National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transect ecosystem research

  1. Simulation games that integrate research, entertainment, and learning around ecosystem services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costanza, Robert; Chichakly, Karim; Dale, Virginia; Farber, Steve; Finnigan, David; Grigg, Kat; Heckbert, Scott; Kubiszewski, Ida; Lee, Harry; Liu, Shuang; Magnuszewski, Piotr; Maynard, Simone; McDonald, Neal; Mills, Richard; Ogilvy, Sue; Pert, Petina L.; Renz, Jochen; Wainger, Lisa; Young, Mike; Richard Ziegler, C.

    2014-11-07

    Humans currently spend over 3 billion person-hours per week playing computer games. Most of these games are purely for entertainment, but use of computer games for education has also expanded dramatically. At the same time, experimental games have become a staple of social science research but have depended on relatively small sample sizes and simple, abstract situations, limiting their range and applicability. If only a fraction of the time spent playing computer games could be harnessed for research, it would open up a huge range of new opportunities. We review the use of games in research, education, and entertainment and develop ideas for integrating these three functions around the idea of ecosystem services valuation. This approach to valuation can be seen as a version of choice modeling that allows players to generate their own scenarios taking account of the trade-offs embedded in the game, rather than simply ranking pre-formed scenarios. We outline a prototype game called Lagom Island to test the proposition that gaming can be used to reveal the value of ecosystem services. Ultimately, our prototype provides a potential pathway and functional building blocks for approaching the relatively untapped potential of games in the context of ecosystem services research.

  2. Simulation games that integrate research, entertainment, and learning around ecosystem services

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Costanza, Robert; Chichakly, Karim; Dale, Virginia; Farber, Steve; Finnigan, David; Grigg, Kat; Heckbert, Scott; Kubiszewski, Ida; Lee, Harry; Liu, Shuang; et al

    2014-11-07

    Humans currently spend over 3 billion person-hours per week playing computer games. Most of these games are purely for entertainment, but use of computer games for education has also expanded dramatically. At the same time, experimental games have become a staple of social science research but have depended on relatively small sample sizes and simple, abstract situations, limiting their range and applicability. If only a fraction of the time spent playing computer games could be harnessed for research, it would open up a huge range of new opportunities. We review the use of games in research, education, and entertainment andmore » develop ideas for integrating these three functions around the idea of ecosystem services valuation. This approach to valuation can be seen as a version of choice modeling that allows players to generate their own scenarios taking account of the trade-offs embedded in the game, rather than simply ranking pre-formed scenarios. We outline a prototype game called Lagom Island to test the proposition that gaming can be used to reveal the value of ecosystem services. Ultimately, our prototype provides a potential pathway and functional building blocks for approaching the relatively untapped potential of games in the context of ecosystem services research.« less

  3. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL

    2016-07-12

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  4. Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-03-22

    Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

  5. Methodology for Augmenting Existing Paths with Additional Parallel Transects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, John E.

    2013-09-30

    Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is sample planning software that is used, among other purposes, to plan transect sampling paths to detect areas that were potentially used for munition training. This module was developed for application on a large site where existing roads and trails were to be used as primary sampling paths. Gap areas between these primary paths needed to found and covered with parallel transect paths. These gap areas represent areas on the site that are more than a specified distance from a primary path. These added parallel paths needed to optionally be connected together into a single paththe shortest path possible. The paths also needed to optionally be attached to existing primary paths, again with the shortest possible path. Finally, the process must be repeatable and predictable so that the same inputs (primary paths, specified distance, and path options) will result in the same set of new paths every time. This methodology was developed to meet those specifications.

  6. Ecosystem Spectroscopy - Investigating associations between hyperspect...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuki's research interests include ecosystem functions and processes, big eco-geospatial data analytics, and geospatial cloud analytics. Yuki holds a B.A. and M.S. degrees in...

  7. Biothem-based Mississippian transect from the Basin and Range Province to the Anadarko basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, M.W. ); Lane, H.R. ); Couples, G.D. )

    1991-03-01

    A west-to-east transect, constructed using the 'Biostratigraphic Package Approach' of Lane and Frye and illustrating the biostratigraphic, lithologic, and depositional sequence relationships within the Mississippian system, extends from the basin and range province across the Transcontinental Arch (TA) and into the Anadarko basin. The transect is based on both published and proprietary biostratigraphic data. It was constructed primarily to portray the regional distribution and exploration significance of biotherms relative to the axis of the TA. These biotherms are biostratigraphic units that are wedge- or lens-shaped bodies of strata that are bounded by paleontologically recognizable unconformities in their updip extents, are conformable with underlying and overlying biothems in their maximum shelfal development, are conformable or bounded by surfaces of nondeposition and or submarine erosion in their downdip, basinal extremities, and also contain a logical sequence of depositionally related facies. An unexpected result of constructing the transect was the recognition of an apparent compensatory temporal and spatial distribution of Mississippian biothems. This distribution is interpreted to imply that biothems deposited during relative highstand events on one flank of the TA are time-equivalent to biothems deposited during relative lowstand events on the opposite flank of the TA. Platescale tilting, along with local subsidence and uplift, is suggested as the overriding mechanism controlling deposition along the extent of the transect.

  8. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, JD; Berg, LK

    2015-12-01

    Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. Current convective cloud parameterizations contain uncertainties resulting in part from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneities in boundary layer and aerosol properties. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign is designed to provide a detailed set of measurements that are needed to obtain a more complete understanding of the life cycle of shallow clouds by coupling cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to land surface properties, ecosystems, and aerosols. HI-SCALE consists of 2, 4-week intensive observational periods, one in the spring and the other in the late summer, to take advantage of different stages and distribution of “greenness” for various types of vegetation in the vicinity of the Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as well as aerosol properties that vary during the growing season. Most of the proposed instrumentation will be deployed on the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream 1 (G-1) aircraft, including those that measure atmospheric turbulence, cloud water content and drop size distributions, aerosol precursor gases, aerosol chemical composition and size distributions, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Routine ARM aerosol measurements made at the surface will be supplemented with aerosol microphysical properties measurements. The G-1 aircraft will complete transects over the SGP Central Facility at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, within clouds, and above clouds.

  9. Biodiversity and industry ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    Biodiversity describes the array of interacting, genetically distinct populations and species in a region, the communities they are functioning parts. Ecosystem health is a process identifying biological indicators, end points, and values. The decline of populations or species, an accelerating trend worldwide, can lead to simplification of ecosystem processes, thus threatening the stability an sustainability of ecosystem services directly relevant to human welfare in the chain of economic and ecological relationships. The challenge of addressing issues of such enormous scope and complexity has highlighted the limitations of ecology-as-science. Additionally, biosphere-scale conflicts seem to lie beyond the scope of conventional economics, leading to differences of opinion about the commodity value of biodiversity and of the services that intact ecosystems provide. In the fact of these uncertainties, many scientists and economists have adopted principles that clearly assign burdens of proof to those who would promote the loss of biodiversity and that also establish {open_quotes}near-trump{close_quotes} (preeminent) status for ecological integrity. Electric utility facilities and operations impact biodiversity whenever construction, operation, or maintenance of generation, delivery, and support facilities alters landscapes and habitats and thereby impacts species. Although industry is accustomed to dealing with broad environmental concerns (such as global warming or acid rain), the biodiversity issue invokes hemisphere-side, regional, local, and site-specific concerns all at the same time. Industry can proactively address these issues of scope and scale in two main ways: first, by aligning strategically with the broad research agenda put forth by informed scientists and institutions; and second, by supporting focused management processes whose results will contribute incrementally to the broader agenda of rebuilding or maintaining biodiversity. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  11. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  12. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE ModelData Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  13. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  14. Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Finding of No Significant Impact page 1 Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Finding of No Significant Impact Bonneville Power Administration DOE/EA-2006 July 2016 SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. The ongoing program, implemented by BPA and United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), involves activities and projects to restore

  15. ARM - Research Themes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  16. Five-years of microenvironment data along an urban-rural transect; temperature and CO2 concentrations in urban area at levels expected globally with climate change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Kate; Ziska, Lewis H; Bunce, James A; Quebedeaux, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    The heat island effect and the high use of fossil fuels in large city centers is well documented, but by how much fossil fuel consumption is elevating atmospheric CO2 concentrations and whether elevations in both atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are consistent from year to year are less well known. Our aim was to record atmospheric CO2 concentrations, air temperature and other environmental variables in an urban area and compare it to suburban and rural sites to see if urban sites are experiencing climates expected globally in the future with climate change. A transect was established from Baltimore city center (Urban site), to the outer suburbs of Baltimore (suburban site) and out to an organic farm (rural site). At each site a weather station was set-up to monitor environmental variables annually for five years. Atmospheric CO2 was significantly increased on average by 66 ppm from the rural to the urban site over the five years of the study. Air temperature was significantly higher at the urban site (14.8 oC) compared to the suburban (13.6 oC) and rural (12.7 oC) sites. Relative humidity was not different between sites but vapor pressure deficit (VPD) was significantly higher at the urban site compared to the suburban and rural sites. During wet years relative humidity was significantly increased and VPD significantly reduced. Increased nitrogen deposition at the rural site (2.1 % compared to 1.8 and 1.2 % at the suburban and urban sites) was small enough not to affect soil nitrogen content. Dense urban areas with large populations and high vehicular traffic have significantly different microclimates compared to outlying suburban and rural areas. The increases in atmospheric CO2 and air temperature are similar to changes predicted in the short term with global climate change, therefore providing an environment suitable for studying future effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems.

  17. Stratus Cloud Structure from MM-Radar Transects and Satellite Images: Scaling Properties and Artifact Detection with Semi-...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure from mm-Radar Transects and Satellite Images: Scaling Properties and Artifact Detection with Semi-Discrete Wavelet Analyses A. B. Davis Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico N. P. Petrov Department of Physics The University of Texas Austin, Texas E. E. Clothiaux Department of Meteorology The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania A. Marshak Climate and Radiation Branch National Aeronautics and Space

  18. Ecosystem Spectroscopy: Investigating Associations between Hyperspectr...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ecosystem dynamics at the biosphere-atmosphere interface to enable more accurate climate forecasting. Although our ability to forecast ecosystem functions and climate at the...

  19. Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Research Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Research thorium test foil A thorium test foil target for proof-of-concept actinium-225 production In addition to our routine isotope products, the LANL Isotope Program is focused on developing the next suite of isotopes and services to meet the Nation's emerging needs. The LANL Isotope Program's R&D strategy is focused on four main areas (see

  20. Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 Terrestrial Ecosystem Project (Geco) Field

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Campaign Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 Terrestrial Ecosystem Project (Geco) Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 Terrestrial Ecosystem Project (Geco) Field Campaign Report In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility GoAmazon campaign, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES)-funded Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon 2014/15)

  1. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  2. Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-10-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance.

  3. Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The LANL Isotope Program's R&D strategy is focused on four main areas (see article list below for recent efforts in these areas): Medical Applications are a key focus for research ...

  4. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  5. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  6. Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.

  7. Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research CORE-SHELL NANOPARTICLES AND NANOSTRUCTURED MESOPOROUS MATERIALS(NMMs) Nanomaterials need no special introduction as interest in them sparked exponential growth in the past couple of decades, not only in scientific laboratories but also in industries around the world. In addition to size and shape effects, newer designs of nanostructures have also begun gaining prominence providing a new opportunity to tailor the properties of nanomaterials and investigate their fundamental behavior as

  8. Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 160-0002 Sector: Solar Product: Japan-based installer of solar...

  9. Terrestrial Ecosystem Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Climate Model Development and Validation (CMDV) Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global

  10. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju

    2013-01-01

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Seasonal and Interannual Variability in 13C of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes from 2002-2009 Submitter: Torn, M. S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Torn MS, SC Biraud, CJ Still, WJ Riley, and JA Berry. 2011. "Seasonal and inter-annual variability in δ13C of net ecosystem carbon exchanges from 2002-2009 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains." Tellus, 63(2), 10.1111/j.1600-0889.2010.00519.x. Time

  12. Image analysis of anatomical traits in stalk transections of maize and other grasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckwolf, Sven; Heckwolf, Marlies; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; de Leon, Natalia; Spalding, Edgar P

    2015-04-09

    Grass stalks architecturally support leaves and reproductive structures, functionally support the transport of water and nutrients, and are harvested for multiple agricultural uses. Research on these basic and applied aspects of grass stalks would benefit from improved capabilities for measuring internal anatomical features. In particular, methods suitable for phenotyping populations of plants are needed.

  13. Simulation of hydrologic influences on wetland ecosystem succession. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pompilio, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    This research focuses on the development of a simulation model to determine the affects of hydrological influences on a wetland ecosystem. The model allows perturbations to the inputs of various wetland data which in turn, influences the successional development of the ecosystem. This research consisted of converting a grassland ecosystem model to one which simulates wetland conditions. The critical factor in determining the success of wetland creation is the hydrology of the system. There are four of the areas of the original model which are affected by the hydrology. The model measures the health or success of the ecosystem through the measurement of the systems gross plant production, the respiration and the net primary production of biomass. Altering the auxiliary variables of water level and the rate of flow through the system explicitly details the affects hydrologic influences on those production rates. Ten case tests depicting exogenous perturbations of the hydrology were run to identify these affects. Although the tests dealt with the fluctuation of water through the system, any one of the auxiliary variables in the model could be changed to reflect site specific data. Productivity, Hazardous material management, Hazardous material pharmacy.

  14. Federal interagency ecosystem management initiative: Great Lakes ecosystem case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordle, S.

    1995-12-01

    In August 1994 a team of representatives from six Federal agencies conducted a case study of ecosystem management practices in the Great Lakes. Its report was based on interviews carried out in Chicago, Illinois, and Ann Arbor, Michigan; on phone interviews; and on written materials provided by Federal and State officials as well as representatives of Tribal organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, industry, and the International Joint Commission. The report describes mainly what the participants told or provided to the survey team, with a few explicit conclusions and recommendations from the team. The issues covered by the survey included Legal, Institutional, Science and Information, Budget, and Public Participation.

  15. Microbes as engines of ecosystem function: When does community structure enhance predictions of ecosystem processes?

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Graham, Emily B.; Knelman, Joseph E.; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Siciliano, Steven; Breulmann, Marc; Yannarell, Anthony; Beman, J. M.; Abell, Guy; Philippot, Laurent; Prosser, James; et al

    2016-02-24

    In this study, microorganisms are vital in mediating the earth’s biogeochemical cycles; yet, despite our rapidly increasing ability to explore complex environmental microbial communities, the relationship between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. Here, we address a fundamental and unanswered question in microbial ecology: ‘When do we need to understand microbial community structure to accurately predict function?’ We present a statistical analysis investigating the value of environmental data and microbial community structure independently and in combination for explaining rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling processes within 82 global datasets. Environmental variables were the strongest predictors of processmore » rates but left 44% of variation unexplained on average, suggesting the potential for microbial data to increase model accuracy. Although only 29% of our datasets were significantly improved by adding information on microbial community structure, we observed improvement in models of processes mediated by narrow phylogenetic guilds via functional gene data, and conversely, improvement in models of facultative microbial processes via community diversity metrics. Our results also suggest that microbial diversity can strengthen predictions of respiration rates beyond microbial biomass parameters, as 53% of models were improved by incorporating both sets of predictors compared to 35% by microbial biomass alone. Our analysis represents the first comprehensive analysis of research examining links between microbial community structure and ecosystem function. Taken together, our results indicate that a greater understanding of microbial communities informed by ecological principles may enhance our ability to predict ecosystem process rates relative to assessments based on environmental variables and microbial physiology.« less

  16. Building an Innovation Ecosystem | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Building an Innovation Ecosystem Building an Innovation Ecosystem June 30, 2016 - 4:13pm Addthis Graphic by Sarah Harman Graphic by Sarah Harman Mike Mueller Senior Digital Content Strategist, EERE Communications What are the key facts? EERE's Technology-to-Market program has been carefully studying and strengthening a nationwide innovation ecosystem to give game-changing clean energy technologies a fighting chance at success. Through significant stakeholder engagement and careful coordination,

  17. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  18. Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Hide Map References: Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem1 The Cleantech Open Innovation Lab2 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  19. Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    reduce poverty and hunger, improve human health and nutrition, and enhance ecosystem resilience through high-quality international agricultural research, partnershp and...

  20. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from 40 lakes along a north–south latitudinal transect in Alaska

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Greene, S.; Thalasso, F.

    2014-09-12

    Uncertainties in the magnitude and seasonality of various gas emission modes, particularly among different lake types, limit our ability to estimate methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from northern lakes. Here we assessed the relationship between CH4 and CO2 emission modes in 40 lakes along a latitudinal transect in Alaska to physicochemical limnology and geographic characteristics, including permafrost soil type surrounding lakes. Emission modes included Direct Ebullition, Diffusion, Storage flux, and a newly identified Ice-Bubble Storage (IBS) flux. We found that all lakes were net sources of atmospheric CH4 and CO2, but the climate warming impact of lake CH4more » emissions was two times higher than that of CO2. Ebullition and Diffusion were the dominant modes of CH4 and CO2 emissions respectively. IBS, ~ 10% of total annual CH4 emissions, is the release to the atmosphere of seasonally ice-trapped bubbles when lake ice confining bubbles begins to melt in spring. IBS, which has not been explicitly accounted for in regional studies, increased the estimate of springtime emissions from our study lakes by 320%. Geographically, CH4 emissions from stratified, dystrophic interior Alaska thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in icy, organic-rich yedoma permafrost soils were 6-fold higher than from non-yedoma lakes throughout the rest of Alaska. Total CH4 emission was correlated with concentrations of phosphate and total nitrogen in lake water, Secchi depth and lake area, with yedoma lakes having higher nutrient concentrations, shallower Secchi depth, and smaller lake areas. Our findings suggest that permafrost type plays important roles in determining CH4 emissions from lakes by both supplying organic matter to methanogenesis directly from thawing permafrost and by enhancing nutrient availability to primary production, which can also fuel decomposition and methanogenesis.« less

  1. 2-D computer modeling of oil generation and migration in a Transect of the Eastern Venezuela Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallango, O. ); Parnaud, F. )

    1993-02-01

    The aim of the study was a two-dimensional computer simulation of the basin evolution based on available geological, geophysical, geochemical, geothermal, and hydrodynamic data with the main purpose of determining the hydrocarbon generation and migration history. The modeling was done in two geological sections (platform and pre-thrusting) located along the Chacopata-Uverito Transect in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. In the platform section an hypothetic source rock equivalent to the Gyayuta Group was considered in order to simulate the migration of hydrocarbons. The thermal history reconstruction of hypothetic source rock confirms that this source rock does not reach the oil window before the middle Miocene and that the maturity in this sector is due to the sedimentation of the Freites, La Pica, and Mesa-Las Piedras formations. The oil expulsion and migration from this hypothetic source rock began after middle Miocene time. The expulsion of the hydrocarbons took place mainly along the Oligocene-Miocene reservoir and do not reach at the present time zones located beyond of the Oritupano field, which imply that the oil accumulated in south part of the basin was generated by a source rock located to the north, in the actual deformation zone. Since 17 m.y. ago water migration pattern from north to south was observed in this section. In the pre-thrusting section the hydrocarbon expulsion started during the early Tertiary and took place mainly toward the lower Cretaceous (El Cantil and Barranquim formations). At the end of the passive margin the main migration occur across the Merecure reservoir, through which the hydrocarbon migrated forward to the Onado sector before the thrusting.

