we've talked an awful lot, you and we here at the Department of Energy. We've talked about how to make your home energy efficient, how to diagnose your home's problems and how to fix them, what works best and what doesn't (depending on where you live and what kind of home you have). Time's come to ask: how did you do? Did you

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Onshore Wind Resources 110 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Data are annual average wind speed at 80 meters. * m/s = meters per second. Web Page: For related information, see http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html. Sources: This map was created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Department of Energy (April 1, 2011). Wind resource estimates developed by AWS Truepower, LLC for windNavigator®. See http://www.windnavigator.com and

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Pathlength Distributions Derived from a High Resolution Spectrometer (AWS) Min, Q.(a), Harrison, L.(a), Kiedron, P.(a), Berndt, J.(a), and Joseph, E.(b), Atmospheric Science Research Center, SUNY at Albany (a), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Howard University (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A high resolution oxygen A-band and 820 nm water vapor band spectrometer has been developed and deployed in a field campaign at the ARM SGP site. The

  2. Analysis of geometric phase effects in the quantum-classical Liouville formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Izmaylov, Artur F.; Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 ; Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-02-28

    We analyze two approaches to the quantum-classical Liouville (QCL) formalism that differ in the order of two operations: Wigner transformation and projection onto adiabatic electronic states. The analysis is carried out on a two-dimensional linear vibronic model where geometric phase (GP) effects arising from a conical intersection profoundly affect nuclear dynamics. We find that the Wigner-then-Adiabatic (WA) QCL approach captures GP effects, whereas the Adiabatic-then-Wigner (AW) QCL approach does not. Moreover, the Wigner transform in AW-QCL leads to an ill-defined Fourier transform of double-valued functions. The double-valued character of these functions stems from the nontrivial GP of adiabatic electronic states in the presence of a conical intersection. In contrast, WA-QCL avoids this issue by starting with the Wigner transform of single-valued quantities of the full problem. As a consequence, GP effects in WA-QCL can be associated with a dynamical term in the corresponding equation of motion. Since the WA-QCL approach uses solely the adiabatic potentials and non-adiabatic derivative couplings as an input, our results indicate that WA-QCL can capture GP effects in two-state crossing problems using first-principles electronic structure calculations without prior diabatization or introduction of explicit phase factors.

  3. Estimating Small-area Populations by Age and Sex Using Spatial Interpolation and Statistical Inference Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Qai, Qiang; Rushton, Gerald; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Bright, Eddie A; Coleman, Phil R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to compute population estimates by age and sex for small areas whose boundaries are different from those for which the population counts were made. In our approach, population surfaces and age-sex proportion surfaces are separately estimated. Age-sex population estimates for small areas and their confidence intervals are then computed using a binomial model with the two surfaces as inputs. The approach was implemented for Iowa using a 90 m resolution population grid (LandScan USA) and U.S. Census 2000 population. Three spatial interpolation methods, the areal weighting (AW) method, the ordinary kriging (OK) method, and a modification of the pycnophylactic method, were used on Census Tract populations to estimate the age-sex proportion surfaces. To verify the model, age-sex population estimates were computed for paired Block Groups that straddled Census Tracts and therefore were spatially misaligned with them. The pycnophylactic method and the OK method were more accurate than the AW method. The approach is general and can be used to estimate subgroup-count types of variables from information in existing administrative areas for custom-defined areas used as the spatial basis of support in other applications.

  4. Large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. S.; Jain, S. L.; Mishra, M. K.

    2011-08-15

    Characteristics of ion-acoustic soliton in dusty plasma, including the dynamics of heavily charged massive dust grains, are investigated following the Sagdeev Potential formalism. Retaining fourth order nonlinearities of electric potential in the expansion of the Sagdeev Potential in the energy equation for a pseudo particle and integrating the resulting energy equation, large amplitude soliton solution is determined. Variation of amplitude (A), half width (W) at half maxima and the product P = AW{sup 2} of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV), dressed and large amplitude soliton as a function of wide range of dust concentration are numerically studied for recently observed parameters of dusty plasmas. We have also presented the region of existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic soliton in the dusty plasma by analyzing the structure of the pseudo potential. It is found that in the presence of positively charged dust grains, system supports only compressive solitons, on the other hand, in the presence of negatively charged dust grains, the system supports compressive solitons up to certain critical concentration of dust grains and above this critical concentration, the system can support rarefactive solitons also. The effects of dust concentration, charge, and mass of the dust grains, on the characteristics of KdV, dressed and large amplitude the soliton, i.e., amplitude (A), half width at half maxima (W), and product of amplitude (A) and half width at half maxima (P = AW{sup 2}), are discussed in detail.

  5. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standard Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.

  6. Tribological bench and engine dynamometer tests of a low viscosity SAE 0W-16 engine oil using a combination of ionic liquid and ZDDP as anti-wear additives

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Barnhill, William C.; Gao, Hong; Kheireddin, Bassem; Papke, Brian L.; Luo, Huimin; West, Brian H.; Qu, Jun

    2015-09-29

    We have previously reported an oil-miscible phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) with an effective anti-wear (AW) functionality when added to a base oil by itself or combined with a conventional zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) for a synergistic effect. In this research, we investigated whether this synergy manifests in formulated engine oils. An experimental SAE 0W-16 engine oil was generated containing a combination of IL and ZDDP with equal phosphorus contribution. The prototype engine oil was first evaluated using tribological bench tests: AW performance in boundary lubrication (BL) and friction behavior (Stribeck curves) in elastohydrodynamic, mixed, and BL. In addition, the forthcoming standardmore » Sequence VIE engine dynamometer test was then conducted to demonstrate improved fuel economy. Results were benchmarked against those of another experimental engine oil with almost the same formulation except using ZDDP only without the IL (similar total phosphorus content). The IL-ZDDP formulation consistently outperforms the ZDDP-only formulation in friction reduction and wear protection, and results from the bench and engine tests are well correlated.« less

  7. Search for anomalous quartic WWγγ couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WWγγ in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp̄ collisions at s√=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with Λcutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore » limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/Λ²|<0.0025 GeV⁻² and |aWC/Λ²|<0.0092 GeV⁻².« less

  8. Translaminar fracture toughness test methods and results from interlaboratory tests of carbon/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, J.H.; Kortschot, M.T.; Lloyd, W.R.; Eidinoff, H.L.; Wilson, D.A.; Ashbaugh, N.