  2. REMM: The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrance, R.; Altier, L.S.; Williams, R.G.; Inamdar, S.P.; Sheridan, J.M.; Bosch, D.D.; Hubbard, R.K.; Thomas, D.L.

    2000-03-01

    Riparian buffer zones are effective in mitigating nonpoint source pollution and have been recommended as a best management practice (BMP). The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model (REMM) has been developed for researchers and natural resource agencies as a modeling tool that can help quantify the water quality benefits of riparian buffers under varying site conditions. Processes simulated in REMM include surface and subsurface hydrology; sediment transport and deposition; carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transport, removal, and cycling; and vegetation growth. Management options, such as vegetation type, size of the buffer zone, and biomass harvesting also can be simulated. REMM can be used in conjunction with upland models, empirical data, or estimated loadings to examine scenarios of buffer zone design for a hillslope. Evaluation of REMM simulations with field observations shows generally good agreement between simulated and observed data for groundwater nitrate concentrations and water table depths in a mature riparian forest buffer. Sensitivity analysis showed that changes that influenced the water balance or soil moisture storage affected the streamflow output. Parameter changes that influence either hydrology or rates of nutrient cycling affected total N transport and plant N uptake.

  3. ARM - Funded Research Proposals

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    govScienceFunded Research Proposals Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Funded Research

  4. Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs September 14, 2011 - 4:22pm Addthis Rich ...

  5. Methane and carbon dioxide emissions from 40 lakes along a north–south latitudinal transect in Alaska

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Greene, S.; Thalasso, F.

    2015-06-02

    Uncertainties in the magnitude and seasonality of various gas emission modes, particularly among different lake types, limit our ability to estimate methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from northern lakes. Here we assessed the relationship between CH4 and CO2 emission modes in 40 lakes along a latitudinal transect in Alaska to lakes' physicochemical properties and geographic characteristics, including permafrost soil type surrounding lakes. Emission modes included direct ebullition, diffusion, storage flux, and a newly identified ice-bubble storage (IBS) flux. We found that all lakes were net sources of atmospheric CH4 and CO2, but the climate warming impact of lakemore » CH4 emissions was 2 times higher than that of CO2. Ebullition and diffusion were the dominant modes of CH4 and CO2 emissions, respectively. IBS, ~10% of total annual CH4 emissions, is the release to the atmosphere of seasonally ice-trapped bubbles when lake ice confining bubbles begins to melt in spring. IBS, which has not been explicitly accounted for in regional studies, increased the estimate of springtime emissions from our study lakes by 320%. Geographically, CH4 emissions from stratified, mixotrophic interior Alaska thermokarst (thaw) lakes formed in icy, organic-rich yedoma permafrost soils were 6-fold higher than from non-yedoma lakes throughout the rest of Alaska. The relationship between CO2 emissions and geographic parameters was weak, suggesting high variability among sources and sinks that regulate CO2 emissions (e.g., catchment waters, pH equilibrium). Total CH4 emission was correlated with concentrations of soluble reactive phosphorus and total nitrogen in lake water, Secchi depth, and lake area, with yedoma lakes having higher nutrient concentrations, shallower Secchi depth, and smaller lake areas. Our findings suggest that permafrost type plays important roles in determining CH4 emissions from lakes by both supplying organic matter to methanogenesis directly from

  6. Coso geothermal environmental overview study ecosystem quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, P.

    1981-09-01

    The Coso Known Geothermal Resource Area is located just east of the Sierra Nevada, in the broad transition zone between the Mohave and Great Basin desert ecosystems. The prospect of large-scale geothermal energy development here in the near future has led to concern for the protection of biological resources. Objectives here are the identification of ecosystem issues, evaluation of the existing data base, and recommendation of additional studies needed to resolve key issues. High-priority issues include the need for (1) site-specific data on the occurrence of plant and animal species of special concern, (2) accurate and detailed information on the nature and extent of the geothermal resource, and (3) implementation of a comprehensive plan for ecosystem protection.

  7. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  8. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B.; Miller, Karl V.; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  9. GIS solutions for ecosystem management in developing countries: A case study of Sao Tome and Principe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, L.; Barrasso, T.; Pinto da Costa, H.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote awareness of the application of the Geographic information system (GIS) technology to the management of ecosystems in developing countries. The adoptation of systematic environmental research and management techniques by national and local conservation programs helps ensure the sustainability of important biological resources.

  10. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  11. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Walker Branch Watershed is located on the U. S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation near Oak Ridge, in Anderson County, Tennessee. The Walker Branch Watershed Project began in 1967 under sponsorship of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U. S. Department of Energy). Initially, the project centered primarily on the geologic and hydrologic processes that control the amounts and chemistry of water moving through the watershed. Past projects have included: • U. S. Department of Energy funded studies of watershed hydrology and forest nutrient dynamics • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funded studies of forest micrometeorology • Studies of atmospheric deposition under the National Atmospheric Deposition Program • The International Biological Program Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome Project • National Science Foundation sponsored studies of trace element cycling and stream nutrient spiraling • Electric Power Research Institute funded studies of the effects of acidic deposition on canopy processes and soil chemistry. These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  12. Update on Washington initiatives on ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, D.

    1995-12-01

    A biological {open_quotes}revolution{close_quotes} is in progress. Due to initiatives of the Clinton-Gore administration, biologists across the nation are trying to define and use a new concept called ecosystem management. {open_quotes}Ecosystem management{close_quotes} was born in the frustration of trying to deal with the spotted owl controversy in the Northwest. Biologists could not agree on what should be done. And the biologists and economists rarely got together to try to solve problems. Some astute individuals realized that to achieve a sustainable development, ecosystems would have to be managed on a much larger scale than merely small plots of lands. And people from many different backgrounds and disciplines would need to come together to find solutions. This paper will present the views of a Washington insider who has been a player (although too frequently a minor league player!) in administration initiatives to infuse ecosystem management principles and practices in our national conscience. Today, federal agency staff talk to those in other offices within their own agency. Federal agency staff also work on joint projects across federal agencies. In addition, state government, nonprofits, universities, interested individuals, and tribal governments are becoming involved. This is the biological {open_quotes}revolution{close_quotes} that is in progress. The emphasis is shifting from looking at the life history and problems of single species to a much broader approach of examining many species, including humans. The author will present a report on results of the ecosystem management initiative in the last year and point out some of the hurdles still ahead.

  13. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  14. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  15. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  16. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  17. Microbes as engines of ecosystem function: When does community...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Language: English Subject: microbial diversity; functional gene; statistical modeling; microbial ecology; ecosystem processes; respiration; nitrification; denitrification Word ...

  18. Maximum entropy models of ecosystem functioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, Jason

    2014-12-05

    Using organism-level traits to deduce community-level relationships is a fundamental problem in theoretical ecology. This problem parallels the physical one of using particle properties to deduce macroscopic thermodynamic laws, which was successfully achieved with the development of statistical physics. Drawing on this parallel, theoretical ecologists from Lotka onwards have attempted to construct statistical mechanistic theories of ecosystem functioning. Jaynes’ broader interpretation of statistical mechanics, which hinges on the entropy maximisation algorithm (MaxEnt), is of central importance here because the classical foundations of statistical physics do not have clear ecological analogues (e.g. phase space, dynamical invariants). However, models based on the information theoretic interpretation of MaxEnt are difficult to interpret ecologically. Here I give a broad discussion of statistical mechanical models of ecosystem functioning and the application of MaxEnt in these models. Emphasising the sample frequency interpretation of MaxEnt, I show that MaxEnt can be used to construct models of ecosystem functioning which are statistical mechanical in the traditional sense using a savanna plant ecology model as an example.

  19. Measures of the Effects of Agricultural Practices on Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Polasky, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agriculture produces more than just crops. Agricultural practices have environmental impacts that affect a wide range of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity. Understanding the contribution of various agricultural practices to the range of ecosystem services would help inform choices about the most beneficial agricultural practices. To accomplish this, however, we must overcome a big challenge in measuring the impact of alternative agricultural practices on ecosystem services and of ecosystem services on agricultural production.

  20. Coastal ecosystems of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, R.C.; Markovits, P.S.; Kirkwood, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide training on recent developments in understanding coastal ecosystems in the southeastern United States for Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) field personnel and other natural resource managers in the region. Major emphasis was given to three types of systems: marshes, mangroves, and sea grasses. Other systems such as coral reefs, mud flats, bottomland hardwoods, and estuaries were discussed in less detail. Twenty-three papers were presented during the workshop. One of these was abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA.

  1. Opportunities for Field Research | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Opportunities for field research The SRS offers: * Landscape scale: 803 km2 * Diversity of ecosystems * Natural and impacted areas * Well-characterized habitats * Long history of research * Protected access * 30 Research Set-Aside Areas Since 1951 the Savannah River Site (SRS) has served as an invaluable outdoor laboratory for SREL scientists and colleagues. The geographic diversity of the SRS offers visiting researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems, or natural

  2. Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign Report Laboratory (LANL) worked on the Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) intensive operational period (IOP). PACE's primary goal was to demonstrate routine Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) field operations and improve instrumental and operational performance.

  3. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dataset: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic...

  4. Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp, aka Solar MW Energy Inc Place: Ontario, California Zip: 91761 Product:...

  5. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking" Telescopes: An...

  6. T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems Thomas G. Hinton Savannah River Ecology ... availability from sequential extractions compared to plant uptake of 137Cs and 90Sr. ...

  7. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking"...

  8. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic. Authors: Sullivan, Paddy ; Sloan, Victoria ; Warren, Jeff ; McGuire, Dave ; Euskirchen, Eugenie ;...

  9. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  10. Energy flow, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The resilience, defined here as the speed with which a system returns to equilibrium state following a perturbation, is investigated for both food web energy models and nutrient cycling models. Previous simulation studies of food web energy models have shown that resilience increases as the flux of energy through the food web per unit amount of energy in the steady state web increases. Studies of nutrient cycling models have shown that resilience increases as the mean number of cycles that nutrient (or other mineral) atoms make before leaving the system decreases. In the present study these conclusions are verified analytically for general ecosystem models. The behavior of resilience in food web energy models and nutrient cycling models is a reflection of the time that a given unit, whether of energy or matter, spends in the steady state system. The shorter this residence time is, the more resilient the system is.

  11. Overview of the federal interagency ecosystem management initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huke, S.

    1995-12-01

    In early 1994, the White House established a Federal Interagency Ecosystem Management Task Force and Working Group to implement the ecosystem management recommendation in the Vice President`s National Performance Review. The Task Force identified seven ecosystems where mature interagency ecosystem-based activities are mature and ongoing and may provide valuable lessons for broader application. Case studies of each of the seven ecosystems were prepared by interagency teams conducting interviews with representatives of federal, state, and local governments and private interests. The seven ecosystems are: the Southern Appalachian Highlands, Anacostia River Watershed, Prince William Sound, Pacific Northwest Forests, Coastal Louisiana, South Florida, and Great Lakes ecosystems. A final synthesis report, scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1995, will provide an overview of constraints, opportunities, and recommendations in five issue areas: legal, budgetary, science, institutional, policy, and public involvement. A second phase of this initiative will entail the development of ecosystem management strategies for three {open_quotes}new initiatives{close_quotes} laboratories.

  12. Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Bert G

    2013-01-01

    : stimulation of ecosystem gas exchange by elevated atmospheric CO2; the architecture and distribution of coarse roots using the novel approach of ground penetrating radar; mechanisms for the disturbance of soil carbon pools via the "priming" effect; and how interannual and seasonal variation in precipitation alters the physiological response of key species to elevated CO2. This project was a collaboration between research groups at the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, the Dynamac Corporation, Northern Arizona University, and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

  13. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  14. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Serkowski, John A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-12-31

    This Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates is designed to support the Oncor geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The following data categories are covered: water-surface elevation and temperature, sediment accretion rate, photo points, herbaceous wetland vegetation cover, tree plots and site summaries, fish catch and density, fish size, fish diet, fish prey, and Chinook salmon genetic stock identification. The handbook is intended for use by scientists collecting monitoring and research data for the CEERP. The ultimate goal of Oncor is to provide quality, easily accessible, geospatial data for synthesis and evaluation of the collective performance of CEERP ecosystem restoration actions at a program scale.

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Pajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems PACE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsPajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems PACE Campaign Links Field Campaign Report ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Pajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems PACE 2011.12.16 - 2012.04.29 Lead Scientist : Manvendra Dubey For data sets, see below. Abstract The primary goal of the Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) IOP is to demonstrate routine MAOS field operations and

  16. Observed and modeled ecosystem isoprene fluxes from an oak-dominated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ecosystem isoprene fluxes from an oak-dominated temperate forest and the influence of drought stress Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observed and modeled ecosystem ...

  17. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An ecosystem-scale ...

  18. Extensions to the CYCLUS Ecosystem in Support of Market-Driven...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Extensions to the CYCLUS Ecosystem in Support of Market-Driven Transition Capability Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extensions to the CYCLUS Ecosystem in ...

  19. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored

  20. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The natural resources of the Gulf’s ecosystem are vital to many of the region’s industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood...

  1. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Cumulus convection ...

  2. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  3. Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

  4. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  5. Building the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort | Department of Energy Building the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort Building the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort March 15, 2016 - 2:05pm Addthis Raymond Weitekamp and Corinne Allen utilize the resources and expertise of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Molecular Foundry lab to

  6. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediments and Related Deposits terrestrial climate change Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on archives that incorporate and preserve information about changes in temperature, precipitation, nutrients, vegetation, fire history, etc. The resolution and length of such paleoclimate/ecological records is dependent on the type of archive. Although much

  7. Developing micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dizdaroglu, Didem

    2015-09-15

    Sustainability assessment is increasingly being viewed as an important tool to aid in the shift towards sustainable urban ecosystems. An urban ecosystem is a dynamic system and requires regular monitoring and assessment through a set of relevant indicators. An indicator is a parameter which provides information about the state of the environment by producing a quantitative value. Indicator-based sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all spatial scales to provide efficient information of urban ecosystem sustainability. The detailed data is necessary to assess environmental change in urban ecosystems at local scale and easily transfer this information to the national and global scales. This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. The proposed indicator framework measures the sustainability performance of urban ecosystem in 3 main categories including: natural environment, built environment, and socio-economic environment which are made up of 9 sub-categories, consisting of 23 indicators. This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature [Turkish] Highlights: • As the impacts of environmental problems have multi-scale characteristics, sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all scales. • The detailed data is necessary to assess local environmental change in urban ecosystems to provide insights into the national and global scales. • This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. • This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature.

  8. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (HI-SCALE) Science Plan (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the

  9. The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Annual Report, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Serkowski, John A.

    2013-11-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps). The purpose of the project is to develop a geospatial, web-accessible database (called “Oncor”) for action effectiveness and related data from monitoring and research efforts for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The intent is for the Oncor database to enable synthesis and evaluation, the results of which can then be applied in subsequent CEERP decision-making. This is the first annual report in what is expected to be a 3- to 4-year project, which commenced on February 14, 2012.

  10. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  11. Threshold responses to interacting global changes in a California grassland ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Christopher; Cortinas, Susan

    2015-02-02

    Final Report for Threshold responses to interacting global changes in a California grassland ecosystem

  12. Determining the appropriate scope: Assessing at the ecosystem level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southerland, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Traditional approaches to determining the scope of environmental impact assessment have been based on an ad hoc selection of issues by the project proponent and other interested parties. Resulting in an inadequate consideration of both cumulative effects and impacts on biodiversity. Although public involvement in scoping the assessment must by resource-oriented, rather than activity-oriented, the appropriate scope of environmental impact assessment is the ecosystem. Drawing from the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) guidance on the consideration of biodiversity under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the growing consensus on principles of ecosystem management, scoping should begin with the large-scale ecosystem focusing on essential components potentially affected by the project to determine the appropriate bounds for the study. Although the science of analyzing ecosystems has many limitation, progress in improving environmental impact assessment can be made at any of the three increasingly difficult steps in assessing at the ecosystem level: (1) The first step involves bounding the assessment within the regional context to address cumulative effects and biodiversity. The adoption of a landscape scale has proven to be the most effective solution to the problems of setting boundaries for study units in time and space that do not omit important sources, endpoints (indicators), or processes. (2) The second step involves the use of higher-level indicators to characterize biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Useful measures include community indices of biological integrity and landscape parameters such as habitat composition and fragmentation. (3) The third step involves identifying ecosystem thresholds (i.e., carrying capacities) to analyze the significance of cumulative impacts. Trends analysis can help identify potential threshold effects when process models are not available.

  13. XVis: Visualization for the Extreme-Scale Scientific-Computation Ecosystem: Year-end report FY15 Q4.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.; Sewell, Christopher; Childs, Hank; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Geveci, Berk; Meredith, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The XVis project brings together the key elements of research to enable scientific discovery at extreme scale. Scientific computing will no longer be purely about how fast computations can be performed. Energy constraints, processor changes, and I/O limitations necessitate significant changes in both the software applications used in scientific computation and the ways in which scientists use them. Components for modeling, simulation, analysis, and visualization must work together in a computational ecosystem, rather than working independently as they have in the past. This project provides the necessary research and infrastructure for scientific discovery in this new computational ecosystem by addressing four interlocking challenges: emerging processor technology, in situ integration, usability, and proxy analysis.