    1995-12-31

    Fracture tests were performed with carbon/polymer laminates and analyzed for the purpose of developing translaminar fracture toughness test and analysis procedures. Notched specimens were tested of two types of symmetrical layups--quasi-isotropic [0/45/90] and [0/90]; two carbon fiber/epoxy materials--a relatively brittle T300 fiber/976 epoxy and a tougher AS4 fiber/977-2 epoxy; two laminate thicknesses--2 mm and 4 mm; and three specimen configurations--the standard three-point bend and compact configurations, and an extended compact specimen with arm-height to specimen-width ratio of 1.9. Stress and displacement expressions were obtained for the extended compact specimen, including those for stress intensity factor, K, and crack mouth opening displacement, V, in terms of relative notch length, a/W, and for a/W in terms of V. Relationships for the bending stresses that control self-similar and off-axis cracking for the extended compact specimen were derived.

  9. PREDICTION OF CHARACTERISTIC LENGTH AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS IN DUCTILE-BRITTLE TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P

    2008-04-15

    Finite element method was used to analyze the three-point bend experimental data of A533B-1 pressure vessel steel obtained by Sherry, Lidbury, and Beardsmore [1] from -160 to -45 C within the ductile-brittle transition regime. As many researchers have shown, the failure stress ({sigma}{sub f}) of the material could be approximated as a constant. The characteristic length, or the critical distance (r{sub c}) from the crack tip, at which {sigma}{sub f} is reached, is shown to be temperature dependent based on the crack tip stress field calculated by the finite element method. With the J-A{sub 2} two-parameter constraint theory in fracture mechanics, the fracture toughness (J{sub C} or K{sub JC}) can be expressed as a function of the constraint level (A{sub 2}) and the critical distance r{sub c}. This relationship is used to predict the fracture toughness of A533B-1 in the ductile-brittle transition regime with a constant {sigma}{sub f} and a set of temperature-dependent r{sub c}. It can be shown that the prediction agrees well with the test data for wide range of constraint levels from shallow cracks (a/W= 0.075) to deep cracks (a/W= 0.5), where a is the crack length and W is the specimen width.

  10. Sasse Modeling of First Cycle Neptunium (VI) Recovery Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J. E.

    2006-04-01

    A flowsheet has been proposed to separate neptunium from solutions in H-Canyon Tanks 16.4, 12.5, and 11.7 in the First Cycle solvent extraction banks, in which cerium(IV) (Ce(IV)) serves as an agent to oxidize neptunium to neptunium(VI) (Np(VI)). A SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction) spreadsheet model indicates that the proposed flowsheet is a feasible method for separating neptunium and uranium from sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities. The proposed flowsheet calls for stripping the sulfates, thorium, and other metal impurities into the 1AW stream and extracting and then stripping the neptunium and uranium into the 1BP stream. SASSE predicts that separation of thorium from the other actinides can be accomplished with actinide losses of 0.01% or less. It is assumed that other metal impurities such as iron, aluminum, and fission products will follow the thorium into 1AW. Due to an organic/aqueous distribution coefficient that is close to one, SASSE predicts that plutonium(VI) (Pu(VI)) is split between the A Bank and B Bank aqueous output streams, with 27% going to 1AW and 73% going to 1BP. An extrapolated distribution coefficient based on unvalidated Ce(IV) distribution measurements at a single nitrate concentration and a comparison with thorium(IV) (Th(IV)) distributions indicates that Ce(IV) could reflux in 1B Bank. If the Ce(IV) distribution coefficient is lower than would be predicted by this single point extrapolation, but still higher than the distribution coefficient for Th(IV), then Ce(IV) would follow Np(VI) and uranium(VI) (U(VI)) into 1BP. The SASSE model was validated using data from a 1964 oxidizing flowsheet for the recovery of Np(VI) in Second Cycle. For the proposed flowsheet to be effective in recovering neptunium, the addition of approximately 0.025 M ceric ammonium nitrate (Ce(NH4)2(NO3)6) to both the 1AF and 1AS streams is required to stabilize the neptunium in the +6

  11. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnMgBeSe Schottky barrier diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigue, F.; Tournie, E.; Faurie, J.-P.; Monroy, E.; Calle, F.; Munoz, E.

    2001-06-25

    Planar geometry Schottky barrier photodiodes designed for visible-blind ultraviolet detection have been fabricated. They are based on ZnMgBeSe alloys grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. High crystalline quality is achieved, which leads to a high responsivity (0.17 A/W at 375 nm) and a sharp cutoff of more than three orders of magnitude. As attested by the linear variation of the photocurrent with the optical excitation, there is no internal gain mechanism. A detectivity of 2{times}10{sup 10}mHz{sup 1/2}W{sup {minus}1} is obtained showing that low-noise devices with high sensitivity have been fabricated. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Cherokee Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cherokee Wind Presenter: Carol Wyatt Cherokee Nation Businesses, Inc. DOE Tribal Energy Program October 26, 2010 KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\c hilocc o N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco

  13. Russian and Ukrainian welding industries learn to handle change

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegenfuss, H.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Less than three weeks after the coup against Communist Party General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev that eventually led to the disbanding of the Soviet Union, a technical delegation from the US entered the newly renamed city of St. Petersburg. The delegation visited manufacturing facilities and welding institutions that were changing from central control to a local decentralized operation and that were unsure of what would be the government's role in their operations. Plans for the trip began at the AWS Welding Show in Detroit, Mich., in April 1991, when in-depth discussions were held with Deputy Director Sergey Kuchuk-Yatsenko of the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute, Kiev, Ukraine. A summary of the trip is given in this paper.

  14. A=15O (1986AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See also (1981AJ01) and Table 15.17 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models:(1982WA1Q, 1982YA1D, 1983SH38). Special states:(1979GO27, 1980GO1Q, 1980HI1C, 1984ST1E). Electromagentic transitions:(1980KO1L, 1980MI1G, 1980RI06, 1982AW02, 1983TO08, 1984CA02). Astrophysical questions:(1980BA1P, 1981WA1Q, 1983LI01, 1985GI1C). Complex reactions involving 15O:(1981HU1D, 1981SC1P, 1983DE26, 1983FR1A, 1983JA05, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A,

  15. A=6He (1984AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 6.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model Calculations: (1979SH1C, 1980FI1D, 1981KU13, 1982FI13, 1982KR1B, 1982LE11, 1982VO01). Special states: (1982FI13, 1983DE16, 1983KR05, 1983LE01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1982AW02). Complex reactions involving 6He: (1978DU1B, 1978VO1A, 1979BO22, 1979VI05, 1980BO31, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981CU05, 1981VO10, 1982BO1Q, 1982BO35, 1982BO1Y, 1982GU1H, 1982HE1D,

  16. A=7He (1984AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7He) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Reactions involving pions: (1978FU09, 1979BA1M, 1979PE1C). Hypernuclei: (1978DA1A, 1978SO1A, 1979BU1C, 1981WA1J, 1982KO11). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1981AV02, 1982AW02, 1982NG01). 1. 7Li(π-, γ)7He Qm = 128.36 See (1979AJ01). 2. 7Li(n, p)7He Qm = -10.42 At En = 14.8 MeV a proton group is reported corresponding to 7Heg.s.: Γ < 0.2 MeV: see (1979AJ01). See also

  17. Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, K.