  14. The OSG open facility: A sharing ecosystem

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Jayatilaka, B.; Levshina, T.; Rynge, M.; Sehgal, C.; Slyz, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) ties together individual experiments’ computing power, connecting their resources to create a large, robust computing grid, this computing infrastructure started primarily as a collection of sites associated with large HEP experiments such as ATLAS, CDF, CMS, and DZero. In the years since, the OSG has broadened its focus to also address the needs of other US researchers and increased delivery of Distributed High Through-put Computing (DHTC) to users from a wide variety of disciplines via the OSG Open Facility. Presently, the Open Facility delivers about 100 million computing wall hours per year to researchers whomore » are not already associated with the owners of the computing sites, this is primarily accomplished by harvesting and organizing the temporarily unused capacity (i.e. opportunistic cycles) from the sites in the OSG. Using these methods, OSG resource providers and scientists share computing hours with researchers in many other fields to enable their science, striving to make sure that these computing power used with maximal efficiency. Furthermore, we believe that expanded access to DHTC is an essential tool for scientific innovation and work continues in expanding this service.« less

  15. The OSG open facility: A sharing ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayatilaka, B.; Levshina, T.; Rynge, M.; Sehgal, C.; Slyz, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) ties together individual experiments’ computing power, connecting their resources to create a large, robust computing grid, this computing infrastructure started primarily as a collection of sites associated with large HEP experiments such as ATLAS, CDF, CMS, and DZero. In the years since, the OSG has broadened its focus to also address the needs of other US researchers and increased delivery of Distributed High Through-put Computing (DHTC) to users from a wide variety of disciplines via the OSG Open Facility. Presently, the Open Facility delivers about 100 million computing wall hours per year to researchers who are not already associated with the owners of the computing sites, this is primarily accomplished by harvesting and organizing the temporarily unused capacity (i.e. opportunistic cycles) from the sites in the OSG. Using these methods, OSG resource providers and scientists share computing hours with researchers in many other fields to enable their science, striving to make sure that these computing power used with maximal efficiency. Furthermore, we believe that expanded access to DHTC is an essential tool for scientific innovation and work continues in expanding this service.

  16. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolutionmore » imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating variables

  17. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating

  18. Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

  19. Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimel, David; Pavlick, Ryan; Fisher, Joshua B.; Asner, Gregory P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Townsend, Philip; Miller, Charles E.; Frankenberg, Christian; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Cox, Peter

    2015-02-06

    Modeled terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle feedbacks contribute substantial uncertainty to projections of future climate. The limitations of current observing networks contribute to this uncertainty. Here we present a current climatology of global model predictions and observations for photosynthesis, biomass, plant diversity and plant functional diversity. Carbon cycle tipping points occur in terrestrial regions where fluxes or stocks are largest, and where biological variability is highest, the tropics and Arctic/Boreal zones. Global observations are predominately in the mid-latitudes and are sparse in high and low latitude ecosystems. Observing and forecasting ecosystem change requires sustained observations of sufficient density in time and space in critical regions. Using data and theory available now, we can develop a strategy to detect and forecast terrestrial carbon cycle-climate interactions, by combining in situ and remote techniques.

  20. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1992-04-01

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

  1. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  2. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  3. Amped Up! Magazine- Accelerating Clean Energy through an Innovation Ecosystem

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Amped Up! Magazine features new Acting Assistant Secretary David Friedman and his vision for moving the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) forward as well as the office’s efforts in building an innovation ecosystem to accelerate clean energy ideas to the marketplace.

  4. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape The Cleantech Group www.cleantech.com Principal Authors Greg Neichin David Cheng Contributing Authors Sheeraz Haji Josh Gould Debjit Mukerji David Hague 2 Table of Contents Page I. Introduction .............................................................................. 3 In-Depth Market Analysis II. Advanced Metering

  5. Partnerships - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnerships JCESR brings together high-powered scientists and engineers from ten universities, five national laboratories, and five industrial firms, and provides them with the tools and institutional backing needed to discover new materials, understand their basic science, accelerate technology development, and commercialize revolutionary energy storage technologies. The team's combined expertise spans the full innovation ecosystem - mission-driven basic research, innovative engineering,

  6. Research | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research From photovoltaic (PV) materials to PV modules to PV systems, the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) pursues ...

  7. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  8. Consequences of natural upwelling in oligotrophic marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-03-01

    One of the major environmental consequences of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plans may be the artificial upwelling of nutrients to the surface waters of oligotrophic ecosystems. Within a 10 km/sup 2/ area, OTEC plants of 1000 MWe total capacity could upwell the same amount of nutrients as occurs naturally off Peru each day. The biological response to possible eutrophication by OTEC plants may not be similar to that within coastal upwelling ecosystems, however. Upwelling in offshore oceanic systems does not lead to increased primary production despite high nutrient content of the euphotic zone. Continuous grazing may not allow phytoplankton blooms to develop in oceanic upwelling systems to the proposed OTEC sites. At present this is a hypothesis to be tested before full evaluation of OTEC induced upwelling can be made.

  9. Indian Boundary Prairies: A Test Bed to Evaluate Ecosystem Services

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Provided by Urban Nature Preserves | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Indian Boundary Prairies: A Test Bed to Evaluate Ecosystem Services Provided by Urban Nature Preserves Event Sponsor: Northwestern Argonne Institute for Science and Engineering Seminar Start Date: Nov 7 2016 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 362/Room E388 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): William M. Miller Speaker(s) Title: Northwestern University Host: Cristina Negri We are collaborating with Argonne

  10. The relationship of ecosystem management to NEPA and its goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.G.; Randolph, J.

    2000-07-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was intended to promote a systematic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to planning and decision making, including the integration of the natural and social sciences and the design arts. NEPA critics have cited three key shortcomings in its implementation: (1) a lack of engagement with the NEPA process early in the planning process through interdisciplinary collaboration; (2) a lack of rigorous science and the incorporation of ecological principles and techniques; and (3) a lack of emphasis on the Act's substantive goals and objectives. In recent years and independent of NEPA, a policy of ecosystem management has been developed, which represents a fundamental change from a fragmented, incremental planning and management approach to a holistic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary land and resource management effort. The authors postulate that by incorporating ecosystem management principles in their planning and decisionmaking, federal agencies can address the shortcomings in NEPA implementation and move closes to NEPA's intent. A case analysis of EISs prepared by the USDA Forest Service before and after adopting an ecosystem management approach supports their hypothesis.

  11. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  12. Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

  13. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge

    2006-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

  14. A comprehensive data acquisition and management system for an ecosystem-scale peatland warming and elevated CO2 experiment

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Krassovski, M. B.; Riggs, J. S.; Hook, L. A.; Nettles, W. R.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T. A.

    2015-11-09

    Ecosystem-scale manipulation experiments represent large science investments that require well-designed data acquisition and management systems to provide reliable, accurate information to project participants and third party users. The SPRUCE project (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change, http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is such an experiment funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE), Office of Science, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Program. The SPRUCE experimental mission is to assess ecosystem-level biological responses of vulnerable, high carbon terrestrial ecosystems to a range of climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 atmosphere. SPRUCE provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemicalmore » processes, and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, and the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The SPRUCE experiment will generate a wide range of continuous and discrete measurements. In order to successfully manage SPRUCE data collection, achieve SPRUCE science objectives, and support broader climate change research, the research staff has designed a flexible data system using proven network technologies and software components. The primary SPRUCE data system components are the following; 1. data acquisition and control system – set of hardware and software to retrieve biological and engineering data from sensors, collect sensor status information, and distribute feedback to control components; 2. data collection system – set of hardware and software to deliver data to a central depository for storage and further processing; and 3. data management plan – set of plans, policies, and practices to control consistency, protect data integrity, and deliver data. This publication presents our approach to meeting the challenges of

  15. Transportation Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    transportation-research TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Transportation Research Current Research Overview The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) has established its only high-performance computing and engineering analysis research facility at Argonne National Laboratory to provide applications support in key areas of applied research and development for the USDOT community. The Transportation Research and

  16. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15

    indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  17. Research Gallery

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Gallery Research Gallery Exhibits in this gallery capture Laboratory's leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems...

  18. Bridging the Divide: Linking Genomics to Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Melinda D.

    2014-03-15

    community composition persisted post-drought, ANPP recovered completely the year after drought due to rapid demographic responses by the dominant grass, compensating for loss of the dominant forb. Overall, our results show that an extreme reduction in ecosystem function attributable to a climate extreme (e.g., low resistance) does not preclude rapid ecosystem recovery. Given that dominance by a few species is characteristic of most ecosystems, knowledge of the traits of these species and their responses to climate extremes will be key for predicting future ecosystem dynamics and function. In addition, our research suggests that water stress will dominate photosynthetic and productivity responses caused by discrete drought and heat wave events, rather than direct or additive effects of heat stress, with differential sensitivity in these grasses altering future ecosystem function.

  19. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N

  20. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Submitter: Area of Research: Journal Reference: N/A

  2. Is the ecosystem service concept improving impact assessment? Evidence from recent international practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosa, Josianne Claudia Sales Sánchez, Luis E.

    2015-01-15

    Considering ecosystem services (ES) could foster innovation and improve environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA) practice, but is the potential being fulfilled? In order to investigate how ES have been treated in recent international practice, three questions are asked: (i) were the tasks of an ES analysis carried out? (ii) how is such analysis integrated with other analysis presented in the ESIA? (iii) does ES analysis result in additional or improved mitigation or enhancement measures? These research questions were unfolded into 15 auxiliary questions for reviewing five ESIA reports prepared for mining, hydroelectric and transportation infrastructure projects in Africa, Asia and South America. All cases incorporated ES into ESIA to meet a requirement of the International Finance Corporation's Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability. It was found that: (i) in only three cases most tasks recommended by current guidance were adopted (ii) all reports feature a dedicated ES chapter or section, but in three of them no evidence was found that the ES analysis was integrated within impact assessment (iii) in the two ESIAs that followed guidance, ES analysis resulted in specific mitigation measures. Few evidence was found that the ES concept is improving current ESIA practice. Key challenges are: (i) integrating ES analysis in such a way that it does not duplicate other analysis; (ii) adequately characterizing the beneficiaries of ES; and (iii) quantifying ES supply for impact prediction. - Highlights: • Incorporating ecosystem services analysis in impact assessment can improve results. • Additional impacts and mitigation were identified. • Challenges include developing appropriate indicators for impact prediction. • A key challenge is integrating the concept in such a way that it does not duplicate other analysis.

  3. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Mayes, Melanie; Gu, Lianhong; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2014-01-01

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  4. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  5. Resilience of lotic ecosystems to a light-elimination disturbance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, A.D.; Mulholland, P.J.; Palumbo, A.V.; Flum, T.F.; DeAngelis, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Resilience of eight laboratory stream ecosystems was evaluated following a 92-d light elimination disturbance. Prior to the disturbance, four treatments (snails/once-through flow, snails/recirculated flow, no snails/once-through flow, no snails/recirculated flow) were imposed on the streams, resulting in systems with different biomass levels, nutrient concentrations, and recycling indices. Based on results from models of ecosystem response to disturbance, the authors hypothesized a priori that once-through streams would recover more quickly than recirculated streams within each grazing regime and that grazed streams would recover more quickly than ungrazed streams within each flow regime. Their results indicated that once-through streams did have a higher resilience than recirculated streams when snails were absent, but not when snails were present. Indeed, most parameters recovered faster in streams without snails than those with them, irrespective of flow regime, in contrast to their prediction. Despite the faster initial recovery rates in once-through than recirculated streams without snails, final biomass levels were similar between these streams. Measurements of phosphorus recycling indices suggested that higher rates of nutrient recycling near the end of the experiment in recirculated streams compensated for the lower inputs of new nutrients in the incoming water, allowing biomass to reach levels similar to those in once-through streams.

  6. An ecosystem approach to fish and wildlife conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeper, N.

    1995-12-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) has embraced an ecosystem approach as a more effective way to protect and conserve the nation`s wildlife and the habitat upon which it depends. This does not represent a sharp reversal in our past policies. Rather, it formalizes, builds upon, and expands past efforts that were already moving away from short-term fixes and toward long-term solutions; away from artificially mimicking natural processes and towards restoration of natural processes. The Service reorganized nationwide and established cross-program watershed-based teams to overcome internal barriers and to better incorporate input from our partners. Although watershed are an important way to delineate boundaries, boundaries are actually issue-dependent and therefore quite fluid. Two examples of an ecosystem approach demonstrate the Service`s commitment to policies, decisions, and actions that are based on ecological principles, stress prevention over restoration, support long-term solutions based on natural time scales and over large geographic areas, and consider input from our partners.

  7. Climate Change Alters Seedling Emergence and Establishment in an Old-Field Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Classen, Aimee T; Norby, Richard J; Campany, Courtney E; Sides, Katherine E; Weltzin, Jake

    2010-01-01

    In shaping how ecosystems respond to climatic change, ecosystem structure can dominate over physiological responses of individuals, especially under conditions of multiple, simultaneous changes in environmental factors. Ecological succession drives large-scale changes in ecosystem structure over time, but the mechanisms whereby climatic change alters succession remain unresolved. Here, we investigate effects of atmospheric and climatic change on seedling establishment, recognizing that small shifts in seedling establishment of different species may have long-term repercussions on the transition of fields to forests in the future. Our 4-year experiment in an old-field ecosystem revealed that response of seedling emergence to different combinations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, air temperature, and soil moisture depends on seed phenology, the timing of seed arrival into an ecosystem. We conclude that seed phenology is an important plant trait that can shape, and help predict, the trajectories of ecosystems under climatic change.

  8. Resistance and resilience of pond and stream ecosystems to toxicant stress: Project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Johnson, A.R.; Bartell, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This project will evaluate hypotheses concerning the resistance and resilience of aquatic ecosystems exposed to toxic chemicals. Our goals are to develop diagnostic criteria for ecosystem classification and to improve existing methods of ecological risk estimation. The development of models that predict ecosystem level effects requires quantifying the relationships between the underlying control structure of ecosystems (patterns of energy and material flux) and the contributions of thos structures to ecosystem resistance and resilience. We address these problems through an integration of manipulative experiments, multidimensional state space analysis, and ecosystem modeling. These studies will quantify the underlying rate structure in pond and stream systems (including, production, herbivory, nutrient uptake and recycling) and will measure changes in their structures in response to perturbations by toxicants.

  9. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape | Department of Energy U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters, communication

  10. Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, Norm

    2009-02-18

    The overarching goals of the 'Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation' Project (BPA Project No.2002-011-00) are to: (1) assess abiotic and biotic factors (i.e., geomorphologic, hydrological, aquatic and riparian/floodplain communities) in determining a definitive composition of ecological integrity, (2) develop strategies to assess and mitigate losses of ecosystem functions, and (3) produce a regional operational loss assessment framework. To produce a scientifically defensible, repeatable, and complete assessment tool, KTOI assembled a team of top scientists in the fields of hydrology, hydraulics, ornithology, entomology, statistics, and river ecology, among other expertise. This advisory team is known as the Research Design and Review Team (RDRT). The RDRT scientists drive the review, selection, and adaptive management of the research designs to evaluate the ecologic functions lost due to the operation of federal hydropower facilities. The unique nature of this project (scientific team, newest/best science, adaptive management, assessment of ecological functions, etc.) has been to work in a dynamic RDRT process. In addition to being multidisciplinary, this model KTOI project provides a stark contrast to the sometimes inflexible process (review, re-review, budgets, etc.) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project RDRT is assembled annually, with subgroups meeting as needed throughout the year to address project issues, analyses, review, and interpretation. Activities of RDRT coordinated and directed the selection of research and assessment methodologies appropriate for the Kootenai River Watershed and potential for regional application in the Columbia River Basin. The entire RDRT continues to meet annually to update and discuss project progress. RDRT Subcontractors work in smaller groups throughout the year to meet project objectives. Determining the extent to which

  11. Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem Processes Authors: Dubey, Manvendra Krishna 1 ; Parker, Harrison Alexander 1 ; Myers, Katherine ...

  12. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  13. DOE/SC-ARM-13-011 Green Ocean Amazon Terrestrial Ecosystem Collaborati...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    late successional species) that can inform future versions of the CLM Ecosystem Demography model (Moorcroft et al. 2001). This will be an interactive process, with changes in...

  14. The Birth of the Green Button Ecosystem Event February 6th in...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    The Birth of the Green Button Ecosystem Graciously hosted by SDG&E at their Energy Innovation Center, San Diego California Green Button creators, developers, industry vendors,...

  15. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...

    Energy Savers

    The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters, communication units, and ...

  16. Monitoring genetic damage to ecosystems from hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1992-03-01

    Applications of ecological toxicity testing to hazardous waste management have increased dramatically over the last few years, resulting in a greater awareness of the need for improved biomonitoring techniques. Our laboratory is developing advanced techniques to assess the genotoxic effects of environmental contamination on ecosystems. We have developed a novel mutagenesis assay using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is potentially applicable for multimedia studies in soil, sediment, and water. In addition, we are conducting validation studies of a previously developed anaphase aberration test that utilizes sea urchin embryos. Other related efforts include field validation studies of the new tests, evaluation of their potential ecological relevance, and analysis of their sensitivity relative to that of existing toxicity tests that assess only lethal effects, rather than genetic damage.

  17. PARTNERING WITH ON-SITE RESEARCH

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnering With On-Site Research Collaboration is Key to Tackling Grand Energy Challenges The challenges we face today are the most critical in decades-from the impact of energy use on global ecosystems to the difficulties of efficiently harnessing our natural resources. Science and engineering have provided us with solutions to grand challenges in the past, and we are confident that they will help us build the bridge to a clean, sustainable energy future. However, complex problems are often

  18. Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J. ); Ainsworth, Calvin C. ); Driver, Crystal J. ); Cataldo, Dominic A. )

    1998-12-01

    The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control in tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.

  19. Research Highlights

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Office of Science Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    a printable PDF Submitter: Schmid, B., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: ARM Climate Research...

  1. Research Projects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Research Projects Joint Los Alamos National LaboratoryUCSD Research Projects Collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San...

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fog and Rain in the Amazon For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight The diurnal and seasonal...

  4. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    to Terrestrial Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

  5. Magnetotelluric Transect of Long Valley Caldera: Resistivity...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    that the anomaly does not represent resistivity complexity in just the upper few kilometers. A fundamental, calderawide 3-D effect is documented by comparison of observed and...

  6. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience. Potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-01-30

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  7. Effects of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics of tundra and riparian vegetation: A project in the R4D program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Models were proposed as research tools to test the basic understanding of the structure and function of arctic ecosystems, as a means for providing initial management assessments of potential response to energy-related development, and as a vehicle for extrapolation of research results to other arctic sites and landscapes. This final summary report reviews progress made on models at a variety of scales from nutrient uptake by individual roots to nutrient availability within arctic landscapes, and examines potentials and critical limitations of these models for providing insight on patch and landscape level function in tundra regions.

  8. Research Mission

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Mission Research Mission NETL's Office of Research & Development is a national resource for fossil energy research and development, with a mission to create and expand the knowledge base that enables the safe, sustainable utilization of our abundant, domestic energy resources. In support of that mission, the onsite research effort: Develops solutions to key barriers to the implementation of emerging energy technologies. Explores transformational new concepts for next generation

  9. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Global Change Biology; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 10 Publisher: Wiley Research Org: Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA ...