    2012-10-01

    AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

  18. Role of self-trapped holes in the photoconductive gain of β-gallium oxide Schottky diodes

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Crawford, Mary H.; Jayawardena, Asanka; Ahyi, Ayayi; Dhar, Sarit

    2016-03-10

    Solar-blind photodetection and photoconductive gain > 50 corresponding to a responsivity > 8 A/W was observed for β-Ga2O3 Schottky photodiodes. We investigated the origin of photoconductive gain. Current-voltage characteristics of the diodes did not indicate avalanche breakdown, which excludes carrier multiplication by impact ionization as the source for gain. However, photocapacitance measurements indicated a mechanism for hole localization for above-band gap illumination, suggesting self-trapped hole formation. Comparison of photoconductivity and photocapacitance spectra indicated that self-trapped hole formation coincides with the strong photoconductive gain. We conclude that self-trapped hole formation near the Schottky diode lowers the effective Schottky barrier in reversemore » bias, producing photoconductive gain. Ascribing photoconductive gain to an inherent property like self-trapping of holes can explain the operation of a variety of β-Ga2O3 photodetectors.« less

  19. Alternative generation and analysis for phase I privatization transfer system needs

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, J.D.

    1996-09-10

    This decision document provides input for the Phase I Privatization waste staging plans for the High-Level Waste (HLW)and Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Programs. This AGA report evaluates what infrastructure upgrades to existing 200 East waste transfer systems are necessary for delivery of HLW and LLW streams to the Phase I Privatization vendor. The AGA identifies the transfer routing alternatives for supernatant waste transfers from the 241-AN, 241-AW, and 241-AP Tank Farms to the 241-AP-102 tank and/or the 241-AP-104 tank. These two tanks have been targeted as the initial LLW feed staging tanks. In addition,this report addresses the transfer of slurry waste from the 241-AY and 241-AZ Tank Farms to the Phase I Privatization vendor`s facilities for HLW immobilization.

  20. Ten polymorphic DNA loci, including five in the rat MHC (RT1) region, form a single linkage group on rat chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, E.F.; Du, Y.; Zha, H.; Goldmuntz, E.A.; Wilder, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    We have described ten markers for polymorphic loci on rat chromosome 20, including five in the rat MHC (RT1) region. These markers formed a single linkage group spanning a recombination distance of 0.40. The markers identified five expressed gene loci - RT1.N1 (thymus leukemia antigen 1), Tnfa (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}), Hspa1 (heat shock protein 70), Ggt1 ({gamma} glutamyl-transferase 1), and Prkacn2 (protein kinase C catalytic subunit binding inhibitor 2), two loci with sequences that are related to expressed genes - RT1.Aw2 (sequence related to a non-RT1A class I {alpha} chain) and Mt21 (sequence related to metallothionein 2), and three anonymous loci - D20Arb548, D20Arb234, and D20Arb249. These polymorphic markers should facilitate mapping studies and genetic monitoring of inbred rat strains. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Fracture toughness testing of bi-material joints with high strength mis-match

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, M.; Hornet, P.; Cornec, A.; Schwalbe, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the influence of strength mis-match on CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) R-curves obtained from homogeneous and electron beam (EB) welded bimaterial CT and SENB specimens of two aluminum alloys. The R-curves of metal-metal bimaterial specimens are compared with the R-curves of each alloy to determine the effect of strength mismatch on the locally measured CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) fracture toughness properties. The homogeneous specimens of two different aluminum alloys, namely 2024-FC and 2024-T351 with yield strengths of 80 and 360 MPa respectively, as well as EB welded bi-material 5 mm thick CT and SENB specimens (a/W = 0.15 and 0.5) have been tested at room temperature. The local CTOD ({delta}{sub 5}) fracture toughness measurements on such composite specimen configurations produced generally strength mis-match and geometry independent R-curves.

  2. Fracture of surface cracks loaded in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.J.; Reuter, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    Theoretical background of the constraint effect in brittle fracture of solids is reviewed. Fracture test data from D6-aC, a high strength steel, using three-point-bend (SE(B)) specimens and surface cracked plate (SC(B)) specimens under bending are presented. It is shown that the SE(B) data has an elevated fracture toughness for increasing a/W, i.e., a crack geometry with a larger T/K corresponds to a higher K{sub c} which is consistent with the theoretical prediction. The fundamental fracture properties, i.e., the critical strain and the critical distance, determined from the SE(B) test data are then applied to the interpretation and prediction of the SC(B) test data. Reasonable agreement is achieved for the crack growth initiation site and the load.

  3. Effect of nonisothermal electrons on dressed soliton in ion beam plasma system

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. S.

    2009-03-15

    Using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) evolution equations, governing the first and second order potentials for ion acoustic wave in an ion beam plasma system with nonisothermal electrons, are derived. Adopting renormalization procedure of Kodama and Taniuti [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45, 298 (1978)] nonsecular dressed soliton solution of these coupled equations is determined. An alternative approach is also used to obtain large amplitude soliton solution, retaining higher order nonlinearities in the expansion of the Sagdeev potential and integrating the resulting energy equation for the system. For small amplitude approximation, this solution reduces to dressed soliton solution obtained for the system using the renormalization in the RPM. Variation of the amplitude (A), velocity ({lambda}), width (W), and the product amplitudexwidth{sup 4} (AW{sup 4}) are numerically studied for the Korteweg-de Vries, dressed and large amplitude soliton for different values of parameters of the beam-plasma system, and results are summarized.

  4. STORAGE, NUTRITIONAL AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF HIGH-FAT FISH AND RICE FLOUR COEXTRUDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Sukumar Bandyopadhyay; Amarender Singh Bawa

    2013-10-01

    The present research is on understanding the storage, nutritional and sensory characteristics of high-fat fish (khoira) and rice flour coextrudates at storage temperature of 30C. The extruder processing conditions used are barrel temperature (200C), screw speed (109 rpm), fish content of feed (44%) and feed moisture content (39%). Sorption isotherm data indicated that the safe aw level was about 0.4–0.7. Guggenheim -Anderson -de Boer model described the sorption data adequately with an r2 value of 0.99. During the initial 15 days of storage, there was a loss of vitamin A and total tocopherols by 64.4 and 20.6%, and an increase in peroxides and free fatty acid content by about 116 mg/kg and 21.7%. The nonlinear mathematical model developed has adequately described the changes in nutritional and storage properties. Sensory attributes indicated that the product fried for 15 s was most acceptable.

  5. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  6. Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign - A Handbook for Federal Energy Managers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    n t li b a f Creating an EnErgy AwArEnEss ProgrAm A HAnDBooK For FEDErAL EnErgy mAnAgErs Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy is c ean, abu U.S. Department of Energy and Bringing you a prosperous future where energy dan , re a le, nd af ordable Creating an Energy Awareness Program A HAnDBooK For FEDErAL EnErgy mAnAgErs The Federal government is the single largest domestic user of energy, spending more than $17 billion to power its vehicles, operations, and approximately 500,000 facilities

  7. Test report of evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flowmeters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, W.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-03

    This document reports the results of testing four different flowmeters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101,241-AN- 103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105 and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1/78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford have forced the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter has been chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

  8. SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD !, TI11S COllT!<'}.l~f l8 AW.TEO ORDER Vr;OER O?>.$ (IS CfR TCO) fiATJtiG I 3 ~-DATE 1SSli[O ] Ii. RE,QU:siilO!i'f'lJRCl-'ASE !llcl/BC.R 15F:M002922 EMCHC U.S. Dep:1rl".!n0.nt of Energy EM Consoliciat.ed Businnss CeriLer 250 E:. Sth Str~at, S11ite 500 Cincinnnl.i Ofl 4S20~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---------- NOTE: fft1U]*4 b!d Ut(j!1\lo~1 *0Ntf"3od ''1lff£10('mol'1"bj.j*and._'"""'~"c'°~* - - -

  9. United States Wind Resource Map: Annual Average Wind Speed at 30 Meters

    WindExchange

    30 m 21-FEB-2012 2.1.1 Wind Speed m/s >10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.5 8.0 7.5 7.0 6.5 6.0 5.5 5.0 4.5 4.0 < 4.0 Source: Wind resource estimates developed by AWS Truepower, LLC. Web: http://www.awstruepower.com. Map developed by NREL. Spatial resolution of wind resource data: 2.0 km. Projection: Albers Equal Area WGS84. The average wind speeds indicated on this map are model-derived estimates that may not represent the true wind resource at any given location. Small terrain features, vegetation,

  10. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse November 2009

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Vogel receiVes lANsce Director's excelleNce AwArD 2 AccelerAtor struc- ture DeVelopmeNt AND thiN coAtiNg oN Niobium sAmples 3 NANogrAiNs DemoN- strAte extrAorDiNAry thermAl stAbility 3 competitiVe ADsorp- tioN of luNg surfAc- tANt AND AlbumiN 4 heADs up! For more than 15 years, Yusheng Zhao has been on a scientifc journey

  11. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse November 2010

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 First beAm tests with the time Projection chAmber 4 Discovery oF new Phys- ics in leAD-zirconium- titAnium voltAge bArs 5 los AlAmos lenDs its exPertise to cleAn energy AnD cArbon sequestrAtion Projects 6 electric-FielD moDiFicA- tion oF mAgnetism in A thin Film 7 Aot & lAnsce Division stAFF AwArDeD

  12. Large area, low capacitance, GaAs nanowire photodetector with a transparent Schottky collecting junction

    SciTech Connect

    Seyedi, M. A. Yao, M.; O'Brien, J.; Dapkus, P. D.; Wang, S. Y.; Nanostructured Energy Conversion Technology and Research , Advanced Studies Laboratories, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA and NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035

    2013-12-16

    We present experimental results on a GaAs/Indium-Tin-Oxide Schottky-like heterojunction photodetector based on a nanowire device geometry. By distributing the active detecting area over an array of nanowires, it is possible to achieve large area detection with low capacitance. Devices with bare GaAs and passivated AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires are fabricated to compare the responsivity with and without surface passivation. We are able to achieve responsivity of >0.5A/W and Signal-Noise-Ratio in excess of 7?dB for 2?V applied reverse bias with passivated nanowire devices. Capacitance-voltage measurement yields <5?nF/cm{sup 2}, which shows a strong possibility for high-speed applications with a broad area device.

  13. Ultraviolet band-pass Schottky barrier photodetectors formed by Al-doped ZnO contacts to n-GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, J.K.; Lee, M.L.; Tun, C.J.; Lin, S.W.

    2006-01-23

    This work prepared Al-doped ZnO(AZO) films using dc sputtering to form Schottky contacts onto GaN films with low-temperature-grown GaN cap layer. Application of ultraviolet photodetector showed that spectral responsivity exhibits a narrow bandpass characteristic ranging from 345 to 375 nm. Moreover, unbiased peak responsivity was estimated to be around 0.12 A/W at 365 nm, which corresponds to a quantum efficiency of around 40%. In our study, relatively low responsivity can be explained by the marked absorption of the AZO contact layer. When the reverse biases were below 5 V, the study revealed that dark currents were well below 5x10{sup -12} A even though the samples were annealed at increased temperatures.

  14. Performance enhancement of GaN metalsemiconductormetal ultraviolet photodetectors by insertion of ultrathin interfacial HfO{sub 2} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, Burak; Okyay, Ali Kemal E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-03-15

    The authors demonstrate improved device performance of GaN metalsemiconductormetal ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) by ultrathin HfO{sub 2} (UT-HfO{sub 2}) layer on GaN. The UT-HfO{sub 2} interfacial layer is grown by atomic layer deposition. The dark current of the PDs with UT-HfO{sub 2} is significantly reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to those without HfO{sub 2} insertion. The photoresponsivity at 360?nm is as high as 1.42 A/W biased at 5 V. An excellent improvement in the performance of the devices is ascribed to allowed electron injection through UT-HfO{sub 2} on GaN interface under UV illumination, resulting in the photocurrent gain with fast response time.

  15. 11C

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    C β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1940MO09, 1954WO23: 11C. 1941SM11: 11C; measured T1/2. 1941SO01: 11C; measured T1/2. 1944SI30: 11C; measured T1/2. 1951DI12: 11C; measured T1/2. 1953KU08: 11C; measured T1/2. 1955BA63: 11C; measured T1/2. 1957PR53: 11C; measured T1/2. 1957SC29, 1967CA09: 11C; measured K/β+. 1958AR15: 11C; measured T1/2. 1964KA31: 11C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965PA10: 11C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1969AW02: 11C;

  16. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Hfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3??m. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29??m. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.110{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  17. A detailed investigation on the impact of post-growth annealing on the materials and device characteristics of 35-layer In{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}As/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector with quaternary In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As capping

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikary, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Subhananda

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? We investigated the effect of ex situ annealing on InGaAs/GaAs QDIP with InAlGaAs layer. ? As-grown defect was removed by using post-growth annealing treatment. ? Increase in the compressive strain due to annealing is calculated from XRD curve. ? Three-fold enhancement in responsivity is observed in the QDIPs annealed at 650 C. ? Two-fold enhancement in D* is observed sample annealed at 650 C compared to as grown. -- Abstract: The effect of post-growth rapid thermal annealing on 35-layer In{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}As/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) with quaternary In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As capping has been investigated. Transmission electron microscopy showed some as-grown defects were removed by post growth annealing treatment. An increase in the compressive strain in the heterostructure due to annealing was identified from X-ray diffraction curve. A two-color photoresponse in the long-wave region (8.5 and 10.2 ?m) was observed in both as-grown device and those annealed at 650 C temperature. A three-fold enhancement in peak responsivity was observed in the QDIPs annealed at 650 C (1.19 A/W) compared to that in the as-grown (0.34 A/W). Detectivity also increased by two fold from as-grown to 650 C annealed device. The changes are attributed to the removal of as-grown defects and dislocations during epitaxial growth. These removals changed the confinement potential profile, which resulted in an improvement in the detectivity and responsivity of the annealed sample.