  10. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1354-1013 Publisher: Wiley Research Org: Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); ...

  11. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  12. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  13. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  14. Research Areas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Areas Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions ⇒ Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Biosciences The Biosciences Area forges multidisciplinary teams to solve national challenges in energy, environment and health issues; and to advance the engineering of biological systems for sustainable manufacturing. Biosciences Area research is coordinated through three divisions and is enabled by Berkeley

  15. Research Projects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    LaboratoryNational Security Education Center Menu NSEC Educational Programs Los Alamos Dynamics Summer School Science of Signatures Advanced Studies Institute Judicial Science School SHM Data Sets and Software Research Projects Current Projects Past Projects Publications NSEC » Engineering Institute » Research Projects » Joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/UCSD research projects Past Research Projects Previous collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of

  16. Current Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Research The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) has established its only high-performance computing and engineering analysis research facility at Argonne National Laboratory to provide applications support in key areas of applied research and development for the USDOT community. The Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) features a state-of-the-art massively parallel computer system, advanced scientific visualization capability, high-speed network

  17. Research Library

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Guides Video Tutorials Mobile Resources Alerts Bibliographic Management Scholarly Communication & Open Access Copyright Open Access ORCID Primo LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library Mission We deliver agile, responsive knowledge services, connecting people with information, technology and resources. Vision Essential knowledge services for national security sciences. The Research Library provides

  18. Methods Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Methods Research Methods being developed by MANTISSA Researchers Celeste: Bayesian modeling for astronomical images Randomized Linear Algebra for BioImaging Large-Scale PCA for Climate Efficient Graph Analytics for Genomics Unsupervised Learning for Neuroscience Deep Learning for Object Recognition Deep Learning for Daya Bay Unsupervised Learning in Neuroscience Last edited: 2016-11-01 15:21:22

  19. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Joseph Mondloch poster presentation. ...

  20. Modeling the role of terrestrial ecosystems in the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel, W.R.; Post, W.M.; Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon which includes a five-compartment submodel for circulation in terrestrial ecosystems of the world is presented. Although this terrestrial submodel divides carbon into compartments with more functional detail than previous models, the variability in carbon dynamics among ecosystem types and in different climatic zones is not adequately treated. A new model construct which specifically treats this variability by modeling the distribution of ecosystem types as a function of climate on a 0.5/sup 0/ latitude by 0.5/sup 0/ longitude scale of resolution is proposed.

  1. Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award Rowland's research was recognized by DOE for incorporating hydrological controls on carbon cycling in flood plain ecosystems into Earth System Models. May 8, 2014 Joel Rowland Joel Rowland Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "Joel contributed to the vitality of our Laboratory as a postdoc and continues to provide an innovative and intellectual spark as

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, B.E.

    1984-02-01

    The 1983 annual report highlights research in five areas funded by the Ecological Sciences Division of the Office of Energy Research. The five areas include: western semi-arid ecosystems; marine sciences; mobilization fate and effects of chemical wastes; radionuclide fate and effects; and statistical and quantitative research. The work was accomplished under 19 individual projects. Individual projects are indexed separately.

  3. Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science and Ecosystem Support Division

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study details EPA's decision to address water conservation and management for its Science and Ecosystem Support Division due to a severe drought. The plan aimed to reduce potable water usage through an air handler condensate recovery project.

  4. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  5. Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter C

    2002-08-15

    This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

  6. 2015 DOE Final UF Report. Effects of Warming the Deep Soil and Permafrost on Ecosystem Carbon Balance in Alaskan Tundra. A Coupled Measurement and Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuur, Edward

    2015-06-11

    The major research goal of this project was to understand and quantify the fate of carbon stored in permafrost ecosystems using a combination of field and laboratory experiments to measure isotope ratios and C fluxes in a tundra ecosystem exposed to experimental warming. Field measurements centered on the establishment of a two-factor experimental warming using a snow fence and open top chambers to increase winter and summer temperatures alone, and in combination, at a tundra field site at the Eight Mile Lake watershed near Healy, Alaska. The objective of this experimental warming was to significantly raise air and deep soil temperatures and increase the depth of thaw beyond that of previous warming experiments. Detecting the loss and fate of the old permafrost C pool remains a major challenge. Because soil C has been accumulating in these ecosystems over the past 10,000 years, there is a strong difference between the radiocarbon isotopic composition of C deep in the soil profile and permafrost compared to that near the soil surface. This large range of isotopic variability is unique to radiocarbon and provides a valuable and sensitive fingerprint for detecting the loss of old soil C as permafrost thaws.

  7. Linking ecosystem scale vegetation change to shifts in carbon and water cycling: the consequences of widespread piñon mortality in the Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvak, Marcy Ellen

    2012-10-01

    The southwestern United States experienced an extended drought from 1999-2002 which led to widespread coniferous tree mortality. Piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, were extremely vulnerable to this drought. An abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) across 1.5 million ha triggered rapid and extensive changes in the structure of PJ woodlands with potentially large, yet unknown, consequences for ecosystem services and feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate system. Given the spatial extent of PJ woodlands (3rd largest biome in the US) and climatic predictions of increased frequency and intensity of drought in the region, it is crucial to understand the consequences of these disturbances on regional carbon and energy dynamics, biogeochemical processes and atmospheric CO2. The overall objective of our research was to quantify what impact widespread mortality of piñon trees has for carbon and water cycling in PJ woodlands. Our specific objectives for this proposal were: 1) Quantify the carbon, water and energy exchange trajectory after mortality in PJ woodlands; 2) Determine the mechanisms controlling the response and recovery of ecosystem production and respiration processes following large-scale piñon mortality; 3) Use the relationships we measure between ecosystem structure and function PJ woodlands recover from mortality to scale the results of our study up to the regional scale.

  8. NETL Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Research One of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) three strategic goals contained in the DOE's 2014-2018 Strategic Plan is to advance foundational science, innovate energy technologies, and inform data driven policies that enhance US economic growth and job creation, energy security, and environmental quality. DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory contributes to this strategic goal through cutting-edge research and development focused on efficient energy use and clean energy

  9. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Michalsky J, F Denn, C Flynn, G Hodges, P Kiedron, A Koontz, J Schlemmer, and SE Schwartz. 2010. "Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992-2008." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  10. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    MAGIC Ship-based Observations Help Validate Satellite Microwave Liquid Water Path PI Contact: Painemal, D., NASA LaRC /SSAI Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Painemal D, T Greenwald, M Cadeddu, and P Minnis. 2016. "First extended validation of satellite microwave liquid water path with ship-based observations of marine low clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 43(12),

  11. Researchers - JCAP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Who We Are JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance & Advisory Boards Operations & Administration Who we are Overview JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Our Achievements Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Our People Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance &

  12. Research Approach

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Approach Research Approach NETL's onsite research approach is based on integrating simulation tools with targeted experimental validation at real-life conditions in the lab and in the field. Simulation tools increase confidence in designs, thereby reducing the risk associated with incorporating multiple innovative technologies, realizing scale-up, and predicting the behavior and properties of real materials. The scientific underpinnings encoded into these models also ensure that

  13. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Experiment Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal...

  14. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and GCM Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Rasch, P., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ivanova, D., Embry-Riddle...

  15. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Applied Optics,...

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Ronfeld, D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: NA The...

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Doppler Radar to Characterize Cloud Parameters Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kogan, Y., University of Oklahoma - CIMMS Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic ... Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T ...

  19. Research | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the science behind them-for a future powered by clean energy. Subscribe Stay connected with the latest news and research breakthroughs from NREL. Sign up now Photo...

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes...

  1. Research Proposals

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards are intended to be an avenue for significant energy efficiency and renewable energy innovation. To enable the participants' creativity as they conduct their...

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Long-Term Impacts of Aerosols on the Vertical Development of Clouds and Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research:...

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal...

  4. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    over the MJO Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., National Aeronautics and Space Administration Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

  5. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Get Organized Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., National Aeronautics and Space Administration Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud...

  6. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Using ARM Cloud Data to Evaluate the Effect of a Land Surface on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: GSFC, N., NASA GSFC Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

  7. Research Library

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    For more resources see the Reports page. First try: IHS Standards Expert login more ... Library Catalog Los Alamos Authors Los Alamos Research Online Review & Approval System ...

  8. UNIRIB: Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    of the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is to perform nuclear physics research, and provide training and education. UNIRIB member universities have gained...

  9. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle ...

  10. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column ModelsParameterizations Working Group(s):...

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle,...

  12. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fog and Rain in the Amazon Download a printable PDF Submitter: Gentine, P., Columbia University Sobel, A., Columbia University Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation...

  13. Research Projects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Research Projects Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San ...

  14. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Radiation Processes ...

  15. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Doppler spectra. Over the North Slope of Alaska, researchers used cloud radar Doppler velocity spectra, lidar backscattering coefficients and depolarization ratios, and...

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    to Lose Download a printable PDF Submitter: Laskin, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Fast, J. ., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol...

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nucleation Events Download a printable PDF Submitter: McMurry, P. ., University of Minnesota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal ...

  18. Research Areas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    in diverse research areas such as cell biology, lithography, infrared microscopy, radiology, and x-ray tomography. Time-Resolved These techniques exploit the pulsed nature of...

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Sites Enable Assessment of Cluster Analysis for Identifying Cloud Regimes Submitter: Jakob, C., Monash University Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chamber Studies Uncover New Pathways for Atmospheric Aerosol Growth PI Contact: Smith, J., University of California, Irvine Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): ...

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Northwest National Laboratory, researchers found that a significant increase in the amount of light scattered by the clouds was caused by the amount of pollution in the air. ...

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Differences Between Tropical and Trade-Wind Shallow Cumuli Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghate, V. P., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working...

  3. A comprehensive data acquisition and management system for an ecosystem-scale peatland warming and elevated CO2 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krassovski, M. B.; Riggs, J. S.; Hook, L. A.; Nettles, W. R.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T. A.

    2015-11-09

    Ecosystem-scale manipulation experiments represent large science investments that require well-designed data acquisition and management systems to provide reliable, accurate information to project participants and third party users. The SPRUCE project (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change, http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is such an experiment funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE), Office of Science, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Program. The SPRUCE experimental mission is to assess ecosystem-level biological responses of vulnerable, high carbon terrestrial ecosystems to a range of climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 atmosphere. SPRUCE provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes, and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, and the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The SPRUCE experiment will generate a wide range of continuous and discrete measurements.

    In order to successfully manage SPRUCE data collection, achieve SPRUCE science objectives, and support broader climate change research, the research staff has designed a flexible data system using proven network technologies and software components. The primary SPRUCE data system components are the following; 1. data acquisition and control system – set of hardware and software to retrieve biological and engineering data from sensors, collect sensor status information, and distribute feedback to control components; 2. data collection system – set of hardware and software to deliver data to a central depository for storage and further processing; and 3. data management plan – set of plans, policies, and practices to control consistency, protect data integrity, and

  4. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are

  5. Research | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Research Mission Statement The objective of PARC is to understand the basic scientific principles that underpin the efficient functioning of natural photosynthetic antenna systems as a basis for design of biohybrid and bioinspired architectures for next-generation systems for solar-energy conversion. Scientific Themes Through basic scientific research, PARC seeks to understand the principles of light harvesting and energy funneling as applied to The PARC Vision Graphic three

  6. Environmental Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Effects from Hydrocarbon Contaminants in the Ecosystem - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLachlan, John A.

    2000-09-14

    The three major components of the research included: (a) a biotechnology based screening system to identify potential hormone mimics and antagonists (b) an animal screening system to identify biomarkers of endocrine effects and (c) a literature review to identify compounds at various DOE sites that are potential endocrine disruptors. Species of particular interest in this study were those that can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and thus provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. The objective of this basic research is to characterize the potential of common hydrocarbon contaminants in ecosystems to act as endocrine disruptors. Although the endocrine disrupting effects of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs have been well characterized in both animals and humans, little is known about the capacities of other hydrocarbon contaminants to act as endocrine disruptors. Results obtained from this research project have provided information on endocrine disrupting contaminants for consideration in DOE's risk analyses for determining clean-up levels and priorities at contaminated DOE sites.

  7. Bioprocessing research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, E.N.

    1996-06-01

    This section describes research and development activities performed for the Fossil Energy Bioprocessing Research Program. This program includes fundamental research for coal applications that investigates advanced reactor design for conversion of coal and coal liquids, the use of enzymes in pure organic media, and development of biological processes for the conversion of coal residuum. In addition, the program includes studies on advanced bioreactor systems for the treatment of gaseous substrates and the conversion to liquid fuels, removal of heteroatoms from heavy oils, renewable hydrogen production, remediation of oil containing soils. The program also includes natural gas and oil technology partnership support.

  8. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Ensheng; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Weile; Wang, Han; Hayes, Daniel J; McGuire, A. David; Hastings, Alan; Schimel, David

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

  9. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    To Rain or Not to Rain...Aerosols May Be the Answer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

  10. Research Projects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The primary objective of this research effort is to develop and prototype a novel unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), as illustrated in the figure, that could be used for unmanned ...

  11. Caterpillar Research

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  12. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. ...

  13. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of ...

  14. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fielding, M. D., University of Reading Area of Research:...

  15. Global and Regional Variability and Change in Terrestrial Ecosystems Net Primary Production and NDVI: A Model-Data Comparison

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Rafique, Rashid; Zhao, Fang; de Jong, Rogier; Zeng, Ning; Asrar, Ghassem R.

    2016-02-25

    The net primary productivity (NPP) is commonly used for understanding the dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems and their role in carbon cycle. We used a combination of the most recent NDVI and model–based NPP estimates (from five models of the TRENDY project) for the period 1982-2012, to study the role of terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle under the prevailing climate conditions. We found that 80% and 67% of the global land area showed positive NPP and NDVI values, respectively, for this period. The global NPP was estimated to be about 63 Pg C y-1, with an increase of 0.214 Pg Cmore » y-1 y-1. Similarly, the global mean NDVI was estimated to be 0.33, with an increasing trend of 0.00041 y-1. The spatial patterns of NPP and NDVI demonstrated substantial variability, especially at the regional level, for most part of the globe. However, on temporal scale, both global NPP and NDVI showed a corresponding pattern of increase (decrease) for the duration of this study except for few years (e.g. 1990 and 1995-98). Generally, the Northern Hemisphere showed stronger NDVI and NPP increasing trends over time compared to the Southern Hemisphere; however, NDVI showed larger trends in Temperate regions while NPP showed larger trends in Boreal regions. Among the five models, the maximum and minimum NPP were produced by JULES (72.4 Pg C y-1) and LPJ (53.72 Pg C y-1) models, respectively. At latitudinal level, the NDVI and NPP ranges were ~0.035 y-1 to ~-0.016 y-1 and ~0.10 Pg C y-1 y-1 to ~-0.047 Pg C y-1 y-1, respectively. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the modeled NPP generally correspond to the NDVI trends in the temporal dimension. The significant variability in spatial patterns of NPP and NDVI trends points to a need for research to understand the causes of these discrepancies between molded and observed ecosystem dynamics, and the carbon cycle.« less

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    New Method for Retrieving Cloud Heights from Satellite Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chang F, P Minnis, B Lin, MM Khaiyer, R Palikonda, and DA Spangenberg. 2010. "A modified method for inferring cloud top height using GOES-12 imager 10.7- and 13.3-µm data." Journal of

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Adoption of RRTMG in the NCAR CAM5 and CESM1 Global Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Iacono, M. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Collins, W. D., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Shortwave cloud forcing for three versions of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) with CERES

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., University of Alaska Fairbanks Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106,

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, J Barnard, LK Berg, CN Long, and C Flynn. 2011. "Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L07801,

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Possible Impact of Homogeneous Freezing Nucleation on in Situ Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., DOE - SunShot Initiative, AAAS S&T Policy Fellow Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. Cirrus Clouds and Climate Engineering: New Findings on Ice Nucleation and Theoretical

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., DOE - SunShot Initiative, AAAS S&T Policy Fellow Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. "Representing the ice fall speed in climate

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, A Korolev, and J Fan. 2011. "Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T06, doi:10.1029/2011JD015888. The mighty cloud

  4. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116,

  5. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model

  6. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    First Ground-Based Spectral Observations of the Entire Infrared Band Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, EJ Mlawer, G Bianchini, MP Cadeddu, S Crewell, JS Delamere, RO Knuteson, G Maschwitz, M Mlynzcak, S Paine, L Palchetti, and DC Tobin. 2012.

  7. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution + Storm Clouds = Warmer Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fan J, D Rosenfeld, Y Ding, L Leung, and Z Li. 2012. "Potential aerosol indirect effects on atmospheric circulation and radiative forcing through deep convection." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L09806,

  8. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu J, Z Li, Y Zheng, C Flynn, and M Cribb. 2012. "Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D00K38,

  9. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes:

  10. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3,

  12. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 1 Spurred by a series of articles published in 1995 claiming solar absorption in cloudy atmospheres far exceeded model predictions, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program researchers at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

  13. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sun L, R Sun, XW Li, SL Liang, and RH Zhang. 2012. "Monitoring surface soil moisture status based on remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation index information." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.015. Shown

  14. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J.