  18. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  19. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cotlet, Mircea; Huang, Yuan Zang; Chen, Jia -Shiang; Huidong Zang; Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.; Nam, Chang -Yong

    2016-03-24

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS2) field-effect transistors(FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS2 FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS2-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS2 is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QDphotoluminescence and SnS2 optical absorption as well as the large nominalmore » donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS2. Furthermore, we also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS2 FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.« less

  20. Iraq challenges sanctions, offers 4.5 million b/d developable capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, T.R.

    1995-04-10

    The prospective oil deals of the century were unveiled last month in Baghdad at the unlikely venue of the first international oil conference in Iraq in decades. In a dramatic twist Iraq detailed 33 oil fields that are now open for joint development with foreign partners. The productive capacity of the listed fields totals some 4.5 million b/d, and the underlying proved reserves exceed 50 billion bbl--equal to more than US and Canadian reserves combined. Reversing its prior compulsive secretiveness concerning oil affairs, the government cleared at the highest level the proposal to publicize the available resources and to offer corroborative detail. ``Four and a half million b/d is an awful lot of oil,`` noted one foreign oilman who was loath to be quoted because his company feared possible reprisals in the US. The economic bait was both clear and enticing. Iraq chose the public forum to signal to the world the gains that could accrue to the first countries that break with the US over continuing the sanctions. The paper discusses the political impacts, the substantial offerings, exploitation costs, and bypassing sanctions.

  1. High-performance deep ultraviolet photodetectors based on ZnO quantum dot assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiaoyong; Xu, Chunxiang E-mail: jghu@yzu.edu.cn; Hu, Jingguo E-mail: jghu@yzu.edu.cn

    2014-09-14

    A high-performance ZnO quantum dots (QDs)-based ultraviolet (UV) photodetector has been successfully fabricated via the self-assembly of QDs on the Au interdigital electrode. The broadened band gap in ZnO QDs makes the device has the highly selective response for the deep UV detection. The unique QD-QD junction barriers similar to back-to-back Schottky barriers dominate the conductance of the QD network and the UV light-induced barrier-height modulation plays a crucial role in enhancing the photoresponsivity and the response speed. Typically, the as-fabricated device exhibits the fast response and recovery times of within 1 s, the deep UV selectivity of less than 340 nm, and the stable repeatability with on/off current ratio over 10, photoresponsivity of 5.0410A/W, and photocurrent gain of 1.910, demonstrating that the ZnO QD network is a superior building block for deep UV photodetectors.

  2. Photo-modulated thin film transistor based on dynamic charge transfer within quantum-dots-InGaZnO interface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang; Yang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Mingju; Tao, Zhi; Wei, Lei Li, Chi Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Baoping; Dai, Qing; Nathan, Arokia

    2014-03-17

    The temporal development of next-generation photo-induced transistor across semiconductor quantum dots and Zn-related oxide thin film is reported in this paper. Through the dynamic charge transfer in the interface between these two key components, the responsibility of photocurrent can be amplified for scales of times (?10{sup 4}?A/W 450?nm) by the electron injection from excited quantum dots to InGaZnO thin film. And this photo-transistor has a broader waveband (from ultraviolet to visible light) optical sensitivity compared with other Zn-related oxide photoelectric device. Moreover, persistent photoconductivity effect can be diminished in visible waveband which lead to a significant improvement in the device's relaxation time from visible illuminated to dark state due to the ultrafast quenching of quantum dots. With other inherent properties such as integrated circuit compatible, low off-state current and high external quantum efficiency resolution, it has a great potential in the photoelectric device application, such as photodetector, phototransistor, and sensor array.

  3. K Basins sludge removal temporary sludge storage tank system

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, M.A.

    1997-06-12

    Shipment of sludge from the K Basins to a disposal site is now targeted for August 2000. The current path forward for sludge disposal is shipment to Tank AW-105 in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). Significant issues of the feasibility of this path exist primarily due to criticality concerns and the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in the sludge at levels that trigger regulation under the Toxic Substance Control Act. Introduction of PCBs into the TWRS processes could potentially involve significant design and operational impacts to both the Spent Nuclear Fuel and TWRS projects if technical and regulatory issues related to PCB treatment cannot be satisfactorily resolved. Concerns of meeting the TWRS acceptance criteria have evolved such that new storage tanks for the K Basins sludge may be the best option for storage prior to vitrification of the sludge. A reconunendation for the final disposition of the sludge is scheduled for June 30, 1997. To support this decision process, this project was developed. This project provides a preconceptual design package including preconceptual designs and cost estimates for the temporary sludge storage tanks. Development of cost estimates for the design and construction of sludge storage systems is required to help evaluate a recommendation for the final disposition of the K Basin sludge.

  4. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  5. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  6. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (first echo). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  7. Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties

    SciTech Connect

    Penik, M.A. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

  8. Graphene oxide/carbon nanoparticle thin film based IR detector: Surface properties and device characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Farzana Aktar; Hossain, Mohammad Abul; Uchida, Koji; Tamura, Takahiro; Sugawa, Kosuke; Mochida, Tomoaki; Otsuki, Joe; Mohiuddin, Tariq; Boby, Monny Akter; Alam, Mohammad Sahabul

    2015-10-15

    This work deals with the synthesis, characterization, and application of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) adorned graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite materials. Here we mainly focus on an emerging topic in modern research field presenting GO-CNP nanocomposite as a infrared (IR) radiation detector device. GO-CNP thin film devices were fabricated from liquid phase at ambient condition where no modifying treatments were necessary. It works with no cooling treatment and also for stationary objects. A sharp response of human body IR radiation was detected with time constants of 3 and 36 sec and radiation responsivity was 3 mAW{sup −1}. The current also rises for quite a long time before saturation. This work discusses state-of-the-art material developing technique based on near-infrared photon absorption and their use in field deployable instrument for real-world applications. GO-CNP-based thin solid composite films also offer its potentiality to be utilized as p-type absorber material in thin film solar cell, as well.

  9. Appendix I1-2 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Zack; Deborah Hanley; Dora Nakafuji

    2012-07-15

    This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to dev elop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET field campaign deployment experiences and challenges. As part of the WindNET project on the Big Island of Hawaii, AWS Truepower (AWST) conducted a field campaign to assess the viability of deploying a network of monitoring systems to aid in local wind energy forecasting. The data provided at these monitoring locations, which were strategically placed around the Big Island of Hawaii based upon results from the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) observational targeting study (Figure 1), provided predictive indicators for improving wind forecasts and developing responsive strategies for managing real-time, wind-related system events. The goal of the field campaign was to make measurements from a network of remote monitoring devices to improve 1- to 3-hour look ahead forecasts for wind facilities.

  10. Low dark current and high speed ZnO metalsemiconductormetal photodetector on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    al??kan, Deniz; Btn, Bayram; ak?r, M. Cihan; zcan, ?adan; zbay, Ekmel

    2014-10-20

    ZnO thin films are deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} on Si substrates. Pt/Au contacts are fabricated by standard photolithography and lift-off in order to form a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector. The dark current of the photodetector is measured as 1?pA at 100?V bias, corresponding to 100?pA/cm{sup 2} current density. Spectral photoresponse measurement showed the usual spectral behavior and 0.35?A/W responsivity at a 100?V bias. The rise and fall times for the photocurrent are measured as 22 ps and 8?ns, respectively, which are the lowest values to date. Scanning electron microscope image shows high aspect ratio and dense grains indicating high surface area. Low dark current density and high speed response are attributed to high number of recombination centers due to film morphology, deducing from photoluminescence measurements. These results show that as deposited ZnO thin film MSM photodetectors can be used for the applications needed for low light level detection and fast operation.

  11. Sodium compatibility of refractory metal alloy/304L braze joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.

    1984-05-01

    Vacuum induction brazing of Mo, Re, Ta, and W aloys to 304L stainless steel with AWS BNi filler metals was investigated. Metal powder (BNi-5 and BNi-7) and metallic glass (BNi-3 and modified BNi-5) brazing alloys were evaluated. Excellent braze joints were obtained with the BNi-3 and modified BNi-5 metallic glass foils. Cracks and porosity were observed in the metal powder BNi-5 and BNi-7 brazes. The as-brazed, refractory metal/304L samples were also qualified in a sodium environment of 1073/sup 0/K (1472/sup 0/F)/130 hours/2 and 100 ppM oxygen concentration. There was no significant chemical corrosive attack observed on any of the sodium samples and weight changes were generally negligible. Braze separation along the refractory metal interface and crack growth in the filler metal, however, were observed in the metal powder brazes after the sodium exposures. As a result, the metal powder fillers were not recommended. A band of discontinuous voids in the metallic glass brazes near the refractory metal interface was also detected. Metallographic, thermal and microprobe analyses revealed that these voids were caused by a diffusion mechanism called Kirkendall porosity. Since the voids were not connected and would not provide a leak path, the metallic glass filler metals were recommended for brazing refractory metal alloys to 304L and for subsequent sodium exposures.

  12. Photoresponsive properties of ultrathin silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Duy P.; Macdonald, Thomas J.; Nann, Thomas; Thierry, Benjamin E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Stockmann, Regina; Offenhusser, Andreas E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au

    2014-12-08

    Functional silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising building blocks in the design of highly sensitive photodetectors and bio-chemical sensors. We systematically investigate the photoresponse properties of ultrathin SiNWs (20?nm) fabricated using a size-reduction method based on e-beam lithography and tetramethylammonium hydroxide wet-etching. The high-quality SiNWs were able to detect light from the UV to the visible range with excellent sensitivity (?1 pW/array), good time response, and high photoresponsivity (R???2.5??10{sup 4?}A/W). Improvement of the ultrathin SiNWs' photoresponse has been observed in comparison to 40?nm counter-part nanowires. These properties are attributable to the predominance surface-effect due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of ultrathin SiNWs. Long-term measurements at different temperatures in both the forward and reverse bias directions demonstrated the stability and reliability of the fabricated device. By sensitizing the fabricated SiNW arrays with cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs), hybrid QD SiNW devices displayed an improvement in photocurrent response under UV light, while preserving their performance in the visible light range. The fast, stable, and high photoresponse of these hybrid nanostructures is promising towards the development of optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  13. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  14. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  15. Summary and viewgraphs from the Q-121 US/Japan advanced current drive concepts workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, P.; Porkolab, M. ); Chan, V.; Pinsker, R.; Politzer, P. ); Darrow, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ehst, D. ); Fukuyama, Atsushi ); Imai, Tsuyoshi; Watari, Tetsuo ); Itoh, Satoshi; Naka

    1990-03-09

    With the emphasis placed on current drive by ITER, which requires steady state operation in its engineering phase, it is important to bring theory and experiment in agreement for each of the schemes that could be used in that design. Both neutral beam and lower hybrid (LH) schemes are in excellent shape in that regard. Since the projected efficiency of all schemes is marginal it is also important to continue our search for more efficient processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each of these areas, that is, validation of theory and the search for better ideas. There were a number of notable results to report, the most striking again (as with last year) the long pulse operation of TRIAM-1M. A low current was sustained for over 1 hour with LH waves, using new hall-effect sensors in the equilibrium field circuit to maintain position control. In JT-60, by sharpening the wave spectrum the current drive efficiency was improved to 0.34 {times} 10{sup 20}m{sup -2}A/W and 1.5 MA of current was driven entirely by the lower hybrid system. Also in that machine, using two different LH frequencies, the H-mode was entered. Finally, by using the LH system for startup they saved 2.5 resistive volt-sec of flux, which if extrapolated to ITER would save 40 volt-sec there. For the first time, and experiment on ECH current drive showed reasonable agreement with theory. Those experiments are reported here by James (LLNL) on the D3-D machine. Substantially lower ECH current drive than expected theoretically was observed on WT-3, but if differed by being in a low absorption regime. Nonetheless, excellent physics results were achieved in the WT-3 experiments, notably in having careful measurements of the parallel velocity distributions.