  15. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of Cloud Properties in Major Reanalyses Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Wu, W., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wu W, YG Liu, and AK Betts. 2012. "Observationally based evaluation of NWP reanalyses in modeling cloud properties over the Southern Great Plains." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D12202,

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    A Decade and Counting Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Long CN, SA McFarlane, A Del Genio, P Minnis, TP Ackerman, J Mather, J Comstock, GG Mace, M Jensen, and C Jakob. 2013. "ARM research in the equatorial western Pacific - a decade and counting." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 94(5),

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hanlon, C., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hanlon CJ, JB Stefik, AA Small, J Verlinde, and GS Young. 2013. "Statistical decision analysis for flight decision support: The SPartICus campaign." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(10), 10.1002/jgrd.50237. In many atmospheric science

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Brass Ring of Climate Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ghan SJ, SJ Smith, M Wang, K Zhang, K Pringle, K Carslaw, J Pierce, S Bauer, and P Adams. 2013. "A simple model of global aerosol indirect effects." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118, 1-20. The simple model of aerosol effects on clouds

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Twenty Years Serving Climate Science Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mather JH and JW Voyles. 2013. "The ARM Climate Research Facility: a review of structure and capabilities." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 94(3), doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00218.1. A scanning ARM

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hudson JG and S Noble. 2013. "CCN and vertical velocity influences on droplet concentrations and supersaturations in clean and polluted stratus clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 71(1), 10.1175/JAS-D-13-086.1. Figure 1. Effective cloud supersaturation

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Rotstayn, L., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Rotstayn, L., and Y. Liu, Sensitivity of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect to an Increase in Cloud Droplet Spectral Dispersion with Droplet Number Concentration, Journal of Climate: Vol. 16, No. 21, pp.3476-3481, May 2003. Figure 1. Measurements of the

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Digging Into Climate Models' Needs with SPADE Download a printable PDF Submitter: Gustafson, W. I., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Gustafson WI, PL Ma, H Xiao, B Singh, PJ Rasch, and JD Fast. 2013. "The separate physics and dynamics experiment (SPADE) framework for determining resolution awareness: A case study of microphysics." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Invisible Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Photo

  4. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Comstock JM, A Protat, SA McFarlane, J Delanoë, and M Deng. 2013. "Assessment of uncertainty in cloud radiative effects and heating rates through retrieval algorithm differences: Analysis using 3 Years of ARM data at Darwin, Australia." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  5. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Overambitious Other Carbon Submitter: Church, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Song C, M Gyawali, RA Zaveri, JE Shilling, and WP Arnott. 2013. "Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50767. Time-dependent Mass Absorption

  6. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Observational Analysis of Land-Atmosphere Coupling for Climate Model Evaluation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Phillips, T. J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Phillips TJ and SA Klein. 2014. "Land-atmosphere coupling manifested in warm-season observations on the U.S. southern great plains." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  7. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    A Revealing Look Inside Northern Australian Wet Season Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, M Bartholomew, M Pope, S Collis, and MP Jensen. 2014. "A Summary of Precipitation Characteristics from the 2006-2011 Northern Australian Wet Seasons as Revealed by ARM Disdrometer Research Facilities (Darwin, Australia)." Journal of

  8. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    MBL Aerosol Properties and Their Impact on CCN at the Azores-AMF Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Logan T, B Xi, and X Dong. 2014. "Aerosol properties and their influences on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei at the ARM mobile facility over the Azores." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119(8),

  9. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Accuracy of GFS and ECMWF Hurricane Sandy Track Forecasts Dependent on Cumulus Parameterization Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bassill, N. P., University of Utah Zipser, E., University of Utah Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Bassill NP. 2014. "Accuracy of early GFS and ECMWF Sandy (2012) track forecasts: Evidence for a dependence on cumulus parameterization." Geophysical Research Letters, ,

  10. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Parameterization of Ice Fall Speeds in Midlatitude Cirrus: Results from SPartICus Submitter: Mishra, S., DOE - SunShot Initiative, AAAS S&T Policy Fellow Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mishra S, DL Mitchell, DD Turner, and RP Lawson. 2014. "Parameterization of ice fall speeds in midlatitude cirrus: Results from SPartICus." Journal of

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Masters the Misunderstood Mixed-Phase Cloud Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, A Cheng, J Fan, AM Fridland, S Ghan, J Harrington, C Hoose, A Korolev, GM McFarquhar, H Morrison, M Paukert, J Savre, BJ Shipway, MD Shupe, A Solomon, and K

  12. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Checking Up on Tropical Sunlight Download a printable PDF Submitter: Riihimaki, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Riihimaki LD and CN Long. 2014. "Spatial variability of surface irradiance measurements at the Manus ARM site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119(9), 10.1002/2013JD021187. The radiometer system used at the

  13. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas-Phase Dry Deposition as a Major Removal Mechanism for Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hodzic, A., NCAR Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hodzic A, B Aumont, C Knote, J Lee-Taylor, S Madronich, and G Tyndall. 2014. "Volatility dependence of Henry's law constants of condensable organics: Application to estimate depositional loss of secondary organic aerosols." Geophysical Research Letters,

  14. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Vapor Turbulence Statistics in the Convective Boundary Layer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, V Wulfmeyer, LK Berg, and JH Schween. 2014. "Water vapor turbulence profiles in stationary continental convective mixed layers." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119,

  15. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions Between Cumulus Convection and Its Environment as Revealed by MC3E Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie S, Y Zhang, SE Giangrande, MP Jensen, R McCoy, and M Zhang. 2014. "Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by the MC3E sounding array." Journal of Geophysical Research

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Vertical Velocities in Cirrus Derived from Aircraft and Ground-based Radar Download a printable PDF Submitter: Muhlbauer, A., University of Washington Kalesse, H., Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Muhlbauer A, H Kalesse, and P Kollias. 2014. "Vertical velocities and turbulence in midlatitude anvil cirrus: A comparison between in situ aircraft measurements and ground-based

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantifying the Importance of Cold Pool Mechanisms for Convection Triggering Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kuang, Z., Harvard University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Torri G, Z Kuang, and Y Tian. 2015. "Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools." Geophysical Research Letters, 42(6), 10.1002/2015GL063227. Horizontal sections of (left) potential temperature and (right) water vapor specific humidity at 25 m from the

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Observed Relations Between Snowfall Microphysics and Triple-Frequency Radar Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kneifel, S., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kneifel S, A von Lerber, J Tiira, D Moisseev, P Kollias, and J Leinonen. 2015. "Observed relations between snowfall microphysics and triple-frequency radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(12),

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stereo Photogrammetry Reveals Substantial Drag on Cloud Thermals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Romps, D., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Romps DM and R Oktem. 2015. "Stereo photogrammetry reveals substantial drag on cloud thermals." Geophysical Research Letters, , doi:10.1002/2015GL064009. ONLINE. A 14-minute sequence of cloud growth as observed by a camera located at the MAST Academy

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrieving Cloud and Aerosol Properties from the ARM Raman Lidar Download a printable PDF Submitter: Thorsen, T., NASA - Langley Research Center Fu, Q., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Thorsen TJ, Q Fu, RK Newsom, DD Turner, and JM Comstock. 2015. "Automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties from the ARM Raman lidar, Part I: Feature detection." Journal of

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Role of Ice Nuclei Recycling in the Maintenance of Cloud Ice in Arctic Mixed-phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: Solomon, A., NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division Feingold, G., NOAA - Earth System Research Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Solomon A, G Feingold, and MD Shupe. 2015. "The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Roles of Wind Shear at Different Vertical Levels in Cloud System Organization and Properties Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Chen Q, J Fan, S Hagos, W Gustafson, and L Berg. 2015. "Roles of wind shear at different vertical levels, Part I: Cloud system organization and properties." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Observation of Fair-weather Cumuli over Land Dynamical Factors Controlling Cloud Size and Cover Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lamer, K., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lamer K and P Kollias. 2015. "Observations of fair-weather cumuli over land: dynamical factors controlling cloud size and cover." Geophysical Research Letters, 42(20), 10.1002/2015GL064534. Statistics of

  4. Research Highlight

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    Characterizing Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Structure Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Qiu S, X Dong, B Xi, and F Li. 2015. "Characterizing Arctic mixed-phase cloud structure and its relationship with humidity and temperature inversion using ARM NSA observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120, 10.1002/2014JD023022. Figure 1.

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    A Partial Mechanistic Understanding of the North American Monsoon Download a printable PDF Submitter: Erfani, E., George Mason University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Erfani E and DL Mitchell. 2014. "A partial mechanistic understanding of the North American monsoon." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119(23), 10.1002/2014JD022038. a) Dependence of inversion

  6. Research Highlight

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    Ice Particle Projected Area- and Mass-Dimension Expressions for Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Erfani E and DL Mitchell. 2015. "Developing and bounding ice particle mass- and area-dimension expressions for use in atmospheric models and remote sensing." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15(20),

  7. Research Highlight

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    Scale-Aware Parameterization of Liquid Cloud Inhomogeneity and Its Impact on Simulated Climate Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie X and M Zhang. 2015. "Scale-aware parameterization of liquid cloud inhomogeneity and its impact on simulated climate in CESM." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(16),

  8. Research Highlight

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    From Fire to Ice Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kulkarni, G., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kulkarni GR, M Nandasiri, A Zelenyuk, J Beranek, N Madaan, A Devaraj, V Shutthanandan, S Thevuthasan, and T Varga. 2015. "Effects of crystallographic properties on the ice nucleation properties of volcanic ash particles." Geophysical Research Letters, 42(8), doi:10.1002/2015GL063270. Tons of

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    Birth and Growth of an Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: N/A An aerosol particle journey. New modeling approaches developed by a research team led by PNNL show how aerosol particles are born and grow to affect the atmosphere and ultimately climate. An aerosol particle journey. New modeling approaches

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    Pollution Changes Clouds' Ice Crystal Genesis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kulkarni, G., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kulkarni GR, K Zhang, C Zhao, M Nandasiri, V Shutthanandan, X Liu, L Berg, and J Fast. 2015. "Ice formation on nitric acid-coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(15), doi:10.1002/2014JD022637.

  11. Research Highlight

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    Spiraling Through a Storm PI Contact: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, T Toto, A Bansemer, MR Kumjian, S Mishra, and A Ryzkhov. 2016. "Insights into riming and aggregation processes as revealed by aircraft, radar, and disdrometer observations for a 27 April 2011 widespread precipitation event." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , doi:10.1002/2015JD024537.

  12. Research Highlight

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    Dependence of Entrainment in Shallow Cumulus Convection on Vertical Velocity and Distance to Cloud Edge PI Contact: Kuang, Z., Harvard University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tian Y and Z Kuang. 2016. "Dependence of entrainment in shallow cumulus convection on vertical velocity and distance to cloud edge." Geophysical Research Letters, , doi:10.1002/2016GL069005. ONLINE. Percentage change in (a) vertical velocity, (b) distance

  13. Research Highlight

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    Three Dimensions Are Better Than Two, When It Comes to Representing Aerosols PI Contact: Ching, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ching J, RA Zaveri, RC Easter, N Riemer, and JD Fast. 2016. "A three-dimensional sectional representation of aerosol mixing state for simulating optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 121(10),

  14. Research Highlight

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    Bell-Shaped Curve Captures Cloud System Variability Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Journal of Geophysical Research, 110, D18205, doi:10.1029/2005JD006158. Figure 1. Reflectivity standard deviation PDFs, resampled as a function of timescale and contoured by equal values of probability, show an increase in variability with scale. The PDF modes lie mostly along the mean

  15. Research Highlights

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    ADCLES » Chemistry » Research Highlights Research Highlights A publication highlights recent advances. Contact Us Division Leader David Morris Deputy Division Leader Mark McCleskey (505) 667-4457 Division Office (505) 667-4457 Email Extraordinary work from Chemistry Division staff 2016 Nuclear Forensics Undergraduate Summer School 2017 11/15 Quantum Dot Solar Windows Technology Wins Special R&D 100 Award Recognition 11/15 Los Alamos scientist recognized for work to increase availability of

  16. Research Projects

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    Research Projects » Past Research Projects Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email UCSD Faculty and Graduate

  17. Research Capabilities

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    Research Capabilities Research Capabilities These capabilities are our science and engineering at work for the national security interest in areas from global climate to cyber security, from nonproliferation to new materials, from clean energy, to supercomputing. thumbnail of Bioscience At Los Alamos, scientists and engineers are working to unlock many of the mechanisms found in nature to improve humanity's ability to battle diseases, create new forms of environmentally friendly and abundant

  18. Research Help

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Help Research Help Find the core literature and resources in a given subject area. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email Business Chemistry Computer Science Earth & Environmental Science Engineering Global Security Health & Safety Information Science Life Sciences Materials Science Mathematics Nanotechnology Nuclear Science & Technology Physics Renewable Energy Space Sciences *Plutonium Science Research Help Looking for Library resources? How to Find can assist you in your search Need

  19. Research Highlight

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    Black Carbon Aerosols Alter Cloud Microphysical Properties PI Contact: Riemer, N., University of Illinois, Urbana Ching, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ching J, N Riemer, and M West. 2016. "Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: Effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 121(10),

  20. Research Highlight

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    A Radiation Closure Study at Both Surface and TOA Using RTM PI Contact: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Dong X, B Xi, S Qiu, P Minnis, S Sun-Mack, and F Rose. 2016. "A radiation closure study of Arctic stratus cloud microphysical properties using the collocated satellite-surface data and Fu-Liou radiative transfer model." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 121(17),

  1. Research Highlight

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    Impacts of the Manaus Pollution Plume on the Microphysical Properties of Amazonian Warm-Phase C PI Contact: Machado, L. A., INPE-CPTEC Cecchini, M. A., National Institute for Space Research (INPE) Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Cecchini MA, LA Machado, JM Comstock, F Mei, J Wang, J Fan, JM Tomlinson, B Schmid, R Albrecht, ST Martin, and P Artaxo. 2016. "Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the

  2. Research Highlight

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    New DSD Parameterization and SR QPE from Aircraft and Surface Distrometer PI Contact: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang J, X Dong, B Xi, and H Andrew. 2016. "Investigation of liquid cloud microphysical properties of deep convective systems: 1. Parameterization of rain drop size distribution and its application for stratiform rain estimate." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 121,

  3. Research Projects

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    Research Projects Joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/UCSD Research Projects Collaborations between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Administrative Assistant Stacy Baker (505) 663-5233 Email "Since 2003, LANL has funded numerous collaborative

  4. Research Highlight

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    Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols Using MFRSR Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Alexandrov, MD, AA Lacis, BE Carlson, and B Cairns. 2007. "Characterization of atmospheric aerosols using MFRSR measurements." (Journal of Geophysical Research 113, DO8204. Sample spectral optical depths of atmospheric constituents in 300 - 900 nm spectral range:

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    Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, G., University of California, San Diego Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Li, G, and GJ Zhang. 2008. "Understanding biases in shortwave cloud radiative forcing in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3) during El

  6. Research Highlight

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    Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Probing of Dense Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis, AB. 2008. "Multiple-scattering lidar from both sides of the clouds: Addressing internal structure." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S10, doi:10.1029/2007JD009666. Figure 1. Lidar

  7. Research Highlight

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    Threshold Radar Reflectivity Separating Precipitating from Non-Precipitating Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liu, Y, B Geerts, PH Daum, R McGraw, and M Miller. 2008. "Threshold radar reflectivity for drizzling clouds." Geophysical Research Letters 35, L03807, doi:10.1029/2007GL031201. Figure 1 shows the comparison of the

  8. Research Highlight

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    Minimal Shortwave Anomalous Absorption Found over ACRF Sites Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Dong, X, BA Wielicki, B Xi, Y Hu, GG Mace, S Benson, F Rose, S Kato, T Charlock, and P Minnis. 2008. "Using observations of deep convective systems to constrain atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation in the optically

  9. Research Highlight

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    Atmospheric Aerosol Measurements on Cloudy Days: a New Method Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Kassianov, EI, and M Ovtchinnikov. 2008. "On reflectance ratios and aerosol optical depth retrieval in the presence of cumulus clouds." Geophysical Research Letters doi:10.1029/2008GL033231.

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    Detection and Retrieval of Cirrus Clouds in the Tropics from AIRS: Validation from ARM Data Submitter: Yue, Q., Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Yue Q and KN Liou. 2009. "Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties determined from AIRS infrared spectra." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L05810,

  11. Research Highlight

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    The Influence of Parameterized Ice Habit on Simulated Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Harrington, J. Y., Pennsylvania State University Avramov, A., Columbia University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Avramov A and JY Harrington. 2010. "Influence of parameterized ice habit on simulated mixed phase Arctic clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D03205,

  12. Research Highlight

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    Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Varnai T and A Marshak. 2009. "MODIS observations of enhanced clear sky reflectance near clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L06807, doi:10.1029/2008GL037089. Figure 1. Illustration of clouds enhancing the

  13. Research Highlight

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    Comparison of Ground-Based Millimeter-Wave Observations During RHUBC I Submitter: Cimini, D., CETEMPS - Dipartimento di Fisica Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Payne, V., Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Exner, M., Radiometrics Corporation Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s):

  14. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Padmaja...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Padmaja Gunda Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Padmaja Gunda Poster Presentation at 2012 EERE Annual Research Meeting, Postdoctoral Research Awards, from the ...

  15. Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Brandon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Brandon Mercado Postdoctoral Research Awards Annual Research Meeting: Brandon Mercado Poster Presentation at 2012 EERE Annual Research Meeting, Postdoctoral Research Awards, from ...

  16. Atmospheric gas supersaturation: educational and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouck, G.R.; D'Aoust, B.; Ebel, W.J.; Rulifson, R.

    1980-11-01

    There still is need for research on gas supersaturation as it relates to gas bubble disease. Better methods are required for both measurement and treatment of gas-supersaturated water. We must understand more about physiological and ecosystem responses to high gas pressures if existing tolerance data for individual species are to be applied accurately to field or fish-cultural situations. A better training program is needed for scientists, engineers, and facility operators involved in the monitoring and mitigation of gas-supersaturated waters.

  17. ASU EFRC - Center researchers

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Center researchers Chad Simmons Academic Professional Gerdenis Kodis Research Assistant Professor Raimund Fromme Faculty Research Associate Yuichi Terazono Faculty Research...

  18. Mitigation for one & all: An integrated framework for mitigation of development impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallis, Heather; Kennedy, Christina M.; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Goldstein, Joshua; Kiesecker, Joseph M.

    2015-11-15

    Emerging development policies and lending standards call for consideration of ecosystem services when mitigating impacts from development, yet little guidance exists to inform this process. Here we propose a comprehensive framework for advancing both biodiversity and ecosystem service mitigation. We have clarified a means for choosing representative ecosystem service targets alongside biodiversity targets, identified servicesheds as a useful spatial unit for assessing ecosystem service avoidance, impact, and offset options, and discuss methods for consistent calculation of biodiversity and ecosystem service mitigation ratios. We emphasize the need to move away from area- and habitat-based assessment methods for both biodiversity and ecosystem services towards functional assessments at landscape or seascape scales. Such comprehensive assessments more accurately reflect cumulative impacts and variation in environmental quality, social needs and value preferences. The integrated framework builds on the experience of biodiversity mitigation while addressing the unique opportunities and challenges presented by ecosystem service mitigation. These advances contribute to growing potential for economic development planning and execution that will minimize impacts on nature and maximize human wellbeing. - Highlights: • This is the first framework for biodiversity and ecosystem service mitigation. • Functional, landscape scale assessments are ideal for avoidance and offsets. • Servicesheds define the appropriate spatial extent for ecosystem service mitigation. • Mitigation ratios should be calculated consistently and based on standard factors. • Our framework meets the needs of integrated mitigation assessment requirements.

  19. Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugan, Patrick J.; Barlow, Chris; Agostinho, Angelo A.; Baran, Eric; Cada, Glenn F; Chen, Daqing; Cowx, Ian G.; Ferguson, John W.; Jutagate, Tuantong; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Marmulla, Gerd; Nestler, John; Petrere, Miquel; Winemiller, Kirk O.