  16. Ammonia concentration modeling based on retained gas sampler data

    SciTech Connect

    Terrones, G.; Palmer, B.J.; Cuta, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    The vertical ammonia concentration distributions determined by the retained gas sampler (RGS) apparatus were modeled for double-shell tanks (DSTs) AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 and single-shell tanks (SSTs) A-101, S-106, and U-103. One the vertical transport of ammonia in the tanks were used for the modeling. Transport in the non-convective settled solids and floating solids layers is assumed to occur primarily via some type of diffusion process, while transport in the convective liquid layers is incorporated into the model via mass transfer coefficients based on empirical correlations. Mass transfer between the top of the waste and the tank headspace and the effects of ventilation of the headspace are also included in the models. The resulting models contain a large number of parameters, but many of them can be determined from known properties of the waste configuration or can be estimated within reasonable bounds from data on the waste samples themselves. The models are used to extract effective diffusion coefficients for transport in the nonconvective layers based on the measured values of ammonia from the RGS apparatus. The modeling indicates that the higher concentrations of ammonia seen in bubbles trapped inside the waste relative to the ammonia concentrations in the tank headspace can be explained by a combination of slow transport of ammonia via diffusion in the nonconvective layers and ventilation of the tank headspace by either passive or active means. Slow transport by diffusion causes a higher concentration of ammonia to build up deep within the waste until the concentration gradients between the interior and top of the waste are sufficient to allow ammonia to escape at the same rate at which it is being generated in the waste.

  17. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP): A Public/Private Partnership for Improving Short Term Wind Energy Forecasts and Quantifying the Benefits of Utility Operations. The Southern Study Area, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Manobianco, John; Schroeder, John; Ancell, Brian; Brewster, Keith; Basu, Sukanta; Banunarayanan, Venkat; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Flores, Isabel

    2014-04-30

    This Final Report presents a comprehensive description, findings, and conclusions for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) -- Southern Study Area (SSA) work led by AWS Truepower (AWST). This multi-year effort, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), focused on improving short-term (15-minute - 6 hour) wind power production forecasts through the deployment of an enhanced observation network of surface and remote sensing instrumentation and the use of a state-of-the-art forecast modeling system. Key findings from the SSA modeling and forecast effort include: 1. The AWST WFIP modeling system produced an overall 10 - 20% improvement in wind power production forecasts over the existing Baseline system, especially during the first three forecast hours; 2. Improvements in ramp forecast skill, particularly for larger up and down ramps; 3. The AWST WFIP data denial experiments showed mixed results in the forecasts incorporating the experimental network instrumentation; however, ramp forecasts showed significant benefit from the additional observations, indicating that the enhanced observations were key to the model systems’ ability to capture phenomena responsible for producing large short-term excursions in power production; 4. The OU CAPS ARPS simulations showed that the additional WFIP instrument data had a small impact on their 3-km forecasts that lasted for the first 5-6 hours, and increasing the vertical model resolution in the boundary layer had a greater impact, also in the first 5 hours; and 5. The TTU simulations were inconclusive as to which assimilation scheme (3DVAR versus EnKF) provided better forecasts, and the additional observations resulted in some improvement to the forecasts in the first 1 - 3 hours.

  18. The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP). A Public-Private Partnership Addressing Wind Energy Forecast Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczak, James M.; Finley, Cathy; Freedman, Jeff; Cline, Joel; Bianco, L.; Olson, J.; Djalaova, I.; Sheridan, L.; Ahlstrom, M.; Manobianco, J.; Zack, J.; Carley, J.; Benjamin, S.; Coulter, R. L.; Berg, Larry K.; Mirocha, Jeff D.; Clawson, K.; Natenberg, E.; Marquis, M.

    2015-10-30

    The Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP) is a public-private research program, the goals of which are to improve the accuracy of short-term (0-6 hr) wind power forecasts for the wind energy industry and then to quantify the economic savings that accrue from more efficient integration of wind energy into the electrical grid. WFIP was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with partners that include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), private forecasting companies (WindLogics and AWS Truepower), DOE national laboratories, grid operators, and universities. WFIP employed two avenues for improving wind power forecasts: first, through the collection of special observations to be assimilated into forecast models to improve model initial conditions; and second, by upgrading NWP forecast models and ensembles. The new observations were collected during concurrent year-long field campaigns in two high wind energy resource areas of the U.S. (the upper Great Plains, and Texas), and included 12 wind profiling radars, 12 sodars, 184 instrumented tall towers and over 400 nacelle anemometers (provided by private industry), lidar, and several surface flux stations. Results demonstrate that a substantial improvement of up to 14% relative reduction in power root mean square error (RMSE) was achieved from the combination of improved NOAA numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and assimilation of the new observations. Data denial experiments run over select periods of time demonstrate that up to a 6% relative improvement came from the new observations. The use of ensemble forecasts produced even larger forecast improvements. Based on the success of WFIP, DOE is planning follow-on field programs.

  19. Engineering work plan and design basis for 241-SY ventilation improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.A.

    1997-05-19

    There are three tanks in the 241-SY tank farm. Tank 241-SY101 and 241-SY-103 are flammable gas watch list tanks. Tank 241-SY-102 is included in the ventilation improvement process in an effort to further control air flow in the tank farm. This tank farm has only one outlet ventilation port for all three tanks. Flammable gas is released (may be steady and/or periodic) from the waste in the primary tank vapor space. The gas is removed from the tank by an active ventilation system. However, maintaining consistent measurable flow through the tank can be problematic due to the poor control capabilities of existing equipment. Low flow through the tank could allow flammable gas to build up in the tank and possibly exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL), prevent the most rapid removal of flammable gas from the tank after a sudden gas release, and/or cause high vacuum alarms to sound. Using the inlet and outlet down stream butterfly valves performs the current method of controlling flow in tank farm 241-SY. A filter station is installed on the inlet of each tank, but controlling air flow with its 12 inch butterfly valve is difficult. There is also in-leakage through pump and valve pits. Butterfly valves on the downstream side of each tank could also be used to control air flow. However, their large size and the relatively low air velocity make this control method also ineffective. The proposed method of optimizing tank air flow and pressure control capability is to install an air flow controller on the inlet of each existing filter station in SY farm, and seal as best as practical all other air leakage paths. Such air flow controllers have been installed on 241-AN and 241-AW tanks (see drawing H-2-85647).

  20. Nucleotide sequences of three distinct clones coding for rat heavy chain class 1 major hitocompatibility antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stepkowski, S.M.; Tain, L.

    1996-09-01

    Poly(A){sup +} RNAs were isolated from ConconavalinA stimulated splenocytes of BUF (RT1.A{sup b}), PVG (RT1.A{sup c}), or PVG.1U (RT1.A{sup u}) rats, respectively, using a Micro-Fast Track kit. After reverse transcription with a synthetic oligo-d(T) primer (5{sup {prime}}-CAT GAT CGA ATT CAC GCG TCT AGA TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TTT TVN-3{sup {prime}}, V = A+G+C, N = A+T+G+C; Genosys, Woodland, TX), 1.6 kilobase products, which encode the entire MHC class I protein and the 3{sup {prime}} non-translated region including the poly-A tail, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two synthetic oligonucleotide primers (Genosys). The upstream primer (5{sup {prime}}-GTC CGG GWT CTC AGA TGG GG C-3{sup {prime}}, W = A+T) was designed based upon the published rat class I sequences of eight genes: RT1.1{sup a} M31018; rat LW2 gene X70066; RT1.1{sup 1}, L26224 X79719; RT1.A{sup u} X82669, and RT1.Aw3 L40363, RT1.E{sup u} L40365, RT1.C{sup 1} L40362. The downstream primer (5{sup {prime}}) ATG ATC GAA TTC ACG CGT CTA GA-3{sup {prime}} was the portion of the oligo-d(T) primer used for reverse transcription. The purified PCR products were inserted into pCR II cloning vectors (Invitrogen). Automated sequencing of plasmid cDNAs from the positive clones obtained from three repeated PCR amplifications identified by restriction enzyme mapping were reproducible. Comparison between new sequences of the heavy chain class I genes and those available in GenBank. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  1. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore » and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  2. K Basin sludge treatment process description

    SciTech Connect

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

  3. The relationship between constraint and ductile fracture initiation as defined by micromechanical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L.; Sheppard, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this study is to provide a proven methodology to allow the transfer of ductile fracture initiation properties measured in standard laboratory specimens to large, complex, flawed structures. A significant part of this work involved specifically addressing the effects of constrain on transferability under large scale yielding conditions. The approach taken was to quantify constrain effects through micromechanical fracture models coupled with finite element generated crack tip stress-strain fields to identify the local condition corresponding to fracture initiation. Detailed finite element models predicted the influence of specimen geometry, loading mode, and material flow properties on the crack tip fields. The ability of two local, ductile fracture models (the Rice and Tracey void growth model (VGM) and the stress-modified, critical strain (SMCS) criterion of Mackenzie et al. and Hancock and Cowling) to predict fracture initiation were investigated. Predictions were made using experimentally verified, two- and three-dimensional, finite strain, large deformation, finite element analyses. Two, high toughness pressure vessel steels were investigated: A516 Gr70, a ferritic, carbon-manganese mild steel demonstrating high hardening behavior, and HY-80, a martensitic, high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel possessing medium hardening ability. Experimental verification of the ductile fracture initiation predictions was performed in a variety of crack geometries possessing a range of a/w ratios from 0.15 to 0.70 and experiencing a range of load conditions from three point bending to nearly pure tension. The predicted constrain dependence of global ductile fracture parameters in the two materials is shown.

  4. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  5. Bulk- and layer-heterojunction phototransistors based on poly [2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethylhexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] and PbS quantum dot hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating Wang, Ran; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Wang, Haiyan; Jin, Lufan; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Guizhong; Yao, Jianquan; Dai, Haitao

    2015-06-22

    The responsivity (R) of a thin film photodetector is proportional to the product of its photo-induced carrier density (n) and mobility (μ). However, when choosing between layer heterojunction (LH) and bulk heterojunction (BH) field-effect phototransistors (FEpTs), it is still unclear which of the two device structures is more conducive to photodetection. A comparison study is performed on the two structures based on polymer and PbS quantum dot hybrids. Both devices exhibit ambipolar behavior, with μ{sub E} ≈ μ{sub H} = 3.7 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for BH-FEpTs and μ{sub H} = 36 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and μ{sub E} = 52 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for LH-FEpTs. Because of the improvements in μ and the channel order degree (α), the responsivity of LH-FEpTs is as high as 10{sup 1 }A/W, which is as much as two orders of magnitude higher than that of BH-FEpTs (10{sup −1}A/W) under the same conditions. Although the large area of the BH improves both the exciton separation degree (β) and n in the BH-FEpT, the lack of an effective transport mechanism becomes the main constraint on high device responsivity. Therefore, LH-FEpTs are better candidates for use as photo detectors, and a “three-high” principle of high α, β, and μ is found to be required for high responsivity.

  6. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor`s controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first.

  7. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Fangwei Fu

    2006-08-09

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the transient

  8. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  9. Quality management systems for fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) sterile insect technique

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, C.; Robinson, A.; Shelly, T.; Hendrichs, J.

    2007-03-15

    The papers presented in this issue are focused on developing and validating procedures to improve the overall quality of sterile fruit flies for use in area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programs with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component. The group was coordinated and partially funded by the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, under a five-year Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Quality Assurance in Mass-Reared and Released Fruit Flies for Use in SIT Programmes'. Participants in the CRP from 16 countries came from both basic and applied fields of expertise to ensure that appropriate and relevant procedures were developed. A variety of studies was undertaken to develop protocols to assess strain compatibility and to improve colonization procedures and strain management. Specific studies addressed issues related to insect nutrition, irradiation protocols, field dispersal and survival, field cage behavior assessments, and enhancement of mating competitiveness. The main objective was to increase the efficiency of operational fruit fly programs using sterile insects and to reduce their cost. Many of the protocols developed or improved during the CRP will be incorporated into the international quality control manual for sterile tephritid fruit flies, standardizing key components of the production, sterilization, shipment, handling, and release of sterile insects. (author) [Spanish] Los articulos presentados en este numero se enfocan en el desarrollo y la validacion de procedimientos para mejorar la calidad total de moscas de las frutas esteriles para su uso en programas de manejo integrado de plagas en donde la tecnica del insecto esteril (TIE) es uno de los componentes clave. El grupo fue coordinado y parcialmente financiado por la Division Conjunta de Tecnicas Nucleares para la Alimentacion y la Agricultura de la FAO/OIEA, Viena, Austria, por un periodo de

  10. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    concentrate it prior to return to the tank farms. In either case, testing is needed to evaluate if this stream is compatible with the evaporator and the other wastes in the tank farm. It should be noted that prior experience in evaporation of another melter off-gas stream, the Recycle Stream at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility, unexpectedly caused deleterious impacts on evaporator scaling and formation of aluminosilicate solids before controls were implemented. The compatibility of this stream with other wastes and components in the tank farms has not been fully investigated, whether it is sent for storage in AW-102 in preparation for evaporation in 242-A evaporator, or if it is pre-concentrated in an auxiliary evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion, precipitation, flammable gases, and scale in the tank farm system. Testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. Alternate disposition of this LAW Recycle stream could beneficially impact WTP, and may also remove a sizeable fraction of the 99Tc from the source term at the IDF. The alternative radionuclide removal process envisioned for this stream parallels the Actinide Removal Process that has been successfully used at SRS for several years. In that process, Monosodium Titanate (MST) is added to the tank waste to adsorb 90Sr and actinides, and then the MST and radionuclides are removed by filtration. The process proposed for investigation for the Hanford WTP LAW Recycle stream would similarly add MST to remove 90Sr and actinides, along with other absorbents or precipitating agents for the remaining radionuclides. These include inorganic reducing agents for Tc, and zeolites for 137Cs. After