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

  20. ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Mace, Georgina; Jackson, Robert B.; Shepherd, John; Liss, Peter; Leinen, Margaret; Schimel, David; Vaughan, Naomi E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Boyd, Philip W.; Norby, Richard J.; Caldeira, Ken; Merikanto, Joonas; Artaxo, Paulo; Melillo, Jerry; Morgan, M. Granger

    2012-06-01

    Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change. Climate change in some regions is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of geoengineering activities have been proposed: carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and solar radiation management (SRM, or sunlight reflection methods), whereby a small percentage of sunlight is reflected back into space to offset warming from greenhouse gases. In this review, we evaluate some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, including the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to Earth. Specifically, we find evidence that, if implemented successfully, some CDR methods and continue use of some SRM methods) could alleviate some of the deleterious ecosystem impacts associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Observations of Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Returns at SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chandra, A. S., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chandra AS, P Kollias, SE Giangrande, and SA Klein. 2010. "Long-term observations of the convective boundary layer using insect radar returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility." Journal of Climate, 23, 5699-5714. Example of time-height mapping

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    Predicting Arctic Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Liu X, S Xie, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Shi, Z Wang, W Lin, SJ Ghan, M Earle, PS Liu, and A Zelenyuk. 2011. "Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 116, D00T11,

  3. Research Highlight

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    New Method for Three-Dimensional Imaging of Cirrus Clouds Submitter: Liou, K., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liou, K.N, S.C. Ou, Y. Takano, J. Roskovensky, G.G. Mace, K. Sassen, and M. Poellot, 2002: "Remote sensing of three-dimensional inhomogeneous cirrus clouds using satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data," Geophysical Research Letters 29(9): 1360. Figure 1 Figure 1

  4. Research Highlight

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    How to Catch Aerosols in the Act Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, M., Nanjing University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wang M, S Ghan, X Liu, TS L'Ecuyer, K Zhang, H Morrison, M Ovchinnikov, R Easter, R Marchand, D Chand, Y Qian, and JE Penner. 2012. "Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L15709, doi: 10.1029/2012GL052204. S-POP derived

  5. Research Highlight

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    The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life in the Midlatitude Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, X Dong, B Xi, S McFarlane, A Kennedy, B Lin, and P Minnis. 2012. "Life cycle of midlatitude deep convective systems in a Lagrangian framework." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117(D23), D23201,

  6. Research Highlight

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    Evaluation of WRF Microphysics Schemes in Squall Line Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wu D, B Xi, Z Feng, A Kennedy, M Grenchen, G Matt, and T W-K. 2013. "The impact of various WRF single-moment microphysics parameterizations on squall line precipitation events." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50798. Comparison of

  7. Research Highlight

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    Effect of Dry Deposition of Condensable Organic Vapors on SOA Formation in the Urban Plume Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hodzic, A., NCAR Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hodzic A, S Madronich, B Aumont, J Lee-Taylor, T Karl, M Camredon, and C Mouchel-Vallon. 2014. "Limited influence of dry deposition of semi-volatile organic vapors on secondary organic aerosol formation in the urban plume." Geophysical Research Letters,

  8. Research Highlight

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    Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schumacher, C., Texas A&M University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lappen C and C Schumacher. 2014. "The role of tilted heating in the evolution of the MJO." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119(6), 10.1002/2013JD020638. In this figure, November through April wavenumber frequency spectrum of OLR (colors) and 850 hPa

  9. Research Highlight

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    Validation of CERES-MODIS Cloud Retrievals Using the Azores Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xi B, P Minnis, and S Sun-Mack. 2014. "Comparison of marine boundary layer cloud properties from CERES-MODIS edition 4 and DOE ARM AMF measurements at the Azores." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119, doi:10.1002/2014JD021813. Figure 1. The ARM radar-MWR

  10. Research Highlight

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    Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Penner, J.E., S.Y. Zhang, and C.C. Chuang, Soot and smoke aerosol may not warm climate, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D21), 4657, doi:10.1029/2003JD003409, 2003. New research results from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program suggest that fossil fuel soot emissions and biomass smoke may

  11. Research Highlight

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    ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington,

  12. Research Highlight

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    Dust Takes Detour on Ice-Cloud Journey Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kulkarni, G., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kulkarni G, C Sanders, K Zhang, X Liu, and C Zhao. 2014. "Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 119(16), doi:10.1002/2014JD021567. Cirrus clouds are

  13. Research Highlight

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    Multiday Production of SOA in Urban and Forest Outflow Submitter: Lee-Taylor, J., NCAR Madronich, S., National Center for Atmospheric Research Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lee-Taylor J, A Hodzic, S Madronich, B Aumont, M Camredon, and R Valorso. 2015. "Multiday production of condensing organic aerosol mass in urban and forest outflow." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15, doi:10.5194/acp-15-595-2015. Simulated SOA in

  14. Research Highlight

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    Bimodal CCN Spectra Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Differential CCN concentrations (per cm3) against critical supersaturation (Sc) for MASE below cloud CCN spectra for each of the 8 modal categories. (a) cat 1, (b) cat 2, (c) cat 3, (d) cat 4, (e) cat 5, (f) cat 6, (g) cat 7, (h) cat 8. Sc in percent for, Hoppel minima are

  15. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    How Well Are Shallow Convective Clouds Simulated in the CAM5 Model? Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chandra, A. S., University of Miami Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chandra AS, C Zhang, SA Klein, and H Ma. 2015. "Low-cloud characteristics over the tropical western Pacific from ARM observations and CAM5 simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(17), 52402, doi:10.1002/2015JD02.

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DCS Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties Derived from Aircraft Data During MC3E Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wang J, X Dong, and B Xi. 2015. "Investigation of ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs using aircraft in situ measurements during MC3E over the ARM SGP site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(8), 3533-3552. Figure 1. The observed PSDs at different aircraft

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Saggy Bright Bands PI Contact: Kumjian, M., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kumjian MR, S Mishra, SE Giangrande, T Toto, AV Ryzhkov, and A Bansemer. 2016. "Polarimetric radar and aircraft observations of saggy bright bands during MC3E." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , doi: 10.1002/2015JD024446. ONLINE. Time series of quasi-vertical profiles from 27 April 2011, 05:00 UTC through about

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Python ARM Radar Toolkit, the World's Leading Interactive Radar Toolkit PI Contact: Helmus, J., Argonne National Laboratory Collis, S. M., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Helmus JJ and SM Collis. 2016. "The Python ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART), a Library for Working with Weather Radar Data in the Python Programming Language." Journal of Open Research Software., 4(1), doi:10.5334/jors.119. The Python ARM

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Changes in Cloud Phase Partitioning in Mixed-phase Clouds: an Arctic Case Study PI Contact: Kalesse, H., Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kalesse H, G DeBoer, A Solomon, M Oue, M Ahlgrimm, D Zhang, M Shupe, E Luke, and A Protat. 2016. "Understanding rapid changes in phase partitioning between cloud liquid and ice in stratiform mixed-phase clouds: An Arctic Case Study."

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R.

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    4D (Space-time) Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties of DCSs Retrieved from NEXRAD PI Contact: Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jingjing T, D Xiquan, X Baike, W Jingyu, H Cameron, M Greg, and F Jiwen. 2016. "Retrievals of ice cloud microphysical properties of deep convective systems using radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 121(18), 10.1002/2015JD024686. Figure 1.

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Measurements Validate New Satellite Multilayer Cloud Remote Sensing Method Submitter: Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Huang, J., P. Minnis, B. Lin, Y. Yi, T.-F. Fan, S. Sun-Mack, and J. K. Ayers, 2006: Determination of ice water path in ice-over-water cloud systems using combined MODIS and AMSR-E measurements. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21801, 10.1029/2006GL027038. Minnis,

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Ensemble Simulation with the ARM IOP Data Submitter: Xu, K., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 The main objective of this study is to use ARM IOP data to refine a cloudiness parameterization, as proposed by Xu and Randall (1996a). The cloudiness parameterization uses

  4. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113,

  5. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic

  6. Estimating nocturnal ecosystem respiration from the vertical turbulent flux and change in storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Lianhong; Van Gorsel, Eva; Leuning, Ray; Delpierre, Nicolas; Black, Andy; Chen, Baozhang; Munger, J. William; Wofsy, Steve; Aubinet, M.

    2009-11-01

    Micrometeorological measurements of nighttime ecosystem respiration can be systematically biased when stable atmospheric conditions lead to drainage flows associated with decoupling of air flow above and within plant canopies. The associated horizontal and vertical advective fluxes cannot be measured using instrumentation on the single towers typically used at micrometeorological sites. A common approach to minimize bias is to use a threshold in friction velocity, u*, to exclude periods when advection is assumed to be important, but this is problematic in situations when in-canopy flows are decoupled from the flow above. Using data from 25 flux stations in a wide variety of forest ecosystems globally, we examine the generality of a novel approach to estimating nocturnal respiration developed by van Gorsel et al. (van Gorsel, E., Leuning, R., Cleugh, H.A., Keith, H., Suni, T., 2007. Nocturnal carbon efflux: reconciliation of eddy covariance and chamber measurements using an alternative to the u*-threshold filtering technique. Tellus 59B, 397 403, Tellus, 59B, 307-403). The approach is based on the assumption that advection is small relative to the vertical turbulent flux (FC) and change in storage (FS) of CO2 in the few hours after sundown. The sum of FC and FS reach a maximum during this period which is used to derive a temperature response function for ecosystem respiration. Measured hourly soil temperatures are then used with this function to estimate respiration RRmax. The new approach yielded excellent agreement with (1) independent measurements using respiration chambers, (2) with estimates using ecosystem light-response curves of Fc + Fs extrapolated to zero light, RLRC, and (3) with a detailed process-based forest ecosystem model, Rcast. At most sites respiration rates estimated using the u*-filter, Rust, were smaller than RRmax and RLRC. Agreement of our approach with independent measurements indicates that RRmax provides an excellent estimate of nighttime

  7. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration, April 29-30, 2008, Astoria, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sutherland, G. Bruce

    2008-09-29

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C. A compact disk, attached to the back cover, contains material in hypertext-markup-language from the conference website (http://cerc.labworks.org/) and the individual presentations.

  8. Analysis of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River from an Ecosystem Perspective. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.

    1995-01-01

    Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology was applied to the analysis of chinook salmon in the mid-Columbia subbasins which flow through the steppe and steppe-shrub vegetation zones. The EDT examines historical changes in life history diversity related to changes in habitat. The emphasis on life history, habitat and historical context is consistent with and ecosystem perspective. This study is based on the working hypothesis that the decline in chinook salmon was at least in part due to a loss of biodiversity defined as the intrapopulation life history diversity. The mid Columbia subbasins included in the study are the Deschutes, John Day, Umatilla, Tucannon and Yakima.

  9. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D; Evans, Dave; Ogle, Kiona; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2012-12-13

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  10. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the worlds great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most

  11. Root Diseases and Exotic Ecosystems: Implications for Long-Term Site Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otrosina, W. J.; Garbelotto, M.

    1997-09-01

    Management activities and various land uses have taken place recently that have dramatically altered edaphic and environmental conditions under which forest tree species and ecosystems have evolved. Sequoia giganteum stands, fire suppression in this fire dependent ecosystem has resulted in increased mortality due to Heterobasidion annosum. On hypothesis is that fire suppression results in increased encroachment of true firs, easily infected by S-group Heterobasidion annosum, thereby transferring the disease via root contacts with S. giganteum. Existence of a hybrid with S and P ISG's of H. annosum may be evidence for anthropogenic influences on evolutionary pathways in this pathogen.

  12. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field

  13. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Long CN. 2010. "Correcting for circumsolar and near-horizon errors in sky cover retrievals from sky images." The Open Atmospheric Science Journal, 4, doi:10.2174/1874282301004010045. Long CN, JM Sabburg, J Calbo, and D Pages. 2006. "Retrieving

  14. Research Highlight

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    A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature Dependent Ice Ch Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lin Y and BA Colle. 2011. "A new bulk microphysical scheme that includes riming intensity and temperature dependent ice characteristics." Monthly Weather Review, 139(3),

  15. Research Highlight

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    Comparison of Arctic Clouds Between ECMWF Simulations and ARM Observations at the NSA Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhao, M., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1: Monthly-averaged vertical distribution of cloud fraction from the observation (a) and the ECMWF model (b), and their differences (c). Both

  16. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiyear Statistics of 2D Shortwave Radiative Effects at Three ARM Sites Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Varnai T. 2010. "Multiyear statistics of 2D shortwave radiative effects at three ARM sites." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 67, 3757-3762. Multiyear average influence of 2D radiative processes on total (surface and

  17. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    General Macrophysical and Microphysical Properties of Deep Convective Clouds as Observed by MODIS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Distributions of cloud optical depth from Aqua in four regions. The mean and standard deviation of the distributions are given for each region indicated by latitude and longitude range in each panel. The means and

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Glaciation Temperature of Deep Convective Clouds with Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A (a) A conceptual diagram of cloud particle size vertical evolution inside a deep convective cloud. (b) Cloud side scanner retrievals of (left) particle size and (right) cloud phase. (a) A conceptual diagram of cloud particle size

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Global Model with Embedded Explicit Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Pritchard, M. S., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Pritchard MS, MW Moncrieff, and RC Somerville. 2011. "Orogenic propagating precipitation systems over the US in a global climate model with embedded

  1. Research Highlight

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    Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shupe MD, VP Walden, E Eloranta, T Uttal, JR Campbell, SM Starkweather, and M Shiobara. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part I: occurrence and macrophysical properties." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 626-644.

  2. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical

  3. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Microphysics Schemes in Idealized Supercell Thunderstorm Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H and JA Milbrandt. 2011. "Comparison of two-moment bulk microphysics schemes in idealized supercell thunderstorm simulations." Monthly Weather Review, 139, 1103-1130. Near-surface radar reflectivity after

  4. Research Highlight

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    Evaluation of CRM Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations, Part 1 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varble, A., University of Utah Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Varble AC, AM Fridlind, EJ Zipser, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, J Fan, A Hill, SA McFarlane, J Pinty, and B Shipway. 2011. "Evaluation of cloud-resolving model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: Precipitation and cloud

  5. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zeng, X., Morgan State University GSFC, N., NASA GSFC Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, T Matsui, S Xie, S Lang, M Zhang, DO Starr, and X Li. 2011. "Estimating the ice crystal enhancement factor in the tropics." Journal of the

  6. Research Highlight

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    Dependence of the Single-Scattering Properties of Small Ice Crystals on Idealized Shape Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2011. "Dependence of the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals on idealized shape

  7. Research Highlight

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    Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of

  8. Research Highlight

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    Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR Wm-2) signals in the tropics averaged between 10°S and 10°N from (a) a regional simulation with moisture constrained by observations and (b) NOAA-CPC satellite observations. The

  9. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors Influencing the Microphysics and Radiative Properties of Liquid-Dominated Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Earle, M., Environment Canada Liu, P., Environment Canada Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Earle ME, PS Liu, JW Strapp, A Zelenyuk, D Imre, GM McFarquhar, NC Shantz, and WR Leaitch. 2011. "Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of

  10. Research Highlight

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    Optical Properties of the 1997 TWP Smoke Event Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. MPL image showing evolution of early September, 1997 smoke event at Manus, TWP. Figure 2. Selected aerosol extinction cross section profiles at the ARM TWP site during 1997 showing progression of aerosol loading. Figure 3. Cloud-cleared optical measurements at the TWP site from July 27 to

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer Calculations Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarlane SA, K Gaustad, E Mlawer, C Long, and J Delamere. 2011. "Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 4, 1713-1733. Time

  12. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Snow Particle Observations in Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, P Zuidema, GM McFarquhar, A Bansemer, and AJ Heymsfield. 2011. "Microphysical observations in shallow mixed-phase and deep frontal Arctic cloud systems." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 137(659), doi:10.1002/qj.840. Fitted size distribution intercept

  13. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R

  14. Research Highlight

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    Influence of Humidified Aerosols on Lidar Depolarization Below Ice-Precipitating Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, and AS Ackerman. 2011. "Influence of humidified aerosol on lidar depolarization measurements below

  15. Research Highlight

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    A Dance of Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Song, C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Song C, RA Zaveri, JE Shilling, ML Alexander, and M Newburn. 2011. "Effect of hydrophilic organic seed aerosols on secondary organic aerosol formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene." Environmental Science & Technology, 45(17), doi:10.1021/es201225c. The injection of alpha-pinene, a

  16. Research Highlight

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    Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Submitter: Solomon, A., NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Solomon A, MD Shupe, O Persson, and H Morrison. 2011. "Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion." Atmospheric

  17. Research Highlight

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    Modeling the Sensitivity of Convection to Tropospheric Humidity Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., National Aeronautics and Space Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Del Genio AD. 2011. "Representing the sensitivity of convective cloud systems to tropospheric humidity in general circulation models." Surveys in Geophysics, , doi:10.1007/s10712-011-9148-9.

  18. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Intercomparison of Model Simulations of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, P Zuidema, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, G de Boer, J Fan, AM Fridlind, T Hashino, JY Harrington, Y Luo, M Ovchinnikov, and B Shipway. 2011. "Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during

  19. Research Highlight

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    The Birth of a Cloud Droplet Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ghan SJ, H Abdul-Razzak, A Nenes, Y Ming, X Liu, M Ovchinnikov, B Shipway, N Meskhidze, J Xu, and X Shi. 2011. "Droplet nucleation: Physically-based parameterizations and comparative evaluation." Journal of Advances

  20. Research Highlight

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    TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective

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    Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Morrison H and WW Grabowski. 2011. "Cloud-system resolving model simulations of aerosol indirect effects on tropical deep convection and its thermodynamic environment." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(20),

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    Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., The Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and

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    Unraveling the Complexity of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, G de Boer, G Feingold, J Harrington, M Shupe, and K Sulia. 2011. "Resilience of persistent Arctic mixed-phase clouds." Nature Geoscience, 5, doi:10.1038/ngeo1332. A conceptual model that illustrates the primary processes and basic physical structure of persistent Arctic

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    Trends in Downwelling Longwave Radiation over SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Gero P and DD Turner. 2011. "Long-term trends in downwelling spectral infrared radiance over the U.S. Southern Great Plains." Journal of Climate, 24(18),

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    Evaluation of Simulated Clouds and Radiation at the ARM Site Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Ghan, S.J. and Leung, L.R., 1999: "A Comparison of Three Different Modeling Strategies for Evaluating Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations," Monthly Weather Review 127( 9): 1967-1984. Observed and Simulated Column Water Vapor Column

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    Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds on Earth's Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Qian, Y., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Qian Y, CN Long, H Wang, JM Comstock, SA McFarlane, and S Xie. 2012. "Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations."

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    Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Submitter: Kirchstetter, T. W., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hadley OL and TW Kirchstetter. 2012. "Black carbon reduction of snow albedo." Nature Climate Change, , doi:10.1038/nclimate1433. Spectrally weighted snow albedo over the 300-2,500 nm solar spectrum: derived from our experiments (dots, 1 standard deviation) and modelled using SNICAR

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    Cloud Boundary Detection and Analysis from Micro Pulse Lidar Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. A high resolution MPL image for 14 January 1998 during testing of MPL008 (NSA unit) at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center. Figure 2. MPL overlap correction algorithm. Figure 3. Accompanying diagram to Figure 2 detailing overlap correction development. Figure 4. Cloud

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    Tropical Rain Clouds Still a Challenge to Cloud-Resolving Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, J Fan, WW Grabowski, AA Hill, TR Jones, MM Khaiyer, G Liu, P Minnis, H Morrison, L Nguyen,

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    Challenging Work: Observing in the Arctic Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Matsui N, CN Long, J Augustine, D Halliwell, T Uttal, D Longenecker, O Niebergall, J Wendell, and R Albee. 2012. "Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 5, doi:10.5194/amt-5-429-2012. The Arctic is showing

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    Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Comparison of Boundary Layer Clouds Schemes in Climate Models with Satellite Observations Figure 1. Comparison of Boundary Layer Clouds Schemes in Climate Models with Satellite Observations Key Contributors: James McCaa, as part of his Ph.D. dissertation

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    Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean profiles of (first column) total precipitation normalized Q1, (second column) convective precipitation normalized convective heating, (third column) stratiform heating, and (fourth column) convective

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    Radiative-Dynamical Feedbacks in Thin Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Petters, J. L., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Petters JL, JY Harrington, and EE Clothiaux. 2012. "Radiative-dynamical feedbacks in low liquid water path stratiform clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(5), 10.1175/JAS-D-11-0169.1. Large-eddy simulation time series output

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    Mexico City Carbon-Containing Particle Composition Simulated Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lee-Taylor J, S Madronich, B Aumont, M Camredon, A Hodzic, GS Tyndall, E Aperl, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume." Atmospheric Chemistry and

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    CAM5 Shows Reasonable Aerosol First Indirect Effects on Non-Precipitating Low Liquid Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhao, C., Beijing Normal University Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhao C, SA Klein, S Xie, X Liu, JS Boyle, and Y Zhang. 2012. "Aerosol first indirect effects on non-precipitating low-level

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    Many Forecast Errors Are Climate Errors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie S, H Ma, JS Boyle, SA Klein, and Y Zhang. 2012. "On the correspondence between short- and long-timescale systematic errors in CAM4/CAM5 for the years of tropical convection." Journal of Climate, 25(22),

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    Diurnal Cycle of Monsoon Clouds, Precipitation, and Surface Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., NOAA Global Monitoring Division/CIRES May, P. T., Bureau of Meteorology Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: May PT, CN Long, and A Protat. 2012. "The diurnal cycle of the boundary layer, convection, clouds, and surface radiation in a coastal monsoon environment (Darwin

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    Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Submitter: Zhang, Q., University of California, Davis Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Setyan A, Q Zhang, M Merkel, WB Knighton, Y Sun, C Song, J Shilling, TB Onasch, S Herndon, D Worsnop, JD Fast, R Zaveri, LK Berg, A Wiedensohler, BA Flowers, MK Dubey, and R Subramanian. 2012. "Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic

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    Anthropogenic Aerosols: a Clearer Understanding Submitter: Daum, P., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Liu, Y., and P. H. Daum, 2002: "Indirect warming effect from dispersion forcing," Nature 419(6872):580-581. Figure 1. Key = Green symbols: triangle - FIRE, northeastern Pacific; Crossed circles - SOCEX, Southern Ocean; Filled circle - ACE1, Southern Ocean; Blue symbols: Filled circles - ASTEX 8,

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    How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase

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    Influence of Observed Cirrus Microphysical Properties on Shortwave Radiation: a Case Study Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Nousiainen, T. P., University of Helsinki Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mauno P, GM McFarquhar, T Nousiainen, M Timlin, M Kahnert, and P Raisanen. 2011. "The influence of cloud microphysical properties on shortwave radiation: A case study over Oklahoma."

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    Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal

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    Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging Mechanisms Improve Agreement of Global Simulations with Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dubey, M. K., Los Alamos National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Longitudinal and vertical distribution of global zonal mean hydrophobic to hydrophilic conversion time for carbonaceous aerosols with new laboratory aging mechanism. Impact of new aging mechanism on global zonal mean black carbon

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    Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter over Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, and B Cairns. 2012. "Evaluation of hydrometeor phase and ice properties in cloud-resolving model

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    Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, D Liu, and M Zhao. 2012. "Quantifying the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds."

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    Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of

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    Observations Guide Low-Cloud Parameterization Development in the ECMWF Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ahlgrimm, M., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Forbes, R. M., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ahlgrimm M and R Forbes. 2012. "The impact of low clouds on surface shortwave radiation in the ECMWF model."

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    SGP Observations Help Validate Soil Temperature Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Huang, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Xia Y, M Ek, J Sheffield, B Livneh, M Huang, H Wei, S Feng, L Luo, J Meng, and E Wood. 2012. "Validation of Noah-simulated soil temperature in the North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2." Journal of Applied

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    The Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bergmann, D., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yu H, M Chin, J West, C Atherton, N Bellouin, D Bergmann, I Bey, H Bian, T Diehl, G Forberth, P Hess, M Schulz, D Shindell, T Takemura, and Q Tan. 2013. "A multimodel assessment of the influence of regional

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    Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McComiskey A and G Feingold. 2012. "The scale problem in quantifying aerosol indirect effects." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-1031-2012. Differing values: Values derived from aircraft and surface observations,

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    Pollution Hitches Ride to Arctic Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zelenyuk A, D Imre, J Beranek, E Abramson, J Wilson, and M Shrivastava. 2012. "Synergy between secondary organic aerosols and long-range transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons." Environmental Science & Technology, 46(22), doi:10.1021/es302743z. When airborne

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    2007 Floods Not a Complete Washout in U.S. Great Plains Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lamb PJ, DH Portis, and A Zangvil. 2012. "Investigation of Large-Scale Atmospheric Moisture Budget and Land Surface Interactions over U.S. Southern Great Plains including for CLASIC (June 2007)." Journal of

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    Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hagos SM and R Leung. 2012. "Large-scale environmental variables and transition to deep convection in cloud resolving model simulations: A vector representation." Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 4(M11001), 2012MS000155, doi:10.1029/2012MS000155. The relationship

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    Shaking Things Up-What Triggers Atmospheric Convection in the West African Sahel? Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Couvreux F, C Rio, F Guichard, M Lothon, G Canut, D Bouniol, and A Gounou. 2012. "Initiation of daytime local convection in a semi-arid region analysed with high-resolution simulations and AMMA observations." Quarterly

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    Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Probabilistic Distribution and Dependence on Dry Air Sources Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Lateral entrainment rate in shallow cumuli: Dependence on dry air sources and probability density functions."

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    Strong Impacts of Vertical Velocity on Cloud Microphysics and Implications for Aerosol Indirect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, S Niu, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "Observed impacts of vertical velocity on cloud

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    Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi:

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    Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2012. "On spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths." Journal of

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    Development and Validation of a Black Carbon Mixing State Resolved Three-Dimensional Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Matsui H, M Koike, Y Kondo, N Moteki, JD Fast, and RA Zaveri. 2013. "Development and validation of a black carbon mixing state resolved three-dimensional model: Aging processes and radiative impact." Journal of

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    Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, S Niu, S Krueger, and T Wagner. 2013. "Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in

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    The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern California Measured During CARES and CalNex Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cahill JF, K Suski, JH Seinfeld, RA Zaveri, and KA Prather. 2012. "The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex

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    Modeling Aerosols in Fair-Weather Clouds During CHAPS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shrivastava, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shrivastava M, LK Berg, J Fast, R Easter, A Laskin, WI Gustafson, Y Liu, and CM Berkowitz. 2013. "Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study." Journal of

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    When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shilling, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shilling JE, RA Zaveri, JD Fast, L Kleinman, M Alexander, MR Canagaratna, E Fortner, JM Hubbe, JT Jayne, A Sedlacek, A Setyan, S Springston, DR Worsnop, and Q Zhang. 2013. "Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign."

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    Fair-Weather Clouds Hold Dirty Secret Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shrivastava, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shrivastava MB, JD Fast, RC Easter, WI Gustafson, RA Zaveri, JL Jimenez, P Saide, and A Hodzic. 2011. "Modeling organic aerosols in a megacity: Comparison of simple and complex representations of the volatility basis set

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    An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative Transfer Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Pincus, R., H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogenous cloud fields, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 108, No. D13, 4376, doi:10.1029/2002JD003322, 2003 Key Contributors: H.W. Barker, J.J.

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    Statistics of Vertical Velocities from Monsoonal Convection with Verification Download a printable PDF Submitter: Collis, S. M., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Collis S, A Protat, PT May, and C Williams. 2013. "Statistics of storm updraft velocities from TWP-ICE including verification with profiling measurements." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 52(8), 10.1175/jamc-d-12-0230.1. A

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    Burning on the Prairies Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fischer ML, MS Torn, DP Billesbach, G Doyle, B Northup, and SC Biraud. 2012. "Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.011. Pasture burning during the

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    Evaluation of Cloud Properties and Precipitation for Stratiform and Convective Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, NP van Lipzig, L Delobbe, and AM Vogelmann. 2012. "The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: evaluation of

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    What Controls the Vertical Extent of Continental Shallow Cumulus? Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhang Y and SA Klein. 2013. "Factors controlling the vertical extent of fair-weather shallow cumulus clouds over land: investigation of diurnal-cycle observations collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains site." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences,

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    Importance of Environmental Instability to the Sensitivity of the Rimed Ice Species in Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K. 2013. "Impact of environmental instability on convective precipitation uncertainty associated with the nature of the rimed ice species in a bulk microphysics

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    Different Strokes for Different Folks-Not Any More, Say Scientists at the UK Met Office Submitter: Morcrette, C. J., Met Office Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morcrette CJ, EJ O'Connor, and JC Petch. 2012. "Evaluation of two cloud parametrization schemes using ARM and Cloud-Net observations." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 138(665), doi:10.1002/qj.969.

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    A Finer Mesh to Improve Cloud Representation in Climate Models? Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Boutle IA, SJ Abel, PG Hill, and CJ Morcrette. 2013. "Spatial variability of liquid cloud and rain: observations and microphysical effects." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, , doi:10.1002/qj.2140. Different sizes of water droplets as well as varying water

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    Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Bouniol D, F Couvreux, PH Kamsu-Tamo, M Leplay, F Guichard, F Favot, and EJ O'Connor. 2012. "Diurnal and seasonal cycles of cloud occurrences, types, and radiative impact over West Africa." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3),

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    Tropical Ice Cloud Simulations Using Scripps Single Column Model (SCM) Reveal Range of Model Uncertainties Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarquhar, G.M., S. Iacobellis, R.C.J. Somerville. SCM Simualtions of Tropical Ice Clouds Using Observationally Based Parameterizations of Microphysics, Journal of Climate: Vol 15, No. 11, pp.

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    The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, AM Vogelmann, W Lin, EP Luke, AT Cialella, P Minnis, MM Khaiyer, ER Boer, and MP Jensen. 2013. "The role of cloud microphysics parameterization in the simulation

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    Microphysics Complexity in Squall Line Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, AM Vogelmann, H Morrison, and JA Milbrandt. 2012. "Sensitivity of idealized squall-line simulations to the level of complexity used in two-moment bulk microphysics schemes." Monthly Weather Review,

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    An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar Processing Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, R McGraw, and L Lei. 2013. "An application of linear programming to polarimetric radar differential phase processing." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(8), 10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00147.1. C-band scanning

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    New Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, S Collis, J Straka, A Protat, C Williams, and S Krueger. 2013. "A summary of convective core vertical velocity properties using ARM UHF wind profilers in Oklahoma." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology,

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    Linking Ice Nucleation to Aerosols and Its Impact on CAM5 Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie S, X Liu, C Zhao, and Y Zhang. 2013. "Sensitivity of CAM5 simulated arctic clouds and radiation to ice nucleation parameterization." Journal of Climate, 26(16),

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    Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports Download a printable PDF Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: China S, C Mazzoleni, K Gorkowski, AC Aiken, and MK Dubey. 2013. "Morphology and mixing state of individual freshly emitted wildfire carbonaceous particles." Nature Communications, 4, 2122, doi:10.1038/ncomms3122.

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    The Impact of Instrument Selection and Sampling on Cloud Fraction at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kennedy, A. D., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kennedy AD, X Dong, and B Xi. 2013. "Cloud Fraction at the ARM SGP Site: Instrument and sampling considerations from 14 years of ARSCL." Theoretical and Applied Climatology (Springer), 115(1-2),

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    Chemical Diffusivity and Viscosity of Secondary Organic Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Abramson E, D Imre, J Beránek, J Wilson, and A Zelenyuk. 2013. "Experimental determination of chemical diffusion within secondary organic zerosol particles." Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 15, doi:10.1039/C2CP44013J. Determining the

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    Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Westwater, E.R., B.B. Stankov, D.Cimini, Y. Han, J.A. Shaw, B.M. Lesht, C.N. Long, 2003, Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, Vol. 21. ARM's Nauru99 campaign provided a

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    Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Song X, GJ Zhang, and JF Li. 2012. "Evaluation of microphysics parameterization for convective clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5." Journal of Climate, 25(24), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00563.1. Rainfall in the

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    New Algorithm for Automated Detection of Planetary Boundary Layer Depth Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Sawyer, V. R., University of Maryland Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Sawyer V and Z Li. 2013. "Detection, variations and intercomparison of the planetary boundary layer depth from radiosonde, lidar, and infrared spectrometer."

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    Pointing Scanning Cloud Radar in the Right Direction Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fielding, M. D., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fielding MD, JC Chiu, RJ Hogan, and G Feingold. 2013. "3D cloud reconstructions: Evaluation of scanning radar scan strategy with a view to surface shortwave radiation closure."

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    Mean and Variance Measurements of Photon Path Length in Oxygen A-Band and Water Vapor Band Provide Insight Into Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Conditions Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Min, Q, and E.E. Clothiaux, Photon path length distributions inferred from rotating shadowband spectrometer measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements Program Southern

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    Cloud Cover Homogenizes Arctic Vegetation Submitter: Street, L., University of Edinburgh Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Street LE, GR Shaver, EB Rastetter, MT van Wijk, BA Kaye, and M Williams. 2012. "Incident radiation and the allocation of nitrogen within Arctic plant canopies: implications for predicting gross primary productivity." Global Change Biology, 18(9), doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2012.02754.x.

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    Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Optimal numerical methods for determining the orientation averages of single-scattering properties of atmospheric ice crystals." Journal of Quantitative

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    A Tall Order: Climate Models Fall Short in Predicting African Sahel Rainfall Download a printable PDF Submitter: Roehrig, R., Meteo-France CNRM/GMME/MOANA Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Roehrig R, D Bouniol, F Guichard, F Hourdin, and JL Redelsperger. 2013. "The present and future of the West African Monsoon: A process-oriented assessment of CMIP5 simulations along

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    First-of-Its-Kind Intercomparison Study Highlights Needed Improvements in Atmospheric Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Petch J, A Hill, L Davies, A Fridlind, C Jakob, Y Lin, S Xie, and P Zhu. 2013. "Evaluation of intercomparisons of four different

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    First Comes the Thunder: Precursors to Local Rainfall in the West African Monsoon Download a printable PDF Submitter: Roeder, L. R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Dione C, M Lothon, D Badiane, B Campistron, F Couvreux, F Guichard, and S Sall. 2013. "Phenomenology of Sahelian convection observed in Niamey during the early monsoon." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 140(679),

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    Addressing the "Light Precipitation Problem" in the ECMWF Global Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ahlgrimm, M., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ahlgrimm M and R Forbes. 2013. "Improving the representation of low clouds and drizzle in the ECMWF model based on ARM observations from the Azores." Monthly Weather Review,

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    Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Keppel-Aleks, G., University of Michigan Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Keppel-Aleks G, JT Randerson, K Lindsay, BB Stephens, JK Moore, SC Doney, PE Thornton, NM Mahowald, FM Hoffman, C Sweeney, PP Tans, PO Wennberg, and SC Wofsy. 2013. "Atmospheric carbon dioxide variability in the Community

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    Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California Download a printable PDF Submitter: Gilles, M., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Moffet, R., University of the Pacific Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Moffet RC, TC Rödel, ST Kelly, XY Yu, GT Carroll, J Fast, RA Zaveri, A Laskin, and MK Gilles. 2013. "Spectro-microscopic measurements of carbonaceous aerosol aging in Central California."

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    Ground Stations Likely Get a Boost from Satellites to Estimate Carbon Dioxide Emissions Download a printable PDF Submitter: Roeder, L. R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Basu S, S Guerlet, A Butz, S Houweling, OP Hasekamp, I Aben, PB Krummel, LP Steele, RL Langenfelds, MS Torn, SC Biraud, B Stephens, A Andrews, and D Worthy. 2013. "Global CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total

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    All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fang, M., University of Miami Albrecht, B. A., University of Miami Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fang M, BA Albrecht, VP Ghate, and P Kollias. 2013. "Turbulence in continental stratocumulus, Part I: External forcings and turbulence structures." Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 149(454),

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    Effect of Environmental Instability on the Sensitivity of Convection to the Rimed Ice Species Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K. 2013. "Impact of environmental instability on convective precipitation uncertainty associated with the nature of the rimed ice species in a bulk microphysics scheme." Monthly Weather Review, 141(8),

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    Forecast Calls for Better Models: Examining the Core Components of Arctic Clouds to Clear Their Influence on Climate Download a printable PDF Submitter: Laskin, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hiranuma N, SD Brooks, RC Moffet, A Glen, A Laskin, MK Gilles, P Liu, AM Macdonald, JW Strapp, and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Chemical characterization of individual particles and

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    Marine Stratocumulus Clouds: Turbulence-Raidation-Thermodynamics Coupling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghate, V. P., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ghate VP, BA Albrecht, MA Miller, A Brewer, and CW Fairall. 2014. "Turbulence and radiation in stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layers: A case study from VOCALS-REx." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 53, 117-135. Figure 1.

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    Measured Parameterization of Fire Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo Using Combustion Efficiency Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dubey, M. K., Los Alamos National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu S, AC Aiken, C Arata, M Dubey, CE Stockwell, RJ Yokelson, EA Stone, T Jayarathne, AL Robinson, PJ DeMott, and SM Kreidenweis. 2014. "Aerosol single scattering albedo dependence on biomass combustion efficiency: Laboratory

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    Initial Aerosol Concentration Is Key Contributor to Low-Level Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Penner, J., Dong, X., Chen. Y., Observational evidence of a change in radiative forcing due to the indirect aerosol effect, Nature, Vol. 427, 15 January 2004. Cloud optical depth, as determined from the parcel model, is indicated by the dots. Red lines show best fit data of cloud liquid

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    Most Systematic Errors in Climate Models Appear in Only a Few Days of Model Integration Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ma, H., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ma H, S Xie, SA Klein, KD Williams, JS Boyle, S Bony, H Douville, S Fermepin, B Medeiros, S Tyteca, M Watanabe, and DL Williamson. 2014. "On the correspondence between mean forecast errors and climate errors in

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    Evaluation of Gridded SACR Reflectivity Observations and Vertical Doppler Velocity Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lamer, K., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lamer K, A Taterevic, I Jo, and P Kollias. 2013. "Evaluation of gridded Scanning ARM Cloud Radar reflectivity observations and vertical Doppler velocity retrievals."

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    Improving Estimates of Cloud Condensation Nuclei Concentration Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Liu J and Z Li. 2014. "Estimation of cloud condensation nuclei concentration from aerosol optical quantities: influential factors and uncertainties." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 14(1), doi:10.5194/acp-14-1-2014.

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    Arctic Winter Frost Flowers Have Negligible Influence on Cloud Longwave Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xu, L., University of California, San Diego Russell, L. M., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Xu L, LM Russell, RC Somerville, and PK Quinn. 2013. "Frost flower aerosol effects on Arctic wintertime longwave cloud radiative forcing."

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    Understanding the Differences Between Absolution Calibration Techniques in the Microwave Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Paine SN, DD Turner, and N Kuechler. 2014. "Understanding thermal drift in liquid nitrogen loads used for radiometric calibration in the field." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 31(3),

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    Retrieving Thermodynamic Profiles in the Boundary Layer in Clear and Cloudy Conditions Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and U Loehnert. 2014. "Information content and uncertainties in thermodynamic profiles and liquid cloud properties retrieved from the ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)."

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    Multi-scale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions from Six Different Platforms over the SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wu, W., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wu W, Y Liu, MP Jensen, T Toto, MJ Foster, and CN Long. 2014. "A comparison of multiscale variations of decade-long cloud fractions from six different platforms over the Southern Great Plains in the United

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    Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Cumuli Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu C, Y Liu, and S Niu. 2014. "Entrainment mixing parameterization in shallow cumuli and effects of secondary mixing events." Chinese Science Bulletin, 59(9), doi:10.1007/s11434-013-0097-1. Relationships between homogeneous mixing degree (ψ3) and two transition scale numbers

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    The Organic Molecules Explaining New Particle Growth in the Boreal Forest Download a printable PDF Submitter: Thornton, J., University of Washington Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ehn M, JA Thornton, E Kleist, M Sipila, H Junninen, I Pullinen, M Springer, F Rubach, R Tillmann, B Lee, F Lopez-Hilfiker, S Andres, I Acir, M Rissanen, T Jokinen, S Schobesberger, J Kangasluoma, J Kontkanen, T Nieminen, T Kurten, LB Nielsen, S Jorgensen, HG

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    Which Absorption Model Should Be Used for Supercooled Liquid Water in the Microwave? Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kneifel, S., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kneifel S, S Redl, E Orlandi, U Löhnert, MP Cadeddu, DD Turner, and M Chen. 2014. "Absorption properties of supercooled liquid water between 31 and 225 GHz: evaluation of absorption models using ground-based observations." Journal of Applied

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    The Emergence of Open Source Software for the Weather Radar Community Download a printable PDF Submitter: Collis, S. M., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Heistermann M, S Collis, MJ Dixon, SE Giangrande, JJ Helmus, B Kelley, J Koistinen, DB Michelson, P Markus, T Pfaff, and DB Wolff. 2015. "The Emergence of Open Source Software for the Weather Radar Community."

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    Precipitation Estimation from the ARM Distributed Radar Network Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, S Collis, A Theisen, and A Tokay. 2014. "Precipitation Estimation from the ARM Distributed Radar Network During the MC3E Campaign." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 53(9),

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    Environmental Thermodynamics Affect Radiative Impact of Deep Convective Cloud Systems Submitter: Jensen, M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Jensen, M.P., A. Del Genio, Radiative and Microphysical Characteristics of Deep Convective System in the Tropical Western Pacific, Journal of Applied Meteorology, Vol. 42, No. 9, pp. 1234-1254. Deep convective systems (often referred to as

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    Assessing Aerosol Impacts on Drizzle Intensity and Frequency from AMF Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chiu, J., University of Reading Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mann JA, JC Chiu, RJ Hogan, EJ O'Connor, TS L'Ecuyer, TH Stein, and A Jefferson. 2014. "Aerosol impacts on drizzle properties in warm clouds from ARM Mobile Facility maritime and continental deployments."

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    Scientists Uncover Combustion Mechanism to Better Predict Warming by Wildfires Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dubey, M. K., Los Alamos National Laboratory Donahue, N., Carnegie Mellon University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Saleh R, E Robinson, D Tkacik, A Ahern, S Liu, A Aiken, R Sullivan, A Presto, M Dubey, R Yokelson, N Donahue, and A Robinson. 2014. "Brownness of organics in aerosols from biomass burning linked to

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    Phase State and Physical Properties of Ambient and Lab Generated Aerosols: X-ray Microscopy Download a printable PDF Submitter: OBrien, R. E., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Gilles, M., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: O'Brien RE, A Neu, SA Epstein, AC MacMillan, B Wang, ST Kelly, SA Nizkorodov, A Laskin, RC Moffet, and MK Gilles. 2014. "Physical properties of ambient and

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    Parameterization of Vertical Velocity in Shallow Convections Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wang X and M Zhang. 2014. "Vertical velocity in shallow convection for different plume types." Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 6(2), doi:10.1002/2014MS000318. Mean profiles of vertical velocity in convective cores (red); convective updrafts (blue); and

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    Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-Phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, and T Luo. 2014. "Ice concentration retrieval in stratiform mixed-phase clouds using cloud radar reflectivity measurements and 1-D ice-growth model simulations." Journal

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    The Anatomy and Physics of ZDR Columns Submitter: Kumjian, M., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kumjian MR, AP Khain, N Benmoshe, E Ilotoviz, AV Ryzhkov, and VT Phillips. 2014. "The anatomy and physics of ZDR columns: Investigating a polarimetric radar signature with a spectral bin microphysical model." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 53(7),

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    Turn Trash Into Treasure: Continental Warm Cloud Properties Derived from Unexploited Solar Background Signals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chiu, J., University of Reading Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Chiu JC, JA Holmes, RJ Hogan, and EJ O'Connor. 2014. "The interdependence of continental warm cloud properties derived from unexploited solar background signals in

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    A New Theory of Time-dependent Freezing and Its Application to Investigation of Formation of Hail Download a printable PDF Submitter: Khain, A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Phillips, V., University of Leeds Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Phillips VT, A Khain, N Benmoshe, E Ilotoviz, and A Ryzhkov. 2014. "Theory of time-dependent freezing. II: Scheme for freezing raindrops and simulations by a cloud model

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    Effects of Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Khain, A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shpund J, JA Zhang, M Pinksy, and A Khain. 2014. "Microphysical structure of the marine boundary layer under strong wind and sea spray formation as seen from a 2D explicit microphysical model. Part

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    First Observations of Tracking Clouds Using Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Download a printable PDF Submitter: Borque, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Borque P, P Kollias, and S Giangrande. 2014. "First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, , . ONLINE. A 2.5-hour long observing sequence from 25 May 2011 of (a) the Total Sky Imager (TSI)

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    Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: an ARM Mobile Facility Deployment Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wood, R., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: N/A Composite seasonal cycles of (a) cloud droplet concentration retrieved using a variety of methods; (b) surface measured cloud condensation nuclei concentrations at four supersaturations.

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    Growing More Effective Ways to Measure Climate Change Download a printable PDF Submitter: Maseyk, K. S., Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6 Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Maseyk K, JA Berry, D Billesbach, JE Campbell, MS Torn, M Zahniser, and U Seibt. 2014. "Sources and sinks of carbonyl sulfide in an agricultural field in the Southern Great Plains." Proceedings of the National Academy of

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    On the Right Track for Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hagos SM, Z Feng, K Landu, and C Long. 2014. "Advection, moistening, and shallow-to-deep convection transitions during the initiation and propagation of Madden-Julian Oscillation." Journal of Advances in Earth System

  9. Research Highlight

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    Hail Generation and Melting in Deep Convective Clouds from the Perspective of Dual-polarization Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ryzhkov, A., National Severe Storms Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ryzhkov AV, MR Kumjian, SM Ganson, and AP Khain. 2014. "Polarimetric radar characteristics of melting hail. Part I: Theoretical simulations using spectral microphysical modeling." Journal of Applied Meteorology and

  10. Research Highlight

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    Validating Water Vapor Turbulence Measurements from Lidar Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, RA Ferrare, V Wulfmeyer, and AJ Scarino. 2014. "Aircraft evaluation of ground-based Raman lidar water vapor turbulence profiles in convective mixed layers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic

  11. Research Highlight

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    Validation of Climate Model Ice Cloud Properties Download a printable PDF Submitter: Eidhammer, T., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Eidhammer T, H Morrison, A Bansemer, A Gettelman, and AJ Heymsfield. 2014. "Comparison of ice cloud properties simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with in situ observations." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 14(18), doi:10.5194/acp-14-10103-2014. Mass weighted terminal fall

  12. Research Highlight

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    Modeling Dust as Component Minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Scanza R, N Mahowald, S Ghan, CS Zender, JF Kok, Y Zhang, and S Albani. 2015. "Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing."

  13. Research Highlight

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    Tall Clouds from Tiny Raindrops Grow Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hagos S, Z Feng, CD Burleyson, KS Lim, CN Long, D Wu, and T Greg. 2014. "Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign." Journal of Geophysical

  14. Research Highlight

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    A Comprehensive Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Dust Surrogate Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, K., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hiranuma N, M Paukert, I Steinke, K Zhang, G Kulkarni, C Hoose, M Schnaiter, H Saathoff, and O Möhler. 2014. "A comprehensive parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation of dust

  15. Research Highlight

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    Overly Intense Convective Updrafts Exposed as a Significant Contributor to Model Biases Submitter: Varble, A., University of Utah Zipser, E., University of Utah Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Varble A, EJ Zipser, AM Fridlind, P Zhu, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, S Collis, J Fan, A Hill, and B Shipway. 2014. "Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model simulations using TWP-ICE observations. Part 1: Deep convective updraft

  16. Research Highlight

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    Finding the Causes for Consistently Low Biased Stratiform Rainfall in Models Submitter: Varble, A., University of Utah Zipser, E., University of Utah Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Varble A, EJ Zipser, AM Fridlind, P Zhu, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, J Fan, A Hill, B Shipway, and C Williams. 2014. "Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model simulations using TWP-ICE observations. 2. Precipitation microphysics." Journal of

  17. Research Highlight

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    Filling Gaps Within Instrument Records Submitter: Kennedy, A. D., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kennedy AD, X Dong, and B Xi. 2015. "Cloud fraction at the ARM SGP site: reducing uncertainty with self-organizing maps." Theoretical and Applied Climatology, , . ONLINE. Example of a large, 40x30 (1200 class) SOM generated from 14 years of synoptic states provided by the North American

  18. Research Highlight

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    Strongly Absorbing Aerosols Affect Retrievals of Cloud Optical Depth Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Cribb, M. C., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Li Z, F Zhao, J Liu, M Jiang, C Zhao, and M Cribb. 2014. "Opposite effects of absorbing aerosols on the retrievals of cloud optical depth from spaceborne and ground-based measurements." Journal of

  19. Research Highlight

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    Satellite Inference of Thermals and Cloud Base Updraft Speeds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zheng, Y., University of Maryland Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zheng Y, D Rosenfeld, and Z Li. 2015. "Satellite inference of thermals and cloud base updraft speeds based on retrieved surface and cloud base temperatures." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , . ONLINE. Validation of satellite-estimated

  20. Research Highlight

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    Intersecting Cold Pools: Convective Cloud Organization by Cold Pools over Tropical Ocean Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, S Hagos, AK Rowe, CD Burleyson, MN Martini, and SP de Szoeke. 2015. "Mechanisms of convective cloud organization by cold pools over tropical warm ocean during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign." Journal of Advances in

  1. Research Highlight

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    Even at High Humidity, Aerosols Stick Around: Slowly Evaporating Particles Refute Assumption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Wilson J, D Imre, J Beránek, M Shrivastava, and A Zelenyuk. 2014. "Evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols at elevated relative humidity." Environmental Science & Technology,

  2. Research Highlight

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    Evaluation of Trigger Functions for Convective Parameterization Schemes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, G., University of California, San Diego Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Suhas E and GJ Zhang. 2014. "Evaluation of trigger functions for convective parameterization schemes using observations." Journal of Climate, 27(20), 10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00718.1. ETS estimate of different trigger functions for SCM-SGP,

  3. Research Highlight

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    Modeling Precipitating Cumulus Congestus Observed by the ARM Radar Suite During the MC3E Field Campaign Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mechem, D. B., University of Kansas Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mechem DB, SE Giangrande, CS Wittman, P Borque, T Toto, and P Kollias. 2015. "Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed

  4. Research Highlight

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    Single Particle Database of Natural Ice Crystals: Dimensions and Aspect Ratios Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J, GM McFarquhar, Y Hong, S Lee, C Jung, R Lawson, and Q Mo. 2015. "Dimensions and aspect ratios of natural ice crystals." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 15,

  5. Research Highlight

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    Characterizing Uncertainties in Ice Particle Size Distributions Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarquhar GM, T Hsieh, M Freer, JR Mascio, and BF Jewett. 2015. "The characterization of ice hydrometeor gamma size distributions as volumes in N0/lambda/mu phase space: implications for microphysical process modeling." Journal of

  6. Research Highlight

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    Regime Analysis to Identify the Contribution of Clouds to Surface Temperature Errors in GCMs Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Met Office Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, CJ Morcrette, H Ma, SA Klein, and JC Petch. 2015. "Using regime analysis to identify the contribution of clouds to surface temperature errors in weather and climate models." Quarterly Journal Royal

  7. Research Highlight

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    "Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde Observations in the Upper Troposphere Submitter: Soden, B. J., University of Miami Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Soden, B.J., D.D. Turner, B.M. Lesht, and L.M. Miloshevich (2004), An analysis of satellite, radiosonde, and lidar observations of upper tropospheric water vapor from the Atmospheric Radiation

  8. Research Highlight

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    Light Absorption of Primary Organic Aerosol Paper Named ACS Editors' Choice Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lu, Z., Argonne National Laboratory Streets, D. ., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu Z, DG Streets, E Winijkul, F Yan, Y Chen, TC Bond, Y Feng, MK Dubey, S Liu, JP Pinto, and GR Carmichael. 2015. "Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions."

  9. Research Highlight

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    Developing and Evaluating Ice Cloud Parameterizations by Combining Radar and in Situ Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Maahn, M., University of Colorado Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Maahn M, U Löhnert, P Kollias, RC Jackson, and GM McFarquhar. 2015. "Developing and Evaluating Ice Cloud Parameterizations for Forward Modeling of Radar Moments

  10. Research Highlight

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    Making Sense of Convective Updrafts: Mass Flux and Microphysics Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mrowiec AA, OM Pauluis, AM Fridlind, and AS Ackerman. 2015. "Properties of a mesoscale convective system in the context of an isentropic analysis." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, ,

  11. Research Highlight

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    A Lidar View of Clouds in Southeastern China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Cribb, M. C., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Liu J, Z Li, Y Zheng, and M Cribb. 2015. "Cloud-Base Distribution and Cirrus Properties Based on Micropulse Lidar Measurements at a Site in Southeastern China." Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, 32(7),

  12. Research Highlight

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    Liquid Water the Key to Arctic Cloud Radiative Closure Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shupe MD, DD Turner, A Zwink, MM Thieman, EJ Mlawer, and T Shippert. 2015. "Deriving Arctic cloud microphysics at Barrow, Alaska: Algorithms, results, and radiative closure." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 54(7),

  13. Research Highlight

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    Sticky Thermals: Evidence for a Dominant Balance Between Buoyancy and Drag in Cloud Updrafts Download a printable PDF Submitter: Romps, D., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Romps DM and AB Charn. 2015. "Sticky thermals: Evidence for a dominant balance between buoyancy and drag in cloud updrafts." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , doi:10.1175/JAS-D-15-0042.1. ONLINE. Hill's vortex (shown

  14. Research Highlight

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    Parameterizing the Mixing State of Complex Submicron Aerosols Using Chemical Imaging Download a printable PDF Submitter: Moffet, R., University of the Pacific Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: O'Brien RE, B Wang, A Laskin, N Riemer, M West, Q Zhang, Y Sun, X Yu, P Alpert, DA Knopf, MK Gilles, and RC Moffet. 2015. "Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization." Journal

  15. Research Highlight

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    A Deeper Look Into Shallow Boundary Layer Clouds Submitter: Bretherton, C. S., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Bretherton, C. S., J. R. McCaa, and H. Grenier. A New Parameterization for Shallow Cumulus Convection and Its Application to Marine Subtropical Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers. Part I: Description and 1D Results, Monthly Weather Review, 132(1), 864-882, 2004, doi:

  16. Research Highlight

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    Arctic Haze: Effect of Anthropogenic and Biomass Burning Aerosols Transported from Europe to the Arctic Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marelle L, J Raut, JL Thomas, KS Law, B Quennehen, G Ancellet, J Pelon, A Schwarzenboeck, and JD Fast. 2015. "Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the

  17. Research Highlight

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    Evaluation of Double-Moment Microphysical Parameterization with Observations During MC3E Download a printable PDF Submitter: Pu, Z., University of Utah Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Pu Z and C Lin. 2015. "Evaluation of double-moment representation of ice hydrometeors in bulk microphysical parameterization: comparison between WRF numerical simulations and UND-Citation data during MC3E." Geoscience Letters, 2(11),

  18. Research Highlight

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    KDP Columns: Characterizing Deep Thunderstorm Updrafts Using Polarimetric Radar Download a printable PDF Submitter: van Lier-Walqui, M., NASA Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: van Lier-Walqui M, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, S Collis, J Helmus, DR MacGorman, K North, P Kollias, and DJ Posselt. 2015. "On polarimetric radar signatures

  19. Research Highlight

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    Three-Dimensional Constrained Variational Analysis: Approach and Application Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, M., Stony Brook University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tang S and M Zhang. 2015. "Three-dimensional constrained variational analysis: Approach and application to analysis of atmospheric diabatic heating and derivative fields during an ARM SGP intensive observational period." Journal of Geophysical

  20. Research Highlight

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    Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Overlap Assumptions Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pincus, R., R. Hemler, and S.A. Klein, 2006: Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev., 134, 3644-3656. As shown by the difference between the two panels, the